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Lucifer, Vol. 9: Crux

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Forces in Hell and on Earth prepare for a final struggle for supremacy in CRUX. Reprinting stories from issues #55-61, this volume ventures through space and time and the places outside both, weaving a sweeping saga out of multiple character threads mortal and immortal alike. This volume contains: Lucifer #5561 Forces in Hell and on Earth prepare for a final struggle for supremacy in CRUX. Reprinting stories from issues #55-61, this volume ventures through space and time and the places outside both, weaving a sweeping saga out of multiple character threads mortal and immortal alike. This volume contains: Lucifer #55–61


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Forces in Hell and on Earth prepare for a final struggle for supremacy in CRUX. Reprinting stories from issues #55-61, this volume ventures through space and time and the places outside both, weaving a sweeping saga out of multiple character threads mortal and immortal alike. This volume contains: Lucifer #5561 Forces in Hell and on Earth prepare for a final struggle for supremacy in CRUX. Reprinting stories from issues #55-61, this volume ventures through space and time and the places outside both, weaving a sweeping saga out of multiple character threads mortal and immortal alike. This volume contains: Lucifer #55–61

30 review for Lucifer, Vol. 9: Crux

  1. 4 out of 5

    Stewart Tame

    Ive been procrastinating on this review because, well, Ive been having trouble figuring anything out to say about the book. I mean, I read it, I liked it, but when I try to summarize the plot or even come up with a decent teaser for it Im left vaguely gesturing with my mouth opening and closing but no sound coming out. No one wants to see that. So I decided to start writing about how I can't think of anything to write. And, damn!, it seems to be working I used to read Lucifer. It was one of many I’ve been procrastinating on this review because, well, I’ve been having trouble figuring anything out to say about the book. I mean, I read it, I liked it, but when I try to summarize the plot or even come up with a decent teaser for it I’m left vaguely gesturing with my mouth opening and closing but no sound coming out. No one wants to see that. So I decided to start writing about how I can't think of anything to write. And, damn!, it seems to be working … I used to read Lucifer. It was one of many titles I followed back in the day. I ultimately reached a point where I couldn't afford to keep spending money on comics every week. I’d tried cutting back in the past, but it never lasted long. The only decision that made any sense was to quit. So I did. It helped that the local comics shop stopped holding titles for me after my box of stuff they were holding for me got out of control. Anyway, no more monthly titles for me. I buy the occasional graphic novel and manga, and now get the bulk of my comics reading through the local library. Anyway, point is: I haven't read Lucifer since around issue #25 or so. So, while I’m not up on the previous several volumes’ worth of material, I’m generally familiar with the characters and setting and so on. Mike Carey writes as well as ever. It's a tribute to his skills that he's been writing Lucifer almost as long as Neil Gaiman wrote Sandman. His Lucifer is subtly different from Gaiman’s--and both are very different from the FOX TV series. It's not completely fair to compare them. After all, it's not his fault he isn't Neil Gaiman (Fun Fact: an informal survey of my bookshelves reveals that 99.9999% of authors are not Neil Gaiman … probably.) This is good, solid fantasy writing with some rather clever ideas. I’m definitely keen to read the next book to see how things come out. Considering that the book is named for him and all, it's rather surprising how little Lucifer actually appears in it. This is a title worth reading. Recommended!

