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Revivers. Able to wake the recently dead, and let them bear witness to their own demise. Twelve years after the first reviver came to light, they have become accepted by an uneasy public. The testimony of the dead is permitted in courtrooms across the world. Forensic revival is a routine part of police investigation. In the United States, that responsibility falls to the F Revivers. Able to wake the recently dead, and let them bear witness to their own demise. Twelve years after the first reviver came to light, they have become accepted by an uneasy public. The testimony of the dead is permitted in courtrooms across the world. Forensic revival is a routine part of police investigation. In the United States, that responsibility falls to the Forensic Revival Service. Despite his troubled past, Jonah Miller is one of their best. But while reviving the victim of a brutal murder, he encounters a terrifying presence. Something is watching. Waiting. His superiors tell him it was only in his mind, a product of stress. Jonah is not so certain. Then Daniel Harker, the first journalist to bring revival to public attention, is murdered, and Jonah finds himself getting dragged into the hunt for answers. Working with Harker's daughter Annabel, he becomes determined to find those responsible and bring them to justice. Soon they uncover long-hidden truths that call into doubt everything Jonah stands for, and reveal a threat that if not stopped in time, will put all of humanity in danger ...


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Revivers. Able to wake the recently dead, and let them bear witness to their own demise. Twelve years after the first reviver came to light, they have become accepted by an uneasy public. The testimony of the dead is permitted in courtrooms across the world. Forensic revival is a routine part of police investigation. In the United States, that responsibility falls to the F Revivers. Able to wake the recently dead, and let them bear witness to their own demise. Twelve years after the first reviver came to light, they have become accepted by an uneasy public. The testimony of the dead is permitted in courtrooms across the world. Forensic revival is a routine part of police investigation. In the United States, that responsibility falls to the Forensic Revival Service. Despite his troubled past, Jonah Miller is one of their best. But while reviving the victim of a brutal murder, he encounters a terrifying presence. Something is watching. Waiting. His superiors tell him it was only in his mind, a product of stress. Jonah is not so certain. Then Daniel Harker, the first journalist to bring revival to public attention, is murdered, and Jonah finds himself getting dragged into the hunt for answers. Working with Harker's daughter Annabel, he becomes determined to find those responsible and bring them to justice. Soon they uncover long-hidden truths that call into doubt everything Jonah stands for, and reveal a threat that if not stopped in time, will put all of humanity in danger ...

30 review for Reviver

  1. 4 out of 5

    Jack +Books & Bourbon+

    Oh Reviver...you temptress, you minx, you tease. From the moment I saw you I knew I had to know all there was about you. And right from the beginning you grabbed me and pulled me in. The first day was spent in your constant company, and we stayed up together until the early hours of the following morning, and I found that I did not tire of you. But...something happened that second day. The things you showed me up front weren't really you, and I found that we didn't get along as well as I thought Oh Reviver...you temptress, you minx, you tease. From the moment I saw you I knew I had to know all there was about you. And right from the beginning you grabbed me and pulled me in. The first day was spent in your constant company, and we stayed up together until the early hours of the following morning, and I found that I did not tire of you. But...something happened that second day. The things you showed me up front weren't really you, and I found that we didn't get along as well as I thought. That second day was a pale imitation of the first, and it was nearly a struggle to remain in your presence. I persevered, and overall my time with you was memorable, but sadly it wasn't all that it could have been, and we could only part on merely amicable terms... I wanted to love this book. I really really did. And honestly, for the first half, I was entranced. The concept of Reviving is one of the coolest literary inventions I've read in a long time. And the way the legality, morality, and public perception of it was handled was simply brilliant. One of the main characters didn't have nearly the arc I expected, and that was a pleasant surprise. And the ominous feeling of something from beyond was teased just enough that you wanted to know more. That you just KNEW that something evil was coming for Jonah. Except...that's not really how it ended up happening. What started out as a wonderful ghost story/forensic procedural morphed and devolved into a by-the-numbers action adventure tale, with enough close scrapes for a Bond movie. Programmers turned action heroes, villains who weren't very...villainous, gotta save the world and get the girl mentality near the end, and a beer drinking & microwave meal eating 30 something whom nearly every woman in the book is attracted to (sorry, but if that's a 30+ year old male's only diet, he won't get a first glance, let alone a second). And Never Geary...oh you wonderful, impossible man you. I loved him and hated him in equal measure. He was a little...too perfect in my opinion. If we all had friends like that, the world would be a utopia. I guess it was the rapid shift in tone that really did it in for me. The writing was fine, the concepts solid, the main conceit absolutely amazing and unique, the side effects of the Reviving process were believable and carried real heft, and the horror/dread elements were all in place. The tension ratcheted up, the stakes got a little higher, and then BAM, everything kinda changed. I still like the book, for sure, but the last 40% or so really brought the rating down for me.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Lara

    I did not finish this book--I made it about halfway in, and set it aside with a sigh. My three reasons for doing so are as follows: 1) This is so very much a first novel. There's a ton of exposition, a lot of telling instead of showing, several instances of "As you know, Bob..." fact-dumping, and the characters are, with the exception of the protagonist, one-dimensional. You know who's good and who's bad. There are also multiple instances of heavy-handed foreshadowing that are meant to ramp up su I did not finish this book--I made it about halfway in, and set it aside with a sigh. My three reasons for doing so are as follows: 1) This is so very much a first novel. There's a ton of exposition, a lot of telling instead of showing, several instances of "As you know, Bob..." fact-dumping, and the characters are, with the exception of the protagonist, one-dimensional. You know who's good and who's bad. There are also multiple instances of heavy-handed foreshadowing that are meant to ramp up suspicion, but instead made me say with a sigh, "Well, that character's doomed..." 2) This book could not be angled any more to be made into a TV series if it *tried*. It reads almost like a procedural script, the pacing is reminiscent of an episode (event, reactions, research, bigger event, aftermath, quiet moment...), and the simple characters have about as much development as your average detectives on any variant of Law and Order or CSI--enough so you can tell them apart, but not quite enough to make them real. I want to read a *book*, not an adaptation-to-screen treatment. 3) A quibble, but it started to really bug me. The author of this book is Irish, living in England. This book is set in northern Virginia, and while a couple of supporting characters are British or Irish, the protagonist himself is American. Nevertheless, he and most other American characters continually use British turns of phrase. *Continually*. It does not sound right for a 30ish American male to say things like "Ah, the milk's gone off," or "I'll spend the evening in the bath", and it's even more jarring when background characters are saying things like "Good on you!" and specifically drinking Guinness in a bar (not that I don't like Guinness, but single American men drinking after a long day of reviving corpses would probably be drinking American beer). In short, loved the premise, but the execution falls flat.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Ms. Nikki

