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Work with Me: The 8 Blind Spots Between Men and Women in Business

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Work With Me is the timely collaboration of two of the world’s foremost authorities on gender relations. Barbara Annis, world-renowned expert on gender issues in the workplace, and John Gray, author of the number one relationship book of all time, Men Are from Mars, Women Are from Venus, team up to resolve the most stressful and confusing challenges facing men and women at Work With Me is the timely collaboration of two of the world’s foremost authorities on gender relations. Barbara Annis, world-renowned expert on gender issues in the workplace, and John Gray, author of the number one relationship book of all time, Men Are from Mars, Women Are from Venus, team up to resolve the most stressful and confusing challenges facing men and women at work. Annis and Gray reveal, for the first time, survey results of over 100,000 in-depth interviews of men and women executives in over 60 Fortune 500 companies. Readers will discover the Eight Gender Blind Spots, the false assumptions and opinions men and women have of each other, and in many ways, believe of themselves. Through research, science, and stories, Annis and Gray expose the blind spots that cause our misunderstandings, miscommunications, mistrust, resentment, and frustrations at work. Readers will discover the biology and social influences that compel men and women to think and act as they do, and direct how they communicate, solve problems, make decisions, resolve conflict, lead others, and deal with stress, enabling them to achieve greater success and satisfaction in their professional and personal lives. Work With Me is the definitive work-life relational guide, filled with "ah-ha!" moments and discoveries that will remove the blind spots and enable men and women to work and succeed together.


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Work With Me is the timely collaboration of two of the world’s foremost authorities on gender relations. Barbara Annis, world-renowned expert on gender issues in the workplace, and John Gray, author of the number one relationship book of all time, Men Are from Mars, Women Are from Venus, team up to resolve the most stressful and confusing challenges facing men and women at Work With Me is the timely collaboration of two of the world’s foremost authorities on gender relations. Barbara Annis, world-renowned expert on gender issues in the workplace, and John Gray, author of the number one relationship book of all time, Men Are from Mars, Women Are from Venus, team up to resolve the most stressful and confusing challenges facing men and women at work. Annis and Gray reveal, for the first time, survey results of over 100,000 in-depth interviews of men and women executives in over 60 Fortune 500 companies. Readers will discover the Eight Gender Blind Spots, the false assumptions and opinions men and women have of each other, and in many ways, believe of themselves. Through research, science, and stories, Annis and Gray expose the blind spots that cause our misunderstandings, miscommunications, mistrust, resentment, and frustrations at work. Readers will discover the biology and social influences that compel men and women to think and act as they do, and direct how they communicate, solve problems, make decisions, resolve conflict, lead others, and deal with stress, enabling them to achieve greater success and satisfaction in their professional and personal lives. Work With Me is the definitive work-life relational guide, filled with "ah-ha!" moments and discoveries that will remove the blind spots and enable men and women to work and succeed together.

30 review for Work with Me: The 8 Blind Spots Between Men and Women in Business

  1. 4 out of 5

    Becki Iverson

    This was a stop-halfway-through book, and it didn't need to be. But I suppose it was sort of my own fault - I should have known that any book separating groups of people so bluntly in the title (in this case, gender) wasn't going to be subtle about how to treat a complex topic. I believe there are differences between men and women in the workplace, but it's not as simple as one vs. another, especially in the work place. This book tends to wander, rambling between personal and professional, with This was a stop-halfway-through book, and it didn't need to be. But I suppose it was sort of my own fault - I should have known that any book separating groups of people so bluntly in the title (in this case, gender) wasn't going to be subtle about how to treat a complex topic. I believe there are differences between men and women in the workplace, but it's not as simple as one vs. another, especially in the work place. This book tends to wander, rambling between personal and professional, with a lot of unnecessary text. It's also short on suggestions and large on observation; I suppose that could be helpful for the kind of reader who wouldn't seek this book out on purpose, but it doesn't do much for those who are already observant enough to see a problem and are actively trying to fix it. The hardest part is how divisively and oversimplified the definitions of each gender are in this book; god help you if you're homosexual, transsexual, etc. and don't fit squarely into the stereotypical categories this book provides. I wanted a book to help navigate the office and instead found something with a lot of oversimplified and possibly harmful generalizations. If you're the kind of person who doesn't see an issue with the way things are this might be worth picking up.... but for the rest of us, it's a waste of time.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Charissa Ty

