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A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to Heaven,or How I Made Peace with the Paranormal and Stigmatized Zealots and Cynics in the Process

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In this book, Corey Taylor undertakes something never before attempted in the history of rock superstardom: he takes you with him as he journeys undercover through various ghostbusting groups who do their best to gather information and evidence about the existence of spirits. Some are more credible than others, and, frankly, some are completely insane, but all are observed In this book, Corey Taylor undertakes something never before attempted in the history of rock superstardom: he takes you with him as he journeys undercover through various ghostbusting groups who do their best to gather information and evidence about the existence of spirits. Some are more credible than others, and, frankly, some are completely insane, but all are observed with appropriate seriousness as Taylor attempts to better understand some of the spooky things that have happened to him in his life, especially that night at the Cold House. But that’s not all, folks. Taylor once again gives you a behind-the-scenes tour of his crazy life and the many beyond-the-grave events he’s encountered. (You’ll be shocked how often Slipknot has been invaded by the supernatural.) Taylor also touches on his religious background and how it led him to believe in much more than the Man in the Sky.


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In this book, Corey Taylor undertakes something never before attempted in the history of rock superstardom: he takes you with him as he journeys undercover through various ghostbusting groups who do their best to gather information and evidence about the existence of spirits. Some are more credible than others, and, frankly, some are completely insane, but all are observed In this book, Corey Taylor undertakes something never before attempted in the history of rock superstardom: he takes you with him as he journeys undercover through various ghostbusting groups who do their best to gather information and evidence about the existence of spirits. Some are more credible than others, and, frankly, some are completely insane, but all are observed with appropriate seriousness as Taylor attempts to better understand some of the spooky things that have happened to him in his life, especially that night at the Cold House. But that’s not all, folks. Taylor once again gives you a behind-the-scenes tour of his crazy life and the many beyond-the-grave events he’s encountered. (You’ll be shocked how often Slipknot has been invaded by the supernatural.) Taylor also touches on his religious background and how it led him to believe in much more than the Man in the Sky.

30 review for A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to Heaven,or How I Made Peace with the Paranormal and Stigmatized Zealots and Cynics in the Process

  1. 5 out of 5

    Tyler

    I'm a huge Slipknot fan. They've been my favourite band for 10+ years, but this isn't about a defense of Slipknot. I used to be a Corey fanboy but I'm older now and see more of what he does right and wrong. I read his last book and thought it was decent but not amazing by any means. I feel like teenager me would have been all COREY TAYLOR'S BOOK IS OMG AWESOME! The problem with both of Corey's books, but moreso with this one, is that he just thinks he's smarter than he is. He's an intelligent dud I'm a huge Slipknot fan. They've been my favourite band for 10+ years, but this isn't about a defense of Slipknot. I used to be a Corey fanboy but I'm older now and see more of what he does right and wrong. I read his last book and thought it was decent but not amazing by any means. I feel like teenager me would have been all COREY TAYLOR'S BOOK IS OMG AWESOME! The problem with both of Corey's books, but moreso with this one, is that he just thinks he's smarter than he is. He's an intelligent dude, don't get me wrong... I've known that for a while. But when he throws out a theory that really isn't the revelation he claims it to be, and does it in a condescending way, it's just not that appealing. I know he's always been very "in your face" about his beliefs, and I appreciate his militant way of going about things at times, but he goes too far. You can be completely sure of yourself without talking down on people. When he sticks to the ghost stories, it's a great read. It's creepy and he is such a good writer and storyteller (someone said it's like you're having a beer with him and I agree), that it's a real joy to read. I mean it's not really his fault that I went in hoping and expecting something else, but had I gotten more of THAT and less of his theories and opinions (some are okay, way too much time is spent doing this), it would have been great. Maybe it was the same reviewer on here, but he/she also said something along the lines of, "When someone is telling a ghost story do you care about his/her theories?" That's exactly it. He can throw in a little bit of opinions but honestly, the religion thing is just out of context and boring. The ghost stories are where he shines. So it's with that I say that this book is a mostly entertaining read, but damn it could have been better, and should have been better, because Corey is a gifted writer... he really is.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Bonnie