    Bring me back, from death's decay. There are some things I need to say. Don't let my death, be your downfall. Don't cry for me. No tears at all. Celebrate my life. The good, the strive. In my heart did you dwell. Goodbye to you. My sweet, Farewell. by Nikki This is one of those reads where you wish another author would have written it, put their brand on it. The concept of human beings who can revive the dead (Revivers) to say their goodbyes, tell how they were killed, or who murdered them is great. It takes a Bring me back, from death's decay. There are some things I need to say. Don't let my death, be your downfall. Don't cry for me. No tears at all. Celebrate my life. The good, the strive. In my heart did you dwell. Goodbye to you. My sweet, Farewell. by Nikki This is one of those reads where you wish another author would have written it, put their brand on it. The concept of human beings who can revive the dead (Revivers) to say their goodbyes, tell how they were killed, or who murdered them is great. It takes a toll on the Revivers and they need time to recuperate. Lately though, one Reviver, Jonah, is having remnant memories. Memories from the dead that stay with him even after the dead have been laid to rest for the final time. Something evil is waiting to be set free and only Revivers can do it. Sound great, right? Sorry. Poor execution and some bland characters make this read slow and unsatisfying. (view spoiler)[The ending was also left open for a continuation. (hide spoiler)]

  4. 4 out of 5

    Lukas Anthony

    A really cool concept, but I just couldn't get invested in the characters. 'Reviver' is a book that was all about the concept for me, I'd read somewhat similar things featured in side-plots of other novels (mainly in the urban fantasy genre) and was interested to see the concept become the main focus of a novel. The concept being that there are people in the world, who are capable of 'reviving' people who have been murdered, so they can tell the police what has happened and who killed them. While A really cool concept, but I just couldn't get invested in the characters. 'Reviver' is a book that was all about the concept for me, I'd read somewhat similar things featured in side-plots of other novels (mainly in the urban fantasy genre) and was interested to see the concept become the main focus of a novel. The concept being that there are people in the world, who are capable of 'reviving' people who have been murdered, so they can tell the police what has happened and who killed them. While I have given the novel a low(ish) score overall, there were a few things I liked here. There was a definitive effort here to give you the back story of the 'revivers' and how these people developed these powers and what public opinion on them was. They even focused on the political side as opposed to just the moral, and I think it felt quite real in the way that it would be perceived. There was also side plots about the side effects, and medical repercussions for the actual revivers themselves that were quite interesting, that were told in a very scientific way, which was a nice touch. I also liked the somewhat supernatural twist that happens towards the end, and the idea of something piggybacking onto a murdered persons soul and being released into this world was a really good idea, and one of the reasons I may read the sequel somewhere down the line. The main thing that I felt let it down and my main issue was, in the novels characters. I just couldn't get fully invested in them, it's not even that they are paper thin cardboard cutouts. The first half of the novel is slow with the build up, and we get some definite character development for our main character, but I just couldn't get too enthusiastic about him. I was never really convinced to root or care for him. Overall, this is an interesting debut novel, and in all likeliness, the issues I had with this entry could even be improved upon come the next entry in this series. I can say that I probably would read the sequel, if just to see how the religious aspects at the end of this entry developed after the end of this one.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Paul Nelson

    Reviver is the debut novel and the start of a new trilogy by Seth Patrick, first off the cover is electrifying but what impressed me was when the guy in the book shop opened an app on his phone called blippar and we looked at the book cover through his phone, suddenly the cover came alive and I was suitably stunned as the book took on the appearance of the trailer to a horror movie. A simple video, but small things amuse small minds and I was sold, hopefully the book would be as impressive as th Reviver is the debut novel and the start of a new trilogy by Seth Patrick, first off the cover is electrifying but what impressed me was when the guy in the book shop opened an app on his phone called blippar and we looked at the book cover through his phone, suddenly the cover came alive and I was suitably stunned as the book took on the appearance of the trailer to a horror movie. A simple video, but small things amuse small minds and I was sold, hopefully the book would be as impressive as the interactive cover. Jonah Miller is a Reviver, he can communicate with the dead for a short while after they have passed, ideal for finding the cause of death and if needed the perpetrator. Jonah is called to a murder, Alice Decker and he has to ascertain the murderer. It’s a harrowing experience talking to the newly dead, they’re confused, frightened and you don’t have a lot of time but when the job is done and the camera’s cease recording, Jonah is startled when the corpse raises its head and says ‘we see you’, the dead it seems want something from him. This is put down to overwork and Jonah gets sick time, more drugs but on his next revival, the murder of a young girl he feels as if momentarily he’s taken over by the girl to the point of identifying the killer. The Revival boundaries are becoming blurred, something big is about to happen and Jonah it seems is a passenger on a trip he wants no part of. Definitely an interesting concept, with a well-paced story, the crime thriller and supernatural crossover give an abundance of tension while at the same time being just a little bit creepy in the right way. Looking forward to the second in the Reviver trilogy and the book is certainly as good as the cover. Wouldn't hesitate to recommend Reviver.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Sci-Fi & Scary

    Holy crap, this novel was good! I mean, I’ve had books disturb me before, but it’s generally been because of behavior of the characters. Reviver disturbed me based on premise and then built out from there. Bringing the dead back to life, just long enough to ask them a few questions, and then problems that can arise from that. And problems definitely do arise from that. If you’re familiar with the first episode of Torchwood, the Revivers do something very similar to what that freaky metal hand th Holy crap, this novel was good! I mean, I’ve had books disturb me before, but it’s generally been because of behavior of the characters. Reviver disturbed me based on premise and then built out from there. Bringing the dead back to life, just long enough to ask them a few questions, and then problems that can arise from that. And problems definitely do arise from that. If you’re familiar with the first episode of Torchwood, the Revivers do something very similar to what that freaky metal hand thing did. It can bring the dead back to life, but never for very long, and in forensic pathology it’s used to ascertain who killed the person or whatnot. Seth Patrick did wonderful things with this book. I mean, he set the tone immediately and the atmosphere never let up! The main character, Jonah, for some reason quickly morphed into a younger Christopher Eccleston in my head. Young dude, but not too young, vaguely stand-offish and withdrawn, but with a wonderful heart, he’s a character that is very easy to care for. He’s surrounded by people that also care for him, and do their best to make sure he’s taken care of. He needs that. He’s one of the strongest Revivers out there, but pushes himself way too hard. He’s not perfect, though. He’s just a wonderfully well-developed character that was intensely engaging. Scariest line in the whole book: It came from the dark and talked to them. – Reviver, Seth Patrick I had just finished reading that line and was looking for a pad and pen to write it down with when Miss L snuck into the living-room in her feetie jams and simply said “It’s time for you to read, mom.” I think I jumped hard enough at the unexpected voice that I achieved air-time. That is how good Patrick is at keeping the tension up. (We’ll ignore the fact that I’m also a certified wuss right now.) There was another line that made me stop what I was doing and google it. It’s not quite right in the book, but it is an actual thing. I’m quite glad it’s an actual thing. Explains my morbid sense of humor at times. “There’s a phrase for it. Incongruity of (a)ffect. It means when things get really f*cked up, you grow an equally twisted sense of humor. – Reviver, Seth Patrick Then there was this gem that I wholeheartedly agree with “There’s a saying that for good people to do evil things, it takes religion. But I reckon national security does the job just as well.” – Reviver, Seth Patrick Reviver never needed reviving. It never even floundered. Much like other great books I’ve read, including The Martian and Sorrow’s Point, once I started it, I was hooked. Completely. I found myself slowing down my reading as I neared the end. Half in fear that Patrick would screw it up somehow, half in reluctance to have it end. This book put me in a book coma. I can’t even think about reading another non-kids’ book for a while yet. From the first page until the last, Reviver will keep you entombed within it, scared to turn off the lights, scared to go to sleep at night because you know it’ll haunt your dreams. Reviver is the best horror-mystery cross I’ve ever read, and on my very, very short list of best books ever read, period. It’s truly a must read.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Gail