  2. 5 out of 5

    Štěpán

    holy hell, ba dum ts, this was amazing

  3. 5 out of 5

    Devann

    I absolutely love this volume! The Yahweh Dance is probably my favorite single issue of this entire series. I just love that at this point Yahweh, Lucifer, and now Elaine have all made a universe and it's very interesting to see how they purposely try to go about it in different ways but things always end up more of less the same anyway. I just love Elaine's entire character and story arch, but it's not quiiiite done yet so I'll leave what I really want to say until my next review. It's great to I absolutely love this volume! The Yahweh Dance is probably my favorite single issue of this entire series. I just love that at this point Yahweh, Lucifer, and now Elaine have all made a universe and it's very interesting to see how they purposely try to go about it in different ways but things always end up more of less the same anyway. I just love Elaine's entire character and story arch, but it's not quiiiite done yet so I'll leave what I really want to say until my next review. It's great to see more of Lilith too. I don't agree with most of her choices throughout this series but I think she's a very interesting and well-rounded character. Although honestly the whole thing with her and Sandalphon making an army of half angels has always seemed like a bit of a plot-hole to me. I mean okay we've already established that she can have children with angels, but I didn't think they had the angelic traits, or maybe it's different based on which angel is the father? But also why did Sandalphon later go to all that trouble to try to make a child from Michael if he already had a literal army of them? Maybe so that the child would have Michael's powers? It is funny in a way though because if he hadn't done that then Elaine wouldn't exist and Lucifer would have never gotten involved in all this and their plan might have actually worked out ... Anyway, some highlights: lmao I just love how petty Lucifer is. Like I get where you're coming from but also it's basically just a figure of speech at this point so for once in your life just chill. [throws hands up in the air] I GUESS Mentions of will:

  4. 5 out of 5

    Airiz

    The world is ending, and unlike the scenes you often see in doomsday flicks, there are no episodes of the earth cracking, fireballs raining down on cities, or skyscrapers collapsing on screaming humans. Not yet, at least. In the Lucifer series, it goes from the inside out: The hands of the artists lose their cunning, the minds of musicians their sweet calculus. And emotion dies toolover looks at lover, parent at child, feeling nothing save the dead grey void of anomie. The world loses its savor, The world is ending, and unlike the scenes you often see in doomsday flicks, there are no episodes of the earth cracking, fireballs raining down on cities, or skyscrapers collapsing on screaming humans. Not yet, at least. In the Lucifer series, it goes from the inside out: “The hands of the artists lose their cunning, the minds of musicians their sweet calculus. And emotion dies too—lover looks at lover, parent at child, feeling nothing save the dead grey void of anomie. The world loses its savor, the senses dull. Sweet, sour, bitter, salt, all bleed into one nothingness. In sheer despair of feeling anything at all, people begin to hurt themselves…” Beautifully tragic, indeed. The Divine Word glues every matter together, and its vanishing equates to the corroding of everything it once held… Crux, the ninth volume of the Morningstar’s history after he quits reigning in Hell, is not titled as such for nothing. The story is clearly at its peak. Christopher Rudd, once a damned human soul that rose as the Duke of Gly in Effrul, now emerges as the ruler of the infernal realm after preaching about salvation among the demons and the damned. Lilith betrays Mazikeen and collects all of the Lilim to launch a final assault on Heaven and the Garden that is denied of them; Elaine Belloc practices her demiurgic power by molding another Creation; and Jill Presto is finally giving birth to the Basanos’ child. I liked this volume a lot. It is action-packed, moving, and thought-provoking for the most part. What I’m enamored of the most is the underlying depth of the different philosophy and wisdom that every character gives off, closely seconded by the poetic quality of Carey’s writing. If I were to guess, I’ll say this is just the beginning of the climax, because by now I know how a habit of Carey it is to keep lots of exciting things up his sleeve. I’m expecting him to release these things nonchalantly one by one in every issue, and its effects would be bomb-like in comparison. :D The art is amazing as well, I’m loving how everything—every character— is given the ample amount of attention they deserve. All in all, this is on par with the previous volume The Wolf Beneath the Tree. Four stars for a great read!

  5. 5 out of 5

    Aaron

    As I mentioned in my review of the previous volume, it's incredible to watch Mike Carey grow as a writer throughout this series. What started as a solid fantasy spin-off of Sandman with a storytelling structure almost identical to that series has grown steadily into its own thing. All the characters we've seen throughout this story are finally getting what's coming to them, good or bad, and the numerous one-off stories are combining into a vast, universe spanning war. Carey manages to do this As I mentioned in my review of the previous volume, it's incredible to watch Mike Carey grow as a writer throughout this series. What started as a solid fantasy spin-off of Sandman with a storytelling structure almost identical to that series has grown steadily into its own thing. All the characters we've seen throughout this story are finally getting what's coming to them, good or bad, and the numerous one-off stories are combining into a vast, universe spanning war. Carey manages to do this while still exploring new areas of the world he's created and adding enough information to keep us apprised of everything coming to a head. Reading this actually gives me a lot of hope for another of Carey's series, "The Unwritten," which is currently being published by Vertigo. It has a similar style of semi-slow-but-interesting early stories that seem to be building to a huge climax, and if Lucifer is any indication, The Unwritten is going to go out with a flash.

