web site hit counter Superman: True Brit - Ebooks PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

Superman: True Brit

Availability: Ready to download

Get ready for SUPERMAN: TRUE BRIT, an original hardcover graphic novel with a humorous new take on the Superman legend, courtesy of writer Kim "Howard" Johnson (Monty Python: The First 280 Years) with some help in his comics debut from Monty Python's John Cleese (Fawlty Towers, A Fish Called Wanda)! And with art by fan-favorites John Byrne (JLA, DOOM PATROL) and Mark Farme Get ready for SUPERMAN: TRUE BRIT, an original hardcover graphic novel with a humorous new take on the Superman legend, courtesy of writer Kim "Howard" Johnson (Monty Python: The First 280 Years) with some help in his comics debut from Monty Python's John Cleese (Fawlty Towers, A Fish Called Wanda)! And with art by fan-favorites John Byrne (JLA, DOOM PATROL) and Mark Farmer (JLA: ANOTHER NAIL), this book is sure to be Super! In this veddy British tale, the Last Son of Krypton's rocket ship crash-lands in an English town even smaller than Smallville, where the infant Kal-El is taken in by adoptive parents - the Clarks - who raise their son Colin to hide his powers, because the worst thing anyone can do is stand out in the crowd. But when Colin grows up to become a mild-mannered reporter working for the Daily Smear, a powerful tabloid newspaper dedicated to uncovering the biggest story of the century, he finds that the key to his success may be in going public. What will the neighbors think?


Compare

Get ready for SUPERMAN: TRUE BRIT, an original hardcover graphic novel with a humorous new take on the Superman legend, courtesy of writer Kim "Howard" Johnson (Monty Python: The First 280 Years) with some help in his comics debut from Monty Python's John Cleese (Fawlty Towers, A Fish Called Wanda)! And with art by fan-favorites John Byrne (JLA, DOOM PATROL) and Mark Farme Get ready for SUPERMAN: TRUE BRIT, an original hardcover graphic novel with a humorous new take on the Superman legend, courtesy of writer Kim "Howard" Johnson (Monty Python: The First 280 Years) with some help in his comics debut from Monty Python's John Cleese (Fawlty Towers, A Fish Called Wanda)! And with art by fan-favorites John Byrne (JLA, DOOM PATROL) and Mark Farmer (JLA: ANOTHER NAIL), this book is sure to be Super! In this veddy British tale, the Last Son of Krypton's rocket ship crash-lands in an English town even smaller than Smallville, where the infant Kal-El is taken in by adoptive parents - the Clarks - who raise their son Colin to hide his powers, because the worst thing anyone can do is stand out in the crowd. But when Colin grows up to become a mild-mannered reporter working for the Daily Smear, a powerful tabloid newspaper dedicated to uncovering the biggest story of the century, he finds that the key to his success may be in going public. What will the neighbors think?

30 review for Superman: True Brit

  1. 5 out of 5

    Scott

    "What an absolutely super man! Well done, Superman! Jolly good!" -- TV newsman Blimey! I wish I could say something similarly positive about this disaster of a book. Superman: True Brit was a horribly unfunny - even with Monty Python's very own John Cleese as a credited writer! - Elseworlds-type or 'what if . . .?' tale in which Krypton's baby Kal-El is rocketed to Earth but lands in a British farming community instead of the midwestern U.S. Not even a pleasant cameo appearance by intrepid report "What an absolutely super man! Well done, Superman! Jolly good!" -- TV newsman Blimey! I wish I could say something similarly positive about this disaster of a book. Superman: True Brit was a horribly unfunny - even with Monty Python's very own John Cleese as a credited writer! - Elseworlds-type or 'what if . . .?' tale in which Krypton's baby Kal-El is rocketed to Earth but lands in a British farming community instead of the midwestern U.S. Not even a pleasant cameo appearance by intrepid reporter Lois Lane, or the stylish illustrations of John Byrne can save this thudding mess of a relatively thin story. (Thank goodness it clocks in at just under 100 pages, but it was still often excruciating to read.) It's been awhile since I disliked a graphic novel as much as this one, as the humor misses the mark and the beloved Superman mythos takes a good thrashing. For a better and thought-provoking volume of a comparable nature there is always Mark Millar's superior Red Son.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Anne

