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Lucifer, Vol. 8: The Wolf Beneath the Tree

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The eighth volume of writer Mike Careys beguiling LUCIFER series continues the saga of the Lightbringer, who now faces a deadly new threat to both his Creation and our own. Fenris, the acme of ruin and destruction, has awoken into Gods absence, and he stalks the World-Tree Yggdrasil where he is destined to end of the world. Only Elaine Belloc, the Archangel Michael and Luc The eighth volume of writer Mike Careys beguiling LUCIFER series continues the saga of the Lightbringer, who now faces a deadly new threat to both his Creation and our own. Fenris, the acme of ruin and destruction, has awoken into Gods absence, and he stalks the World-Tree Yggdrasil where he is destined to end of the world. Only Elaine Belloc, the Archangel Michael and Lucifer stand in his wayand their efforts may only hasten the end of all things. THE WOLF BENEATH THE TREE also showcases the special stories Lilith and Neutral Ground. Collecting issues #45 and #50-54, in which the Lightbringer faces a deadly new threat to both his Creation and that of Yahweh. Also featured is the special 40-page story "Lilith" from issue #50, illustrated by award-winner P. Craig Russell, and "Neutral Ground" from issue #45, illustrated by Ted Naifeh.


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The eighth volume of writer Mike Careys beguiling LUCIFER series continues the saga of the Lightbringer, who now faces a deadly new threat to both his Creation and our own. Fenris, the acme of ruin and destruction, has awoken into Gods absence, and he stalks the World-Tree Yggdrasil where he is destined to end of the world. Only Elaine Belloc, the Archangel Michael and Luc The eighth volume of writer Mike Careys beguiling LUCIFER series continues the saga of the Lightbringer, who now faces a deadly new threat to both his Creation and our own. Fenris, the acme of ruin and destruction, has awoken into Gods absence, and he stalks the World-Tree Yggdrasil where he is destined to end of the world. Only Elaine Belloc, the Archangel Michael and Lucifer stand in his wayand their efforts may only hasten the end of all things. THE WOLF BENEATH THE TREE also showcases the special stories Lilith and Neutral Ground. Collecting issues #45 and #50-54, in which the Lightbringer faces a deadly new threat to both his Creation and that of Yahweh. Also featured is the special 40-page story "Lilith" from issue #50, illustrated by award-winner P. Craig Russell, and "Neutral Ground" from issue #45, illustrated by Ted Naifeh.

30 review for Lucifer, Vol. 8: The Wolf Beneath the Tree

  1. 5 out of 5

    Devann

    By all rights this volume is kind of a mess with the different storylines, but it still weirdly works for me. I love the Lilith issue and how she kind of planted the seed in Lucifer's mind for rebellion. Although how exactly did she have a kid with that other angel because I thought none of the angels could have children [except Michael via loophole]? Does her magic vagina just trump the angels being sterile? Also why is the baby like the rest of the Lilim and not an actual half angel like Elain By all rights this volume is kind of a mess with the different storylines, but it still weirdly works for me. I love the Lilith issue and how she kind of planted the seed in Lucifer's mind for rebellion. Although how exactly did she have a kid with that other angel because I thought none of the angels could have children [except Michael via loophole]? Does her magic vagina just trump the angels being sterile? Also why is the baby like the rest of the Lilim and not an actual half angel like Elaine? Oh the questions we will never get answers to. Still, I really like the issue and also can't help thinking of Gaiman's Murder Mysteries when I read it just because they are both an extremely different take on the first murder in heaven. Also I really love seeing child!Mazikeen and seeing how much Lucifer has been a part of her life right from the beginning. I love The Wolf Beneath the Tree as well, not only for the big showdown at the end and what comes next, but also because I like how it blends other mythologies into the overall story. Also I love Michael, Lucifer, and Elaine having an awkward family dinner with Destiny. Awkward family dinners are like one of my favorite tropes so that was great for me. And just Elaine in general! I'm so excited for what's about to happen! I just love her story line so much. Some highlights: And then mentions of will:

  2. 5 out of 5

    Cheese

    artwork takes a small dive in this and not much happens. Picks up at the end.

