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The earthly crisis within manhood will be there until Jesus returns, but in Christ men are pointed toward the gospel as the vision for renewal. Manhood Restored by exciting new pastoral voice Eric Mason combines theological depth with practical insights, putting men in step with a gospel-centered manhood that will enrich every facet of their lives. Mason begins with The Sco The earthly crisis within manhood will be there until Jesus returns, but in Christ men are pointed toward the gospel as the vision for renewal. Manhood Restored by exciting new pastoral voice Eric Mason combines theological depth with practical insights, putting men in step with a gospel-centered manhood that will enrich every facet of their lives. Mason begins with The Scope of Manhood -- looking first at why God created man, at the divine differences between man and woman, and what should drive the purpose of a man during his time on earth. A section on The Problems in Manhood analyzes the false icons that lead to cultural caricatures of men -- the businessman, the thug, the playboy, the athlete, etc. Mason then makes a connection to the cross-cultural fatherhood crisis, looking at the things men do to fill the void when their relationship with dad or God is not there. Finally, The Redemption of Manhood sets Jesus as the true standard of biblical manhood, looking to his perfect example to redeem and restore a man's life in the areas of sexuality, home, and work.


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The earthly crisis within manhood will be there until Jesus returns, but in Christ men are pointed toward the gospel as the vision for renewal. Manhood Restored by exciting new pastoral voice Eric Mason combines theological depth with practical insights, putting men in step with a gospel-centered manhood that will enrich every facet of their lives. Mason begins with The Sco The earthly crisis within manhood will be there until Jesus returns, but in Christ men are pointed toward the gospel as the vision for renewal. Manhood Restored by exciting new pastoral voice Eric Mason combines theological depth with practical insights, putting men in step with a gospel-centered manhood that will enrich every facet of their lives. Mason begins with The Scope of Manhood -- looking first at why God created man, at the divine differences between man and woman, and what should drive the purpose of a man during his time on earth. A section on The Problems in Manhood analyzes the false icons that lead to cultural caricatures of men -- the businessman, the thug, the playboy, the athlete, etc. Mason then makes a connection to the cross-cultural fatherhood crisis, looking at the things men do to fill the void when their relationship with dad or God is not there. Finally, The Redemption of Manhood sets Jesus as the true standard of biblical manhood, looking to his perfect example to redeem and restore a man's life in the areas of sexuality, home, and work.

30 review for Manhood Restored: How the Gospel Makes Men Whole

  1. 5 out of 5

    Josh L.

    A very general book about manhood. In fact, nearly everything advocated for men is also just simple Christ-likeness for women. Those things specific to men were not theologically well-developed but relied on inference and cultural assumptions based on millenia of male - female relations.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Mathew

    Eric Mason writes a much needed corrective for our current fatherless epidemic. We live in an age where you have a 50/50 chance of having or not having a father. Eric addresses this from within his context and with the gospel. What I loved. First, Mason says, “We need fathers, and we’re only going to be fathers to our children when we see that true fatherhood is rooted and defined in God the Father” (p. 3 see pp. 9-10). Understanding this is crucial for rooting out our current fatherhood epidemic Eric Mason writes a much needed corrective for our current fatherless epidemic. We live in an age where you have a 50/50 chance of having or not having a father. Eric addresses this from within his context and with the gospel. What I loved. First, Mason says, “We need fathers, and we’re only going to be fathers to our children when we see that true fatherhood is rooted and defined in God the Father” (p. 3 see pp. 9-10). Understanding this is crucial for rooting out our current fatherhood epidemic. We cannot know what a true father is without knowing who God is. God is the reality that all fathers strive for. Imperfectly, but within the gospel, our fathering is pleasing to God. Second, one lesson I’ve learned over the last year is that you have to listen to diverse voices to learn from them. Sounds easy enough but often we don’t invest. Mason writes from an urban perspective. The analogies, word pictures, and examples are mostly urban. We need more diversity in our theological canon. Diversity heard creates solidarity as brothers in Christ. Different contexts but united together in Christ. Third, I love the balance within the book. Maybe balance isn’t the right word. It’s a root to branch approach. Everything Mason writes is rooted in the Trinitarian gospel and it’s fleshed out in practical application. He takes the truth of the gospel which soars but grounds the truth of manhood in that gospel story. Just a few examples, “In the gospel, Jesus is restoring our vision of manhood” (p. 187). “If a father relates to his children only based on the chores they are supposed to do, that child would grow up with a warped sense of love, accomplishment and self-worth. Similarly, our relationship with God was intended to be much more than a stale deistic relationship where He creates and leaves things on Earth to us” (p. 10). “Restoration, then, is about God’s people experiencing the fullness of His promises by His grace” (p. 43). “ Sanctification, then, is God’s work, through the Holy Spirit, to chisel us into the image He sees in us. This isn’t so much a physical conformity (although we will be ‘like’ Jesus in our new glorified bodies); rather, this is soul work” (p. 47). “Now through the resurrected life of Jesus, we are able to see the world based on God’s redemption intentions . . . . The Word of God is the means by which the new mind grows and fights to dominate the thinking and, therefore, day-to-day living of the disciple” (p. 80). “Instead of making empty promises, real repentance recognizes that without God, we won’t even want God. We must have this sense of desperation when it comes to being found as bound to sexual sin” (p. 97). The Only Hitch. My only hitch lies in the section “Adding Masculinity to Worship Gathering.” I agree we need men standing infront of the church singing. But I’m concerned with this, Effeminate musicians might be the most visible means by which men are turned off to the church . . . . It is a pink elephant many times that the church won’t deal with. I am not in any way homophobic and pressing us to treat people who have and do struggle with the sin of immorality in the form of homosexuality by denying them the blessings that come with forgiveness through Jesus. However, it is important we recognize who and what we are placing before God’s people in leadership of the worship gathering. In that recognition, we must consider whether we are encouraging or distracting those present. When men like this are present in dominant and public form, it could send the wrong message to men about the church [1 Corinthians 11:4 used]. (p. 170) I’m concerned that Mason equates men who don’t fit the typical masculine mold with homosexuality. There seems to be a subtle suggestion that “men like this” don’t belong in the church leadership or infront of the church worship. I’m concerned that this kind of statement will discourage men who don’t fit the masculine mold--whether homosexual or heterosexual. He’s clear it’s not a forgiveness thing but it seems to relegate men who don’t fit the macho American man to secondary service (anything out of the church’s eye). We should bring men infront of the church who are masculine, but that doesn’t mean that other men shouldn’t also serve. We don’t need to swing the pendulum to machoism or celebrate homosexuality as the culture does. I highly recommend this book. It’s a much need correction in our fatherless age. We need men who have withstood the test--that have families, that are leading their families, and that love God--to stand in the gap. We need to hear this call from diverse perspectives. We need to listen. We need to apply the gospel to our families as men. We must fulfill our call as men--a call originating in the garden, a gospel call. Disclosure of Material Connection: I received Manhood Restored free from B&H Publishing. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255: “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”