    I think this book could be summarized to 5 pages since all their points kept repeating itself. One thing they didn't include though, what if women in the marketplace influenced emotional branding? Unlike previous forms of advertising where, like the book states, that focuses on glorifying their own brand and comparing it with Brand X like males do. Everything Emma Watson said in her UN speech could basically win this book's points by a landslide. They included brain science facts in it as well. S I think this book could be summarized to 5 pages since all their points kept repeating itself. One thing they didn't include though, what if women in the marketplace influenced emotional branding? Unlike previous forms of advertising where, like the book states, that focuses on glorifying their own brand and comparing it with Brand X like males do. Everything Emma Watson said in her UN speech could basically win this book's points by a landslide. They included brain science facts in it as well. Somehow it gave me some inspiration to write some very geeky pick up lines. Hey, looking at you raises my oxytocin. and I'm going to look at you until your face burns into the amygdala and hippocampus.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Daniel Taylor

    Madhu is a top paediatrician in India. She’s written a textbook on children’s medicine. But her male colleagues refer to her textbook but place no value on her in-person opinions. The old model of gender equality is men and women are the same and should be treated accordingly. Annis and Gray propose a new model: men and women are different, value those differences. Their book is divided into two parts: eight gender blind spots and how to grow in gender intelligence. The first part looks at the tru Madhu is a top paediatrician in India. She’s written a textbook on children’s medicine. But her male colleagues refer to her textbook but place no value on her in-person opinions. The old model of gender equality is men and women are the same and should be treated accordingly. Annis and Gray propose a new model: men and women are different, value those differences. Their book is divided into two parts: eight gender blind spots and how to grow in gender intelligence. The first part looks at the truth behind some of the common perceptions of men and women: “Do Men Listen?,” “Are Women Too Emotional?” and so on. The second part looks at better ways of communicating. What this book captures is that it’s arrogant for women or men to assume they know how the other gender feels valued. To appreciate the opposite sex, use gender intelligence to understand what’s important to the other person. The logic Annis and Gray base their book on is sound. Their arguments are based on 20 years of qualitative and quantative in-depth surveys of more than 100,000 men and women. As a result, you can use this book to grow your gender intelligence.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Book