  3. 5 out of 5

    sally ✿

    Listen, this series is great and can 100% stand on its own, but there is just something about seeing The Endless that makes my heart so dang full. Destiny is as cryptic, yet somehow sassy, as ever. Delirium still has the coolest outfits and I love her. And if we ever see Morpheus again I will be so overjoyed. Also, kid Mazikeen has my heart.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Airiz

    The Wolf Beneath the Tree brings us a step closer to apex of the Lucifer series, which is apparently the end of the world in the wake of Yahweh’s departure. The main story follows the Norse wolf Fenris who, feeling that the Armageddon/Ragnarok is closing in on the Creation, goes to spill kin-blood on the roots of the Yggdrasil. Lucifer teams up with Michael and Elaine to do what they can to stop everything from collapsing… This volume fills some gaps about the tale of the Lightbringer, back when The Wolf Beneath the Tree brings us a step closer to apex of the Lucifer series, which is apparently the end of the world in the wake of Yahweh’s departure. The main story follows the Norse wolf Fenris who, feeling that the Armageddon/Ragnarok is closing in on the Creation, goes to spill kin-blood on the roots of the Yggdrasil. Lucifer teams up with Michael and Elaine to do what they can to stop everything from collapsing… This volume fills some gaps about the tale of the Lightbringer, back when he’s still the “sweet, savage Samael” (I quite like that phrase for some reason, thank you Yahweh!). The first issue in this tome centers on Lilith—Eve’s precursor in the Garden of Eden—and how she is responsible for the establishment of the Silver City and Lucifer’s rebellion. The best analogy would perhaps be Lilith acting as the intellectual serpent that eggs Lucifer on to yield to his the desire of his strong free will. I enjoyed the issue immensely, as a bunch of questions are answered in the most convincing way that only Mike Carey can pull off. Anyway, we also get to see little Mazikeen and little Briadach meeting the Lightbringer for the first time. I commend P. Craig Russel for the sterling art; it is startlingly reminiscent of his illustrations in Murder Mysteries by Neil Gaiman, only a tad better in here. The rest of the story reverts to the present time, with the protagonists racing the clock to stop the universe’s imminent doom. There’s a small but important appearance of Destiny of the Endless, hosting a dinner with Michael, Lucifer, and Elaine Belloc. The dinner table convo is fascinating as ever, especially that we all know Lucifer hates the said Endless as a concept (escape from predestination = Lucifer’s driving fuel, the point of the whole series). Epiphanies abound, one of the biggest being Jill Presto’s. The volume ends with a character death and kin-shed blood, resulting in the possible conflagration of not only one but two Creations. That said, this is still an outstanding volume. The ending is one heck of a cliffhanger that I immediately moved on to the next tome as soon as I finished this one. Thumb up for an amazing read!

  5. 4 out of 5

    Venus Maneater

    Love love love Naifeh. Too bad he got one of the lesser scripts to work with. I feel like Lucifer is becoming God

  6. 5 out of 5

    Lil

    Loved the backstory with Lilith and the fall. Oh, you angels, just get over it! And bringing in some more of the Endless siblings made me squeal.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Mateen Mahboubi

    First couple one-off stories didn't do too much for me but the main story that is included here was pretty enjoyable. A focused, slow burn, it hit a lot of the notes that I enjoy with the series. Looking forward to seeing how it ends.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Štěpán

    damn, i really liked it

  9. 4 out of 5

    Zec

    Stories: Neutral Ground, Lilith, The Wolf Beneath the Tree Neutral Ground: was a cool concept, decent one-shot. Dark as hell. Lilith: intriguing if overlong tale that covers the origins of Mazikeen, Silver City and Lucifer’s rebellion. Somehow wasn’t as compelling or epic as it could have been. The Wolf Beneath the Tree: starts slowly but bursts into a brilliant climax, reaching some of the series’ highest points in the story and art.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Brian

    I should have reread the last couple volumes before diving into this. I still enjoyed it, especially the Lilith story, but I think I'll appreciate it more upon a future reread with more of the past storylines fresh in my head.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Miles McCoy

    The story is starting to get more and more abstract but the author is doing a fantastic job keeping things together! In this installment, the universe is literally falling apart at the seams and it's still anybody's game to see who will end up king of the ashes!