  3. 5 out of 5

    Jason Bollinger

    Solid case for focusing on biblical masculinity. I enjoyed the book. Dug in prepping to speak at a man night event. It highlighted some helpful ideas...especially in the church chapter. Overall it was good. Long chapters made it hard to get through for me and some was more applicable for his context than for every place. Good job using Scripture as a map.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Greg

    A good book for anyone preparing for a Men's Retreat or event. It challenges men and uses Jesus as a prime example of manhood along with scriptures that focus on elder qualifications (not that every man should be an elder, but they are good examples). I picked up the book hoping it would give definitive answers for the contrast between feminine and masculine, but that is not its focus. It is aimed at encouraging men, stripping down cultural ideals of manhood and replacing them with examples from A good book for anyone preparing for a Men's Retreat or event. It challenges men and uses Jesus as a prime example of manhood along with scriptures that focus on elder qualifications (not that every man should be an elder, but they are good examples). I picked up the book hoping it would give definitive answers for the contrast between feminine and masculine, but that is not its focus. It is aimed at encouraging men, stripping down cultural ideals of manhood and replacing them with examples from Jesus and how the gospel changes men. At times the author does hit a nerve or cross a line for myself. In his exuberance to push or encourage men, he fails to mention what women bring to the table. He will insert a line that women are great, but then talk about men on a higher plane or deeper level. I think he does this at times because of his beliefs on male headship and some good thoughts and studies showing the powerful effects of men in the church and at home when they are centered on Christ. One topic I found interesting covered the topic of the feminization of the church. The author believes that the church should have a female presence and attributes, but he makes the reader more conscious of how we speak, teach, sing, etc. and to ask questions on whether these include masculine tones as well. This is a hard topic to broach in a current global culture and with a church history that hurts or neglects women, but I will say the author shows why these are playing in to the declining male populations in the church.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Mark

    This was a hard one to rate. I went back and forth between 3 and 4. The majority of the book is very sound theologically and very well written. Not a lot of stories but good scripture references. I guess the part I had trouble with is his take on what to do. Example: Painting rooms from pink and sea green to a more masculine color I do not think will make a man more of a man. That comes from the heart. I believe it is more about engagement and teaching, not the surroundings. I think I would use th This was a hard one to rate. I went back and forth between 3 and 4. The majority of the book is very sound theologically and very well written. Not a lot of stories but good scripture references. I guess the part I had trouble with is his take on what to do. Example: Painting rooms from pink and sea green to a more masculine color I do not think will make a man more of a man. That comes from the heart. I believe it is more about engagement and teaching, not the surroundings. I think I would use the majority of the book for reference to help men. While some of his " ideas" are good to help restore manhood, others seem to be playing to the immaturity of much of today's younger generation and their sense of entitlement.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Nicholas Minerva

    Excellent. If you are looking for a great book on being a Christian man, read this book. It does a great job of pointing out the issues facing Christian men today, and consistently and systemically points the reader back to Jesus. It’s full of scripture and is incredibly engaging. Read it!

  7. 4 out of 5

    Reed Schafer

    Would recommend to every Christian man/boy.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Eric Chappell

    "Another book on manhood?" Eric Mason gets it. The Christian book market is flooded with books on biblical masculinity; so why read another one? Well, for one: most of those books are steaming piles of moralistic drivel. Mason's book is a breath of fresh air. It's challenging, but ultimately rooted in and driven by the "newmanity" created by Jesus Christ in the gospel (see Eph 2). Mason begins the book with God's plan and purpose for manhood revealed in Genesis 1. God holds the trademark on manh "Another book on manhood?" Eric Mason gets it. The Christian book market is flooded with books on biblical masculinity; so why read another one? Well, for one: most of those books are steaming piles of moralistic drivel. Mason's book is a breath of fresh air. It's challenging, but ultimately rooted in and driven by the "newmanity" created by Jesus Christ in the gospel (see Eph 2). Mason begins the book with God's plan and purpose for manhood revealed in Genesis 1. God holds the trademark on manhood. He formed man to be His responsible representative in relationship to his Father. That is, man's connectivity to God led to man's identity from which man's activity flowed. Sin disrupted and twisted God's designed intention and made us chasers after bling bling rather than submitters who bow the knee. Mason then shows the repercussions of the Fall in what he calls "daddy deprivation" in our culture. We live in a culture of absentee , self-centered, childish, father-lessness. God's design was for dads to be clarifiers of identity (see Gen 49) and spiritual leaders because that's who the Son of God revealed the Father to be. In steps Jesus, the Restorer of manhood, who set in motion an eternal chain reaction as the prototype man for men. Mason specifies some of the masculine character traits of Jesus in the gospel to give us an image of what true, restored, gospel-centered masculinity looks like. The newmanity created by Jesus in the gospel leads to a restored worldview. We are disciples and apprentices of the God-Man Jesus who can do nothing apart from His work in us by the Spirit, who changes our values, emotions, motivations, and lifestyle to look more and more like Jesus. The Spirit's work results in restored sexuality, restored vision and intentionality, restored family, and a restored ecclesiology that challenges the documented feminization of Christianity over the last 150 years. Mason offers a helpful and necessary section on spiritually fathering men and boys. Just as Jesus fished, prayed, wept, and rejoiced with twelve men who went on to "father" many more in God's Kingdom, so we are called to invest in men, young and old, educating and equipping them in the gospel. Some pitfalls to avoid: creating overdependence, guilt-driven spirituality, overbearing, ministering outside the realm of spiritual authority, and acting like people belong to you. A helpful little book. Mason clearly explains the gospel and places discipleship in its appropriate relationship to Jesus' newmanity. Following Jesus is not effeminate. Men need to see that being in Christ and living for the gospel is the greatest voyage and adventure a man can ever have.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Jeanie

