web site hit counter Dogtripping: 25 Rescues, 11 Volunteers, And 3 RVs On Our Canine Cross-Country Adventure - Ebooks PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

Dogtripping: 25 Rescues, 11 Volunteers, And 3 RVs On Our Canine Cross-Country Adventure

Availability: Ready to download

When mystery writer David Rosenfelt and his family moved from California to Maine, he thought he had prepared for everything. They had mapped the route, brought three GPSs for backup, refrigerators full of food, and volunteers for help. But traveling in three RVs with twenty-five dogs turned out to be a bigger ordeal than he anticipated. Rosenfelt recounts the adventure wi When mystery writer David Rosenfelt and his family moved from California to Maine, he thought he had prepared for everything. They had mapped the route, brought three GPSs for backup, refrigerators full of food, and volunteers for help. But traveling in three RVs with twenty-five dogs turned out to be a bigger ordeal than he anticipated. Rosenfelt recounts the adventure with humor and warmth and tells how he and his wife became passionate foster parents for rescue dogs, culminating in the creation of the Tara Foundation.


Compare

When mystery writer David Rosenfelt and his family moved from California to Maine, he thought he had prepared for everything. They had mapped the route, brought three GPSs for backup, refrigerators full of food, and volunteers for help. But traveling in three RVs with twenty-five dogs turned out to be a bigger ordeal than he anticipated. Rosenfelt recounts the adventure wi When mystery writer David Rosenfelt and his family moved from California to Maine, he thought he had prepared for everything. They had mapped the route, brought three GPSs for backup, refrigerators full of food, and volunteers for help. But traveling in three RVs with twenty-five dogs turned out to be a bigger ordeal than he anticipated. Rosenfelt recounts the adventure with humor and warmth and tells how he and his wife became passionate foster parents for rescue dogs, culminating in the creation of the Tara Foundation.

30 review for Dogtripping: 25 Rescues, 11 Volunteers, And 3 RVs On Our Canine Cross-Country Adventure

  1. 5 out of 5

    Jaline

    This month, with only two books remaining in the Andy Carpenter series, I decided to read this book by the same author instead. It is their travelogue involving the transport of the 25 rescue dogs that David Rosenfelt and his wife Debbie had in their Southern California home to their new home in Maine. They rented 3 RV’s and serendipitously found 11 volunteers to accompany them on this journey across the country. Told with his trademark quirky humour spiced with plenty of the self-deprecating var This month, with only two books remaining in the Andy Carpenter series, I decided to read this book by the same author instead. It is their travelogue involving the transport of the 25 rescue dogs that David Rosenfelt and his wife Debbie had in their Southern California home to their new home in Maine. They rented 3 RV’s and serendipitously found 11 volunteers to accompany them on this journey across the country. Told with his trademark quirky humour spiced with plenty of the self-deprecating variety, this story is perfect for the holiday season. Isn’t that what many people do? Parents: “What are you going to ask Santa to bring you for Christmas?” Child: “A puppy! I want a puppy for Christmas!” And then, in some households there is the kind of end story that David Rosenfelt described in this book. A year later, the puppy is no longer little, cute, and squishy. It is now pretty much full grown and not as cute as it used to be. Dad takes his two young boys and the dog to a shelter and says they want to drop off the dog and pick up another puppy. Shelters in the Southern California area are so crowded that voluntary drop-offs are usually euthanized if they can’t be placed quickly. If it is a stray or a dog dropped off by someone who found the dog, there is a 5-day period of “grace” to find the owner before trying to find an adoption home and, if unsuccessful, this ex-pet is also euthanized. The story of how David and Debbie came to set up their own rescue foundation is one that went straight to my heart. The majority of the dogs that David and Debbie take in are rejected “seniors”, and many of them have health problems. It is their mission to give these dogs a joyful, safe, and love-filled life for whatever time they have left. The story of their cross-country trip with their 25 dogs is fun, funny, and has a few intense moments, too. According to David, he was the only wet blanket on the trip but I’m fairly certain he enjoyed himself and the trip a lot more than he let on, despite all the anxieties over logistics. One of the highlights of this book for me was reading the stories of the dogs they took on the trip – what is known of their previous lives, how the dogs came to their attention (and their home), and what their personalities are like. I loved their stories and they were included as little vignettes between the adventure tale of their cross-country move. Reading the individual stories of these now-beloved pets brought tears to my eyes every time. A lovely and love-motivated novel, one told in a style that is unmistakably David Rosenfelt’s, this was a super enjoyable and satisfying read for me.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Carmen