    Awwwww. I was looking forward to this one. Too bad it sucked. Where was the Funny that I was promised? It wasn't between the pages of True Brit, that's for sure. This thing was just stoopid. Unless you like getting whacked upside the head with subtle satire, then skip this. See?! See?! The English are reserved! They don't like drawing attention to themselves! Oh! And Brittish tabloids are smarmey! *chortle, chortle* And that was the entire story. Yeah, I'm not kidding. Go find something else to read. Awwwww. I was looking forward to this one. Too bad it sucked. Where was the Funny that I was promised? It wasn't between the pages of True Brit, that's for sure. This thing was just stoopid. Unless you like getting whacked upside the head with subtle satire, then skip this. See?! See?! The English are reserved! They don't like drawing attention to themselves! Oh! And Brittish tabloids are smarmey! *chortle, chortle* And that was the entire story. Yeah, I'm not kidding. Go find something else to read.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Sam Quixote

    John Cleese has a long line of credit with me for creating Fawlty Towers alone - that sitcom is perfection! I watched it when I was a kid and an adult and loved it both times, it’s a comedy masterpiece. Then there’s Monty Python which I came to later but still loved and the Holy Grail is one of my favourite movies. Even his lesser-known work like A Fish Called Wanda was superbly written by him (and Kevin Kline steals the show with his insane performance!). So I have a lot of love for Cleese even John Cleese has a long line of credit with me for creating Fawlty Towers alone - that sitcom is perfection! I watched it when I was a kid and an adult and loved it both times, it’s a comedy masterpiece. Then there’s Monty Python which I came to later but still loved and the Holy Grail is one of my favourite movies. Even his lesser-known work like A Fish Called Wanda was superbly written by him (and Kevin Kline steals the show with his insane performance!). So I have a lot of love for Cleese even though Wanda may have been the last great thing he did and that was some 25 years ago! That said, it’s really, really hard to reconcile that brilliance with this comic - Superman: True Brit - which might be the worst Superman comic ever created. It’s certainly the worst I’ve read! Like Mark Millar’s Red Son, which wonders what would have happened if Superman’s Kryptonian vessel had landed in Soviet Russia than American Kansas, True Brit wonders what would have happened if Superman had been raised in England. The difference is that Millar’s story was told totally straight, and superbly, while Cleese and co-writer Howard Johnson’s is told comedically. The only reason I can fathom that it’s meant to be comedy is the inclusion of Cleese because there is no humour in this book. Where do I even begin with this tripe? Let’s start with Superman’s appearance which should be fairly easy to establish but Cleese and co. totally botch. Apparently Cleese thinks Superman is Cyclops because his heat vision is only contained when he wears specially designed glasses - and that’s why he wears glasses! Oh and his farmer dad is also a whiz at creating heat-resistant lenses in his shed, apparently! Then there are the other aspects of his uniform - the S on his chest is the family’s coat of arms, because everyone in Britain has a bloody coat of arms! That’s the only bit of origin that Cleese bothers with because the rest of his outfit materialises out of nowhere. After being told by his parents repeatedly not to use his powers (because what would the neighbours think? AHAHAHA THAT’S SO BRITISH ISN’T IT!!) he suddenly decides to help some Beatles-lookalike musicians (even though this is the ‘00s!) and voila! he appears fully costumed. Cleese also writes Superman as both retarded and without values. When he’s not smashing his head around indoors because he doesn’t know how to control his flying, he’s lobbing tree stumps through houses (duh, how do I use my super-strength again?), or killing cattle accidentally. But that’s probably the comedy right? Look, Superman destroyed some property AND he’s got a dumbass grin on his face - FUNNY. He kowtows to his Rupert Murdoch/J Jonah Jameson-type newspaper boss and comes up with trashy stuff for his tabloid newspaper, because he’s a total buffoon who can’t think for himself. Duh, should I become an investigative reporter or should I just take nudie shots of celebs? Well, of course the latter because my boss told me to and I’m a tool! He also doesn’t understand basic economics because he’s a clod through and through, for no reason besides, I guess, Cleese thought it would be a riot to write him that way. His parents seem to hate him - they’re constantly moving without telling him, trying to escape this powerful alien who’s embarrassing them by doing good - and are always, always telling him to fit in and not stand out. Along with Kevin Costner’s Jonathan Kent in Man of Steel, these were the worst versions of Superman’s parents ever. Oh and then there’s the guy he manages to impale with a cricket bat because isn’t that hysterical? The guy doesn’t die (because Cleese needs this pun so badly) but grows up to be his enemy - Bat-Man. Oh, my fucking sides! They’ve fucking split from laughing so much - Bat-Man, and he’s a man got a cricket bat sticking out of his chest! AHAH… I’ve gotta stop there because the litany of crap that makes up this book could fill a book of the same length. Every page is a disaster. I kept reading because I couldn’t believe how every single page got worse and worse. I wondered how this got published, then realised it was DC, but still couldn’t believe a comedy legend like John Cleese could produce something so unfunny. Moreover, as a Brit, like Cleese, I’m stunned he could write something so full of bad stereotypes and clownish pandering to foreigners’ views of British culture - is he honestly this out of touch or does he just hate Britain now? This book is bad on every level. I hated it so much. It’s such a shocking mess it makes me wonder if Cleese really was as funny as I thought or whether it was his co-writers - like Connie Booth on Fawlty Towers, or Graham Chapman in Monty Python - who propped up his writing, and he’s just a great comedic actor. Either way, avoid, avoid, AVOID, Superman: True Brit. Superman fans will hate it for mangling Superman, British readers will hate it for how the British are portrayed, and comics readers will hate it because it’s so dumb. If you see a copy on the shelf, punch it in the cover for me.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Chad