    For a debut novel this is incredible. It starts off so utterly different from anything I have ever read but then it slightly fails a little and didn't keep my attention as much as the first half, for reasons I cannot explain. Jonah Miller is a brilliant and very complex hero but Never Geary really captured my heart. I just loved this character. The plot is absolutely brilliant, as has been covered by other reviewers, but I felt it became a little hard going and deviated from the revivals too much For a debut novel this is incredible. It starts off so utterly different from anything I have ever read but then it slightly fails a little and didn't keep my attention as much as the first half, for reasons I cannot explain. Jonah Miller is a brilliant and very complex hero but Never Geary really captured my heart. I just loved this character. The plot is absolutely brilliant, as has been covered by other reviewers, but I felt it became a little hard going and deviated from the revivals too much for me. For the first half I couldn't put my kindle down and it was so engrossing I actually felt I had been watching a film. I cannot wait for a follow up and hope Never and Jonah come back again as I feel there is enough life in the story - no pun intended - for this to be a brilliant series by a fantastic new writer. Recommended

  8. 5 out of 5

    Jasper

    Reviver is Seth Patrick’s debut novel and the first in a planned trilogy. He is an Oxford mathematics graduate and Seth Partrick works in the video game industry as a programmer for a.o. the award winning Total War series. Movie rights have already been optioned by Legendary Entertainment, the producers behind The Dark Knight Rises and Man of Steel. When I first read about the book Reviver, it showed a great new concept in the genres of horror and thriller. With a name like Reviver one might thin Reviver is Seth Patrick’s debut novel and the first in a planned trilogy. He is an Oxford mathematics graduate and Seth Partrick works in the video game industry as a programmer for a.o. the award winning Total War series. Movie rights have already been optioned by Legendary Entertainment, the producers behind The Dark Knight Rises and Man of Steel. When I first read about the book Reviver, it showed a great new concept in the genres of horror and thriller. With a name like Reviver one might think it has to do with zombies, but it hasn’t. Reviver is a chilling forensic-police thriller, where the dead haven’t found there last resting place after they have passed just yet. For specific purposes, people can be temporarily revived… In Reviver you follow the main protagonist Jonah Miller, who is Reviver and one of the best there is. Revivers are able to temporarily bring back deceased people to question hem one last time. In the US the Revivers are part of a new division the US Forensics Revival Service. In the beginning of the book there is an emphasis on how this unit operates, what the importance of it is and also you see the daily life od Jonah, which is quite stressful, hectic and Jonah has to fight his own demons. Bordering on a break-down, Jonah’s life become just more difficult. Soon you learn more about the past of Jonah’s character and that he is special. Having been able to revive his mother only once she was dead for only 4 minutes. Forced to take a leave so Jonah can relax, he is called back to reviving once he is the only one left. And this throws him in a path that he hadn’t thought of possible. All his believes of his tutors and best friend proof to be different. Not only Revivers make up the FRS, there are also technician that play an important role in solving the cases. Jonah’s best friend Never makes up a large part of the storyline and acts as a great supporting character, both in taking the storyline further as well as creating some witty and humorous comments to Jonah to liven up the story. There are some other great characters in the FRS and friends of Jonah that make a good impression in the storyline. There was one character Tess, whom I initially thought was a bit far-fetched in the storyline a too sudden introduction and not making any sense. However there is this turnaround point at about 3 quarters of the book where this is all corrected and felt like a door slamming in your face. It’s also here when you see that the earlier plotting and hints introduced by Seth Patrick start to make sense, this was very neatly done. When I started reading Reviver I hadn’t thought about the other things that could be done with reviving… suited for more ominous goals. Now for the Reviving part, WOW, let me rephrase that WOW!!! I have read a fair bit of fiction so far but never would have guessed that this was possible. Seth Patrick introduces a cooler that cool concept with reviving. In was meant to bring criminals to justice, reviving murder victims to let them tell you who murdered them. But it isn’t a science that has been around long only for the last few decades. I think this allowed Seth Patrick to really create this to his own liking and with it shaping the book in a brilliant manner. Because it isn’t a hasty introduction with this is reviving and it allows you to talk to a dead person. No on the contrary, Seth Patrick breaking reviving down to the elementary facts. Seth Patrick takes enough time, not only in the beginning but all throughout the book, to tell a lot of how the fundamental work of reviving. Like the phases of reviving with the reversal and the surge. Also mentioning that people cannot lie when they are revived. But Seth Patrick also involves a lot more around everything like mentioning the group known as the Afterlifers who are against reviving, thereby creating a sense that it isn’t only viewed upon for the better, there is also the private sector for reviving and even insurances for talking to your closes relative one last time. So it’s not only the importance for solving murder cases that is shown but also the deeper economical and sociological aspects. This taken on the whole gave a well thought trough feeling about the reviving, Seth Patrick really created his own science with it and I am very curious as to how it is explored in the later books. I already mentioned above that at 3 quarter the storyline transforms. Seth Patrick managed in a great way to lead you on the chase to find answer, keeping the action tight and not revealing too much of what might come. I really thought that reviving was a great idea in terms of solving the murder cases, however the more ominous idea’s of what might be possible did make me look at it differently, but that was only the first twist that was introduced. Later on there is a much more bigger and more dangerous element added to the story that refers to one of the first scenes of the book when Jonah revives a person and he hears different voices. I found this relation was plotted out in such a clever way and the things that it brought along gave me the chills. Another thing that was interesting in the story were the big pharmaceutical companies and showing the origins of the Reviving art how it al started with Baseline and what kind of experiments they carried out, some for the better and some for the worse. This gave a much more larger feeling to the storyline of Reviver. It shows that there was very careful plotting and a lot of thinking put into Reviver. Reviver is a blockbuster. I had high hopes for Reviver and Seth Patrick’s Reviver lived up to this and went beyond. With Reviver being a debut, it is even better. Reviver is one of the best debuts for 2013 and if you haven’t read this book you are sorely missing out on one of the best books. Seth Patrick has thought of all the large details as well as the minor details, breaking down the Reviver art down to the small part really gave a good grip on what it could do and where possible limitations might be. The characters that you meet along the lines all add there own part to the story and especially Jonah, with being part guinea pig and his friend Never made this whole story come to fruition. From idea to concept to execution, Reviver couldn’t have turned out to be better. I’m hoping to watch this on the big screen soon. originally posted at http://thebookplank.blogspot.com/2013/07/reviver.html