    So at that point I was just trying to gauge how hotels react to our request. I decided to be honest, not because that's my natural instinct or because I thought there was any kind of moral imperative in play here. Rather, my fear was that if I lied, we'd show up at a hotel and of course be unable to sneak the dogs in undetected, and we'd get turned away. And the only way we wouldn't be detected was if the proprietor was in a coma. A very deep, kept-alive-by-machines coma. My feelings about this bo So at that point I was just trying to gauge how hotels react to our request. I decided to be honest, not because that's my natural instinct or because I thought there was any kind of moral imperative in play here. Rather, my fear was that if I lied, we'd show up at a hotel and of course be unable to sneak the dogs in undetected, and we'd get turned away. And the only way we wouldn't be detected was if the proprietor was in a coma. A very deep, kept-alive-by-machines coma. My feelings about this book are mixed. The gist is simple: a man and his wife own 25 dogs. They are moving from CA to ME and they can't afford to put the 25 dogs on a plane, so they rent some RVs and drive them across the country. The dogs are dogs the couple adopted. They are not being moved to a rescue, or being placed in new homes, the couple OWNS 25 dogs. They mainly find these dogs at shelters. Rosenfelt has really no innate love of dogs, but when he met his wife, she was a dog-crazy person, and he goes along with it. They have owned up to 42 dogs at one time. A shelter will call them because a dog is going to be put down, the wife will of course have to save it, and she will return with the dog in question plus four more dogs. You can see how they ended up with so many. Debbie used to just have one dog, a dog she loved and worshiped - a Golden Retriever named Tara. However, when Tara died (1 year and 3 months after David and Debbie get together), she made it her mission to save Golden Retrievers (but ends up not limiting herself to the breed). She vows never to leave one in a shelter. She is a feisty person who literally marches up to a man leading a dog to the needle and demand to adopt it immediately. I admire her desire to help and save dogs. The author has a great sense of humor, mainly stemming from self-deprecating humor. Rosenfelt is a coward, lazy, and not a "real" man. This is how he describes himself, and where his humor mostly stems from. When he's funny, it's great. He made me laugh out loud 9 times. I counted. And that was wonderful! I don't laugh at books so easy - or perhaps I just don't read funny books very often. But I enjoyed laughing so much. But the places between the laughter are pretty boring. It's like Chicken Soup for the Dog Lover's Soul or something. I love dogs! But reading 278 pages of dog shit, dog vomit, the dog escaped, the dog killed a small animal, we rescued this dog from a hoarder, we saved this dog from being put down, we helped this stray... My dog-loving attention span is engaged primarily when there is an actual dog in the room with me. I can pet it, talk to it, take it on a walk, etc. However, just because I love dogs doesn't mean I want to hear about them non-stop for five hours. You know what I mean? Also, I can't help but being a little... concerned. Owning 25-42 dogs? Are you saving the dogs from hoarders or are you hoarding yourself? Rosenfelt actually addresses this: I sometimes think that we might be considered hoarders, though I suppose a major distinction is that hoarded animals are not well cared for or loved; they are simply kept. Okay, roger that. But his wife cannot go to a shelter without bringing home 2-4 new dogs. Isn't that indicative of something? Luckily, she seems to go for senior dogs or dogs with severe health problems who are unlikely to be adopted. So their 'turnover rate' is relatively high. I would have thought they have no children, because no children are ever mentioned in this book. However, Rosenfelt's site says he has two (I think from his previous marriage before he met dog-loving Debbie). 4 - 6 dogs sleep with them every single night in their bed. Is there ever any opportunity for intimacy? What about work? Well, both Rosenfelt and his wife work. But Rosenfelt is an author of a murder mystery series and conveniently works from home. Almost all the dogs on pills, sometimes multiple pills. The pills need to be administered daily, or twice daily. Feeding takes 45 minutes, twice a day. The couple never ever sits down to eat at the table, but only eats standing up in the kitchen, because the dogs beg and Debbie feeds them from the table. The dogs are their life, basically. I really, really think Rosenfelt and his wife are doing good work. Saving dogs from euthanasia and hoarding situations is very noble. They obviously take great care of the dogs and love them to bits. But the book was a bit too much for me - I just am not obsessed enough with dogs to enjoy reading stuff like this. Perhaps a short story or an article once in a while, but not a whole book. P.S. I like that pictures are included in the book. P.P.S. Because I read this book, I am going to check out Rosenfelt's fiction and see how it is.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Bark | Ladies Of Horror Fiction