    Oof, this was a disappointment. I expected a lot better from John Cleese and John Byrne. Maybe if I grew up in England it would be funnier. The whole thing is written as a satire about British tabloids. It's awful. It's such an easy premise to get right. An Elseworlds where Superman's spaceship crashes in England instead of Kansas. Oof, this was a disappointment. I expected a lot better from John Cleese and John Byrne. Maybe if I grew up in England it would be funnier. The whole thing is written as a satire about British tabloids. It's awful. It's such an easy premise to get right. An Elseworlds where Superman's spaceship crashes in England instead of Kansas.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Amber Ditullio

    What if Kal-el had landed in Britain instead of the USA? This book is a hilarious look at that What-if, showing what Superman would have been like if it's followed his parents' motto: WWTNT (What would the neighbors think?) I'd seen this graphic on the shelves at the library for awhile, but hadn't picked it up. Then today, on a whim, I decided "Why not?" And I'm so glad that I did. The writing is witty (but what would you expect from something co-authored by John Cleese) and there were far too ma What if Kal-el had landed in Britain instead of the USA? This book is a hilarious look at that What-if, showing what Superman would have been like if it's followed his parents' motto: WWTNT (What would the neighbors think?) I'd seen this graphic on the shelves at the library for awhile, but hadn't picked it up. Then today, on a whim, I decided "Why not?" And I'm so glad that I did. The writing is witty (but what would you expect from something co-authored by John Cleese) and there were far too many parts where I needed to stop and explain my laughter to Rich. Seeing the British versions of some of the iconic characters of Superman had me rolling with laughter - Perry White, respected editor, has turned into Peregrine Whyte-Badger, the owner of most of the tabloids in Britain and the King of Sleeze. Lois Lane's counterpart is Louisa Layne-Ferret and rather than the hard-nosed reporter, she is a Page 3 girl and Whyte-Badger's secret agent trying to ferret out information from Colin Clark (aka Superman). I do like the fact that they didn't completely ignore those icons, though. Louisa's cousin, Lois, is a newspaper reporter in Metropolis and comes over to do a story on Superman. When things start to fall apart for Supes at the end of the book, I think she's a large part of the reason why he decides to relocate to America. The book has a perfect set-up for more comics in this alternate world, seeing several of the British Characters coming to America, all unaware of the others' arrivals. I could imagine a lot of fun with it, honestly. I'd definitely recommend this to anyone who likes comics and has a sense of humor. Because it will tickle both of those quite nicely (especially when you meet the Bat-Man. ;))