    My rating: 4.5 of 5 stars A copy of A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to Heaven was provided to me by Da Capo Press for review purposes. 'Thinking back now, it was really just a creepy house that creaked and shuddered, but to impressionable nine-year-olds, it was the vacation spot of the devil itself.' To give you all a proper introduction for those who are unaware, Corey Taylor is the lead singer of Slipknot and Stone Sour and the author of Seven Deadly Sins. 'A Funny Thing Happened' is a worthy f My rating: 4.5 of 5 stars A copy of A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to Heaven was provided to me by Da Capo Press for review purposes. 'Thinking back now, it was really just a creepy house that creaked and shuddered, but to impressionable nine-year-olds, it was the vacation spot of the devil itself.' To give you all a proper introduction for those who are unaware, Corey Taylor is the lead singer of Slipknot and Stone Sour and the author of Seven Deadly Sins. 'A Funny Thing Happened' is a worthy follow-up novel and another tantalizing look into the mind of an incredibly interesting man. At face value I was expecting 'A Funny Thing Happened' to be a random smattering of ghostly encounters he has had over the years, and it is, yet it's a fascinating exploration into the reasoning behind ghosts. His scientific details will definitely get you wondering because his hypotheses generated some genuinely possible answers. Surprisingly intellectual and educational, 'A Funny Thing Happened' is definitely a conduit that spurs some serious debates regarding the existence of the paranormal. 'Cynics will claims that my "eyewitness accounts" can easily be described as "flights of fancy," or "the trappings of an overactive imagination." [...] the one I hate even worse than those others: "You saw what you wanted to see and nothing more." Let me fucking telling you something: I did not want to see this shit, and I still do not want to see this shit.' A Funny Thing Happened is written with a humor that is harsh and biting yet oh so entertaining. This is a man that isn't afraid to speak his mind yet is graciously considerate of others beliefs. He's mindful and respectful of others beliefs regardless of whether or not he shares them. Simply put, he is a man of many opinions and isn't afraid to share... such as it should be. 'Belief is a gift you should cherish; knowledge is a gift you should never squander.' This book is like one big discussion, all topics are left open to interpretation, without concrete facts, just mindful musings and hypotheses. It will definitely generate antithetical opinions, however, approach this with an open mind and you may find yourself actually considering the possibilities of an alternate opinion. Or maybe you'll remain a skeptic. Either way, this book will definitely leave you something to ponder.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Burgoo

    Sometimes a book turns out to be very different than your expectations. A Funny Thing Happened is an example of this phenomenon. The press for the book describes it as Taylor “journeys through various ghostbusting groups”. That’s not exactly what happens here. What happens is that Taylor discusses some odd ghostly occurrences that he has experienced, including one adhoc investigation performed by Taylor and some friends. At this point, I should probably mention that I come to this book as neither Sometimes a book turns out to be very different than your expectations. A Funny Thing Happened is an example of this phenomenon. The press for the book describes it as Taylor “journeys through various ghostbusting groups”. That’s not exactly what happens here. What happens is that Taylor discusses some odd ghostly occurrences that he has experienced, including one adhoc investigation performed by Taylor and some friends. At this point, I should probably mention that I come to this book as neither a metal fan nor a true believer in the supernatural. I do, however, have an open mind, and am fascinated with the phenomenon of paranormal investigation groups. I was hoping that A Funny Thing Happened would provide an interesting view into this subculture. What did I get? At the core of A Funny Thing Happened is Taylor’s account of his own personal experiences. For the most part, these stories are great. Taylor is a gifted natural storyteller and the casual tone of his writing makes it feel like you’re having a beer with the guy while he tells you some crazy stories. Yes, the stories are weird and creepy, just like the best ghost stories always are. Unfortunately, too much of the book is devoted to Taylor’s theories about the nature of supernatural entities and subpar rock & roll stories. Now Taylor comes off as a more intelligent guy than you might expect, but I really have no interest in his own pet theories. Think back to the guy telling ghost stories around the campfire – do you care about his theories? Or do you just want to hear more spooky stories? I’m firmly in the last camp. On the whole I’d say that this book is really for fans only. Taylor puts so much of his own personality and personal life into the book that those who are looking for more will be disappointed.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Kira

    30% paranormal anecdote, 70% hot mess. i like corey taylor, i like listening to him during interviews, he's an incredibly talented musician. that being said: this book really needed a strong editor to control the stream of consciousness babble that took up the majority of the work. each chapter would whet your appetite with introductions to his ghost encounters & then just rambled about everything/anything else. i was really disappointed. 30% paranormal anecdote, 70% hot mess. i like corey taylor, i like listening to him during interviews, he's an incredibly talented musician. that being said: this book really needed a strong editor to control the stream of consciousness babble that took up the majority of the work. each chapter would whet your appetite with introductions to his ghost encounters & then just rambled about everything/anything else. i was really disappointed.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Heather