    This is a wee bit gif heavy. I apologize but my brain is too tired to put words on the page and it's dogs and I love dogs, especially goldens. They are such smart, sweet, happy go-lucky creatures. But author David Rosenfelt and his wife might have developed a little dog obsession. Not that there’s anything wrong with that. Especially when you’re as kind hearted and generous as the Rosenfelt’s. When David’s wife retired, instead of sipping martinis by the pool or spending their time golfing or This is a wee bit gif heavy. I apologize but my brain is too tired to put words on the page and it's dogs and I love dogs, especially goldens. They are such smart, sweet, happy go-lucky creatures. But author David Rosenfelt and his wife might have developed a little dog obsession. Not that there’s anything wrong with that. Especially when you’re as kind hearted and generous as the Rosenfelt’s. When David’s wife retired, instead of sipping martinis by the pool or spending their time golfing or some other cliché retirement thing, they took up rescuing old and unwanted golden retrievers and a few other mixed breeds that had fallen on hard times. Many husbands fear their wives walking into a mall and blowing the budget, this guy feared his wife’s visits to the shelter. She could never leave without bringing a few more home. One day they woke up and a few dogs had turned into, well, a whole heck of a lot of dogs (I think it was 50+ at one point!). But they wouldn’t have it any other way. These people are devoted and I enjoyed reading every moment of their story. This is some of their pack. Be warned. If you read this you can’t ever unread it. If you someday end up spending all of your retirement savings on doggie food and vet bills and water for hosing off your poopy shoes, you’ll have to get in line behind me. When the couple decides to relocate from California to Maine, they soon realize that it’s not going to be as simple as loading up one vehicle and taking a road trip. Flying was out of the question. At this time they have twenty-five mostly elderly dogs that spend their time sleeping, barking, eating and pooping. Twenty-five! Can you imagine? They end up renting three RV’s and are fortunate to have a crew of crazy adventurous people volunteer to take the trip with them. Yes, these people actually VOLUNTEERED. There really are people out there in the world like this and they give me hope. Their story is full of the ups and downs of a life filled with dogs. Interspersed within the telling of the epic cross-country trip to Maine, Rosenfeld tells the stories of many of the dogs that have been a part of their lives and, of course, there are moments . . . But Rosenfeld has a way with the words and a great wry sense of humor that never allows one to wallow in the grief for very long. I was sad when it ended because it ended. I think I could’ve listened to this book forever. Very highly recommend. Especially if you’re having one of those days when you fear for humanity.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Robin

    I just fell in love with 25 dogs (and I actually prefer cats) and David Rosenfelt. Rosenfelt, movie and TV writer and a successful author of mysteries and thrillers (patrons love his Andy Carpenter series), married Debbie Myers in the 1990s and together they started the Tara Foundation, named after their beloved golden retriever. They set out to rescue over 4000 dogs, accumulating 25 (and at times more) along the way. In 2011 they decided to move from Los Angeles to Maine and a logistical nightma I just fell in love with 25 dogs (and I actually prefer cats) and David Rosenfelt. Rosenfelt, movie and TV writer and a successful author of mysteries and thrillers (patrons love his Andy Carpenter series), married Debbie Myers in the 1990s and together they started the Tara Foundation, named after their beloved golden retriever. They set out to rescue over 4000 dogs, accumulating 25 (and at times more) along the way. In 2011 they decided to move from Los Angeles to Maine and a logistical nightmare ensued. This book covers not only the organization of the trip across the US and the journey with 25 dogs (how exactly do you get 25 dogs out for a potty-break,and more importantly, who wields the scooper?), but also the stories of various rescued dogs that were with them on the journey. The trip became known as "Woofabago" (google Woofabago and Facebook for photos). This book was charming but I have to admit it was sometimes difficult to read as I seemed to have tears of either laughter at Rosenfelt's Dave Barry-ish humor, or emotion while reading the backstories of the dogs' rescues, brimming in my eyes. And what I liked best about David and his wife was their preference for rescuing large older dogs, even those that only had a few months to live [sniff]. David Rosenfelt has become one of my favorite people on this planet and he is my hero. This book would make a wonderful gift for any animal lover.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Luis

    An amorous journey of wit and "poop" known as "Dogtripping." An amorous journey of wit and "poop" known as "Dogtripping."

  6. 4 out of 5

    Ann-Marie

    All I can say about this book is, if I had known about this trip before it had happened they would have had one more "real man" along, me! I can drive a motor home and know how to operate the relevant systems. I can think of nothing more exciting than to be responsible for the care and well-being of 25 dogs for a week with a bunch of like-minded idiots. So, David Rosenfelt, if you ever have to do it again, this petite woman is your man. You made it sound like a blast, and the stories you told ab All I can say about this book is, if I had known about this trip before it had happened they would have had one more "real man" along, me! I can drive a motor home and know how to operate the relevant systems. I can think of nothing more exciting than to be responsible for the care and well-being of 25 dogs for a week with a bunch of like-minded idiots. So, David Rosenfelt, if you ever have to do it again, this petite woman is your man. You made it sound like a blast, and the stories you told about all the dogs you and Debbie have saved made me love the ones my family has adopted even more.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Manintheboat