    Don't let the title fool you into thinking that this study is just for men. So many of us, men and women included have no ideal what biblical manhood looks like. We start in the humanity of Christ coming as a man not because it is a diss towards women but to compliment women. This is a powerful truthful study. Truthful in that it deals with issues that don't make exceptions but to take ownership of who God called us to be in our gender roles. Each chapter deals with issues that make or break of Don't let the title fool you into thinking that this study is just for men. So many of us, men and women included have no ideal what biblical manhood looks like. We start in the humanity of Christ coming as a man not because it is a diss towards women but to compliment women. This is a powerful truthful study. Truthful in that it deals with issues that don't make exceptions but to take ownership of who God called us to be in our gender roles. Each chapter deals with issues that make or break of who men are called to be. Starting with the life and death of manhood to the last chapter of the restored church. Understanding our roles and applying them is God glorifying, anything less is stealing glory from God and when we steal glory from God, we are in the end destorying ourselves. God in his word has given us many examples as is discussed with great insight. With current issues, as marriage, fatherhood, leadership in the church and in the community, when we apply the Gospel 24/7, restoration is the goal and the ulimate outcome. Manhood Restored addresses the motivation of the heart and the passion that drives men. God created us for something greater- to show his glory. Manhood Restored is for his Glory.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Brian Pate

    We have a manhood crisis today. Men fail to fulfill their responsibility as image-bearers. Too many men function as “emotional children,” for which Mason faults the mythological stage known as “adolescence.” Jesus is the answer: he is the “prototype man for men” (45), the ideal pattern of man in the image of God like we were supposed to be—and into which we are being restored. As men are restored into the image of Christ, it will radically transform their worldview (ch. 4), sexuality (ch. 5), vi We have a manhood crisis today. Men fail to fulfill their responsibility as image-bearers. Too many men function as “emotional children,” for which Mason faults the mythological stage known as “adolescence.” Jesus is the answer: he is the “prototype man for men” (45), the ideal pattern of man in the image of God like we were supposed to be—and into which we are being restored. As men are restored into the image of Christ, it will radically transform their worldview (ch. 4), sexuality (ch. 5), vision (ch. 6), family (ch. 7), and church (ch. 8). Personal application: I was challenged to be a "student" of my wife (133) and to continue to focus on mentoring other men, even older men (178). Critique: Based on the biblical truth that Satan is continually attacking "man" (e.g., Adam, Moses, Jesus), Mason draws the conclusion that Satan is specifically out to get males (186). However, it seems that the ongoing conflict between the seed of the serpent and the seed of woman highlights how Satan is attacking God’s people in general, and the inclusion of key women in this line (e.g., Eve, Tamar, Rahab, Ruth, Mary, etc.) seems to disprove Mason’s theory.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Nile

    I will start by saying that this book is Biblically based and covers a lot of good topics. However, I felt that for such a short book, he covers too many topics as he tries to paint a picture of a godly man. I found his reasoning sporadic and he would jump from one thing to the next in a sort of disorganized fashion. He also treated each chapter very separately and repeated content he used in previous chapters. There were also a number of typographical/grammatical errors in the book that I think I will start by saying that this book is Biblically based and covers a lot of good topics. However, I felt that for such a short book, he covers too many topics as he tries to paint a picture of a godly man. I found his reasoning sporadic and he would jump from one thing to the next in a sort of disorganized fashion. He also treated each chapter very separately and repeated content he used in previous chapters. There were also a number of typographical/grammatical errors in the book that I think point to a bigger issue. That said, he does have good insight into a number of issues that could be very well expressed in blog posts or perhaps articles, but I felt like these did not come together in a cohesive way to create a good book.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Emily Niehaus

    I read this book in anticipation of Dr. Mason speaking at Immanuel Church in Nashville in . Quick & profound read. I appreciated his discussion on the topic of the church being feminized & exploring one of the possible roots (industrial revolution) YET not dwelling here. Dr. Mason leaves his focus on Jesus and the Spirit restoring men and the church. Although I know this book is written by a man for men focusing on masculinity, it was well worth my time reading as a woman. I do wish that Dr. Mason I read this book in anticipation of Dr. Mason speaking at Immanuel Church in Nashville in . Quick & profound read. I appreciated his discussion on the topic of the church being feminized & exploring one of the possible roots (industrial revolution) YET not dwelling here. Dr. Mason leaves his focus on Jesus and the Spirit restoring men and the church. Although I know this book is written by a man for men focusing on masculinity, it was well worth my time reading as a woman. I do wish that Dr. Mason had taken a few moments to acknowledge/warn men that deep sexual sin also affects women; not just that their brothers, leaders, and husbands have deep sexual sin, but that female Christians are battling deep rooted sexual sin.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Phillip Howell

    Overall it was okay. There was a lot of good content and points. I didn't think manhood and masculinity was ever clearly defined in such a way that it differed from femininity or womanhood. Many of the points about manhood in this book apply to women. I was reading looking for answers to those questions so I was left wanting. However, the general point of encouraging men to step up in the church and home was made pretty well. I thought the chapter on the church was only okay and I agreed with hi Overall it was okay. There was a lot of good content and points. I didn't think manhood and masculinity was ever clearly defined in such a way that it differed from femininity or womanhood. Many of the points about manhood in this book apply to women. I was reading looking for answers to those questions so I was left wanting. However, the general point of encouraging men to step up in the church and home was made pretty well. I thought the chapter on the church was only okay and I agreed with his big idea but I didn't always feel comfortable with his examples or illustrations there.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Calum

    Although much of this book seemed as though it lacked direction, it was deeply seeded in the gospel and had a good deal of instruction to offer. I loved how it had Jesus at the centre, portraying Him as the quinessential picture of manhood, and drawing insights as to how we can learn from him and become better men ourselves. A quick and relatively interesting read.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Gord Davies

    This is a must read for all men who are husbands or fathers or anyone who wants to be either!!!