  9. 4 out of 5

    Cheryl

    Jonah is a reviver. He has the ability to touch a person who is dead and communicate with them. Due to his talent he is a great asset to the police department. He has helped solved many murder cases. After his latest case Jonah wonders if he is not going crazy. After he has finished talking with the dead, the victim looks right at Jonah and says” We see you”. Jonah tells his boss but his boss just brushes it off as if Jonah has been working too hard and needs a break. Whatever the “we” are, they Jonah is a reviver. He has the ability to touch a person who is dead and communicate with them. Due to his talent he is a great asset to the police department. He has helped solved many murder cases. After his latest case Jonah wonders if he is not going crazy. After he has finished talking with the dead, the victim looks right at Jonah and says” We see you”. Jonah tells his boss but his boss just brushes it off as if Jonah has been working too hard and needs a break. Whatever the “we” are, they are coming for Jonah. The first reason I noticed this book was the book cover. It was eye catching and creepy in a good way. Then I read the back cover of this book and the summary and I knew I had to check this book out. So glad I did. This book was everything I hoped it would be. It was intriguing, good storyline and a great main character. The ability that Jonah has as a reviver is cool but I can also see how it can also be a burden. I was reading this book and going along fine until I got to this one part in the book where right after Jonah had just revived a young girl. She had walked in on a burglar. She was killed. Jonah had an experience moment where he spotted the killer and jumped him. Afterwards he looked right at the girl’s father and said “I’m sorry” “It was him, Dad. He did it. He killed me.” This is when I knew I was really hooked. The ending finished strong. It leaves me waiting in anticipation for the next book. Reviver is thrilling, roller coaster of a good time that will have you sitting on the edge of your seat!

  10. 5 out of 5

    Pamela (Here to Read Books and Chew Gum)

    http://iblamewizards.com/review-the-r... With an original concept and a fast-paced, exciting and most importantly spine-tingling story, Seth Patrick’s The Reviver is a strong horror début that kept me devouring every last word until the final page. Jonah Miller is a Reviver, working for the FRS (Forensic Revival Service) as a forensic reviver. Revival is a means of restoring the consciousness of the recently deceased for a brief time in order to firstly, give closure to the grieving families in th http://iblamewizards.com/review-the-r... With an original concept and a fast-paced, exciting and most importantly spine-tingling story, Seth Patrick’s The Reviver is a strong horror début that kept me devouring every last word until the final page. Jonah Miller is a Reviver, working for the FRS (Forensic Revival Service) as a forensic reviver. Revival is a means of restoring the consciousness of the recently deceased for a brief time in order to firstly, give closure to the grieving families in the case of private revivals, and secondly, in the case of forensic revivals, to question the victims of violent crimes as a means of identifying their attackers. During a routine revival, Jonah feels a dark and evil presence which he just can’t shake. His colleagues tell him it is simply overwork, but when a journalist who was instrumental in the public acceptance of revival is found dead, Jonah finds himself on a hunt for the truth and the reasons behind his so-called hallucinations. The plot of The Reviver is strong, and it is this plot which props this novel up. Seth Patrick’s writing is clunky in places and his moods don’t quite hit their mark, but the plot is so well crafted and immersive that a few pages in these small failings cease to matter. The characters are perfectly realised and they feel like old friends in no time. What most impressed me was Patrick’s character interactions. They felt natural and nothing seemed out of place. Any odd behaviours were quickly explained in a way which made them understandable, and personal relationships were developed to increase characterisation rather than drive the plot and distract from the central premise. While there were some moments I wish had been dwelt on in greater detail, the overall pace is wonderful. The main antagonist could have had a touch more characterisation and motive, as could the elusive ‘unity’ project, however I’m lead to believe this is potentially a trilogy, so I hope that this is all still to come. Seth Patrick’s novel stands well alone, and was a simply great read. I enjoyed every second of it, and can’t wait for the rest.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Karen

    Spoilers ahead... The subject of reviving was very interesting to me. The ability to revive a person for a few minutes after death to close a murder case or to help find the perpetrator intrigued me. But that subject wasn't enough to save this book. I liked Jonah Miller and I liked Never. They were great characters and you could tell that they cared about each other. Jonah is a nice, caring person whom works as a reviver to bring closure to families wanting to say goodbye. Never is a technician w Spoilers ahead... The subject of reviving was very interesting to me. The ability to revive a person for a few minutes after death to close a murder case or to help find the perpetrator intrigued me. But that subject wasn't enough to save this book. I liked Jonah Miller and I liked Never. They were great characters and you could tell that they cared about each other. Jonah is a nice, caring person whom works as a reviver to bring closure to families wanting to say goodbye. Never is a technician who helps record the session during revival but he also goes above and beyond to ensure Johan does not go crazy. How can you not like them? I'm not going to lie I was quickly engaged since the first chapter but after a few chapters I couldn't understand what the major plot line was. I felt like the book went off on the tangent without really hinting on what we should focus on until a hundred pages in. But even when you get that far in you just lose interest (at least for me). I didn't care for Daniel Harker and to focus the big mystery around his death was a big led down because his death was left to chance. But I guess if it wasn't for Harki we wouldn't know that the bigger picture was using revival to bring an ancient demon back to life and it was Jonah's job to stop this from happening. I would have liked the story if the mystery was played out more. I just needed more excitement. I also didn't like Daniel's daughter, Annabel, she's such a manipulated, push-over, over-achiever journalist. I pray in the book world Jonah will break free from her. He deserves someone better. I wanted to love this book but just couldn't but I do give the author credit for experimenting with a new subject. I know this can be expanded more but it just needs some more magic to make it enjoyable.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Maya Panika

    It's a book of two halves. The early chapters are so long winded, setting scenes and delving inside heads for page after page after page. It seemed to take forever to get going, taking so very long to get to any point at all, I was screaming inside, skipping over paragraphs like a skimmed stone, desperate for it to get to the bloody point. I very nearly gave it up. About a quarter of the way in, it finds its feet and the story emerges and from then on in, it got very much better. The story is goo It's a book of two halves. The early chapters are so long winded, setting scenes and delving inside heads for page after page after page. It seemed to take forever to get going, taking so very long to get to any point at all, I was screaming inside, skipping over paragraphs like a skimmed stone, desperate for it to get to the bloody point. I very nearly gave it up. About a quarter of the way in, it finds its feet and the story emerges and from then on in, it got very much better. The story is good and there's a nice twist towards the end, but the thing as a whole is so lightweight and unsatisfying. Maybe because it's so very visual? It feels written for the purpose of inserting CGI. I'm not at all surprised that the film rights have been sold - or that the author is a games developer for Sega. Ultimately, it was the characters that spoiled it for me; they never really seemed to come alive. Never aside (Never was good), I couldn't believe in any of them. Jonah, the main protagonist, was as animated as balsa wood and with less substance, I couldn't engage with him at all - but there was nothing in the least bit satisfying about any one of the characters, they were all avatars, more or less interchangeable, serving only to advance the plot. I frequently lost touch with which character had done what, they were all so instantly forgettable. In short, when the story finally gets going, it's pretty good, sometimes more than good. The ideas, the concepts are terrific, but the execution isn't up to the task. Reviver feels like a gorgeous veneer of a tremendous concept laid over a badly knocked-together thing of MDF. What a waste.