    Working through NPR's Best Books of 2013. -The entire chapters in italics are horrible. -That most chapters are only 2 pages long is horrible. He needed ONE chapter titled DOGS and then tell all the "how we got this dog" stories. Except it's all the same story and he repeats it over and over and over again, "We got a call from Shelter, there's an unwanted dog there, so we picked it up, took it to the vet, and it lived its life out here." -He repeats himself over and over again like each chapter is Working through NPR's Best Books of 2013. -The entire chapters in italics are horrible. -That most chapters are only 2 pages long is horrible. He needed ONE chapter titled DOGS and then tell all the "how we got this dog" stories. Except it's all the same story and he repeats it over and over and over again, "We got a call from Shelter, there's an unwanted dog there, so we picked it up, took it to the vet, and it lived its life out here." -He repeats himself over and over again like each chapter is its own separate book. Yup, we know you are an author. You told us that in the Intro, then in chapter 3, and chapter 5 etc. -He's whiny like Dave Barry. -Nothing actually happens on the dog trip.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Michelle

    Dogtripping is a real life story about David Rosenfelt and his wife's journey to rescue dogs and move across the country. The Rosenfelt's are moving from Southern California to Maine. When they do this they have to move 25 dogs in the process. After much thought has gone into this plan they decide the best way to do this is in 3 RV's with 11 other people who volunteered to help. David talks about this move and in between talking about the move he introduces the readers to the various dogs that h Dogtripping is a real life story about David Rosenfelt and his wife's journey to rescue dogs and move across the country. The Rosenfelt's are moving from Southern California to Maine. When they do this they have to move 25 dogs in the process. After much thought has gone into this plan they decide the best way to do this is in 3 RV's with 11 other people who volunteered to help. David talks about this move and in between talking about the move he introduces the readers to the various dogs that he and his wife have rescued and kept. I won an ARC of this book and I am so glad I did. This was one of the best books. It's hilarious and warmhearted. Thank goodness for people like David and his wife.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Patricia

    Cute book, cute vignettes of the various dogs in his life, way too much trying-to-be-funny-sarcasm that got old after a while. For a light read it was OK but it was far less engrossing than I expected. Also, I dislike main characters that are helpless, as Mr. Rosenfelt proclaimed and proved himself to be throughout the book.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Orsolya

    Having moved cross-country from Ohio to California for 5 days in a U-Haul truck with a cat; I know the difficulties of relocating a pet. I can’t even imagine doing this with several animals. David Rosenfelt can and DID: with 25 dogs! He recounts his adventures in “Dogtripping: 25 Rescues, 11 Volunteers, and 3 RVs on our Canine Cross-Country Adventure”. Rosenfelt and his wife, Debbie, are the dog version of “crazy cat ladies”. They have volunteered at numerous animal shelters and pet rescues (and Having moved cross-country from Ohio to California for 5 days in a U-Haul truck with a cat; I know the difficulties of relocating a pet. I can’t even imagine doing this with several animals. David Rosenfelt can and DID: with 25 dogs! He recounts his adventures in “Dogtripping: 25 Rescues, 11 Volunteers, and 3 RVs on our Canine Cross-Country Adventure”. Rosenfelt and his wife, Debbie, are the dog version of “crazy cat ladies”. They have volunteered at numerous animal shelters and pet rescues (and run their own rescue), having saved thousands of dogs plus have previously owned upwards of 40 dogs at a time in their own home. Clearly, these dog-crazy folks wouldn’t dream of relocating without their 25 dogs in tow when moving from California across the map to Maine. Enter: “Dog tripping”. “Dogtripping” is suitably filled with humor and emotions, fitting the story being told. I laughed, I cried, and laughed some more… And that was only within the first 15 pages! Rosenfelt writes in a hilarious and friendly tone which heightens the tale and results in laugh-out-loud comedy. His sarcasm is heavy and yet translates easily through text which is impressive. Rosenfelt could have a great career as a stand-up comedian. Although “Dogtripping” is written well-enough, there are problems with execution. The chapters alternate between stories of dog rescues and the actual dog relocation. This feels choppy and abrupt, with the dog rescue chapters being short and somewhat irrelevant. It would have made sense to singularly pen the book on the account of the relocation which were the more interesting chapters, anyway. Oddly, the dog trip chapters are presented in italic font which makes it appear like reading a memory, dream, or letter which is quite distracting. Furthermore, much of “Dogtripping” felt like a “shout-out” to friends/peers of Rosenfelt; while also including references to LA-city life which makes sense to me as I live here, but wouldn’t so much for those who live elsewhere. Again, much of this feels extraneous and “Dogtripping” would be much shorter if the focus was on the actual trip (which is perhaps why all of this was included: there wasn’t enough material). The chapters concerning the stories of dog rescues become quite repetitive slowing down the pace, while the dog relocation chapters leave unanswered questions. Why didn’t the Rosenfelts’ adult child(ren) help with the move? Did they move their belongings? Why is Rosenfelt’s wife not in any of the photos? Although minor areas, “Dogtripping” continues to feel more like a family account or blog versus a substantial book. The conclusion of “Dogtripping” rounds out nicely with a summarized ‘moral’ ending albeit, a bit boring. Basically, Rosenfelt’s trip was uneventful (I had more adventures on my own cross-country trip) and therefore the concept of the book is interesting but the actual feat of relocation wasn’t that remarkable. “Dogtripping” is a whimsy and humorous book which is light and reads quickly: perfect for a beach bag. As an animal lover, I support Rosenfelt and his wife’s animal-saving advocacy but aside from humor, “Dogtripping” just felt like a glorified diary entry/thank-you note to those who helped make the trip possible. “Dogtripping” isn’t terrible and is suggested for animal lovers but it won’t change lives or bear too much repeating.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Rhonda