  12. 5 out of 5

    Keeloca

    Fenris sucks, but everything else is kind of awesome. I love these awkward family get togethers, and any cameo by the Endless are rad. Hell is still stupid. SOMEONE should get rid of it, CHRISTOPHER!

  13. 5 out of 5

    Steven Werber

    Brilliant beyond words. Any graphic novel that has me running to the internet to use google translate and look up angel names is doing something right!!

  14. 4 out of 5

    Jason

    Ace!!

  15. 5 out of 5

    SaraKat

    The wolf is a fun character that provides a scary and powerful antagonist.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Amy

    I love P. Craig Russell and his art in that one issue is still breathtaking.

  17. 4 out of 5

    James

    It's strange to see Fenris in this mythology.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Tiffanie

    I'm not use to Gabriel being a dick. Ha!

  19. 5 out of 5

    Hennie

    5 bloody stars! HELL YES. Also the COVER. ♥

  20. 5 out of 5

    Chris Miller

    The backstory about Lilith, Mazikeen's mother (and mother to all of the Lilim), was very interesting: (view spoiler)[ Her affair with the angel Ibriel (which resulted in Briadach), Mazikeen and Briadach being childhood friends as well as half-siblings, how the Lilim were the ones who built the Silver City for The Host, and how the Lilim were cast out of heaven when Briadach and Mazikeen avenged their mother's broken heart (which itself set the stage for Lucifer's rebellion against God)--all very The backstory about Lilith, Mazikeen's mother (and mother to all of the Lilim), was very interesting: (view spoiler)[ Her affair with the angel Ibriel (which resulted in Briadach), Mazikeen and Briadach being childhood friends as well as half-siblings, how the Lilim were the ones who built the Silver City for The Host, and how the Lilim were cast out of heaven when Briadach and Mazikeen avenged their mother's broken heart (which itself set the stage for Lucifer's rebellion against God)--all very engrossing. (hide spoiler)] The demon Unagor was probably one of the coolest-looking characters I've seen in the Lucifer comics. The second half of this trade paperback consisted of the story of Fenris "The Wolf" trying to speed up the end of God's creation (after which this trade paperback is named). I felt like there were some plot holes and that it generally wasn't very interesting. The cameo from Delirium of The Endless was cool.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Angela