    Work With Me: The 8 Blind Spots Between Men and Women in Business by Barbara Annis and John Gray “Work With Me" is the timely and much needed book on how to work effectively with the opposite gender. The main purpose of this excellent book is to expose and eliminate our blind spots. The authors provide a new level of understanding called “gender intelligence” backed by exhaustive research, sound science and a pragmatic approach to reach solid conclusions. Accomplished authors, Barbara Annis and Work With Me: The 8 Blind Spots Between Men and Women in Business by Barbara Annis and John Gray “Work With Me" is the timely and much needed book on how to work effectively with the opposite gender. The main purpose of this excellent book is to expose and eliminate our blind spots. The authors provide a new level of understanding called “gender intelligence” backed by exhaustive research, sound science and a pragmatic approach to reach solid conclusions. Accomplished authors, Barbara Annis and John Gray, collaborate on this enlightening book on gender relations and provide the public with much needed guidance on how women and men can work with each other, not by expecting to behave the same, but by complementing our differences. This fantastic 272-page book is composed of the following twelve chapters: 1. Are We Really the Same?, 2. Do Women Want Men to Change?, 3. Do Men Appreciate Women, 4. Are Women Being Excluded?, 5. Do Men Have to Walk on Eggshells with Women? 6. Do Women Ask Too Many Questions?, 7. Do Men Listen?, 8. Are Women Too Emotional?, 9. Are Men Insensitive?, 10. Building Trust with Women, Increasing Credibility with Men, 11. Bridging Our Different Values, and 12. Achieving Work-Personal Life Harmony. Positives: 1. Engaging, accessible prose on a timely and fascinating topic. 2. Fair and even-handed treatment of a sensitive topic. 3. Accomplished authors, Barbara Annis and John Gray have great command of the topic. 4. Excellent format that provides a clear path to effective communication. Each chapter includes “The Science Side” which focuses on our biological differences. It also includes “The Personal Side” which offers practical personal 5. The authors excel at clearly defining terms. “Gender intelligence recognizes that gender is a function of both nature and nurture – first informed by nature, then shaped by society and culture. Only by first understanding the nature of our differences can we then gain the insight into how to nurture, develop, and complement our differences, instead of denying and suppressing our own uniqueness and that of the other gender.” Bravo! 6. Eye-opening gender facts interspersed throughout the book, “more girls have been killed in the last fifty years – particularly in China, India, and Pakistan – simply because they were girls than the number of men killed in all the wars of the twentieth century.” 7. Persuasive arguments abound with sensible solutions. “The only solution to achieving a cultural shift in attitude and sustaining any semblance of gender balance and inclusiveness is by understanding what is actually going on in the minds of women and men at work.” 8. The first part of the book is about the eight gender blind spots. The authors do a fantastic job of defining each blind spot with their own research which is immersed smoothly into business stories. 9. Clarity of thought. “The most cited reasons why women feel that men need to change are: “ Not going to spoil it, but understand that the authors do a wonderful job throughout the book of stating clearly what the issues are and how they suggest to address them. They clearly show how gender differences manifest themselves at work. Great stuff. 10. The authors show the clear differences in how women and men approach work and how they want to be acknowledged. “Men and women commonly define and approach teamwork differently. Women generally have a much greater need to be a part of the team and regard teamwork as an opportunity to collaborate and communicate with others...” 11. Thought-provoking statements and plenty of aha moments. “The objectification of women is so deeply ingrained in our culture that it becomes difficult for many men to disengage from their learned behavior and equally value women in the workplace.” 12. The gender differences on dealing with stress…aha. The challenges working with the other gender. 13. Interesting findings…”Women don’t believe that men need to walk on eggshells around them. They wish that men didn’t feel that way and are often surprised that it occurs to the degree that it does.” “…men’s tendency to feel uneasy and uncertain around women, even if it’s occasional. Can negatively affect the professional and personal success of both genders.” 14. The reasons why women ask more questions than men. “Women tend to explore all sides of an issue before making a final decision. By asking, ‘What do you think?’ a woman is not necessarily seeking final thoughts or a solution, but is creating or sustaining a conversation, or strengthening a relationship.” 15. The value of women in the financial industry. “Financial companies with several high-ranking women at either officer or director levels tend to have higher earnings per share, higher return on equity, and higher stock prices than competitors with few or no senior women”. 16. Some findings stand out, “The one thing that women should realize about men is that it’s the results that matter most to them – more than the challenges faced or the relationships made along the way.” 17. The four value spectrums that most distinguish women from men: Improve versus Maintain, Together versus Independently, Journey versus Results, and Sharing versus Declaring. 18. The difference between female and male leaders. The leadership spectrum. 19. The issues of work-life, personal-life balance. The search for harmony. The book provides many insights into how gender blind spots affect the personal side of lives. 20. Understanding the greatest shifts in corporations today. “The hierarchal, heroic approach to leadership in the past will most likely yield to an ensemble leadership style over the next decade and become the dominant trait of the global leader in the years to come.” 21. Links to Notes worked great. Negatives: 1. The book is repetitive. The authors tend to hammer the same points to a fault. Some of it has to do with the fact that the “Science Side” concurs with what was found during interviews but the themes undeniably carry through the whole book. 2. The lack of name-recognition business examples that people can associate with. The IKEA case study was great, but the book lacked more examples of that ilk. 3. The book tends to focus on gender differences in black and white. In defense of the book it does mention in one of the latter “Science Side” that there are exceptions, but should it not be more like a spectrum? Shades of grey and what about gay employees? What does the research say about that? 4. The book’s focus is strictly on gender differences in America but very little on other factors that may have an impact such as cultural differences. There was one example on Japanese culture, but few and far between. Perhaps an idea for a future book? 5. Always take behavioral sciences with a grain of salt and never fall in the trap of one size fits-all thinking. Furthermore, neuroscience is in its infancy and further progress in this field will yield more insights into our behaviors. Caution is warranted. 6. No formal bibliography. In summary, a fantastic book on gender relations. The authors do a wonderful job of providing a better understanding of gender relations in the work environment. The authors based their book on their workshops, interviews and neuroscience which resulted in persuasive conclusions. Their fair and even-handed approach won me over. The book has its limitations; it focuses mainly on gender differences (very little on cultural differences), neuroscience is in its infancy, and one size does not fit all. That being said, I enjoyed the book and is deserving of 4.5 stars. I highly recommend it! Further suggestions: “Lean In: Women, Work, and the Will to Lead” by Sheryl Sandberg, “Drive” by “The Power of Habit: Why We Do What We Do In Life and Business” by Charles Duhigg, “Outliers” by Malcolm Gladwell, and “Quiet” by Susan Cain.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Mary