    I liked the concept for this book. I have to admit I didn't finish it, though. The reason for that was because after a while I got tired of the agenda of it. I am a fan of rescuing animals. All my pets come from shelters, and I only adopt adult animals, figuring they have a lesser chance than the cute kittens. That's why the preachy "all people who take their animals to shelters are bad, bad, BAD people!" refrain began to grate on my nerves. I agree that it's awful to get rid of a dog or cat bec I liked the concept for this book. I have to admit I didn't finish it, though. The reason for that was because after a while I got tired of the agenda of it. I am a fan of rescuing animals. All my pets come from shelters, and I only adopt adult animals, figuring they have a lesser chance than the cute kittens. That's why the preachy "all people who take their animals to shelters are bad, bad, BAD people!" refrain began to grate on my nerves. I agree that it's awful to get rid of a dog or cat because you get tired of it. I agree you should take responsibility for your animals. It just seemed like he was hitting the reader over the head with his opinions. It is as though the author assumes you can not possibly agree with his sentiment, so he repeats it over and over...and over. I never did make it to the trip (I only got halfway through), because it seemed to take a loooong time to plan everything and give backstory,(and preach to the choir), so I truthfully got tired of it. A good concept for a book, but it was just too much anti-shelter system, and I felt he didn't care a fig for anyone who was even ambivalent about animals. Too much agenda in what should have been just a fun read about traveling with 25+ dogs.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Tracy

    I got this sound recording for the family to listen to on a recent car trip. My husband and I were entertained by about the first quarter of the book. We enjoyed David Rosenfelt's brand of self-deprecating humor and the idea of this cross-country road trip with 25 dogs just seemed too insane not to be funny. The kids never really got into the book - it was not engaging enough for them. After the first quarter by husband and I started to get bored with the repeated stories of he and his wife goin I got this sound recording for the family to listen to on a recent car trip. My husband and I were entertained by about the first quarter of the book. We enjoyed David Rosenfelt's brand of self-deprecating humor and the idea of this cross-country road trip with 25 dogs just seemed too insane not to be funny. The kids never really got into the book - it was not engaging enough for them. After the first quarter by husband and I started to get bored with the repeated stories of he and his wife going to a shelter, bringing home 2-5 dogs and adding them to their existing brood. He goes into great detail describing many (perhaps all) of the dogs who made the trip, but after a few dogs' stories that got a little old too. Eventually he began to talk about setting up the logistics of the trip and finally in the last quarter of the book talked about the actual trip across country. Unfortunately for the reader (but I guess fortunately for the Rosenfelts) the trip was pretty uneventful. My husband made the comment that this would have been better as a 4-page magazine article, and I have to agree.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Bethany

    I loved this book. Through the whole book I was either giggling at the author's sarcastic wit or the antics of one of his many rescue dogs, or I was sobbing uncontrollably. Part of being a dog lover is learning to let them go, but that never makes it easier. I get emotional thinking about dogs being put down... a sadness that this author is all too familiar with. This is a must read for dog lovers. You will love it from start to finish, just like I did. I also got to see David Rosenfelt speak recen I loved this book. Through the whole book I was either giggling at the author's sarcastic wit or the antics of one of his many rescue dogs, or I was sobbing uncontrollably. Part of being a dog lover is learning to let them go, but that never makes it easier. I get emotional thinking about dogs being put down... a sadness that this author is all too familiar with. This is a must read for dog lovers. You will love it from start to finish, just like I did. I also got to see David Rosenfelt speak recently. He's entertaining to listen to, so if you have the chance to go listen to him, go. :)

  14. 4 out of 5

    Jami

    I absolutely loved this book! I like his mystery stand alone books and the Andy Carpenter series, and this was a pleasant treat to learn more about the author. I had no idea he was so into dog rescue and the focus of this book is the dogs. What is not to like about a guy who has one word for those who mistreat animals: "assholes." Unlike the author, I was sorry to see the trip end as I wanted to read more! His humor, love of dogs, and personality really comes through in this book and I was thoro I absolutely loved this book! I like his mystery stand alone books and the Andy Carpenter series, and this was a pleasant treat to learn more about the author. I had no idea he was so into dog rescue and the focus of this book is the dogs. What is not to like about a guy who has one word for those who mistreat animals: "assholes." Unlike the author, I was sorry to see the trip end as I wanted to read more! His humor, love of dogs, and personality really comes through in this book and I was thoroughly entertained. If I had known about the trip back then, I also would have volunteered to go along for the ride!