  13. 4 out of 5

    L. McCoy

    This started off pretty great... but went downhill. What’s it about? So basically now some people have a special ability to temporarily (not permanently) bring the dead back to life given the right conditions. In this it mostly focuses on that world and how a reviver who’s a cop and uses his power in murder investigations. That’s basically all I can say without spoilers. Pros: The story is pretty cool. More unique than just another standard crime drama (don’t get me wrong, I love that genre but it’s This started off pretty great... but went downhill. What’s it about? So basically now some people have a special ability to temporarily (not permanently) bring the dead back to life given the right conditions. In this it mostly focuses on that world and how a reviver who’s a cop and uses his power in murder investigations. That’s basically all I can say without spoilers. Pros: The story is pretty cool. More unique than just another standard crime drama (don’t get me wrong, I love that genre but it’s cool to see something fresh). Mostly unpredictable. So I did see some of the twists coming but a lot of it is still surprising. There are some pretty exciting action scenes! The world building is pretty interesting and very well done. There’s a lot more to the world of this book than I expected. There are a few chuckle worthy comic relief moments. The ending is good and has some interesting stuff for book 2. Cons: The characters are kinda bland. Even with their backstories they still seem generic. For example, the main character is a generic cop character that acts the same way a lot of other cop characters in crime dramas do. There are some slow parts that go on and on to the point I kinda couldn’t help but accidentally lose interest in and be like “oh yeah book” (though I doubt this happened for more than 5 minutes anytime this happened). There’s a horror element. It gets more horror-y in the final half or so of the book but unfortunately doesn’t work as well as it should. There’s some filler stuff that honestly just made this book longer and slower than it needed to be. Mixed thoughts: There’s some social commentary. Now I understand that this is something that’s sometimes a little hard to write. In this it is well written and clever... but there’s a few bits that began to beat a dead horse unfortunately. That’s why I have mixed thoughts on it. The narrator of the audio edition I listened to. Sometimes he’s good but unfortunately does this thing of getting super quiet, even in moments that don’t make sense. Overall: Something about this is unfortunate. So it started as a book with 5 star level potential, than I had a few problems so 4 star and in the end more problems so a 3 star rating. This isn’t bad and I added book 2 to my reading list but it definitely has quite a few issues, including some big ones. If you like crime drama stories this is worth checking out for something unique and this is a decent book, there are some things I like about it but as a whole it’s only okay IMO. 3/5

  14. 5 out of 5

    Amy Bunn

    Sometime in the near future, a select portion of the population discovers in themselves the ability to revive the recently deceased for a short period of time. Initially used as a way to allow the decedent and their loved ones to make their final goodbyes, the phenomenon is eventually subjected to scientific study, and then adapted for use during criminal investigations. Reaching the dead is a spotty business, often made more difficult by the condition of the body, time constraints, and the skil Sometime in the near future, a select portion of the population discovers in themselves the ability to revive the recently deceased for a short period of time. Initially used as a way to allow the decedent and their loved ones to make their final goodbyes, the phenomenon is eventually subjected to scientific study, and then adapted for use during criminal investigations. Reaching the dead is a spotty business, often made more difficult by the condition of the body, time constraints, and the skill or ability of the individual initiating contact (the reviver). Jonah Miller is a forensic reviver near the top of his field, but one of his revivals brings back more than he intended. After speaking with the recently murdered Alice Decker, he ends up talking to an unknown, seemingly malevolent force. This encounter, coupled with the murder of a prominent figure in the revival world, leads him on a search for the truth behind what a reviver is really capable of. The concept was interesting, and the spooky cover drew me in, but I think it could have become a better book than it did. Some of the characters struck me as flat, particularly Jonah's best friend, who seemed more an archetype than anything. A better ending would have definitely helped, but, as it was, the explanation for all the goings-on felt farfetched. With proper development and back story, maybe a few clues thrown in here and there, I might have been better able to accept the reason for Jonah's revival experiences, but instead the answers, such as they were, felt thrown at me during the last few chapters. Two personal pet-peeves added annoyance to the overall experience. First there's a character named Never. It's a nickname, and kind of a silly one at that, but it had the annoying tendency of drawing my eye as I read. I read fairly quickly, and that's usually not a barrier to comprehension for me, but in this case I often had to remind myself that the author was referring to a name, not the word as defined in the dictionary. No one was actually saying "Never," even thought the word was glaring out of the page at me! (Ok... maybe this particular pet peeve really only reflects my own inadequacies, but the problem would have never existed if the character had just had a real name! George, Harry, Bartholomew... anything but "Never." Secondly, Seth Patrick is an Irish-born writer who currently lives in England. He is writing a book that seems to be mostly set in the Virginia-North Carolina area. (One of the cities that he frequently references is Greensboro, which is only about an hour's drive south of me.) All this is fine, but I kept feeling a surge of annoyance when the American edition referred several times to the "tyres" on a car. I can understand using tyres in a book set in the UK, or even in the UK edition of this title, but the use of the word "tyres" here only served as a jarring reminder to me that the author was writing about an area that he might not know that much about it. Sloppy editing, to be sure--something that could have been overlooked in a work of overall higher quality, but less forgivable in this book.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Kirsty

    I actually quite enjoyed this book, it was unique and different and was a cross between a crime / conspiracy novel with an unnerving supernatural vein running through it. However, even though I did like it, there were a few bumps in the road and you could tell it was a debut novel. I loved the idea of certain people being able to raise the dead but in a more unconventional way that we would expect. Revivers do not bring back shambling rotting zombies, for a short period of time they are able to p I actually quite enjoyed this book, it was unique and different and was a cross between a crime / conspiracy novel with an unnerving supernatural vein running through it. However, even though I did like it, there were a few bumps in the road and you could tell it was a debut novel. I loved the idea of certain people being able to raise the dead but in a more unconventional way that we would expect. Revivers do not bring back shambling rotting zombies, for a short period of time they are able to put your consciousness back into you body so you can discuss your death, say goodbye to a loved one, or identify your killer. But reviving is still a relatively unknown phenomena, and nobody is 100% sure what else could be pulled through the void when a reviver reaches in to find you in the dark... The reviving aspect of the book was dealt with very well, and explored in a scientific way that made sense and seemed very real. The first half of the book is quite slow going, there is a lot of very detailed scene setting, world building and character thoughts, so sometimes the flow and momentum suffered, and occasionally it felt a little bogged down. Once we are fully immersed into the story in the second half of the book, the action picks up dramatically. There are many twists and turns revealed that are obviously going to be fully explored in the sequels to come, and I'm looking forward to delving further into the religious hints that were dropped. I have high hopes for the next book, now that the initial difficulty of setting up the series has been overcome, I think it will be a much smoother ride.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Siobhan

    I’m going to be completely honest and admit that I was somewhat tentative about this read. I felt as though the idea – whilst somewhat simple – had a lot of potential and I feared for the worst. However, I can honestly say I was not at all disappointed. I was hooked within a few pages, sitting up all night to finish reading the book. With the ending I was suddenly curious as to whether there would be a second only to find out it is the first in a trilogy and was overjoyed! I will admit that I ha I’m going to be completely honest and admit that I was somewhat tentative about this read. I felt as though the idea – whilst somewhat simple – had a lot of potential and I feared for the worst. However, I can honestly say I was not at all disappointed. I was hooked within a few pages, sitting up all night to finish reading the book. With the ending I was suddenly curious as to whether there would be a second only to find out it is the first in a trilogy and was overjoyed! I will admit that I hate waiting around for the next book in a series – and by the time I get my hands on it I will probably be pulling my hair out from waiting – but I am seriously excited. The story follows Jonah, a Forensic Reviver, someone with the ability to bring the dead back to ask them questions about how they died. During a revival he senses something out there, something dark and twisted, and soon the world he knew no longer seems to exist in quite the same way. Within a few pages you will be powering your way through the book, unwilling to put it down, wanting to know exactly what is waiting around the corner. Pick it up, it’s worth it!