  6. 4 out of 5

    Greg

    An overlong, second-tier Monty Python skit -- starring Superman.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Michael Mills

    I enjoyed this reimagining of Superman in the style of British kids comics... for a bit. It's over-extended and the moralising a bit obvious (John Cleese has an axe to grind against the British press and boy does he grind it). The comics the book is apeing would have done it all a lot quicker and (not coincidentally) better. Hell, they already have and I'd've been much better rewarded if I'd gone up to my parents' attic and dug through a few boxes. I can only imagine how bizarre the whole thing i I enjoyed this reimagining of Superman in the style of British kids comics... for a bit. It's over-extended and the moralising a bit obvious (John Cleese has an axe to grind against the British press and boy does he grind it). The comics the book is apeing would have done it all a lot quicker and (not coincidentally) better. Hell, they already have and I'd've been much better rewarded if I'd gone up to my parents' attic and dug through a few boxes. I can only imagine how bizarre the whole thing is for American readers who didn't grow up on The Beano, The Dandy or Buster. Dear cousins, if you're reading, forgive us this - go and try some Bananaman instead.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Juho Pohjalainen

    I like the art, but story-wise this was quite lacking.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Tvrtko Balić

    Most people obviously don't like this book and that had me a bit worried. But I also like alternative versions of different characters and a humorous comic about a British Superman had me interested since the first time I heard of it, so I finally decided to read it. And I actually liked it. What you'll find here is a funny little satirical comic about Superman and about Britain. I enjoyed it, I thought it was funny. I guess the jokes just don't land for everyone, so you will either like it or i Most people obviously don't like this book and that had me a bit worried. But I also like alternative versions of different characters and a humorous comic about a British Superman had me interested since the first time I heard of it, so I finally decided to read it. And I actually liked it. What you'll find here is a funny little satirical comic about Superman and about Britain. I enjoyed it, I thought it was funny. I guess the jokes just don't land for everyone, so you will either like it or it just won't be your cup of tea. Is there anything more meaningful in the story? Not really, which is why I only gave it 3 stars. Of course, any satirical depiction of a character or a society is also commenting on the same, but the comments don't go to God knows what kind of depths and when they try they just get drowned in more silly jokes which stop you from taking anything in it seriously. That's not necessarily a bad thing, it at least means that the enjoyable tone of the book stays throughout, but it does mean that the book was possibly aimed at more and ends up as nothing more than a comedy sketch. A common criticism is that it is too long, but that is only a criticism if you don't enjoy it and are dragging along through it, if you do enjoy it you will be delighted to constantly find elements of Superman's life taken to new absurd interpretations where your expectations are subverted and Superman constantly screws up. In conclusion, this book will make you say "What a joke!" for sure, but what that will mean depends on the individual reader.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Jake

    This book was meh, for sure, but it was earnest. It wanted to be exactly what it was: a quick, goofy read with light-hearted jabs at life in Britain. Superman is Colin Clark, a dopey, lovable guy in love with everything. He's just stoked on things and he gets down a lot because of it. He's Superman as well as a journalist for The Daily Smear. There's inside jokes about Superman and Britain, but what really turns out to be a main theme is how dreadful tabloid magazines are and how unabashedly hor This book was meh, for sure, but it was earnest. It wanted to be exactly what it was: a quick, goofy read with light-hearted jabs at life in Britain. Superman is Colin Clark, a dopey, lovable guy in love with everything. He's just stoked on things and he gets down a lot because of it. He's Superman as well as a journalist for The Daily Smear. There's inside jokes about Superman and Britain, but what really turns out to be a main theme is how dreadful tabloid magazines are and how unabashedly horrendous British newspapers have gotten. Shrug. This book was goofy and fun, even when it wasn't very good. Also, John Cleese was a writer for it? Whaaaaaaaaat?