    Anyone wanting to improve communication of all forms, needs to read this. It is an excellent book with good scenario examples and a few scientific facts to backup their info. It will improve how you ask questions or make comments to both genders. there are explanations as to why women ask questions (not to be annoying or because they lack confidence), if men listen...etc. I changed the way I text my boyfriend. I also formulate my comments and questions differently to avoid the dumb little miscom Anyone wanting to improve communication of all forms, needs to read this. It is an excellent book with good scenario examples and a few scientific facts to backup their info. It will improve how you ask questions or make comments to both genders. there are explanations as to why women ask questions (not to be annoying or because they lack confidence), if men listen...etc. I changed the way I text my boyfriend. I also formulate my comments and questions differently to avoid the dumb little miscommunication arguments.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Theresa Hildebrand

    Caution: Do not listen to this audio book while driving. Somewhat interesting insight into how men & women differ in their workplace communication. I really didn't agree with stereotypes that were constantly reinforced within. Not all women are overly emotional and libel to take offensive at every criticism. This book definitely falls into the category of "Forced myself to finish it." There are better options out there. Caution: Do not listen to this audio book while driving. Somewhat interesting insight into how men & women differ in their workplace communication. I really didn't agree with stereotypes that were constantly reinforced within. Not all women are overly emotional and libel to take offensive at every criticism. This book definitely falls into the category of "Forced myself to finish it." There are better options out there.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Drew

    The author and her team are on the cutting edge of how the genders can work together well in the future.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Rhodabrew

    Got about 60% through, some good points but too much emphasis on making one gender responsible for the actions of the other gender

  9. 5 out of 5

    Laura

    This book gave good scenarios of the different ways men and women act and react to one another.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Lindsay

    I chose to read this book because I've always been interested in psychological perspectives and business. I'm very familiar with John Gray, and I knew with his name on the book, I was sure to learn something. Work with Me is an insightful book that explores gender intelligence, a subject that is fairly new in our society. We have, for so long, learned to believe that men and women are equal--especially in the workplace. However, this fairly new way of working together forgets to address one very I chose to read this book because I've always been interested in psychological perspectives and business. I'm very familiar with John Gray, and I knew with his name on the book, I was sure to learn something. Work with Me is an insightful book that explores gender intelligence, a subject that is fairly new in our society. We have, for so long, learned to believe that men and women are equal--especially in the workplace. However, this fairly new way of working together forgets to address one very important issue: equal doesn't always mean the same. While women have gotten closer to achieving equal value in the workplace, women have had to climb up a male-dominated ladder, where each rung represents a specific obstacle such as male-created workplace policies, feelings of exclusions, differences of communication, etc. This issue is so real that very successful professionals have left or threatened to leave very high-paying positions for lesser pay in order to simply exist in a gender-friendly environment where each person feels like a valued team member. There were several examples of this throughout the book where a simple misunderstanding was someone's last straw. Some were able to work through their differences and learn they were actually on the same page, while others had to transform their lives in order to feel comfortable. It's interesting that, although women now make up nearly half of the workforce, these types of issues have yet to really be brought to the table in way that many professionals can understand. In this book, both Gray and Annis define and discuss gender intelligence by illustrating the eight gender blind spots. The blind spots include questions like Are women too emotional? Or, Do men have to walk on eggshells with women? Throughout the book are many insightful explanations of each of these differences presented from a scientific/biological perspective as well as statistics from thousands of surveys and credible sources. The second part of the Work with Me introduces new ways to bridge the gap between both sides. Although men and women have differences, Work with Me encourages people to embrace these differences and use them as complimentary assets rather than flaws. By increasing gender intelligence and learning how to better understand our different-but-equals, we will form stronger professional relationships which will ultimately lead to overall success for the entire team. This book was slightly heavy reading, but worth the effort as I walked away with greater insight of the opposite sex. Although this book's primary focus is the workplace, there are also a few helpful examples that apply to other areas of personal life such as relationships and parenting. I highly recommend this book for many HR professionals or any managers of business teams, as well as professionals (both men and women) who would like to learn how to work more effectively with the opposite sex. Just increasing your gender intelligence from knowledge and insight from this book will likely prevent you from either getting offended or offending someone else by misinterpreting actions or communication styles. I would rate this book 5 stars and I suggest that they (Annis and Gray) consider developing a workplace training program, based on this book, for businesses to help bring gender intelligence to the workplace. Also, I LOVE the way that the cover feels! Note: I received a complimentary Advanced Reader's copy of this book from GoodReads First Reads program.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Donna