  17. 5 out of 5

    Sharon

    This was a brilliant book loved the story a different approach to the forensic type story. I can't write much as I really don't want to spoil it for potential readers. At times it had my skin crawling because it actually seemed feasible to talk to the not long dead in this manner. The ending was neat and tidy I wasn't left with any questions although there may be the potential for a follow on. I do hope Seth Patrick writes more along these lines as I am now a fan. This was a brilliant book loved the story a different approach to the forensic type story. I can't write much as I really don't want to spoil it for potential readers. At times it had my skin crawling because it actually seemed feasible to talk to the not long dead in this manner. The ending was neat and tidy I wasn't left with any questions although there may be the potential for a follow on. I do hope Seth Patrick writes more along these lines as I am now a fan.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Patti

    ***Won in a Goodreads Giveaway*** Part ghost story, part murder mystery, part saving the world. A really great read, with very well written characters to go with the unusual premise. I'd recommend this one. ***Won in a Goodreads Giveaway*** Part ghost story, part murder mystery, part saving the world. A really great read, with very well written characters to go with the unusual premise. I'd recommend this one.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Jay Pollard

    This book is absolutely awesome, the best book I've ever read, can't wait for the next one! Can't recommend this book enough, this is a MUST read. This book is absolutely awesome, the best book I've ever read, can't wait for the next one! Can't recommend this book enough, this is a MUST read.

  20. 5 out of 5

    James Pyles

    I probably wouldn't even have read Seth Patrick's novel Reviver (2013), but I noticed on the back cover a small review by SF author Neal Asher. I'm familiar with Asher's work and even share the Table of Contents with him in a recent SciFi anthology, so naturally I was intrigued. A few weeks back, I was at the local branch of my little public library, and although I was already reading two books, found myself stuck there with my books and my beloved laptop still at home. So I started wandering the I probably wouldn't even have read Seth Patrick's novel Reviver (2013), but I noticed on the back cover a small review by SF author Neal Asher. I'm familiar with Asher's work and even share the Table of Contents with him in a recent SciFi anthology, so naturally I was intrigued. A few weeks back, I was at the local branch of my little public library, and although I was already reading two books, found myself stuck there with my books and my beloved laptop still at home. So I started wandering the stacks. This library is small enough not to differentiate between general fiction, science fiction, and fantasy, so they are all intermixed. I was randomly strolling through, occasionally picking up and reading the summaries of various novels, when I happened upon "Reviver" and noticed Asher's name on the back cover. I figured, what the heck. This is Seth Patrick's very first novel, and I can only imagine he went through quite a few iterations before he arrived at the final product I consumed. It was a terrific mix of horror, mystery, and a hint of speculative fiction. I know there are purists who detest that sort of thing, but I never was one for the extreme blood, guts, and gore of modern horror. Yes, there is graphic imagery in the novel, but nothing I couldn't handle, and the psychological horror totally hooked me. The premise of the story revolves around people known as "revivers." They have the mysterious (presumably neurological) ability to summon the "souls" of dead people hours after they've died, but only for a few minutes before they must be permanently let go. The protagonist, Jonah Miller is an experienced forensic reviver, someone who recalls the dead after a murder or other police involved death, to discover the identity of the killer or other vital information for a criminal case. He's also flawed, damaged, and utterly likeable. Revivers work both in forensics and in private practice, but Jonah has chosen the former. However, through a set of circumstances he initially doesn't understand, after a difficult revival, he finds himself in contact with something else beyond the grave, something ancient and evil. No one believes him, chalking up his experiences to overwork, stress, and after all, he did have a previous breakdown. However, when award-winning novelist Daniel Harker, the man who broke the news of revival to the world, is murdered, presumably by fanatics who are zealously opposed to revival, Jonah, Harker's journalist daughter Annabel, and his friend and support technician "Never" Geary, find themselves embroiled in a conspiracy that transcends religious fanaticism, covert government experiments in revival as torture, and are thrown into the depths of true evil. Mr. Patrick is Irish, and Geary also being from Ireland, is a nod to that, but the other characters are American and the action takes place in the U.S. Even if published for UK audiences, the editors did let slip the odd "Britishism" in the speech of Americans. I didn't write down each incident, so I can't give examples, and fortunately, they were minor enough not to drag me out of the narrative for very long. Just to let you know, I stayed awake until early morning today finishing off "Reviver." Yes, it is a literal page turner. I didn't know while reading it that this was the first book of a trilogy, but the Epilogue certainly set everything up for a sequel. I was a tad disappointed, because by that time, I was relating to Jonah as a person, and I know he needed the rest. This one is pure horror, mystery, and fun, so it gets my highest recommendation. Go out and get a copy.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Michal Mironov

    An original idea, but unfortunately poorly handled. I expected much more behind intriguing and sinister phrases such as "Forensic Revival Service", “interrogation of death”, or "enhanced torturing techniques after death”. The author bet everything on the dynamic storytelling, but the devil is in the detail, and it is precisely those half-baked, pseudo-scientific details that spoiled the narrative. Moreover, there is only a limited number of characters and motives that the book can absorb. Someti An original idea, but unfortunately poorly handled. I expected much more behind intriguing and sinister phrases such as "Forensic Revival Service", “interrogation of death”, or "enhanced torturing techniques after death”. The author bet everything on the dynamic storytelling, but the devil is in the detail, and it is precisely those half-baked, pseudo-scientific details that spoiled the narrative. Moreover, there is only a limited number of characters and motives that the book can absorb. Sometimes I felt like I was reading a script for a horror series - great for farther development by actors, but too superficial for the book. Despite all the reservations, it's a funny and readable combination of a horror and detective story. I do not regret reading it.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Anna

    I can't put it in any better words than this person has here: https://www.goodreads.com/review/show... I can't put it in any better words than this person has here: https://www.goodreads.com/review/show...