  11. 4 out of 5

    Meghan

    A lot of Cleese's humor is enhanced by/dependent upon the nuance of the performance. Unfortunately, with comic books you don't get a nuanced performance, you get a motionless panel. Cleese is also very gifted with pseudo-intellectual babble, also not a comic book attribute. I'm sure that the same or similar jokes about British culture would have worked much better in a live performance, but this medium doesn't play to Cleese's strengths at all! A lot of Cleese's humor is enhanced by/dependent upon the nuance of the performance. Unfortunately, with comic books you don't get a nuanced performance, you get a motionless panel. Cleese is also very gifted with pseudo-intellectual babble, also not a comic book attribute. I'm sure that the same or similar jokes about British culture would have worked much better in a live performance, but this medium doesn't play to Cleese's strengths at all!

  12. 5 out of 5

    Ross Vincent

    What if Kal-El hadnt landed in Kansas. But in the farmlands of merry o England. And been raised not to fight for Truth, Justice & the American way, but with the mores of WWTNT. (What Would The Neighbors Think). Push, throw in the unique humor of John Cleese... Well, you have one hell of an Elsewheres story.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Sam

    Great reimagining of the Superman myth with a good dose of humour and comedy that I did not see coming. It would have been better if the title did not paint the British in such a caricatured light that seemed stereotypical and mean of the writer at times. Otherwise, I enjoyed reading it and simply could not put it down once I started it!

  14. 5 out of 5

    Mo

    I had high hopes for this book after seeing John Cleese's name on the cover. I was severely disappointed. May be because I'm not British and didn't pick up on a lot of jokes -- regardless, the book sucked. I had high hopes for this book after seeing John Cleese's name on the cover. I was severely disappointed. May be because I'm not British and didn't pick up on a lot of jokes -- regardless, the book sucked.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Bryan

    A waste of paper. Not sure why John Cleese let his name be attached to this painfully unfunny, awkwardly paced, and ultimately pointless tripe.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Nocheevo

    A fairly weak satire with Superman arriving in the UK rather than the US. Cleese's send up of the British way lacks the subtle touch. A fairly weak satire with Superman arriving in the UK rather than the US. Cleese's send up of the British way lacks the subtle touch.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Chuppachup

    Didn't enjoy it. It's far too goofy. I know that's the point but it's almost to the point of overkill. Didn't enjoy it. It's far too goofy. I know that's the point but it's almost to the point of overkill.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Dan

    Like the concept,but horrible story. The art was goofy making it look like an Archie book.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Michael

    Eh, this was alright. After the complex and deep interpretation of 'Red Son', I thought 'True Brit' would hold a similarly exciting mind experiment. Sadly, I feel as though their main objective here was to crack jokes (which I'm not surprised at seeing as two of the credited authors are members of Monty Python). And not all jokes were terrible, I did enjoy how Clark's parents kept moving and forgetting to tell him, and I loved the nod towards the MP's skit of 'Bicycle Repairman'. In the end, the Eh, this was alright. After the complex and deep interpretation of 'Red Son', I thought 'True Brit' would hold a similarly exciting mind experiment. Sadly, I feel as though their main objective here was to crack jokes (which I'm not surprised at seeing as two of the credited authors are members of Monty Python). And not all jokes were terrible, I did enjoy how Clark's parents kept moving and forgetting to tell him, and I loved the nod towards the MP's skit of 'Bicycle Repairman'. In the end, the best I can call this book was lame but enjoyable. (Bat-Man??? REALLY???)