    To those who like reading about religion, Corey Taylor is likely to split the masses (not exactly a shock to those who have read Seven Deadly Sins ). But where atheists like Richard Dawkins make you want to violently punch walls with their attitude, Taylor brings a dose of humour along with a reflective look at himself. He never slams anyone for their belief, but just makes it clear what he says is merely his own belief. And why is this remotely relevant to a book about the existence of ghosts To those who like reading about religion, Corey Taylor is likely to split the masses (not exactly a shock to those who have read Seven Deadly Sins ). But where atheists like Richard Dawkins make you want to violently punch walls with their attitude, Taylor brings a dose of humour along with a reflective look at himself. He never slams anyone for their belief, but just makes it clear what he says is merely his own belief. And why is this remotely relevant to a book about the existence of ghosts? Well, as Corey himself says, "I do not believe in God. [...] So here is the question: How can I believe in ghosts... and not in God? How can I mock the existence of Jehovah and his creepy-winged minions while straight-facedly maintaining that there are ghosts, spirits, poltergeists and haunts among us? How can I go on record with a whole book for that matter, dedicated to my versions of the various events in my life, knowing full well that I might be regarded as a hypocrite at best, a nutcase at worst?" Luckily he answers that too: "The running theory is a case of knowing versus believing." Cutting to the chase: this book has the potential for very polarised reactions. If you're a believer of the paranormal, then you'll find his experiences captivating. More so, if you're a Slipknot or Stone Sour fan, you'll find it incredibly cool that Corey is on the same wavelength as you and has the stories to back it. However, if you're a non-believer, this will read like a crazy man's ramblings. Luckily, Corey notes that himself. For skeptics though, those who sit in the middle ground, this is really interesting. Not sitting fully at one end of the spectrum, the reader can be swung from side to side, finding the stories themselves haunting and unsettling but also finding some moments a little hard to swallow. But is the point to grab you by the shoulders and scream in your face that ghosts exist? Well, no. It's openly concluded that this is just a host of personal experiences, with hope of starting a dialogue into the subject. It's certainly got one person thinking, and probably a few others. The book is just Corey Taylor. Though the stories may be dark at times, or the science-based stuff might feel a bit too academic to some, his humour and wit is ever-present, as well as his ability to deviate into random trains of thought, with a neat splattering of dick, fuck, fart and shit to boot. One book I will compare it to is James Kakalios' The Physics of Superheroes in that, when you accept a certain exception to how we view the world - the 'miracle exception' - then everything is completely plausible, from Superman's jumping abilities to the Flash's great speed. Though Corey's proposal of 'intelligent energy' is likely just smart conjecture, if you make the relevant exception that ghosts are, generally speaking, completely real, his explanation seems completely plausible. A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to Heaven seems like it's going to be packed with a mass of ghost hunting expeditions and doesn't quite live up to that particular hype, but delivers a lot of personal insight into a side of Taylor's life that many never really knew. It also reads a bit like a personal tour through his homes over the years, with a number of anecdotes thrown in for good measure. For one, it's a really enjoyable read and - regardless of personal beliefs - was well worth it, and at no point do you lose his own personality in the process.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Liz

    This book was given to me by a friend after we'd had a discussion on ghosts and the supernatural. While occasionally entertaining I can't really say that this book is truly worth reading. It is something to read on a train, or a busride, or a flight just to pass the time and be done with it. The write style is, obviously, simple and a bit crude. It did not bother me except for the occasions when Taylor decided that it would be funny to write a sentence consisting almost solely of swear words. So This book was given to me by a friend after we'd had a discussion on ghosts and the supernatural. While occasionally entertaining I can't really say that this book is truly worth reading. It is something to read on a train, or a busride, or a flight just to pass the time and be done with it. The write style is, obviously, simple and a bit crude. It did not bother me except for the occasions when Taylor decided that it would be funny to write a sentence consisting almost solely of swear words. Sorry, my sense of humour is a bit more complicated than that. The ghost stories themselves were certainly intriguing although, as always, the problem lies in the question of believing. A bit weird "filler" book for in-between. For those who like Corey Taylor, ghosts (and ghost stories) or both.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Hannah

    This is an obvious must read for any slipknot/stone sour fans or general fans of Corey Taylor himself. He's a very funny guy, who always seems to have some quirky snippet of info to share. Which is usually crazy and sometimes quiet enlightening. He is a talented musician, singer and all round a messed up guy. He's taken some dark paths in his life that have almost killed him but made him stronger in the long run. Which made me so very eager to read more of his inner workings. So it pains me to gi This is an obvious must read for any slipknot/stone sour fans or general fans of Corey Taylor himself. He's a very funny guy, who always seems to have some quirky snippet of info to share. Which is usually crazy and sometimes quiet enlightening. He is a talented musician, singer and all round a messed up guy. He's taken some dark paths in his life that have almost killed him but made him stronger in the long run. Which made me so very eager to read more of his inner workings. So it pains me to give this 2STARS, I didn't find this book interesting. I enjoy hearing him give interviews and I LOVED his last book. This however was in simple terms dull. He rambled on for pages about religion and don't get me wrong, I'm not religious but neither am I atheist. This is one issues that bothers me a lot when all facts aren't presented accurately, if you don't believe in religion then why write about it. Yes we all know people like to believe they are superior because, either A)they are crazy religious or B) they like to think they are far to intellectually magnificent to believe in any religion. I truly don't care either way, Corey is obviously well read and we all know he likes to be heard. I just can't help feeling this was a lot of mundane waffle, rather than experience's that change or shaped his life. The arguments he highlighted through out the book were some what amateurish and not very thought provoking, which is what I guess he was aiming at achieving? The paranormal aspects, which were more or less put on the back burner, were quiet childish in their simplicity but I liked them, they felt raw and perhaps even real though I have no experience of anything supernatural myself, I could still see the potential for some great story telling. I'm not quiet sure as to what the purpose was of this book, though perhaps there was none and it was just some light entertainment, though the subjects he presented were anything but light. I think one book was plenty from one of the most talented musicians in rock.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Gail