  23. 4 out of 5

    Farhana Thamiz

    Thriller or Horror.. They were the last thing in my mind to read. But this book questioning my choices.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Mom2triplets04

    I listened to this one on audio. It started out really good. I thought the concept of a person who has the ability to talk to the dead was really interesting. However, somehow the book just got a bit boring from the middle to the end. I was hoping it would pick up and we'd see more of the revival part of the story but it just didn't do that. Sorry to say this was a disappointment. I listened to this one on audio. It started out really good. I thought the concept of a person who has the ability to talk to the dead was really interesting. However, somehow the book just got a bit boring from the middle to the end. I was hoping it would pick up and we'd see more of the revival part of the story but it just didn't do that. Sorry to say this was a disappointment.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Pauline Ross

    Such a tricky one to categorise: a real genre-bender. There are shades of sci-fi, but it’s a flimsy connection - no squids in space and it’s (more or less) present day. It might be called fantasy, but there are no truly fantastical elements like magic or dragons or demons. It’s sorta, kinda paranormal - yes, let’s go with that. A paranormal police procedural action thriller... This is a fascinating premise: certain people have the ability to revive the recently dead and talk to them. The effects Such a tricky one to categorise: a real genre-bender. There are shades of sci-fi, but it’s a flimsy connection - no squids in space and it’s (more or less) present day. It might be called fantasy, but there are no truly fantastical elements like magic or dragons or demons. It’s sorta, kinda paranormal - yes, let’s go with that. A paranormal police procedural action thriller... This is a fascinating premise: certain people have the ability to revive the recently dead and talk to them. The effects only last a short time, but it's enough to allow loved ones the opportunity to say goodbye, or to allow a murder victim to name their killer. The hero here, Jonah, is one such reviver, working with the police to catch villains or, in some cases, to exonerate the most likely suspect. It sounds all good, right? But of course, there's a catch. The act of revival takes a toll, mentally and physically, on those performing it, and sometimes strange things happen. Cue dramatic music... This is a real curate's egg of a book. Some parts, especially the actual revivals, are absolutely terrific - emotionally engaging, dramatic and oh so spooky, and quite unpredictable (to me, anyway). Other parts I found a total drag. After a great opening chapter, the author feels the need to dump the entire backstory of revivals, and various characters, on our heads. This means, sometimes, entire chapters of dry exposition. Sorry, but I just don't need to know that much, and definitely not all in one go. If parts of the backstory are relevant to the here and now, then dribble it out in small quantities at an appropriate time. The characters - well, the author has tried his damnedest to give everyone a suitably affecting background so as to make them sympathetic, and to some extent that works because it's relevant to the story. Jonah's history, for instance, led directly to his becoming a reviver, and moreover a certain type of reviver which becomes crucial later in the story (not wanting to give too much away here), so I can accept that. But somehow it never quite worked for me. I never really cared much about any of them. The main problem, though, is way too many characters. There must be dozens of named characters here, and I just can't keep that many straight in my head. Towards the end, several dramatic reappearances were spoiled for me because I was saying: who? Towards the end, the plot devolves into standard formulaic thriller territory. You know the sort of thing: people suddenly turn up waving weapons of one sort or another, or behaving in increasingly extreme ways, culminating in the giant oh-my-god-we're-all-going-to-die palaver that goes on and on, getting increasingly over the top. And of course, people inevitably stop to explain things to each other, or rush back into the burning building/line of fire/whatever to rescue people they don't even like very much. Unbelievably silly, in fact. I know it's pretty much what everyone expects from this kind of story, but personally I'd much rather the characters behaved sensibly and stayed within their realm of expertise. Overall, an intriguing premise ripe with possibilities which the author explores quite thoroughly, let down by too much exposition and a way too melodramatic and long-drawn-out finale for my taste. Recommended for fans of all-action high-adrenalin summer-blockbuster-style drama, with a little horror thrown in. Four stars for the spine-chilling revivals, two stars for the info-dumps and three stars for the ending, averaging out at three stars.

  26. 5 out of 5

    usagi ☆ミ

    This one’s kind of hard to parse out, guys – mostly because while really well-written, each half of the book felt like it was almost written by another author. I don’t think I’ve seen such a big disconnect in a novel in a long time that’s only been written by one person. Nevertheless, this is one very interesting story – really original, full of thrills, chills, and spills of the CSI meets zombie kind. If you’re looking for something more original in the zombie genre, I suggest you check out “Re This one’s kind of hard to parse out, guys – mostly because while really well-written, each half of the book felt like it was almost written by another author. I don’t think I’ve seen such a big disconnect in a novel in a long time that’s only been written by one person. Nevertheless, this is one very interesting story – really original, full of thrills, chills, and spills of the CSI meets zombie kind. If you’re looking for something more original in the zombie genre, I suggest you check out “Reviver”. Okay, so more on this big disconnect between the two major halves of the book: While the first half focuses on some very excellent worldbuilding, it’s pretty much just that – setting the scene for the real main plot line – that of the mystery of who killed Daniel Harker. While at times the first half had a little bit too much infodumping going on, the worldbuilding was otherwise really original, very engrossing, and detailed down to the most minute of information of how the Revivers came into being. It’s obvious that Patrick thought this all through quite a bit, and at times, the world almost felt a little too big for the page. The characters, too, were very detailed in their backstory and activity, which helped develop the world further. But I didn’t see much progression of character development. If I did see it, was really slow. That was a bit disappointing, especially since so much of the book is character-driven. However, here’s the second part of the big issue with the disconnected parts of the book – it felt like by the second half that while leaning more toward the plot-driven side, it still felt like Patrick couldn’t quite decide whether this was going to be plot or character-driven, and so tried to balance the two. It didn’t really work, and that’s what threw me off. And unfortunately, detracted from me really enjoying this as much as I wanted to. Patrick definitely has a way with sensory language and imagery – some of the revival scenes and the sensations that Jonah experiences post-revival were absolutely visceral. Sometimes to the point where I had to put the book down for a bit just to breathe. That more than made up for some of this book’s weaknesses, because when you have a book about necromancy/zombies and the like, you WANT visceral to hit the reader for maximum sensory impact when you may be lacking in the emotional impact department. Regardless of my nitpicks, “Reviver” is otherwise very much quite the solid debut, and Patrick is an author to watch if just to wonder what he’ll come up with next. I loved this world, and I hope we get to return to it soon – albeit with maybe a little more editing. “Reviver” is out now from St. Martin’s Press/Macmillan in North America, so definitely check it out when you get the chance! (posted to goodreads, shelfari, and birthofanewwitch.wordpress.com)