    The Wolf Beneath the Tree is probably the hardest volume in the series for ne to review. In some ways, it’s a mess. A series of one-shots combined with a highly disjointed main arc which introduces a flux of new characters makes for bumpy storytelling, and the second issue contained here—regarding a demonic meeting of the minds and a law clerk/punk rocker—could easily have been left out of the series entirely and nothing would have suffered for it. But for all the moments of frustration, there a The Wolf Beneath the Tree is probably the hardest volume in the series for ne to review. In some ways, it’s a mess. A series of one-shots combined with a highly disjointed main arc which introduces a flux of new characters makes for bumpy storytelling, and the second issue contained here—regarding a demonic meeting of the minds and a law clerk/punk rocker—could easily have been left out of the series entirely and nothing would have suffered for it. But for all the moments of frustration, there are moments of brilliance here, too. Most notably in the opening story, which details Lilith’s history and how her relationship with two angels with very different agendas both shaped the face of the Silver City and gave the spark that launched Lucifer’s rebellion against God. It also shows how Mazikeen came to know Lucifer, back when he was still the archangel Samael, and goes far to explain why she reveres him as she does. (As a side note, it seems like my favorite Vertigo stories involve P. Craig Russell’s art. “Ramadan” remains my favorite Sandman story, and “Lilith” is probably my favorite one-shot in the Lucifer realm. ) So we have the “Lilith” issue, we have the “I don’t know why this story about the accountant and the lords of Hell is relevant and by the way when did they all stop dressing like Feudal lords” issue, and then we have the (pardon a bad pun) meat of this collection, the titular “The Wolf Beneath the Tree.” And, by the end of that particular story, if you’re not staring at the last page with your mouth hanging open and mentally reacting the way most people these days do to a “Game of Thrones” style cliffhanger, you should be. I can still remember the month-long wait between the last issue in this collection and the beginning of “Crux.” It was painful. The most painful wait for a new comic book I have probably ever endured. But here’s the problem with “The Wolf Beneath the Tree.” Well, the potential problem. This particular arc assumes a lot about its readers that may not necessarily be true. It assumed they will be familiar with Norse myth, particularly the World Tree and Fenris, both of which are critical to the telling of this story. They, and the other deities who travel with Fenris, are introduced very abruptly, and with only the bare minimum of explanations given. Though the comic gives you enough to get by, it’s not enough to really (again, another bad metaphor) sink your teeth into the story. It assumes the readers will have a certain familiarity with the Endless that they might not necessarily have. (I’ve introduced a few people to Lucifer who have little to no experience with other series, and the appearance to Destiny and Delirium is where they inevitably start getting confused.) It assumes we still care about whether or not Jill Presto is still pregnant (and, seriously, shouldn’t she at least be showing by now?) It’s a story that could have benefited from a lot less time spent on Charles Gilmour and a lot more spent on Fenris and his companions, who deserve more of a story than they got. In truth, this volume would probably be a 2 or 3-star rating, except for the strength of Lilith’s tale, and the climactic battle that ensues from Fenris’s treachery, and which ultimately concludes with Elaine rising to fill a key role in the series. If you haven’t figured out this kid’s destined for great things by now, you’ve not been paying attention.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Tom

    Perhaps my favorite scene in the entire Lucifer run occurs in this volume. Lucifer, Elaine, and Michael have all met for dinner and conversation in the home of Destiny of the Endless. After Michael and Elaine have left, Lucifer tries chatting with Destiny (who he unsuccessfully tried to get a wager from earlier regarding whether or not Lucifer would do something not written in his book). Destiny is his usual incredibly formal and stiff self, which infuriates Lucifer, who has always had issues wi Perhaps my favorite scene in the entire Lucifer run occurs in this volume. Lucifer, Elaine, and Michael have all met for dinner and conversation in the home of Destiny of the Endless. After Michael and Elaine have left, Lucifer tries chatting with Destiny (who he unsuccessfully tried to get a wager from earlier regarding whether or not Lucifer would do something not written in his book). Destiny is his usual incredibly formal and stiff self, which infuriates Lucifer, who has always had issues with the whole concept of predestination, so Lucifer does what few if any would dare to do and rips some pages from Destiny's book and burns them to try to make Destiny as unknowing of the immediate future as Lucifer is. Unflappable, Destiny merely points out the ashes of the pages continue to spell out what the book is saying. The rest of the volume is equally good. After being given the briefest of introductions to Lilith last volume, the first reprint is her full backstory, as well as giving details on characters like Mazikeen and the other Lilim (including the blind seer Briadach), shows Lilith's influence on Lucifer that led to the rebellion, and the construction of Heaven's Silver City. Much of what went down with Lilith seems to be the fault of Gabriel, introduced to the series as something of a judgmental prude. After the introductory chapter, Lilith disappears for the rest of the book, as we slide into the real meat of any volume entitled "The Wolf Beneath the Tree". The wolf in question is Fenris, from Norse myth, a being of pure destruction. The tree is Yggdrasil the world tree. Lucifer had pointed out that the previous volume's Titans were the first of many to make an attempt on creation now that Yahweh has vacated the Silver City, and that more dangerous ones would follow. Fenris and his two compatriots, the West African trickster spirit Abonsam, and a woman deity (I couldn't find her on Wikipedia) Bet Jo'gie are making their own play, only theirs is not to rule but to destroy. Getting to Yggdrasil is difficult for anyone, and cannot come without a great cost, but Fenris and Co. have found their own transportation, leaving Lucifer, Michael, and Elaine to go there on their own. This volume shifts the focus towards an endgame. Up to this point, Lucifer has been highly successful in dealing with all manner of threats, and now even his own reality is threatened, so he moves and ultimately makes a big mistake, though arguably the mistake he makes is really the set up for how the series ultimately ends. Yahweh did let it be known He intended for somebody to take His place, and neither Michael nor Lucifer want to exactly do that...