  6. 4 out of 5

    SaraKat

    I admit to being a little less interested in this installment than previous ones since the main character was hardly in it, much like number 4. Also, so much is happening now that the climax of the end of the world is nigh that I am constantly trying to remember who is who and which threads of the story I've forgotten to account for. :) I think this is a series that can be read multiple times to catch all of the references. I did love the way the end of the world is described. It begins with more I admit to being a little less interested in this installment than previous ones since the main character was hardly in it, much like number 4. Also, so much is happening now that the climax of the end of the world is nigh that I am constantly trying to remember who is who and which threads of the story I've forgotten to account for. :) I think this is a series that can be read multiple times to catch all of the references. I did love the way the end of the world is described. It begins with more of whimper than a bang. ...the hands of the artists lose their cunning. The minds of musicians their sweet calculus. And emotion dies too. Lover looks at lover, parent at child. Feeling nothing save the dead grey void of anomie. The world loses its savor. The senses dull. Sweet, sour, bitter, salt, all bleed into one nothingness. In sheer despair of feeling anything at all, people begin to hurt themselves. I think that is definitely a more likely end of the world scenario. Apathy is a more dangerous thing than unrest.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Zec

    Story: The Eighth Sin, The Crux, The Yahweh Dance, The Breach. I wasnt a big fan of Lilith, but I really enjoyed her interactions with Mazikeen. I do wish that there was more inner conflict among the Lilim before they turned on Mazikeen and Briadach. This was an enjoyable set of arcs that impressed but didnt wow. The standout was Jill and her conversation with her not-yet-born-daughter. It was also cool to see Rachel from the Morningstar Option. The plot has been taking centre stage for a long Story: The Eighth Sin, The Crux, The Yahweh Dance, The Breach. I wasn’t a big fan of Lilith, but I really enjoyed her interactions with Mazikeen. I do wish that there was more inner conflict among the Lilim before they turned on Mazikeen and Briadach. This was an enjoyable set of arcs that impressed but didn’t wow. The standout was Jill and her conversation with her not-yet-born-daughter. It was also cool to see Rachel from the Morningstar Option. The plot has been taking centre stage for a long while, leaving less room for character moments. While not necessarily a bad thing does accentuate the uneven pacing of the series.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Miles McCoy

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Ready or not, the epic adventure of Creation's favorite bad boy is drawing to its inevitable conclusion - the board is set and the major players are preparing for their final play to claim the Primum Mobile - ruler of all God's Creation. Can't wait to see how Lucifer fares in the next book!!

  9. 4 out of 5

    Venus Maneater

    Yahweh Dance on it's own merits one star! The story doesn't surprise or astonish me, at this point. You can only be threatened with the end of all existence so many times until it becomes mundane. I'm becoming jaded, kinda like the new gods.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Kieran Delaney

    Issue 58 is the best so far and standalone too. Remarkable rumination on religion, creation, systems and dumb luck.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Brian

    Things are really ramping up in Heaven, not Heaven, and everywhere else. I can't wait to go back through this series afterwards and pick up all the pieces from the outset.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Steven Werber

    I love this series, as usual, but this particular volume was a bit grim for my taste. I'm also sick of cliffhangers!!

  13. 5 out of 5

    Amy

    The Yggdrasil storyline is still one of my favourites.

  14. 4 out of 5

    James

    War on all sides. Great changes are afoot.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Zachariah

    This is becoming one of my top ten favorites.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Keeloca

    I love the sudden return of Karl and Jayesh, and the Jahwe dance is spectacular, but the Lilith storyline leaves me cold. She's boring. Her main squeeze is boring. Maz, crush them!