  27. 5 out of 5

    Mark

    Reviver is a police procedural novel with an urban noir vibe. It’s also one of the best debuts I’ve read this year. Jonah Miller is a Reviver: one of a few hundred globally who, by human touch, can communicate with the recently dead. When such evidence becomes admissible in court, Jonah’s talents become highly sort after. As part of the US Forensic Revival Service, Jonah’s work is stressful and difficult. Burn-out rates amongst revivers are common. When Jonah revives the victim of a murder and is Reviver is a police procedural novel with an urban noir vibe. It’s also one of the best debuts I’ve read this year. Jonah Miller is a Reviver: one of a few hundred globally who, by human touch, can communicate with the recently dead. When such evidence becomes admissible in court, Jonah’s talents become highly sort after. As part of the US Forensic Revival Service, Jonah’s work is stressful and difficult. Burn-out rates amongst revivers are common. When Jonah revives the victim of a murder and is spoken to by ‘another’ presence, many think that it is time for Jonah to have a rest. He had a type of breakdown a couple of years before, and people are worried that he might be overdoing things. However, when the original journalist who brought revivers to the public’s attention is found murdered, Jonah is brought in to assist on the high profile case. Initially it seems like some sort of revenge attack from the Afterlifers - one of the many groups who decried reviving as a blasphemy. However, Jonah and the victim’s daughter, Annabel, believe that some sort of cover-up is involved and they become determined to bring some long hidden truths to light, even though there are things out there amongst the living and the dead who seem determined to stop them. Wow. I wasn’t expecting this one to be that good. But it draws you in from the rather visceral and very chilling first chapter. Reading like a TV series script (and admittedly, it would make a great TV series), the reader is soon getting to know Jonah, his soon-to-be-retiring boss, Sam Deering, Jonah’s reviver colleagues and his friends as he tries to uncover the big conspiracy. They develop into characters the reader is interested in and then concerned about, using the idea of ‘What-if?’ and applying it to the logical consequences within a contemporary time-frame. It’s fast, it’s surprisingly accessible and easy to read, and was a difficult-to-put-down novel in the first thirty pages. Whilst the ideas aren’t that new, the way they’re written is engaging and exciting. Most of all, for most of the time the decisions they make and the actions they take are sensible and logical, although it does go a little ‘action-hero’ at the end. This one really worked for me. The set-up’s great, the characters are likeable and easily differentiated. Though we do drag in the odd cliché along the way, there’s enough new revelation as well to make the story work. For fans of Fringe and Ben Aaronovitch’s Peter Grant’s Rivers of London series, this has the pace of the CSI TV series and the chilly even rather visceral tone of Thomas Harris’ Hannibal Lecter books and novels. For a debut novel, its style, tone and pace are surprisingly good. Another great holiday read. I loved it.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Jessica Strider

    Pros: interesting characters, carefully realized reviver process and reactions to it Pros/con: lots of flashbacks and info dumps Cons: little narrative tension Twelve years ago Daniel Harker broke the story on revivers, people who could revive the dead and let them physically speak. Now the process is considered routine for forensic work and many people have insurance offering them the chance to say a final good-bye. Jonah Miller has been a reviver since the accident that took his Mom’s life when h Pros: interesting characters, carefully realized reviver process and reactions to it Pros/con: lots of flashbacks and info dumps Cons: little narrative tension Twelve years ago Daniel Harker broke the story on revivers, people who could revive the dead and let them physically speak. Now the process is considered routine for forensic work and many people have insurance offering them the chance to say a final good-bye. Jonah Miller has been a reviver since the accident that took his Mom’s life when he was 14. With higher abilities than many of his colleagues, he works for a forensic office and is given tough cases. At the end of a routine revival, something - unexpected - happens. For a few moments the subject is possessed by a malevolent force. Told the incident was a hallucination, more and more things happen to convince Jonah that maybe overwork wasn’t the cause. This is a slow-moving but interesting story. The author gives you a good grounding of how revival works and how the revelation that there’s something after this life affected the world, from the protesting afterlifers to insurance brokers arranging for final meetings. I personally found the numerous info dumps and flashbacks interesting, because they offered firm grounding in the world and the protagonists. For the sake of variety, it might have been nice to learn some of this information more organically, via conversations, etc. The characters were very interesting. Jonah’s the protagonist, whose sense of morality is strong even as his mind is taken over by remnants of his recent revivals. Then there’s Noah, a revival technician who keeps Jonah company and Annabel Harper, a journalist like her father, who’s investigating a crime and gets Jonah’s help. Because the story is so slow moving, there’s little narrative tension. A few scenes were creepy but I never really felt Jonah was in danger of insanity, though I did fear for his life towards the end of the book, but not on a level that I’d expected to. It’s an interesting story with good world-building, smart characters, some interesting speculative elements and a lot of mystery.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Janette Fleming

    Jonah Miller is a Reviver, able to temporarily revive the dead so they can say goodbye to their loved ones — or tell the police who killed them. Jonah works in a department of forensics created specifically for Revivers, and he’s one of the best in the business. For every high-profile corpse pushing daisies, it’s Jonah’s job to find justice for them. But while reviving the victim of a brutal murder, he encounters a terrifying presence. Something is on the other side watching. Waiting. His superio Jonah Miller is a Reviver, able to temporarily revive the dead so they can say goodbye to their loved ones — or tell the police who killed them. Jonah works in a department of forensics created specifically for Revivers, and he’s one of the best in the business. For every high-profile corpse pushing daisies, it’s Jonah’s job to find justice for them. But while reviving the victim of a brutal murder, he encounters a terrifying presence. Something is on the other side watching. Waiting. His superiors tell him it's only in his mind, a product of stress. Jonah isn't so certain. Then Daniel Harker, the first journalist to bring revival to public attention, is murdered. Jonah finds himself getting dragged into the hunt for answers. Working with Harker's daughter Annabel, he becomes determined to find those responsible and bring them to justice. Soon they uncover long-hidden truths that call into doubt everything Jonah stands for, and reveal a sinister force that threatens us all. Debut novel nicely straddling the increasingly popular supernatural thriller sub-genre The strength of the premise is compelling enough to power the story and the construction of the Reviver back story well done and the revivals themselves are superb. Just a couple of little niggles ....as the story progressed I would have liked more supernatural less running round with guns; female characters that never really develop outside their body shape & hair colour. Finally...dear author, please never ever use Never as a character's name - brought me up short every time I read it. First in a trilogy and a soon to be a film, I will be interested to see where this goes Extra star for the cool interactive cover

  30. 5 out of 5

    Arti Honrao

    The story-line is interesting and is very well-written. The protagonist Jonah who is a reviver (the one who wakes the dead) is perfectly sketched and so are the other characters. The story flow is too good, does not drag at any point and succeeds in keeping the reader interested. A couple of scenes described in the book did make me look around myself in the middle of the night and finally close the book and sleep and then I had dreams of the reviver. It is a kind of book that stays with you, you The story-line is interesting and is very well-written. The protagonist Jonah who is a reviver (the one who wakes the dead) is perfectly sketched and so are the other characters. The story flow is too good, does not drag at any point and succeeds in keeping the reader interested. A couple of scenes described in the book did make me look around myself in the middle of the night and finally close the book and sleep and then I had dreams of the reviver. It is a kind of book that stays with you, you like it or not. The end, at least for me, was kind of expected - especially if you are going to write a part two of the book! I have read that the book is first of the Reviver Trilogy .. I just hope that the author is able to do justice to the remaining two books as he has done to this one. I just have to wait till 17th January 2015 to read Acolyte, the next in the series. (Or may be more, depending on when it would be available in India) Overall, if you are not a one-genre person and would like to try something new, you must grab this book. If you are a reader of this genre and have read the likes of Stephen King, you might not like it so much but considering that Reviver is the debut novel of the Author, he does deserve some credit for writing 409 pages of the book that you cannot put down easily. Also, I do not really think this book can be categorised into horror genre, Thriller, may be yes. http://www.artihonrao.net/2014/06/rev...

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