  16. 5 out of 5

    Tim Baumgartner

    I finished reading this book just prior to a youth retreat I served at for my school. The session I was leading was guys-only and I used some material from this book. I tried to fit all my notes here, but there's not enough space. It's elsewhere, but there's some REALLY good stuff in here: Introduction Men can have covenants, documents, strategies, and pragmatic principles, but without the gospel there is no authentic empowerment to execute what is laid out in them. (2) Being that all creation has I finished reading this book just prior to a youth retreat I served at for my school. The session I was leading was guys-only and I used some material from this book. I tried to fit all my notes here, but there's not enough space. It's elsewhere, but there's some REALLY good stuff in here: Introduction Men can have covenants, documents, strategies, and pragmatic principles, but without the gospel there is no authentic empowerment to execute what is laid out in them. (2) Being that all creation has been cursed (Rom. 8:22) (2) Because of the deprivation of fathers, we see human efforts as unredeemed replacements. Unredeemed determination, womanizing, being a better father than their father, bitterness, and all the rest can’t fill the gap of a father. All replacements are illegitimate means for a legitimate need (Jer 1:11-13). We need fathers, and we’re only going to be fathers to our children when we see that true fatherhood is rooted and defined in God the Father. (3) Manhood is core and fundamental to the identity of Jesus, before and after He walked on the earth. (3) ??? How do we know that??? Real men follow Jesus and fulfill their purpose in their generation (Acts 13:36). (4) Ch. 1: The Life and Death of Manhood [Mason uses ‘Baby’ from Cash Money Billionaires as an example of a trademark. They created ‘Bling, bling’ and said they wished they got paid for it every time it was used.] That’s how trademarking works. It’s a claim on something original, something unique, that establishes ownership. Many might use, build on, or add something to the original, but the trademark establishes the absolute first origin of something. It’s important in business; it’s even more important in creation. (5) …when He created man He didn’t speak him into existence as He did the stars, water, land and animals. Instead God innovated a new technique in creation. God formed man. (6) [In Gen 1:26-28]…we find a statement of purpose along with mere description. (6) [likeness and image] In the Book of Genesis the two terms describe human beings who in some way reflect the form and function of the creator. The form is more likely stressing the spiritual rather than the physical. (7) Man as an Image Bearer Representation and Responsibility This is an incredible responsibility. Both Genesis 1:28 and 2:15 describe this responsibility as the act of subduing and caring for creation. …Genesis 1:28 might be paraphrased like this: ‘Harness its potential and use its resources for your benefit.’ (8) The word care in Genesis 2:15 (NIV) carries a similar sense. The man is called ‘to work it and keep’ (ESV) the garden. In essence, this responsibility was a job. [he works and names the animals]. Whenever we talk about this at Epiphany Fellowship, the woman go crazy. They love hearing that the man got a job before he had a woman! Then and now, in a redeemed sense, work is a key part of who we are as men. (9) Man was called to subdue…to care…to rule. (9) Relationship …what is missing up to this point is the relationship. (9) Relationship with God is so central to what it means to be an image bearer (Jer. 9:23-24; John 17:3). The man’s form and nature and matched by the woman’s as she reflects him and complements him as an equal, yet distinct partner. (11) What Killed Manhood? We talk ourselves into thinking that sin is just a bad choice; it’s not. We get so nearsighted when we see something we want to experience that everything else fades away. Adam chose to set aside his representation of God, responsibility for God, and relationship with God, and these things were lost because of the price of his sin. Although men and women are equal, their function in the fall was different. As the man, Adam is held responsible for it (Rom. 5:12). (12) [What about 1 Tim 2:14-15?-MY THOUGHTS] It would only get worse from there. As more people were born, after the fall in Genesis 3, they would be born without Adam’s responsibility, representation, and relationship, at least in the sense that God meant in the beginning. Without a relationship with God to navigate and give value to responsibility and relationship, humankind would spiral out of control. (13) Things Got Worse Genesis 2:17…: he would ‘surely die’… if he ate from the tree…here encompasses both a spiritual and physical sense. (13) [See Gen 6:5-6]. Sin Experts If Hollywood is a cultural barometer…[See movie Seven:] The guilty are punished with an even more perverse form of their sin of choice. (14) [See Ecc. 8:11]. [See contrast of Rom. 1:24-28 & 2 Thess. 2:7]. (15) …because sin has not only destroyed humanity but creation as well, all of redeemable creation must be re-created—born again in its own way—for things to finally be as they should. (16) Attempts to Assassinate Godly Manhood Male genocide [Cain killing Abel] and castrating manhood [Nehemiah, Daniel, Hananiah, Mishael, and Azariah were possibly eunuchs] have consistently been the enemy’s way to tarnish hope with fear. (17) The redefinition of the family calls for a redefinition of God’s intention for the genders. (18) Ch. 2: The Impact on Daddy Deprivation David Blankenhorn explains: Tonight, about 40 percent of American children will go to sleep in homes in which their fathers do not live. Before they reach the age of eighteen, more than half of our nation’s children are likely to spend at least a significant portion of their childhoods living apart from their fathers. (21) Without fathers, young boys have no sense of who they are and who they are called to be as men. It only makes sense that it would be this way, given that a boy’s earthly father is suppose to establish this clarity of identity early in life. (22) Daddy Replacements Mankind has always been in the business of giving away the greatness of what God has provided for that which is substandard (Jer. 2:11-13; Rom 1:21-23). (23) Artists Lil Wayne and Bryan ‘Baby’ Williams have had a long-standing relationship as father and son. In many ways their relationship has personified for a generation what a father really is—the cool father is down for you no matter what. [50 Cent said he does NOT want to meet his father.] (24) Gay Parents [See Gay Parent magazine: www.gayparentingmag.com]. Single Mothers The Census Bureau’s 1997 report has staggering numbers. [See ‘chart’]. (26) Thugs The images of manhood are limited to the TV and the neighborhood (27) God’s Intention for Fatherhood Several basic observations can be made from this Scripture [Gen. 2:24]. 