  23. 5 out of 5

    Darrell

    “Try as you might, you can never be your own father.” Since Ted Naifeh did the art for the Neutral Ground story line, we get to see characters from How Loathsome make a cameo appearance. This one shot ultimately didn’t have an impact on the overall story line, however. Next, we get another one shot featuring the backstory of Lilith back before Lucifer rebelled against heaven and Mazikeen was still a kid. Gabriel (who died in a Hellblazer story line before the Lucifer series began) also appears. A “Try as you might, you can never be your own father.” Since Ted Naifeh did the art for the Neutral Ground story line, we get to see characters from How Loathsome make a cameo appearance. This one shot ultimately didn’t have an impact on the overall story line, however. Next, we get another one shot featuring the backstory of Lilith back before Lucifer rebelled against heaven and Mazikeen was still a kid. Gabriel (who died in a Hellblazer story line before the Lucifer series began) also appears. An angel fathers a child in this story even though we were told previously that all angels are sterile. I’m not sure why the child looks like a demon either. The main story line in this volume focuses on the wolf Fenris from Norse mythology who embodies destruction. It’s his job to travel to the world tree Yggdrasil to usher in the end of the world. Lucifer doesn’t care much that God’s creation is going to end, but when he finds out his creation is also in danger, he tries to stop it. Delirium and Destiny from the Sandman make cameos. Destiny’s presence is a bit confusing, however, since predestination was supposed to have ended when Yahweh left. I guess it hasn’t entirely faded yet. Lucifer tells Destiny he doesn’t like the concept of cause and effect because that leads to the prison of predestination. However, Destiny rightly points out that without cause and effect, we’d be left with chaos. It’s an old philosophical problem. If everything that happens is caused by what happened before, there’s no free will, but if there is no cause and effect, everything happens randomly and there’s still no free will.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Aldi

    I think this is the one Lucifer volume that I don't find comprehensively awesome. Lilith's backstory is great, and I love the reveal about Mazikeen and Briadach being a kind of catalyst for Lucifer's original rebellion, but "Neutral Ground" is genuinely bland, and I think both it and "The Wolf Beneath the Tree" suffer from featuring a generic sadsack middle-aged dude as the narrative conduit. I could not have cared less about what happened to either of them. I think Elaine summed it up best: "An I think this is the one Lucifer volume that I don't find comprehensively awesome. Lilith's backstory is great, and I love the reveal about Mazikeen and Briadach being a kind of catalyst for Lucifer's original rebellion, but "Neutral Ground" is genuinely bland, and I think both it and "The Wolf Beneath the Tree" suffer from featuring a generic sadsack middle-aged dude as the narrative conduit. I could not have cared less about what happened to either of them. I think Elaine summed it up best: "Another glass of testosterone, anyone?" That said, the new direction of the overall arc, with Fenris becoming a player and the stakes getting upped (yet again- this story has as many near-apocalypses as Buffy the Vampire Slayer), was gripping, I loved the cameos from Delirium and Destiny, and the ending was a sucker punch. (view spoiler)[Michael! Nooooooooooooooo. (hide spoiler)] In terms of art, it's a mixed bag as well - while I usually enjoy P. Craig Russell's art, it didn't really work for me here; Ted Naifeh's guest panels leave me about as lukewarm as the story they went with, and it wasn't until the third story and the return to Gross/Kelly that the art grabbed me again. I love how they've developed Elaine since her beginnings - she looks more of a teenager now but at the same time also sort of ageless, which really works. In general, this volume feels a bit scattered and unmemorable, with too many random threads aimlessly wriggling through each other, whereas so far everything has been beautifully paced. It's still pretty damn fabulous because Lucifer, but it's the weakest of the lot.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Raj