  17. 4 out of 5

    Jordan

    as always, wonderful in this contemporary with no fantastic or elements but a surprise in the ending!

  18. 4 out of 5

    Chris Miller

    The first issue in this trade paperback deals with the politics of Effrul again, which is probably my least favorite story of the entire Lucifer series, BUT it was illustrated by Marc Hempel. I really love his style; it's highly stylized with a heavy use of outline. His style reminds me of Lynd Ward's woodcuts. Most of this trade deals with Lilith's revenge against God, in the form of her leading an army to destroy an already deteriorating Silver City. I wasn't that into it. I enjoyed watching The first issue in this trade paperback deals with the politics of Effrul again, which is probably my least favorite story of the entire Lucifer series, BUT it was illustrated by Marc Hempel. I really love his style; it's highly stylized with a heavy use of outline. His style reminds me of Lynd Ward's woodcuts. Most of this trade deals with Lilith's revenge against God, in the form of her leading an army to destroy an already deteriorating Silver City. I wasn't that into it. I enjoyed watching Lucifer teach Elaine how to do the "Yahweh dance," although it was a little bit confusing in parts.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Aldi

    It's weird to have an almost-lull so late in the game, when up until Lucifer, Vol. 7: Exodus, everything had been building so exquisitely. But then again, I know that Lucifer, Vol. 10: Morningstar will smash me into a thousand tiny sobbing pieces, so maybe I should just enjoy the calm(ish) before the storm. Thoughts: -Opening with Marc Hempel guest art. Noooooo! I'm sure his style has fans but I am not of them. At least it's short. (I am sad though, because this is a great side story (view It's weird to have an almost-lull so late in the game, when up until Lucifer, Vol. 7: Exodus, everything had been building so exquisitely. But then again, I know that Lucifer, Vol. 10: Morningstar will smash me into a thousand tiny sobbing pieces, so maybe I should just enjoy the calm(ish) before the storm. Thoughts: -Opening with Marc Hempel guest art. Noooooo! I'm sure his style has fans but I am not of them. At least it's short. (I am sad though, because this is a great side story (view spoiler)[Duma speaks!! Christopher gets to rule hell! Lys and Christopher still got their love-hate-betrayal thing going! (hide spoiler)] and the whacky art does nothing for it.) -Lilith is both irritating and highly amusing by turns in this one. She would be SUCH an annoying mum to argue with. "Look here, young lady, I brought you and your twenty-seven thousand demon siblings into this world and I can take you out of it again. Don't argue with me, I am your mother and I'm only torturing and killing you because I'm trying to teach you something. I'm not mad, darling, I'm DISAPPOINTED>" *stabbity kill dismember* -Speaking of annoying mothers, I'm glad to see Rachel again, but feel very lukewarm about Jill's murderous-Tarot-card-offspring-delivery-spirit-journey plot. I preferred the earlier solution to this dilemma. -I am enjoying the focus on Lilith but I have trouble buying that she, the character whose relentless pursuit of independence and self-determination predates - and in fact inspires - even Lucifer's, would base several thousand years' elaborate vengeance plotting on something a bunch of random dudes in a random floating time-travelling house told her. -The Yahwe Dance is awesome. I love how Lucifer just kinda hangs around and taunts a bit while Elaine tries to suss out the details of apotheosis. A+++ annoying uncle game. Also, the guest art was lovely in this story.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Angela