  15. 4 out of 5

    Johnna Fonner

    I nearly fell asleep reading this one. It was boring, and he didn't have anything very interesting to say about the trip, which didn't happen until halfway through the book. The dog profile chapters that he mixed in were equally as bland. I don't think the author was very likeable or considerate. Just because you save dogs doesn't give you a pass to be inconsiderate to other people and their property. I read an entire chapter on dog shit. Not fun. Enough said. I nearly fell asleep reading this one. It was boring, and he didn't have anything very interesting to say about the trip, which didn't happen until halfway through the book. The dog profile chapters that he mixed in were equally as bland. I don't think the author was very likeable or considerate. Just because you save dogs doesn't give you a pass to be inconsiderate to other people and their property. I read an entire chapter on dog shit. Not fun. Enough said.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Elizabeth

    So much to like! Funny, sad, 300 dogs. And yes! Tara will live forever. No need to worry. He mentions at one point his Andy Carpenter books were just doing ok so maybe this last one would end the series. Well it was the first cover (#6 PLAY DEAD) to have a dog on it and sales took off.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Dagny

    More about how each dog was acquired than about the actual trip, but an enjoyable read anyway. Also very interesting when he related his writing history and their dog charity work.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Judy

    Dogtripping is a heartwarming, true story about a couple who operated a dog rescue in Southern California and moved to Maine. The story of the move is interjected with stories of the rescues of their different dogs as well as their original Golden Retrieve, Tara, who inspired them to begin rescuing. The author describes a "normal" day in a household that contains anywhere from 25-42 dogs at one time. I believe this will be an inspirational and fun read for dog lovers. The author has a sense of hum Dogtripping is a heartwarming, true story about a couple who operated a dog rescue in Southern California and moved to Maine. The story of the move is interjected with stories of the rescues of their different dogs as well as their original Golden Retrieve, Tara, who inspired them to begin rescuing. The author describes a "normal" day in a household that contains anywhere from 25-42 dogs at one time. I believe this will be an inspirational and fun read for dog lovers. The author has a sense of humor similar to Bill Bryson's enhancing the enjoyment of the story. The narration is well-done, too.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Victoria

    I’ve been a huge fan of Rosenfelt’s since first discovering his wonderful Andy Carpenter series on the bookstore shelves in 2009. I have since purchased and read all of his mystery novels - both within the series and his standalone thrillers. This book marks not only Rosenfelt’s nonfiction debut, but also my first experience listening to one of his books rather than reading it. And what a terrific experience it was! Morning traffic - once the bane of my commute - suddenly became a welcome thing. I’ve been a huge fan of Rosenfelt’s since first discovering his wonderful Andy Carpenter series on the bookstore shelves in 2009. I have since purchased and read all of his mystery novels - both within the series and his standalone thrillers. This book marks not only Rosenfelt’s nonfiction debut, but also my first experience listening to one of his books rather than reading it. And what a terrific experience it was! Morning traffic - once the bane of my commute - suddenly became a welcome thing. I became a nicer driver - waving people ahead of me, in no hurry to get to where I was going, content to listen to the smooth narration (though not read by the author, his voice certainly sounded convincing to me) alternate between relating the history of his journey into being “dog-crazy” and his cross-country move from California to Maine. Some chapters focus on one particular dog in his family and because the Rosenfelts tend to adopt only the most unadoptable of dogs (the elderly or terminally ill), these sections evoke tears. But, like in his fictional novels, Rosenfelt’s humour balances the sadness. And the books is also filled with a lot of love - not only for the dogs (golden retrievers in particular), but also the very obvious love for his wife. It is a wonderful book and I was genuinely disappointed when it ended - I wanted more stories! And though I wouldn’t want to slow down the publication of his fiction novels, I would love to read (listen) to more about Rosenfelt’s real life.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Kirsti

    I really enjoyed this book, but I need to say it. The badly photo shopped cover does not accurately reflect the story within. The title does not really reflect it either. This is not the story of cute, wide eyed pups road tripping. This is the story of a man and a woman who step in and save adult dogs whom no one seems to want. Old dogs, sick dogs, ugly dogs, big dogs, nuisance dogs, dogs with learned behaviors that deem them unable to be adopted. These aren't the cute, body less puppies riding I really enjoyed this book, but I need to say it. The badly photo shopped cover does not accurately reflect the story within. The title does not really reflect it either. This is not the story of cute, wide eyed pups road tripping. This is the story of a man and a woman who step in and save adult dogs whom no one seems to want. Old dogs, sick dogs, ugly dogs, big dogs, nuisance dogs, dogs with learned behaviors that deem them unable to be adopted. These aren't the cute, body less puppies riding in a Chev (no, really, look closely at the cover, those dogs have no visible body through the windscreen) So what made me buy this book, apart from the fact I buy/read all animal memoirs and biographies I come across? The only thing the front cover got right; the words 'On the road with 25 rescue dogs...what could go wrong?' The actual story thankfully is much better than the cover. I respect the work this couple does, and found unlikely humor and sadness. There is a great story here that I recommend to all my animal loving friends. Absolutely don't judge a book by it's cover!