    It's the end of the world and I feel fine. With God gone and his Name no longer holding everything together, the wolf Fenris emerges to destroy Yggdrasil while Michael journeys to take advice from Destiny of the Endless. The first part of this book tells the story of Lilith, Adam's first consort, and her liaisons with both Michael and Lucifer before the Fall as well as her part in it. This is an interesting story in fleshing out a character who has previously only existed as mother to the Lilim. It's the end of the world and I feel fine. With God gone and his Name no longer holding everything together, the wolf Fenris emerges to destroy Yggdrasil while Michael journeys to take advice from Destiny of the Endless. The first part of this book tells the story of Lilith, Adam's first consort, and her liaisons with both Michael and Lucifer before the Fall as well as her part in it. This is an interesting story in fleshing out a character who has previously only existed as mother to the Lilim. It also features a young Mazikeen (in her only appearance in this book, much to its detriment) who's just as awesome as she would grow up to be. The second part is an oddity, and one that didn't really work for me. Neutral ground is found for a conclave of demons, deciding what to do now that God is gone. The organiser, bored with the whole affair, goes to have some fun with their "host". To be honest, I'm not entirely sure what happened here. Did Lucifer trap the conclave? Or was it all just a diversion? The final part brings us to Fenris and Yggdrasil and the ultimate trick played on Lucifer - for once not in control of the situation. Fenris is a manipulator worthy of the Lightbringer himself, and his use of the human madman to achieve his ends is creepy and totally fitting for this mythos. I'm not too sure about the final pages though, which seem to introduce yet another element into this already bulging story. I'll just have to read the next volume to find out more.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Robb Bridson

    I was starting to fear the series was tapering off, but here it starts building toward the final climax (4 volumes left... follows basically the same trajectory as Sandman, it seems) and, though this arc seems to be mostly bridge material, it is damn good bridge material. Since God's abandoned the universe, bad stuff has started. Michael wants to save the universe. Lucifer just wants to stick to his own universe and let our universe die, as you'd expect. Elaine joins them in a meeting with Destin I was starting to fear the series was tapering off, but here it starts building toward the final climax (4 volumes left... follows basically the same trajectory as Sandman, it seems) and, though this arc seems to be mostly bridge material, it is damn good bridge material. Since God's abandoned the universe, bad stuff has started. Michael wants to save the universe. Lucifer just wants to stick to his own universe and let our universe die, as you'd expect. Elaine joins them in a meeting with Destiny wherein Michael tries to find a trick to save the universe and Lucifer inadvertently stumbles on a reason to help save the universe. Meanwhile we are introduced to one of the biggest, baddest antagonists Lucifer has faced yet: Fenris the Wolf. He's out to bring destruction to... everything really. A few tangents: a little to remind us that Jill Presto is still around and might be carrying another evil Taror baby... I don't care about Jill Presto, but I suppose this might turn out to be important later. No sign of Mazikeen in this volume. Her story line is probably moving secretly. Other tangents are the old story involving Lilith and Lucifer, giving insight into how both turned out how they did, and showing what a dick Gabriel was. There's also a little break from the arc where we see how the demons are coping with God's absence, but it's mostly about a specific demon getting bored and tormenting a human. Pretty good little horror story-- the Lucifer stand-alone issues are usually fun.

