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The Electronic Silk Road: How the Web Binds the World Together in Commerce

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From China to Facebookistan, the Internet has transformed global commerce. A cyber-law expert argues that we must free Internet trade while simultaneously protecting consumers.  On the ancient Silk Road, treasure-laden caravans made their arduous way through deserts and mountain passes, establishing trade between Asia and the civilizations of Europe and the Mediterranean. From China to Facebookistan, the Internet has transformed global commerce. A cyber-law expert argues that we must free Internet trade while simultaneously protecting consumers.  On the ancient Silk Road, treasure-laden caravans made their arduous way through deserts and mountain passes, establishing trade between Asia and the civilizations of Europe and the Mediterranean. Today’s electronic Silk Roads ferry information across continents, enabling individuals and corporations anywhere to provide or receive services without obtaining a visa. But the legal infrastructure for such trade is yet rudimentary and uncertain. If an event in cyberspace occurs at once everywhere and nowhere, what law applies? How can consumers be protected when engaging with companies across the world? In this accessible book, cyber-law expert Anupam Chander provides the first thorough discussion of the law that relates to global Internet commerce. Addressing up-to-the-minute examples, such as Google’s struggles with China, the Pirate Bay’s skirmishes with Hollywood, and the outsourcing of services to India, the author insightfully analyzes the difficulties of regulating Internet trade. Chander then lays out a framework for future policies, showing how countries can dismantle barriers while still protecting consumer interests.


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From China to Facebookistan, the Internet has transformed global commerce. A cyber-law expert argues that we must free Internet trade while simultaneously protecting consumers.  On the ancient Silk Road, treasure-laden caravans made their arduous way through deserts and mountain passes, establishing trade between Asia and the civilizations of Europe and the Mediterranean. From China to Facebookistan, the Internet has transformed global commerce. A cyber-law expert argues that we must free Internet trade while simultaneously protecting consumers.  On the ancient Silk Road, treasure-laden caravans made their arduous way through deserts and mountain passes, establishing trade between Asia and the civilizations of Europe and the Mediterranean. Today’s electronic Silk Roads ferry information across continents, enabling individuals and corporations anywhere to provide or receive services without obtaining a visa. But the legal infrastructure for such trade is yet rudimentary and uncertain. If an event in cyberspace occurs at once everywhere and nowhere, what law applies? How can consumers be protected when engaging with companies across the world? In this accessible book, cyber-law expert Anupam Chander provides the first thorough discussion of the law that relates to global Internet commerce. Addressing up-to-the-minute examples, such as Google’s struggles with China, the Pirate Bay’s skirmishes with Hollywood, and the outsourcing of services to India, the author insightfully analyzes the difficulties of regulating Internet trade. Chander then lays out a framework for future policies, showing how countries can dismantle barriers while still protecting consumer interests.

36 review for The Electronic Silk Road: How the Web Binds the World Together in Commerce

  1. 4 out of 5

    Louise Wills

    Thought provoking and accessible Excellent introduction to the legal issues of Internet use and trade. Particularly liked the discussion re International trade law and GATS potential to advance human rights norms.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Thomas Ruddy

    This book is about international trade policy, and more specifically trade in services. The author Chander is an Indian academic like Bhagwati, but a law professor, not economist; he is a globalization optimist like Tom Friedman. Like the Americans around Al Gore in the heady late Nineties, he does not want growth of the Internet to be hindered by having some government try to regulate the Internet and tax e-commerce -- some would say out of protectionist motives. Thus he is for free trade, but This book is about international trade policy, and more specifically trade in services. The author Chander is an Indian academic like Bhagwati, but a law professor, not economist; he is a globalization optimist like Tom Friedman. Like the Americans around Al Gore in the heady late Nineties, he does not want growth of the Internet to be hindered by having some government try to regulate the Internet and tax e-commerce -- some would say out of protectionist motives. Thus he is for free trade, but wants human rights to be respected, and proposes a compromise scenario. He goes through some cases that exemplify the jurisdiction problem, and advocates the compromise "glocalization" and harmonization, giving specific prescriptions for applying the two principles.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Tiffany C.

    I thought this book was very well done. I've heard the author speak at events before and after reading this book, I have a better appreciation for where his perspectives stem from. This book was well organized, especially compared to other tech books, in how it conveys the historical development of technology policies in various parts of the world as well as the major cases that shaped those policies. I regret that I let this sit in my library for as long as I did. It was definitely better than I thought this book was very well done. I've heard the author speak at events before and after reading this book, I have a better appreciation for where his perspectives stem from. This book was well organized, especially compared to other tech books, in how it conveys the historical development of technology policies in various parts of the world as well as the major cases that shaped those policies. I regret that I let this sit in my library for as long as I did. It was definitely better than I had expected.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Madhavi Sunder

  5. 5 out of 5

    Sleekkat

  6. 4 out of 5

    Samuel Carstensen

  7. 4 out of 5

    Bobbie Casey

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    John

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    Jacob

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    Paulius

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    Ace

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    Jim

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    Justin

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    Ansel Halliburton

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    Lucy

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    Kynan

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    Lauren

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    Zhenqing

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    Lindsay

  21. 5 out of 5

    Laura

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    Jeffery

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    Courtney

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    Jenny

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    Charles Martin

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    Nida

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    Miche6

  28. 5 out of 5

    Sonia Kantak

  29. 4 out of 5

    Prissy

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    Diana

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    Bob

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    Michelle

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    Henry Hu

  34. 5 out of 5

    Ed

  35. 5 out of 5

    Feyyaz

  36. 4 out of 5

    Jasmine

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