1. The fact that man has to leave his parents and bond to his wife assumes a parental bond. 2. Fatherhood is assumed in God’s design. 3. The presence and impact of a father is an essential part of that design. (27) For the first time in Scripture the word father is used. (28) Father as Clarifier of Identity [See Gen 28:13 (ESV); 1 Sam 1; Gen 49]. The Father as Spiritual Leader The proverbs, for example, make frequent use of the term ‘my son’ intrinsically connecting with discipleship….an instructor—trainer as well as disciplinarian. [See excerpt from Eerdman’s Dictionary of the Bible]. (30) God as Father [See Ps 110:1 & Matt 6-The Lord’s Prayer]. God the Spirit Reveals God as Father [See Rom 8:15-16; 2 Cor 5:1-5; Eph 1:14; rest of Rom 8]. (32) God the Son Reveals God as Father …no other human explained God the Father more effectively than Jesus. [See Jn 1:18; 5:19-20; Isa 53:10]. Through a relationship with the Lord Jesus Christ, God becomes our Father. He is proud of His children because He is pleased with His Son who lives in them. [See Jn 8:39-47; 10:22-30]. (33-4) Extended Adolescence and Biblical Maturity [Regarding adolescence, his psych. Class argued the most about the transition out of this stage]. As the class continued, everyone (no matter the worldview) came to the conclusion that this stage in human development was a Western invention that postponed the responsibility of adulthood to a later date. From a general revelation standpoint, everyone agreed that there is only childhood and adulthood. Irresponsibility and responsibility. Immaturity and maturity. [It’s taking longer and longer for boys to become men]. The problems with this extended childhood are many: (34) [See explanations on pg. 35]. 1. Compromised maturity. 2. Fathers who are only friends. 3. Subsidized pictorial of manhood. 4. Unmarried women. 5. Un-hirable men. 6. Life lived in fantasy. Emotional Immaturity [Page 36 has list of traits for emotional infants and children]. One of the root causes of prolonged childhood in adulthood is the lack of emotional growth. According to Scazzero emotional immaturity many times stems from ignoring the past’s impact on the present. When this happens…we place ourselves in a state of stasis that doesn’t allow us to grow emotionally beyond whatever trauma or disappointment that holds us in bondage. …we saw how God forced Jacob to overcome the impact of his past on his present and future [Jacob]. The outline of that study [‘Dealing With Your Past’], provides an introduction as to how God moved men through confronting what has stunted their growth and then pass it [All from the Book of Genesis]: • An incident (25:29-34; 27) • Pending consequences and pain (27:41) • Runs from his problems (27:42-28:10) • God gives him promises for his journey (28:10-15) • Jacob acknowledges God’s presence (28:16-22) • Tries to secure the blessing of God with human effort o Lies (25:29-34) o Deceit (27:1-30) o Experiencing the reaping of what he’s sown (29:15-30) • God teaches Jacob o How to respond to His voice (31:3) o Recognition of God’s continued presence (31:5) o Recognition of God’s protection (31:6) o How to deal with conflict (31:33-55) • God placed Him alone (32:24) • God forces Jacob out of his wits to dependence by breaking him (32:24-32) • Jacob faces his past on God’s terms (34) (pages 37-8) [See 1 Cor 13:11; Book of Proverbs (boy to man)]. (38) Ch. 3: The Restorer of Manhood [Think of TV shows that fix up houses (‘as is’ to what ‘could be’). Instead of just deciding what flower to plant, you might have to focus on the structure, asbestos, and black mold. You might need to address deeper issues] …to truly enjoy the full restoration in the long-term. Jesus, as God’s general contractor, is looking at our lives and making the same claim. (41-2) Restoration is the act of returning something to its original state. (42) [See Haggai 2:9; Isa 54]. …these companies [DC, Marvel, G.I. Joe, Masters of the Universe, etc.] typically created a prototype of the action figures prior [this setting the standard by which those coming after would be judged] to creating the others [See Rom 8:29]. (45) [The author knows a phenomenal artist (sculptor)]…I asked him once about his technique, and his response has stuck with me: ‘When you look at this stone you see a rock, but when I look at it I see an image in the rock. All I am trying to do is get to the image by removing everything else in the way.’ Sanctification, then, is God’s work, through the Holy Spirit, to chisel us into the image He sees in us. [See this video [Chisel Me]: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kh5pK...]. …it’s much more effective to address cultural concerns, then social concerns, and then personal concerns. [See Jesus’ way: 1) Jn 8; 10=cultural; 2) Matt 8; 19=social; and 3) Jn 3=personal]. [Jay-Z is a mogul and very driven, but so is Jesus—in an even better way—see Jn 5:19-20, 30-32]. (57) …what we see from Jesus isn’t a desire to be right; it is instead a commitment to God and the truth. (59) I pray that we would commune with God to the point that the thought of diminishing that communion would cause us the kind of grief Jesus felt in the garden that night and on the cross the next day. (61) [Consider: sensitivity for a selfish desire vs. truly empathizing. Also gentleness and consideration. Also humility.]. [Mason shared a testimony of trying to plant the church with his wife who had cancer. He cried. He felt frustrated and embarrassed, but after the service a man said he was now motivated, after seeing Mason’s love for his wife, to not divorce his wife as he planned]. (64-65) [Compare Gal 5:19-20 to 2 Cor 11:1-3; Nah 1:2; Jn 2:17]. Ch. 4: Restored Worldview [Mason uses example of Michael Vick who had it all, but went to jail. Then went to the Eagles as a third-stringer. The others got hurt and he got his chance, but the fans weren’t happy. Then he just demonstrated great leadership with his humility and won the fans over as they wanted someone to follow. The same goes with Jesus, but more.] And anyone who still thinks of following this kind of leader leads to a life of boredom simply hasn’t taken time to engage in the type of life Jesus has called us to. (70) [Think of Donald Trump’s The Apprentice show. Eventually, at the end of each show, someone is unceremoniously dismissed with ‘You’re fired.’ But when we come to Jesus’ feet, we typically don’t meet the same level of enthusiasm.] (71) [See Prov 18:1]. [D.A. Carson:] In one context, individualism breeds courage, an entrepreneurial spirit, individual heroism, self-denial, differ gratification, and thrift. It may accent values such as honor, and industry. But if for whatever reasons the cultural values change, individualism can easily become a factor that reinforces narcissism, self-indulgence, instant gratification, self-promotion, and greed. (74-5) Eze 36:25-27 is a good base for understanding all of the Christian life [compare Jn. 3]. (77) Ch. 5: Restored Sexuality When we make promises to God without the power of God, we run the risk of making a rash vow (Ecc 5). (95) [See the real repentance, in its simplicity: 2 Sam 11-12. David said, ‘I have sinned against the Lord.’ Don’t make excuses at ALL.] Acknowledge the character of the Lord. We come to God on His terms as an act of faith that God will actually do and be what He has said He will do and be. Own our sin. There is no blame. No justification. Ask for forgiveness and cleansing. …for renewed motives and character. Envision life beyond your bondage. [without God, we won’t even want God]. (96-7) Godly sex is so paradoxical because two seemingly contradictory things are meant to happen at the same time: we enjoy it, but also must be self-less toward our spouse in having it. (97) Let’s be honest—every man wants to have the badge of being good in bed. The funny thing is that this desire often disappears with marriage. God wants men to be good at sex. No doubt. (98) Just as Jesus’ death motivates and empowers us as men to live well in other areas of life, it also motivates us in our sexual relationship with our wives. Jesus’ death helps you be good in bed! (98) [Ways to view sex through selflessness:] • Procreation [See Ps 127:3-5]. • Recreation and Satisfaction [See Prov 5:15-19]. (100) [The three principles for dealing with lust:] …my three Fs: Flee, Follow, and Fellowship [2 Tim 2:22]. (101) • Flee …fleeing is ugly [See Joseph in Genesis who left his outer garment behind]. Sometimes we have to run in an ugly way from opportunities of temptation. • Follow We aren’t just running away from temptation; we are running toward the Lord. • Fellowship We are better together… (102-3) Sex and the Gospel [one of the most profound studies Mason has seen] by Blake Wilson …addresses the fact that for the Gentile church, sex was included as a basic Bible doctrine [See Acts 15:28-29]. MY QUESTION=Should we offer a class for college students (or high school to talk about sex), that they can obtain upon request? Ch. 6: Restored Vision …credibility leads to a sexy kind of trust. Your wife knows and trusts you to lead her, for no matter where you lead her, she knows you’ll be seeking the face of God. (105) Walking with God I’m not talking about the kind of prayer in public when a man begins to preach to people more than talk to God. Nor am I talking about vain and irreverent repetition recited around the dinner table just for the sake of saying a blessing. I’m talking about following the example of Jesus in Godward, authentic, focused prayer. …nothing in His [Jesus] life other than His death expressed His humanity more than His prayer life. What made it so unique and desirable for His first followers? • The sense that God is His Father (Lk 11:2) …it [Father] is the primary title He uses when addressing God…Therefore, prayer for men should not seem as something that is more natural for women. • A commitment to a particular place (Matt 14:13; Mk 1:45; Lk 4:42; Jn 11:54) …there is something significant about setting apart a consistent place for prayer. • Deep sense of dependence (Lk 22:44) …if Jesus was willing to admit His own dependence on God the Father for strength, courage, and direction, who do we think we are to do anything less? ‘Prayer is the source of the Christian life, a Christian’s lifeline. Otherwise, it’s like having a baby in your arms and dressed her up so cute—but she’s not breathing! Never mind the frilly clothes; stabilize the child’s vital signs. It does no good to talk to someone in a comatose state. [We need to teach on prayer and do it ourselves]. (107-8) • Venting outlet (Lk 22:42) [See Heb. 5:7; Ps. 62:8; Lam. 2:19]…[Jesus] was livid about its [the world] state. • Talk to God in the most difficult moments (Mk 15:34) Decision-making [shaped by being wise] Put a moral slant on skill and you get wisdom. Wisdom is skill in living; it is living one’s life so that something of lasting value is produced…wisdom isn’t just the ability to get tasks, goals, and objectives done, but the character that shapes how and why you do it. Direction starts with vision …people will not become a part of a new work unless they are confident that the leader(s) have a clear and compelling vision for that work. There should be no visionless men in the church, for vision is the ability and clarity to see God’s preferred future through Jesus Christ and the Word of God. (112-3) Obstacles to a Healthy Vision [3] 1. Self-motivated dreams (2 Tim 3) 2. Passion for pleasing others rather than God (Jer 23:9-40) 3. The unwillingness to unwind current pursuits (Matt 8:18-22) Visioneering=Inspiration + Conviction + Action + Determination + Completion ‘All of our attempts at holiness are filled with ill-motive.’ [Mason’s seminary Prof] In their landmark book, Decision Making and the Will of God, Garry Frieson and J. Robin Maxon speak of the will of God as a sphere rather than a dot. …90% of what God wants us to do has already been revealed. (123) When we are seeking to establish the vision and plans of the Lord, the following outline is helpful: 1. Pray 2. Ask God for visionary and directional clarity 3. Write down the vision 4. Plan and strategize what it will take for the plan to come to fruition 5. Continue to seek the Lord’s face 6. Seek godly counsel 7. Make the necessary revisions 8. Work the updated plan with much prayer 9. Thank the Lord for bringing different aspects of the vision and planning to fruition. (125) Final Thoughts of Planning and Decision Making God has provided the resources for making decisions. (2 Pet 1:3) As we work through the process of arriving at the decision, God is continually present and working within us. (Phil 2:13) It is God who sovereignly opens doors of opportunity for us. (Acts 16:6-10; Prov 3:5-6) Along the way God utilizes the circumstances and the very process of decision making to change our character and bring us to maturity. (Acts 10) (128) Ch. 7: Restored Family [Think of how King Kong fought for and protected Ann]. ‘Leadership is taking the initiative for the benefit of others’ (131).