  21. 5 out of 5

    Angie Boyter

    If you've enjoyed David Rosenfelt's mysteries featuring Andy Carpenter and his golden retriever Tara, you'll find the same kind of writing here, with lots of humorous comments on humanity, including himself. I laughed a lot and chuckled and teared up a few times. This is a great book for animal lovers. Ostensibly the story of Rosenfelt's trip moving family, including 25 dogs, from California to Maine, the chapters about the trip itself are heavily interspersed with short chapters about various dog If you've enjoyed David Rosenfelt's mysteries featuring Andy Carpenter and his golden retriever Tara, you'll find the same kind of writing here, with lots of humorous comments on humanity, including himself. I laughed a lot and chuckled and teared up a few times. This is a great book for animal lovers. Ostensibly the story of Rosenfelt's trip moving family, including 25 dogs, from California to Maine, the chapters about the trip itself are heavily interspersed with short chapters about various dogs Rosenfelt has rescued and loved. The chapters were great, but I felt that the trip itself was shortchanged. For example, nine people went with Rosenfelt and his wife, but the reader gets almost no sense of their personalities other than Rosenfelt saying they were great to volunteer (which I am sure he means sincerely) and they enjoyed the trip. The description of the trip could have been more lively.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Kat

    I have read many of Rosenfelt's novels, and always enjoy the light banter and witty repartee between his fictional characters. This book was completely different, however, and chronicled the true life adventure of moving over 25 rescued dogs from California to Maine in 3 RV's. Stating that Rosenfelt and his wife are dog lovers is drastically understating their passion for canines. The dogs they are transporting aren't ones they plan to place in homes; they are the keepers! Sprinkled in amongst t I have read many of Rosenfelt's novels, and always enjoy the light banter and witty repartee between his fictional characters. This book was completely different, however, and chronicled the true life adventure of moving over 25 rescued dogs from California to Maine in 3 RV's. Stating that Rosenfelt and his wife are dog lovers is drastically understating their passion for canines. The dogs they are transporting aren't ones they plan to place in homes; they are the keepers! Sprinkled in amongst the logistics of the trip are dog stories of the many animals they have rescued and how Rosenfelt and his wife began their dog rescue operation, The Tara Foundation. I enjoyed the story, but had trouble relating at times to their extreme love of dogs. Eating every single meal standing up for YEARS because otherwise the dogs would get all the food was a few steps beyond reasonable in my book!!

  23. 4 out of 5

    Perri

    I picked up this book because of all the title and fun cover. I haven't read his Andy Carpenter mysteries but plan to give them a go. A fast breezy read, about his wife and his passionate dog rescue efforts, interspersed with a travelogue of how they moved his 25 dogs cross county in three RVs. He can be a bit sanctimonious about his rescues, but his self deprecating attitude softens the message. For an author I thought the transitions he made between dog stories and travel were somewhat abrupt, I picked up this book because of all the title and fun cover. I haven't read his Andy Carpenter mysteries but plan to give them a go. A fast breezy read, about his wife and his passionate dog rescue efforts, interspersed with a travelogue of how they moved his 25 dogs cross county in three RVs. He can be a bit sanctimonious about his rescues, but his self deprecating attitude softens the message. For an author I thought the transitions he made between dog stories and travel were somewhat abrupt, but overall I enjoyed the bumpy ride.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Karen

    I needed something lighter this week. Though this has a few tough parts - as expected in any book dealing with the lives of rescue dogs - there were plenty of funny moments as well as heartfelt moments. I loved that he talked about each dog. Anyone who has spent time around a dog (or cat or any animal) knows they each have their own personality and quirks. That RV company had no idea what they had done. haha

  25. 5 out of 5

    Karen Snyder

    Hilarious, motivating and inside look into a "real dog lovers!" Hilarious, motivating and inside look into a "real dog lovers!"

  26. 5 out of 5

    Clover White

    An entertaining read, though the thought of being in an RV with that many shedding, drooling dogs makes my skin crawl. My daughter read this for a school assignment, and insisted I read it, too. I'm sure a true dog lover would have had all the feels for the various dog stories, but it mostly made me thankful that my dog interactions are constricted to rubbing the farm dog's belly when I visit my parents. Dogs are a lot of work! An entertaining read, though the thought of being in an RV with that many shedding, drooling dogs makes my skin crawl. My daughter read this for a school assignment, and insisted I read it, too. I'm sure a true dog lover would have had all the feels for the various dog stories, but it mostly made me thankful that my dog interactions are constricted to rubbing the farm dog's belly when I visit my parents. Dogs are a lot of work!