  20. 5 out of 5

    Reverenddave

    Very English

  21. 4 out of 5

    Jorge Lopez

    This is a 95 pages book that was really hard to finish. Very disappointing except for Byrne's art, even though he seems to be in autopilot here. This is a 95 pages book that was really hard to finish. Very disappointing except for Byrne's art, even though he seems to be in autopilot here.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Tim Gray

    It is fun, but it's not great. It is fun, but it's not great.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Ming

    Fitfully amusing. Does an okay job of killing time, I suppose?

  24. 5 out of 5

    Meena Sharma

    Strong start (a little tongue and cheek); mediocre finish. If I could give a 3.5 I would.

  25. 4 out of 5

    M

    Superman: True Brit is exactly what you get when you blend Monty Python with DC superheroes. Penned by Kim Howard Johnson and John Cleese - both no stranger to the Python antics - the Elseworlds tale plants the British flag firmly in the American hero's arse. With the young Kryptonian found in a hamlet of England, young Colin Clark is raised by neighbor-fearing parents with no clue how to temper a super-powered child. As Colin is sent off to college, he attempts to suppress his abilities and fit Superman: True Brit is exactly what you get when you blend Monty Python with DC superheroes. Penned by Kim Howard Johnson and John Cleese - both no stranger to the Python antics - the Elseworlds tale plants the British flag firmly in the American hero's arse. With the young Kryptonian found in a hamlet of England, young Colin Clark is raised by neighbor-fearing parents with no clue how to temper a super-powered child. As Colin is sent off to college, he attempts to suppress his abilities and fit in with the general English populace. Despite gaining a job working for a tabloid, Colin continues to see his powers as dangerous mishaps and shameful events until opting to rescue a pair of celebrities from a car accident. Clad in a mixture of the classic Superman costume and the Union Jack, the new hero is initially well-received. Yet trials from the monarchy, lawsuits from the government, and the machinations of his own publisher, force the young Superman to retain a stiff upper lip in the face of the farce his life has become. Though I understand the goal behind the book was to have a laugh or two at the expense of the cross-culture effort, the tome falls flat on that account. The result is a childish running gag that does not move beyond its own infantile humor. I will stick with Red Son as a fine example of how Superman's birthplace can affect the Man of Steel. True Brit will get relegated to the rubbish bin for its bollocks.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Tina

    This farcical version of Superman has him landing in England and growing up as Colin Kent. Superman: True Brit It’s quite tongue in cheek with the writing influences of John Cleese, Kim Johnson and John Byrne. This is the British tale of Superman reared by his adoptive English parents. The drawings depict the caricatures people think of about England, the fodder jokes and stereo types such as the men with pitch helmets, bad dentistry, continual rain and fish mongers having a go at one another. Here’ This farcical version of Superman has him landing in England and growing up as Colin Kent. Superman: True Brit It’s quite tongue in cheek with the writing influences of John Cleese, Kim Johnson and John Byrne. This is the British tale of Superman reared by his adoptive English parents. The drawings depict the caricatures people think of about England, the fodder jokes and stereo types such as the men with pitch helmets, bad dentistry, continual rain and fish mongers having a go at one another. Here’s another stereotype … Further on in the book you see Colin trying to blend in. “And so, Colin Clark grows up British. Quietly. Respectably, and without causing embarrassment. NO super flying. No super speed. No X-Ray vision, no super dancing (he’s stepping on a girls foot whilst tying to dance at school). The Monty Python humor shines through when poor Colin uses a bit too much enthusiasm at a cricket match and impales a schoolmate with a cricket bat. You have names like Mr. Whyte-Badger and places such as Weston Super-Mare featured in this book. It’s funny, it’s irreverent and a great sampling of British humor.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Raj