    I gave this book a 4 because, even though it describes and explains 8 major differences between men and women in their work relationships, it misses a major reason for success in dealing with people in work and even in personal relationships. My husband and I have three adult children. We could never treat the two girls the same way. They are more different from each other than they are from their brother. Yes, there are gender differences that can be substantiated by looking at brain structure, I gave this book a 4 because, even though it describes and explains 8 major differences between men and women in their work relationships, it misses a major reason for success in dealing with people in work and even in personal relationships. My husband and I have three adult children. We could never treat the two girls the same way. They are more different from each other than they are from their brother. Yes, there are gender differences that can be substantiated by looking at brain structure, but there are also difference within each gender as a result of personal biology, environment and experience. If you want to be successful at dealing with people, you must learn to ascertain each individual's talents, perceive their communication style and assign to them the task that "fits" them. You must let them be what they were born to be. For women to treat all women the same way because they are women is as incorrect, in my opinion, as men treating them differently from men because they are women. This book falls short of treating people as individuals... and is probably as guilty of discrimination by putting all women into one category of behavior and men into another. Perhaps this is the 21st century method of categorizing and discriminating against women in the work force. I also disagree with this book because. in today's toxic environment, more and more of the physiological changes that normally happen to the brain before birth are not happening because of chemical and hormonal imbalances. As a result, for some adults, there is not as much difference between the "female" and "male" brain as previosuly. The book is very accurate in what it describes and explains about the blind spots that occur in the business world between men and women, and it reveals very many much more effective ways of communicating between the genders. However, the book does describe workshops in which mixed gender teams are given a difficult task to perform under time pressure. Until the participants actually see the behavior in a video, they are unaware of their habits and the effects on their peers. It also gives many examples from the work force and through many interviews. But it is unlikely that most people would see themselves by reading this book. They need the experience of video recording their actions and of open honest feedback from the other participants. This book cannot accomplish this. It is only a beginning. Is it worth ready? Yes. But I don't think it gives more common sense explanations of the blind spots between men and women as Red Green's Beginner's Guide to Women...which is more enjoyable reading!

  12. 4 out of 5

    Soundview Executive Book Summaries

    Work with Me: The 8 Blind Spots Between Men and Women in Business by Barbara Annis and John Gray was chosen by Soundview Executive Book Summaries as one of the Top 30 Business Books of 2014. THE SOUNDVIEW REVIEW: Do “Gender Blind Spots” exist in today’s workplace? According to authors Barbara Annis and John Gray, Ph.D., there are eight gender blind spots that can cause minor misunderstandings to become chronic dividers in the office and beyond. The pair combine thoughtful examples with timely rese Work with Me: The 8 Blind Spots Between Men and Women in Business by Barbara Annis and John Gray was chosen by Soundview Executive Book Summaries as one of the Top 30 Business Books of 2014. THE SOUNDVIEW REVIEW: Do “Gender Blind Spots” exist in today’s workplace? According to authors Barbara Annis and John Gray, Ph.D., there are eight gender blind spots that can cause minor misunderstandings to become chronic dividers in the office and beyond. The pair combine thoughtful examples with timely research in their book Work With Me: The 8 Blind Spots Between Men and Women in Business. This book is now available as a Soundview Executive Book Summary. Executives would be hard-pressed to find two more capable experts on gender in the workplace than Annis and Gray. Annis is the pioneer of the concept of Gender Intelligence and has brought this practice to numerous Fortune 500 companies, governments and organizations. As stated in his bio, Gray authored the “Best-Selling Relationship Book of All Time” Men Are from Mars, Women Are from Venus. Team-ups between business thought leadership titans can occasionally fall flat. This is not the case for Annis and Gray. Work With Me takes readers on a fast-paced, info-packed march through the eight gender blind spots. Each blind spot is posed in the form of a question, such as “Do Men Listen?” and “Are Women Too Emotional?” Annis and Gray provide the answer to each question through a variety of means. The Twitter enthusiast will enjoy the bite-sized “Gender Facts.” Readers who connect with stories will appreciate the gems from the more than 100,000 interviews the authors conducted with male and female executives. Like many of today’s best business books, Work With Me extends its material beyond the office to give readers work/life applicability. It’s a book that may start out on an executive’s desk in the morning and end up on his or her nightstand by midnight. Soundview's 8-page Executive Book Summary of Work With Me is available here.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Hung Tran

    helps you understand and how to deal with both gender in the workplace. It describes how men and women mind work differently in different situations. Great book.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Fred Kohn