    Crux is another one the volumes that has always felt slightly disjointed. Where we have mostly been following a linear timeline until this point, Crux takes us into the Soft Places and, therefore, into a very malleable timeline. Told in flashback, but not really, the opening recounts a journey Lilith once took, and a meeting wherein the future was shown to her. The journey through that timeline is a bit of a roller coaster ride, ending with Mazikeen and her brother Briadach in a perilous Crux is another one the volumes that has always felt slightly disjointed. Where we have mostly been following a linear timeline until this point, Crux takes us into the Soft Places and, therefore, into a very malleable timeline. Told in flashback, but not really, the opening recounts a journey Lilith once took, and a meeting wherein the future was shown to her. The journey through that timeline is a bit of a roller coaster ride, ending with Mazikeen and her brother Briadach in a perilous position, once which is eclipsed by an even greater occurrence. The true gem of this volume is found in "The Yahweh Dance," wherein Elaine must come to grips with the power she has taken from her father, and the consequences that taking that power brought. It is both a wonderful commentary on the creation myth, religion as a whole, and some of Carey's best storytelling in the series. And as Elaine learns to manipulate her new power, and to make world conform to her will, a change of leadership in Hell and another among the Lilim threatens to accelerate the utter annihilation of our creation. Oh, and Jill Presto, who was pregnant, and the not pregnant and then pregnant again, all without every showing a baby bump, suddenly starts looking a little rounder and finally gives birth. Amid Carey's build-up to the final battle of the series, there are some moments that made me scratch my head a bit. The Basanos, dormant for so long and assumed to be a non-factor, rises Phoenix-life to be a thorn in Jill's side yet again. The addition of a second faction to the army of the Lilim--you know, Lilith's *other* children--seems a bit over-the-top, especially given how precarious the Silver City's position already is. And it seems odd that, while tying up loose ends to prepare for the big finale, that more loose ends would instead be created. And while the Basanos was always a fascinating idea for a foe, and executed well in the beginning of the series, I think things would have progressed fine if they had not been allowed to linger and keep attempting to reassert themselves. Onward to the final two volumes...

  21. 5 out of 5

    Tom

    Volume 9 of the Lucifer series begins with showing what happens when the I-am-so-sure-this-name-was-not-meant-to-be-at-all-symbolic Christopher Rudd has risen to the ranks of a Hell-lord. It seems someone has been teaching the damned and the demons how to be kind to each other and offering forgiveness for sins. While this doesn't sit well with the likes of Lady Lys and Remiel, it does allow for something so monumental that it allows the silent Duma to speak. Then it's back to Lilith. After Volume 9 of the Lucifer series begins with showing what happens when the I-am-so-sure-this-name-was-not-meant-to-be-at-all-symbolic Christopher Rudd has risen to the ranks of a Hell-lord. It seems someone has been teaching the damned and the demons how to be kind to each other and offering forgiveness for sins. While this doesn't sit well with the likes of Lady Lys and Remiel, it does allow for something so monumental that it allows the silent Duma to speak. Then it's back to Lilith. After largely sitting out the previous volume past her back story, Lilith's place in the plot against Yahweh and the Silver City are fleshed out. One of the shapeless Jin En Mok has convinced her to help, well, destroy creation. It's not certain if Lilith has really realized what all that actually means, but there it is. This means turning the Lilim to Lilith's side, even if it means torturing and attempting to kill the old leadership of Mazikeen and Briadach. She's only partially successful. This volume concludes with two moments of great importance for the rest of the series. First, Lucifer shows Elaine what happens when a creator intervenes with his or her creation in the rather memorable "Yahweh Dance" chapter. Then it comes time to Jill Presto to finally give birth to the Basanos baby that she has been really trying to get rid of for quite some time, ending up in a small hut, guided there by Coyote, and meeting up with Rachel Begai and her shaman grandfather, with Rachel returning to the series after her appearance in the original mini-series, something else I probably forgot when reading these books the first time through thanks to the long gap between publications.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Paul