  27. 4 out of 5

    Teri Stich

    Trying to imagine what it would be like to travel in RVs cross country with 25 dogs, I just had to read this. David Rosenfelt has a great, wry sense of humor though a bit on the whiny side (He even admits to that). This book is two books in one actually, part stories about their life running the Tara Foundation, a dog rescue and the many dogs they brought home to live with them (over 40 at one point!) and part the adventure of moving from California to Maine with the help of 11 volunteers. So ve Trying to imagine what it would be like to travel in RVs cross country with 25 dogs, I just had to read this. David Rosenfelt has a great, wry sense of humor though a bit on the whiny side (He even admits to that). This book is two books in one actually, part stories about their life running the Tara Foundation, a dog rescue and the many dogs they brought home to live with them (over 40 at one point!) and part the adventure of moving from California to Maine with the help of 11 volunteers. So very touching in many ways, he and his wife are to be commended on the rescue work they did in Southern California. Uplifting, heartbreaking, laugh out loud all rolled into one. Crazy as it sounds, couldn’t help but wish I had been a part of it. Dog lovers, Travel Writing readers, Humor readers, and Quirky Book readers, to you I recommend this! Let’s face a book that uses “Francois de La Rochefoucauld wrote in 1650 that “the only thing constant in life is change’” as its opening line with the reason being it making him the only author ever to begin a book with the those words has true potential to entertain! The author has also written a number of mysteries that I may have to look into.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Mayda

    The title of this tale says it all, well, nearly all. 25 mostly large dogs, along with 11 volunteers who are mostly strangers to each other but who were brought together by a couple who really don’t look insane but at least one seems to be leaning in that direction, are all stuffed into 3 pretty big RVs which they drive (the people, not the dogs, that would be silly) from California to Maine. Easy-peasy? Well, no, but certainly worth the effort. You will think you are on the trip along with Davi The title of this tale says it all, well, nearly all. 25 mostly large dogs, along with 11 volunteers who are mostly strangers to each other but who were brought together by a couple who really don’t look insane but at least one seems to be leaning in that direction, are all stuffed into 3 pretty big RVs which they drive (the people, not the dogs, that would be silly) from California to Maine. Easy-peasy? Well, no, but certainly worth the effort. You will think you are on the trip along with David Rosenfelt, his wife Debbie, and all the others, but you may be very glad you weren’t. Much planning went into this cross-country trek, but still, things went wrong. Interspersed with the travelogue are the stories of the canines themselves. Heart-warming and humorous, this book is purebred entertainment from the first page to the last. Even if you aren’t lucky enough to have a four-footed, furry friend in your life, you can be lucky enough to read about them – just open this book and get started on the adventure.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Miranda

    I feel head over heels for this story. It's real and to me at times hilarious. As a advid animal lover myself I know the feeling of wanting to save them all, especially since I live in California and our shelters in all honesty as terrible. I've been to almost all of the ones listed here and I'm absolutely positive one of the dogs they rescued is one I volunteered with at the shelter and to this day had always that she had been put down. It's nice to possibly believe that it's the same dog and s I feel head over heels for this story. It's real and to me at times hilarious. As a advid animal lover myself I know the feeling of wanting to save them all, especially since I live in California and our shelters in all honesty as terrible. I've been to almost all of the ones listed here and I'm absolutely positive one of the dogs they rescued is one I volunteered with at the shelter and to this day had always that she had been put down. It's nice to possibly believe that it's the same dog and she loved the rest of her days loved. I don't know if I'll ever get into his fiction work but I will say this was a good healthy laugh and cry worthy story for me. So who knows maybe I'll try his other works and see if it had his same humor. :)

  30. 5 out of 5

    Amy

    So enjoyable!! Only Rosenfelt with his self-deprecating humor can make an RV trip with 25 dogs sound fun. Loved reading the history and rescue stories from the past, the journey across America, and the difference they have made in 100's of dogs. Rosenfelt shares many laugh out loud moments. Love his sense of humor, as well as his rescue work and devotion to dogs! I'd love to have been a volunteer on this journey. A meet and greet with this author and his dogs would be wonderful! This book has a So enjoyable!! Only Rosenfelt with his self-deprecating humor can make an RV trip with 25 dogs sound fun. Loved reading the history and rescue stories from the past, the journey across America, and the difference they have made in 100's of dogs. Rosenfelt shares many laugh out loud moments. Love his sense of humor, as well as his rescue work and devotion to dogs! I'd love to have been a volunteer on this journey. A meet and greet with this author and his dogs would be wonderful! This book has a permanent place on my bookshelf with my other beloved dog books.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.