  27. 4 out of 5

    PurplyCookie

    "Lucifer Vol. 8: The Wolf Beneath the Tree" follows the vendetta of the great wolf Fenris of Norse mythology against the banquet guests who long ago betrayed him, and the fate of a young man who bludgeons wife and child to death; when these plotlines merge, all creation, even Lucifer's domain, is imperiled. Lucifer now faces a deadly new threat to both his Creation and our own. Fenris, the acme of ruin and destruction, has awoken into Gods absence, and he stalks the World-Tree Yggdrasil where he "Lucifer Vol. 8: The Wolf Beneath the Tree" follows the vendetta of the great wolf Fenris of Norse mythology against the banquet guests who long ago betrayed him, and the fate of a young man who bludgeons wife and child to death; when these plotlines merge, all creation, even Lucifer's domain, is imperiled. Lucifer now faces a deadly new threat to both his Creation and our own. Fenris, the acme of ruin and destruction, has awoken into Gods absence, and he stalks the World-Tree Yggdrasil where he is destined to end of the world. Only Elaine Belloc, the Archangel Michael and Lucifer stand in his wayand their efforts may only hasten the end of all things. This volume also showcases the special stories Lilith and Neutral Ground (a grimly amusing demon-possession romp). It was a special treat to read of the back story of Lilith and the origin of the Lilim. It really does lend a richer interpretation to the Lilim's current vendetta against angels. This installment of the Lucifer graphic novels has a little bit of everyhting. A flashback including the origins of Mazikeen (based on Lilth's story), a family reunion/dinner with the appearance of Destiny, Ragnarok, a resolution of sorts between Michael and Lucifer and a cliffhanger. An added bonus is Delirium's cameo appearance. Book Details: Title Lucifer Vol. 8: The Wolf Beneath the Tree Author Mike Carey Reviewed By Purplycookie

  28. 4 out of 5

    Krystl Louwagie

    These are interesting, but I always feel like I'm missing things. Of course, that could be because I happen to be reading them a bit out of order-I only read the ones I get through paperbackswap, so I'm kind of at the mercy of that. Still, interesting is the furthest I really get with these, never really that attached or invested in how the plot is going.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Anchorpete

    I know the book said Lucifer on the cover and it said that Mike Carey was the writer but this really felt like Sandman, written by Neil Gaiman. I am sure the appearances of both Delirium and Destiny helped me get that impression, but there were other factors that reminded me of the classic Vertigo series. There were the references to North Mythology (Fenris and his history) and how horrifying they were when put into a real world narrative. There was also a human character, whose entire life was I know the book said Lucifer on the cover and it said that Mike Carey was the writer but this really felt like Sandman, written by Neil Gaiman. I am sure the appearances of both Delirium and Destiny helped me get that impression, but there were other factors that reminded me of the classic Vertigo series. There were the references to North Mythology (Fenris and his history) and how horrifying they were when put into a real world narrative. There was also a human character, whose entire life was shredded, because he was caught between Mythical forces. I had recently read one of the massive Lucifer Collections, and there was so much build up in that giant trade, that at times it would get tedious and redundant. In that collection, the story kept referring to the fact that Lucifer had created his own universe, and that the power players in our universe all had their own designs as to what they could do with this new revelation. This book takes it to the next level, and inevitably raises the stakes. God has left his throne, and now the Universe he created is going to begin to fall apart. Will Lucifer help save God's universe? Will he watch from his new universe, as everyone perishes in the old one? It is a much more exciting scenario in this trade, than what I had seen in previous collections

  30. 5 out of 5

    Aaron

    The series takes a sudden shift into the dark with this volume. Throughout the previous volumes we've been made aware that something is brewing in the realm of the Norse gods, and in this book we finally see exactly what has been wrong. And it's intense. Due to the way Carey sets this up, I don't feel like it's a spoiler to say that essentially Ragnarok is on its way, and the central characters must do everything in their power to stop it. As the story builds we get a sense that the evil forces The series takes a sudden shift into the dark with this volume. Throughout the previous volumes we've been made aware that something is brewing in the realm of the Norse gods, and in this book we finally see exactly what has been wrong. And it's intense. Due to the way Carey sets this up, I don't feel like it's a spoiler to say that essentially Ragnarok is on its way, and the central characters must do everything in their power to stop it. As the story builds we get a sense that the evil forces at play are nigh unstoppable, which Carey conveys extremely well through feelings of helpless and dread on even the part of the reader. I only take a star away for a fairly confusing anti-deus-ex-machina used to put the main characters in mortal danger near the end. I went back and reread the leadup to this moment several times and there's no explanation as to what exactly happens. We're just meant to understand that something went wrong (and this isn't presented as a mystery, we're just mean to be like "Oh, ok, they got hurt."). Besides that one hiccup, solid storytelling and a great setup for another long Lucifer arc.

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