    Lucifer Vol. 9 - Crux Forces in Hell and on Earth prepare for a final struggle for supremacy in CRUX. Reprinting stories from issues #55-61, this volume ventures through space and time and the places outside both, weaving a sweeping saga out of multiple character threads mortal and immortal alike. & Lucifer Vol. 10 - Morningstar The war in Heaven reaches its universe-shaking conclusion in MORNINGSTAR, the tenth volume of writer Mike Carey's celebrated series. Collecting issues #62-69, Lucifer Vol. 9 - Crux Forces in Hell and on Earth prepare for a final struggle for supremacy in CRUX. Reprinting stories from issues #55-61, this volume ventures through space and time and the places outside both, weaving a sweeping saga out of multiple character threads mortal and immortal alike. & Lucifer Vol. 10 - Morningstar The war in Heaven reaches its universe-shaking conclusion in MORNINGSTAR, the tenth volume of writer Mike Carey's celebrated series. Collecting issues #62-69, MORNINGSTAR gathers together the forces of Heaven, Hell, and everyone in between for a final battle to determine the fate of both Yahweh and Lucifer's Creations — a fate no one, not even the Lightbringer, could foresee. Reviewed together as they were read back-to-back Things have gotten interesting. Interesting is that the story has little to do with its tittle character and more to do with the backup cast. Not that that's a bad thing, Carey does weave an interesting tale. But one does get the felling of "so what"... so what if the entirity of existence is on the verge of collapse, right? Although the story in these books might be a game changer for the book's cast, nothing that is actually potrayed has or will have an effect on the rest of the DC/Vertigo Universe, right? When everything is said and done... the entire story will have been about "nothing"... this graphic novel is the equivalent of a Seinfeld season. Sure it's entertaining as hell (heh, see what I did there?), but when everything is said and done... it'll have been a fun ride, but the destination 's pretty m'eh. Still, it does merit its 4-star if only for the entertainment factor.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Raj

    This book starts with the unexpected sight of a demon offering a drink of water to one of the damned, much to the horror of its peers. Hauled up before Remiel, ruler of Hell, it seems that there is a new creed being preached and Christopher Rudd, once one of the damned liberated to be the plaything for a Lady is the preacher. This story is short (if ending on one heck of a punchline), and I liked the story a lot, but I really didn't like the art. It felt far too cartoony and didn't seem to suit This book starts with the unexpected sight of a demon offering a drink of water to one of the damned, much to the horror of its peers. Hauled up before Remiel, ruler of Hell, it seems that there is a new creed being preached and Christopher Rudd, once one of the damned liberated to be the plaything for a Lady is the preacher. This story is short (if ending on one heck of a punchline), and I liked the story a lot, but I really didn't like the art. It felt far too cartoony and didn't seem to suit the tale at all. The core of the book, though, is taken up with Lilith and her preparations for war against Heaven, taking the head of her army of children, the Lilim, they prepare to assault the Silver City. This story also shows how Elaine gets on having being given the creative power by her dying father, Michael and I enjoyed her attempts to get to grips with this power by creating her own Creation. We end the volume returning to Jill Presto and her trying to come to terms with the fact that she still caries a child of the Basanos. This is a very interesting story, as it's about a woman who has no desire to be a mother, especially not to this sort of child. Lilith's conversations with Mazikeen and Mazikeen's actions are one of the highlights of this book, showing just how far that Mazikeen has come from the start. From simply being Lucifer's consort she is now a keen warrior and major player in her own right.

  24. 5 out of 5

    PurplyCookie

    The archangel Michael lies dead at the base of the World Tree, and his power, let loose, burns his daughter Elaine and his brother Lucifer out of this universe and into a newborn one. Their absence allows the first woman, Lilith, and a handful of others to plot grabbing power from Heaven while the Powers in the Silver City remain disoriented. Christopher Rudd as the new ruler of Hell wants to make up for the sin of Hell itself. Lilith and her offspring want to gain a final revenge for being The archangel Michael lies dead at the base of the World Tree, and his power, let loose, burns his daughter Elaine and his brother Lucifer out of this universe and into a newborn one. Their absence allows the first woman, Lilith, and a handful of others to plot grabbing power from Heaven while the Powers in the Silver City remain disoriented. Christopher Rudd as the new ruler of Hell wants to make up for the sin of Hell itself. Lilith and her offspring want to gain a final revenge for being denied paradise although they built the Silver City. The Jin en Mok want to break free from their constricted existence in this creation. Fenris the wolf is destruction incarnate and just wants to finish what he started. In "The Yahweh Dance," we find Elaine Belloc learning to harness her newly acquired demiurgic power under Lucifer's tutelage. In addition to being written as a smart and sassy teenager coming to terms with her semi-divinity, Elaine's appeal, to me, is that she provides a humanizing, compassionate foil to Lucifer's single minded pursuits. Finally, the pregnancy of Jill comes to term. A good story in itself, but also a nice cliffhanger to see what fate incarnate (the offspring of the Basanos) will do in the next volume. Book Details: Title Lucifer Vol. 9: Crux Author Mike Carey Reviewed By Purplycookie