    This graphic novel tries to answer the question of what would happen if the infant Kal-El landed in Somerset rather than Kansas and grew up to be a true Brit. Well the first thing you've got to answer is what a true Brit is. The answer that Howard and Cleese have come up with is someone who mustn't grumble, never stand out and always ask WWTNT (What Would The Neighbours Think), and who ends up working for a sleezy tabloid rather than an upstanding beacon of virtue. A lot of that rings sort of tru This graphic novel tries to answer the question of what would happen if the infant Kal-El landed in Somerset rather than Kansas and grew up to be a true Brit. Well the first thing you've got to answer is what a true Brit is. The answer that Howard and Cleese have come up with is someone who mustn't grumble, never stand out and always ask WWTNT (What Would The Neighbours Think), and who ends up working for a sleezy tabloid rather than an upstanding beacon of virtue. A lot of that rings sort of true, but it never quite gels for me. While it does raise a smile, it's never laugh-out-loud funny, but the serious story about dealing with corruption and tabloid journalism also feels undermined by the slapstick. And I still have no idea what was going on with Colin's parents moving house all the time. So a nice idea and one that kills a bit of free time but in true British fashion, I just shrug my shoulders, s'okay, I s'pose.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Dale

    I found this and hoped for something that it was not Now, I'm not going to hold the fact that I did not read the cover very carefully against the book - that's my fault, not the book's. I was hoping for something a bit more serious, like Millar's Red Son in which Superman is raised in the USSR rather than in the USA. But, this book is a tongue-in-cheek take on Superman, based on the premise that he landed in Kent in England, rather than Kansas, USA. Co-written by Monty Python contributers (it d I found this and hoped for something that it was not Now, I'm not going to hold the fact that I did not read the cover very carefully against the book - that's my fault, not the book's. I was hoping for something a bit more serious, like Millar's Red Son in which Superman is raised in the USSR rather than in the USA. But, this book is a tongue-in-cheek take on Superman, based on the premise that he landed in Kent in England, rather than Kansas, USA. Co-written by Monty Python contributers (it doesn't seem quite right to call John Cleese a mere contributor), this is an irreverant look at English culture, government and media - Superman is merely the medium used to deliver these scathing attacks.R Read more at: http://dwdsreviews.blogspot.com/2012/...

  29. 4 out of 5

    Camilla

    Superman: True Brit is one of those books that has some moments that are funnier than others. Most made me smile. One or two made me actually laugh. The story is cute, though, and plays up on some humorous British stereotypes (What would the neighbors think?). By the end, though, Superman (view spoiler)[moves to America and changes his identity to be less British (hide spoiler)] , so there wasn't all that much point to the comic book. This is supposed to be what Superman would be like as a Brit. Superman: True Brit is one of those books that has some moments that are funnier than others. Most made me smile. One or two made me actually laugh. The story is cute, though, and plays up on some humorous British stereotypes (What would the neighbors think?). By the end, though, Superman (view spoiler)[moves to America and changes his identity to be less British (hide spoiler)] , so there wasn't all that much point to the comic book. This is supposed to be what Superman would be like as a Brit. Not "Superman (view spoiler)[doesn't feel like Britain is for him and becomes American Superman (hide spoiler)] . There wasn't a whole lot of plot; it was humor based. I liked it despite the lack of any real comic book action. There was enough to keep an interest. Overall, I guess the rating would have been higher if it weren't for the ending.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Stuart Butterworth

    A short while back, I read Superman: Red Son, and after seeing what could have happened if Kal-El had landed in the Russian Steppes rather than Kansas, I started thinking about how Superman could have developed if he had landed in a rural part of the UK - how he would be unfailingly polite and helpful, but somewhat inept and clumsy, he would be forever eager to please but would always upset somebody - the story almost wrote itself. The I find that not only does the story write itself, but someone A short while back, I read Superman: Red Son, and after seeing what could have happened if Kal-El had landed in the Russian Steppes rather than Kansas, I started thinking about how Superman could have developed if he had landed in a rural part of the UK - how he would be unfailingly polite and helpful, but somewhat inept and clumsy, he would be forever eager to please but would always upset somebody - the story almost wrote itself. The I find that not only does the story write itself, but someone else actually wrote it - and here it is. Ah well - bang go my hopes of fame and fortune! :-( Its a cracking little story, taking a rather humourous new slant on the Superman mythos, adding a touch of awfully British satire, a dash of self-deprecating humour, and lashings and lashings of ginger beer, erm, I mean Python-esque references, not surprising considering who the writers are.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.