  17. 4 out of 5

    Michael Boling

    Manhood – The very word conjures up a variety of mental images to include anything ranging from Chuck Norris to Tim “The Tool Man” Taylor. While those views of manhood are what most often is associated with that term, is that really the biblical picture of what a man was designed by God to be? Is manhood solely related to one’s ability to get their hands greasy from working on that classic muscle car or going out to hunt like Uncle Si from Duck Dynasty? Thankfully the answer is no to those quest Manhood – The very word conjures up a variety of mental images to include anything ranging from Chuck Norris to Tim “The Tool Man” Taylor. While those views of manhood are what most often is associated with that term, is that really the biblical picture of what a man was designed by God to be? Is manhood solely related to one’s ability to get their hands greasy from working on that classic muscle car or going out to hunt like Uncle Si from Duck Dynasty? Thankfully the answer is no to those questions because if it were yes, quite frankly I would be in trouble. Understanding what has been labeled in recent years as “biblical manhood” has also run the gamut from books by John Eldridge that explore manhood as something akin to seeking the highest mountaintop to more relevant books like Eric Mason’s recent work Manhood Restored: How the Gospel Makes Men Whole. This approach of using the gospel to address the idea of wholeness and what that means for men is refreshing and theologically astute as after all, it is the gospel message found in Scripture that is the means of redemption through which we look to God to restore that which has been marred by sin. Mason clearly notes and rightly so, biblically manhood is not about sinful man’s efforts to be all they can be, meaning if a man only tries real hard, he will be able to be a good husband, father or a man. Scripture clearly notes our efforts are filthy rags so even the most herculean efforts devoid of God working in a man’s life will fall well short of their intended goal. As Mason notes, the result of sin when it comes to manhood is “Instead of responsibility, representation, and relationship, things like chauvinism, violence, passivity, insecurity, and addiction would characterize generation after generation of men in a continually increasing way.” Thankfully, there is an answer to this sin problem, the same answer Scripture provides for anything marred by sin and that is the gospel of Jesus Christ whereby that which has been broken can through the power of the Holy Spirit be restored. Mason essentially discusses four man elements of manhood in his book: 1) God’s intended plan for men and the subsequent impact of sin; 2) The unfortunate absent/delinquent father; 3) Jesus’ role as redeemer and restorer of that which has been marred by sin; and 4) Ways in which restoration plays out in everyday life. As the father of an adopted child, I am very aware of the impact of the lack of a quality father role on a child. In that regard, I truly appreciated Mason covering that topic in great detail. This is not merely an unfortunate reality for urban youth. While “daddy deprivation” may indeed be statistically pervasive in the urban setting, absent fathers may actually exist in settings where they have not, at least on paper, abandoned the family setting. As Mason rightly notes, “daddy issues have been a cross-ethnic, cross-socioeconomic, cross-generational problem that doesn’t discriminate.” As with anything, when something is absent, people will seek to fill that void. Mason aptly describes examples of what people try and fill the father void with, specifically noting the entertainment industry, the increase in the acceptance of gay parents, the reality of single motherhood, and the allure of gangs as issues for society today. It was God’s desire and design that “earthly fathers would be a representation of a heavenly One” thus fatherhood is an essential part of life. To that extent, as Mason so wonderfully outlines, a father assists children to understand issues of identity and the father is a spiritual leader of the home. Furthermore, we can see how fatherhood works with in the Godhead. Understanding God as our heavenly Father is often impacted by how we view our earthly fathers. Given our earthly fathers are to be a proper reflection of the heavenly example, when the earthly father is not living up to God’s original plan, it goes without saying many people will in turn either use that failure of their earthly father to blame God or they will reject God in their life because of the rejection received from their earthly father. Thus, any element of intimacy with God, something He very much longs to have with His people, is marred by the lack of intimacy and care demonstrated by many earthly fathers. As noted earlier, thankfully there is a solution to this seemingly overwhelming problem in our society and it is Jesus Christ, the restorer of manhood. Mason declares “Jesus is the means by which everything will be restored” to include proper relationships with our fathers, with God and the means by which we can even understand what it means to be a biblical man. Our example is that of Jesus, the One Mason describes as the “prototype man” and rightly so. He avers “God’s design – His divine intent – is for those who are in Jesus to look like Jesus.” Since He is the example par excellence, it is vital to engage Scripture through the leading of the Holy Spirit to more completely understand the One who was the perfect example of what manhood looks like in everyday life. An important aspect of understanding Jesus is realizing his divine and human nature. As Mason clearly outlines, “This is key to understanding the greatness of Jesus, because it reminds us that Jesus didn’t cheat. He was fully human and was faced with the same temptations common to all of us. Jesus, and Jesus alone, stands apart as the perfect man, for not only was He born that way – perfectly God but also perfectly man – He remained perfect in His humanity.” Does this mean as men we can achieve perfection in this life? Of course not, however, that does not mean we cannot strive through the Holy Spirit working in our lives to look to that standard of perfection provided by Jesus and to desire to achieve that standard. We must of course realize we will stumble at times as our flesh wages war against the Spirit of God in our lives. However, the gospel message declares that Christ is the restorer and redeemer. Those who look to the author and finisher of our faith will find themselves noting areas in their life that need to be brought under the lordship of Christ. In doing so, men will become more like what God intended, people who reflect the example set forth by Christ, people who are the spiritual leaders in their families, communities, and churches, people who are willing to embrace the leadership role and people who constantly look to Jesus and the redemption provided at the cross. Manhood Restored is a clarion call for men to be men, not through sheer will power alone, but more importantly by realizing that true restoration can only come through Jesus’ example and through the gospel message. Those who desire to understand true biblical manhood will find this book to be illuminating and something they will return to over and over. It is a timely book in an age where far too often men can be found shirking their God-given responsibility. Be a man, read this book, and look to Jesus to understand what true manhood looks like. I enjoyed it from cover to cover. I received this for free from B&H Publishing Group for this review. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255 : “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”