  25. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer

    The title of Carey's ninth installment of Lucifer is perhaps the epitome of truth in advertising. Here, finally, we get to the crux of the stories told thus far: Lilith's plan for revenge, Jill Presto's desperate struggle to end her pregnancy, Elaine Belloc's rise to godhead, and the little matter of just who precisely shall reign in Hell now that Lucifer's outgrown that throne. Carey's closing in on the final volume of his series and so the pace here naturally escalates, but there's still time The title of Carey's ninth installment of Lucifer is perhaps the epitome of truth in advertising. Here, finally, we get to the crux of the stories told thus far: Lilith's plan for revenge, Jill Presto's desperate struggle to end her pregnancy, Elaine Belloc's rise to godhead, and the little matter of just who precisely shall reign in Hell now that Lucifer's outgrown that throne. Carey's closing in on the final volume of his series and so the pace here naturally escalates, but there's still time for the little touches that have always made Lucifer so much fun, like Gaudium's snarky asides or the fantastic set-piece wherein Jill Presto summons the god of Las Vegas by letting it all ride on red. Or the lessons Lucifer teaches Elaine about good intentions while world-building. The final panel is perhaps one of the best in the series, and a perfect close for the penultimate volume. All things come together. All things are poised, as was intended. And now, Carey will push.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Darrell

    Suicide, apathy, and chaos rule as all of creation slowly disintegrates, including human souls. The demons of Hell and the damned souls theyve been assigned to torture for eternity decide to team up and storm the gates of heaven while the Lilim join forces with other children of Lilith to do the same. We also finally see the end of Jills supernatural pregnancy. In Jewish mythology, Lilith was the first wife of Adam before there was an Eve. Lilith can see the future (as if we didnt have enough Suicide, apathy, and chaos rule as all of creation slowly disintegrates, including human souls. The demons of Hell and the damned souls they’ve been assigned to torture for eternity decide to team up and storm the gates of heaven while the Lilim join forces with other children of Lilith to do the same. We also finally see the end of Jill’s supernatural pregnancy. In Jewish mythology, Lilith was the first wife of Adam before there was an Eve. Lilith can see the future (as if we didn’t have enough characters who could do that) and like Lucifer, she wants to escape from predestination by placing her hope in a different creation. In a comic interlude, Elaine learns how to be a god through trial and error after creating her own universe. We meet one of the gods of Las Vegas in the form of a dead gangster. We also return to Native American mythology a bit with the appearance of Coyote and the reappearance of Rachel who we haven’t seen since the first story arc.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Christopher Reynolds

    This volume of Lucifer is the probably the most difficult for a new reader to drop into, as it mainly concentrates on setting up the final battle in the subsequent volume. Unfortunately, Lucifer himself figures very little in all this, and the story is mainly a prelude with all the exciting stuff held off. The initial story "Eighth Sin" sets up the army of hell and is let down by some art that doesn't really seem appropriate. Christopher Rudd and his surroundings were never much good after their This volume of Lucifer is the probably the most difficult for a new reader to drop into, as it mainly concentrates on setting up the final battle in the subsequent volume. Unfortunately, Lucifer himself figures very little in all this, and the story is mainly a prelude with all the exciting stuff held off. The initial story "Eighth Sin" sets up the army of hell and is let down by some art that doesn't really seem appropriate. Christopher Rudd and his surroundings were never much good after their initial storyline back in Dalliance of the Damned. The two Crux issues also do narrative legwork setting up the threats of Lilith and Berim (Berim can turn into a white tiger but is otherwise bland). Yahweh Dance is good and actually has a decent bit of Lucifer, but #59-61 are all about bringing back a bunch of characters and putting them into the right places for the final conflict. My rankings of the Lucifer volumes: 3 (best), 6, 8, 4, 11, 2, 10, 1, 7, 9, 5 (worst)