    This book is really, really good and I am at a loss to explain the relatively low average rating and the negative reviews. As a man working in a female-dominated workplace (my immediate supervisor, department head, branch manager, HR director, and finance director are all women— in fact, the only male manager at my branch is the CEO) I have frequently found myself rather befuddled after years of working in male-dominated workplaces. This book has given me invaluable tools not only for understand This book is really, really good and I am at a loss to explain the relatively low average rating and the negative reviews. As a man working in a female-dominated workplace (my immediate supervisor, department head, branch manager, HR director, and finance director are all women— in fact, the only male manager at my branch is the CEO) I have frequently found myself rather befuddled after years of working in male-dominated workplaces. This book has given me invaluable tools not only for understanding some of the things that are going on which are puzzling me, but also to explain to my bosses some of my feelings which I suspect they don't really "get". If this book has any downside at all, it is that it is more directed at women that are befuddled by working for men rather than the other way around. But, after all, isn't that by far the more usual situation?

  15. 4 out of 5

    Annie

    I think "Women Are From Venus, Men Are From Mars" is a better book in understanding differences in communication styles between men and women and provides useful techniques. "Work With Me" contained huge sweeping stereotypes, like offering help to a man suggests that you think he's incapable of doing it himself. I think plenty of men and women are willing to accept help. The book provided some interesting perspective on dialogs -- she says "Have we considered the impact?", what she means "This c I think "Women Are From Venus, Men Are From Mars" is a better book in understanding differences in communication styles between men and women and provides useful techniques. "Work With Me" contained huge sweeping stereotypes, like offering help to a man suggests that you think he's incapable of doing it himself. I think plenty of men and women are willing to accept help. The book provided some interesting perspective on dialogs -- she says "Have we considered the impact?", what she means "This could be a problem that we're ignoring." However, it didn't provide that much information in improving communication.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Shawna

    I read this book for work and was really surprised by how much I like it. They cite scientific studies about how men and women deal with conflict (which applies to workplace conflict as well)... they look at the history of office culture and corporate hierarchies... and then they apply that to the how office politics work. The end result is a new understanding of how people act at work that can help us be more mindful employees and bosses.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Carol R.

    I heard about this book through the ABWA magazine and knew I needed to buy it. While it's geared for business, I think the insights will be valuable for anyone working with the opposite gender whether on church committees, on nonprofit boards, or in a marriage. I do wish it gave a few more strategies for using the knowledge in actual situations! I heard about this book through the ABWA magazine and knew I needed to buy it. While it's geared for business, I think the insights will be valuable for anyone working with the opposite gender whether on church committees, on nonprofit boards, or in a marriage. I do wish it gave a few more strategies for using the knowledge in actual situations!

  18. 5 out of 5

    Lee

    Disappointing. Disjointed. Despite its title, routinely in the middle of a chapter there is a scenario about dating. Eew

  19. 4 out of 5

    Rick Rempala

    great idea,crappy book.would be a good Readers Digest article could have said it all in 5 pages instead of 249!

  20. 5 out of 5

    vicks

    I enjoyed reading the pitfall of business between men and women. Keep it interesting very well written.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Heather

    did not finish

  22. 4 out of 5

    Vince

    Skim-read the high-level concepts here. Want to return to this.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Dimple Kaul

    A Brilliant Book that must be a mandatory read for the Corporate World - especially the corner office folks!

  24. 4 out of 5

    Vicky Griffith

    This is an overly simplistic look at gender divides in the workplace, but I did take a few things away from reading it. I'd advise taking its points with a grain of salt. This is an overly simplistic look at gender divides in the workplace, but I did take a few things away from reading it. I'd advise taking its points with a grain of salt.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Kelly

    *I won a copy of this book from Goodreads. Absolutely excellent. This is the book that will move gender equality in the workplace forward.

  26. 4 out of 5

    John Pedersen

    Extremely valuable, clearly written book about the differences between how men and women approach work and life. I bet I'll be going back to this one again and again. Extremely valuable, clearly written book about the differences between how men and women approach work and life. I bet I'll be going back to this one again and again.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Sharon

    Even still today we have to discuss the difference between men and woman. Interesting read.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Nirina

  29. 5 out of 5

    Silvia

  30. 5 out of 5

    Anna Brodarick

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