  18. 4 out of 5

    Keir

    Eric Mason’s book on what one may call “biblical manhood” I think is a good primer on the subject. I much appreciated the solid scriptural points he makes regarding our priorities as men. At the same time, I think it could be said that a number of the mandates he lays out for Christian men could be, in truth, asserted for both men and women. Mason frequently repeats many of his assertions throughout the book which may be a good way to drive home essentials to those not yet familiar with biblical Eric Mason’s book on what one may call “biblical manhood” I think is a good primer on the subject. I much appreciated the solid scriptural points he makes regarding our priorities as men. At the same time, I think it could be said that a number of the mandates he lays out for Christian men could be, in truth, asserted for both men and women. Mason frequently repeats many of his assertions throughout the book which may be a good way to drive home essentials to those not yet familiar with biblical ideas he wishes to present, although he does the same with some of the anecdotal illustrations he includes as well. To this point, I think some of the issues Mr. Mason sees as predominant ones may be intrinsic to the culture he is most familiar (in fact, he does make note of this) and therefore are not necessarily issues at large or at least not as critical elsewhere. At times, some of the elaborations seem somewhat clichéd and end up detracting from good arguments. I read this in a men’s group context, and I think that this book is very good for that type of open discussion setting. Overall, I really valued the author’s frequent focus on the Gospel and I think this a book worth reading, but not one I’d list as “must read” for Christian men.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Nathan

    The book drives forward with an urgency that is unusually stimulating writing in the male spiritualism genre. A number of delightful nuggets are contained within. There are some flaws in the pictures drawn; Mason asserts that Jesus is the ultimate picture of manhood (true), but he doesn't address the fact that Jesus is also the picture that women are called to conform themselves to, which leaves large question marks about the differences between men and women. While the author affirms that men a The book drives forward with an urgency that is unusually stimulating writing in the male spiritualism genre. A number of delightful nuggets are contained within. There are some flaws in the pictures drawn; Mason asserts that Jesus is the ultimate picture of manhood (true), but he doesn't address the fact that Jesus is also the picture that women are called to conform themselves to, which leaves large question marks about the differences between men and women. While the author affirms that men and women are different, he only discusses the differences in vague references to "femininity" , which is seems to be overly critical, not recognizing that femininity is also a positive attitude (specifically for women). In sum, the book contains some valuable truths and reminders of how to live responsible and Godly lives that don't diminish the value of manliness, but the book lacks balance and nuance.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Joshua Mitchell

    The title and price originally drew me into this book but I found that a lot of the material in the book was not fresh and new. It seemed like stuff I have read in other books or articles. Took a while to get through it because it was not captivating. Plus it was written for a target audience that I don't really fit into. There were still some good thoughts and concepts but nothing really quotable.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Jonathan

    Not a bad book, but unimpressive. Mason outlines the issues the men are burdened with and otherwise face. As a survey of the topic it's fine, but it lacks depth. The thesis of the book is that men need the Gospel to be restored. No argument there. But it doesn't go further than that. If I read this earlier in my Christian journey, it would be a nice starting point. But as it stands now, it's a little too simple.

  22. 4 out of 5

    James Budzinski

    I have listened to a lot of Tony Evans material and definitely see his influence in this book. I have a couple of chapters that stand alone as a five star chapter but not everyone. I do recommend this for fathers. And then I recommend passing it on to other fathers. I have recently reread some of this book before I share it with someone.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Kenny B

    read this book! Pastor Mason offers a systematic and biblical review of manhood. With references to bugattis, Lil Wayne, and Hip Hop specifically, he shares a uniquely urban perspective to the topoc without isolatimg those that may be unfamilar. lastly he gives specific practical challenges for men in various walks of life in and outside of the church.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Jon

    A fine read with solid encouragements to push back against the emasculation epidemic of our culture. Some fresh and profound insights particularly when wrestling with popular culture and the fatherless issues of our day, but wasn't earth shattering. Found little application for the specific situation single men find themselves in beyond a "get married" emphasis.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Colton Wyatt

    Excellent read! I would recommend this book to anyone who wants to catch a vision of what godly manhood looks like. The 2nd-to-last chapter hit me especially hard. I earnestly pray that God molds me into the sort of man presented in this book - a man after His own heart - in my person, my family, and my church.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Timothy Goldsmith

    A thoughtful, biblical exposition of what it is to be a Christian man, looking to shape one's manhood on Christ's bold, strong, yet tender and self-sacrificial character rather than modern misrepresentations pushed by popular culture. As an American book, I'd say there are some culturally loaded opinions, but on the whole it's a great read.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Gary Hinkle

    Pastor Eric Mason has hit the nail on the head in my opinion regarding what a Biblical man should be. His writing seems to be coming from a more urban setting, but is definitely needed in all areas. I commend him for tackling such a strong topic in such a volatile time for men, especially in the church today. Very well written and resourced.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Brian

    Excellent book for men or women in developing a vision for the roles of men. The first half was a little tough to get through, but has a lot of good theological points. The second half is packed with practical advice on family, marriage, church relationships. It isn’t a complete guide on all of the topics, but more of a directory in where to focus your vision.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Matt Moran

    Excellent. Compelling, practical, and theologically strong. I was provoked and challenged - this is a book that churches should be handing out to their men. There are a couple spots where the flow of the book feels awkward - not chapter to chapter, but paragraph to paragraph.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Nick Hand

    Encouraging book with good points throughout but nothing seemingly outstanding to me I guess to really pull me in or feel like I was garnering a lot of growing knowledge from it. Still a good read, but I guess I'm looking for something a bit more growth-developing.

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