  28. 5 out of 5

    Rebecca

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. So far, the best book of the series. It very effectively weaved together three different plots very naturally. I absolutely loved the varying art and interchange between Lucifer and Elaine in "The Yahweh Dance", and the relationship between Elaine and the third Earth was deeply insightful about our own history of our relationships with divinity. (If you're into the flawed theoretical God as a concept.) I could and have reread that section just to appreciate how well it was done. Although the So far, the best book of the series. It very effectively weaved together three different plots very naturally. I absolutely loved the varying art and interchange between Lucifer and Elaine in "The Yahweh Dance", and the relationship between Elaine and the third Earth was deeply insightful about our own history of our relationships with divinity. (If you're into the flawed theoretical God as a concept.) I could and have reread that section just to appreciate how well it was done. Although the rest was really good, this part bumped my rating up to 5 stars over 4. A little detached from the other three plots, the introductory story about Christopher Rudd in Hell was pretty good. I enjoyed the more abstract, cartoony style it was drawn in, but was a little disappointed by the behavior of Remiel. It seemed inconsistent with his previous personality. Though the current state with God kind of explained it, I felt it was a stretch. Just overall, an excellent read.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Robert Beveridge

    Mike Carey, Lucifer: Crux (Vertigo, 2006) God abdicated his throne a couple of volumes back, leading directly to the re-emergence of Fenris and the beginning of the end of both our universe and Lucifer's own creation. There were other repercussions, too, and as Crux opens, we see the first of them; a dying Michael tries to pass his power into Elaine, but the resultant explosion sends both Elaine and Lucifer into another realm entirely, leaving the way clear for the Lilim to attempt to size Mike Carey, Lucifer: Crux (Vertigo, 2006) God abdicated his throne a couple of volumes back, leading directly to the re-emergence of Fenris and the beginning of the end of both our universe and Lucifer's own creation. There were other repercussions, too, and as Crux opens, we see the first of them; a dying Michael tries to pass his power into Elaine, but the resultant explosion sends both Elaine and Lucifer into another realm entirely, leaving the way clear for the Lilim to attempt to size control of heaven. As if Fenris weren't enough of a problem. While all that's going on, Lucifer's giving Elaine a crash course in how to use her newfound power; she'll need all of it if she's going to hold worlds together in the face of such an assault. Very, very good stuff, this, and well worth your time if you're a Sandman fan (and aren't we all?). ****

  30. 5 out of 5

    Annette Jordan

    Heaven and Hell are forced to unite to prevent the destruction of the world, we meet some old friends again, and learn the fate of Elaine Belloc. Lilith decides to enlist her children the Lilim in a plot to destroy Heaven, even if Nazikeen and her brother are casualties of her ambition. Jill Presto has a surprise and goes on a quest of her own. The various mythologies and story threads are weaving together in this volume, aptly titled Crux since the story is clearly reaching a critical point. Heaven and Hell are forced to unite to prevent the destruction of the world, we meet some old friends again, and learn the fate of Elaine Belloc. Lilith decides to enlist her children the Lilim in a plot to destroy Heaven, even if Nazikeen and her brother are casualties of her ambition. Jill Presto has a surprise and goes on a quest of her own. The various mythologies and story threads are weaving together in this volume, aptly titled Crux since the story is clearly reaching a critical point. “The hands of the artists lose their cunning, the minds of musicians their sweet calculus. And emotion dies too—lover looks at lover, parent at child, feeling nothing save the dead grey void of anomie. The world loses its savor, the senses dull. Sweet, sour, bitter, salt, all bleed into one nothingness. In sheer despair of feeling anything at all, people begin to hurt themselves…”

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