    I found Corey Taylor's schtick (OMFG I'm so ADHD and thinking constantly about so many things that I'm totally amazing don't you wish your mind was as active as mine) to be tiresome. The encounters he had with the paranormal tended to lose all impact due to his tendency to prattle on and on and on. I often felt like he was generating cheap filler to hit "book length". This would've made an interesting short essay; it's a shame he didn't realize that. HIs analytical skills seemed lacking. He claim I found Corey Taylor's schtick (OMFG I'm so ADHD and thinking constantly about so many things that I'm totally amazing don't you wish your mind was as active as mine) to be tiresome. The encounters he had with the paranormal tended to lose all impact due to his tendency to prattle on and on and on. I often felt like he was generating cheap filler to hit "book length". This would've made an interesting short essay; it's a shame he didn't realize that. HIs analytical skills seemed lacking. He claimed to rail against god, but he was actually dissing religion. He consistently used "hung" instead of "hanged", which I assume was a deliberate choice (or else his editor is a twit). He seemed sure his reader would find words like "entropy" above their level. The ghost sightings he discussed were not compelling, partially because he comes across as someone who lacks the capacity to deeply think about any given situation so I'm left assuming he didn't notice alternative explanations staring him in the face. Around page 180 I realized I really didn't care what else he had to say -- it would undoubtably be more of the same pointless blather -- so I closed the book and returned it to the library.

  9. 5 out of 5

    ⠀n. ♡

    this won't be a real review because i am very biased but... i love this man. i could sit and listen to him babble all day. this was great. i like You're Making Me Hate You: A Cantankerous Look at the Common Misconception That Humans Have Any Common Sense Left more, but thats just because it's more of my cup of tea. anyways, i love corey taylor and think he's a genius. this won't be a real review because i am very biased but... i love this man. i could sit and listen to him babble all day. this was great. i like You're Making Me Hate You: A Cantankerous Look at the Common Misconception That Humans Have Any Common Sense Left more, but thats just because it's more of my cup of tea. anyways, i love corey taylor and think he's a genius.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Lita

    I will say it, I love this book. I am not a Slipknot or Stone Sour fan because I never listened to their music to know if I would be. I discovered Corey Taylor (amazing vocals on Can to Can't) through the Sound City project and as research does, I stumbled upon the fact that he is a writer. Anything about ghosts will catch my interest so I sought out the book and read it in one day. I haven't done that since reading Mötley Crue's bio. A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to Heaven is not for the sma I will say it, I love this book. I am not a Slipknot or Stone Sour fan because I never listened to their music to know if I would be. I discovered Corey Taylor (amazing vocals on Can to Can't) through the Sound City project and as research does, I stumbled upon the fact that he is a writer. Anything about ghosts will catch my interest so I sought out the book and read it in one day. I haven't done that since reading Mötley Crue's bio. A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to Heaven is not for the small of mind. Corey clearly states his beliefs in the paranormal supported by his personal experiences, some with witnesses. This is not a platform simply to prove he is right. The book, while entertaining the reader with his wit and fantastic stories, poses questions to make the reader think. Maybe I embraced the book because he brought out so many discussions that I have had myself and have come to the same conclusions. If you have an open mind and make it through the book, you'll have a whole lot of questions to ponder when you finish reading it. That's a good thing. This books sets out to start a conversation and if it does, it has achieved it's goal. You might also find out why your lights flicker.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Matt Kelland

    "I want to know certain answers if only to be able to figure out the right questions to ask in the process. If I knew where to start, I wouldn't be writing this book." The way Corey Taylor writes is sheer joy. He's as readable as humorists like PJ O'Rourke or Hunter S Thompson: witty, incisive, merciless, and filled with authenticity. You don't have to like Slipknot to enjoy his books. "I want to know certain answers if only to be able to figure out the right questions to ask in the process. If I knew where to start, I wouldn't be writing this book." The way Corey Taylor writes is sheer joy. He's as readable as humorists like PJ O'Rourke or Hunter S Thompson: witty, incisive, merciless, and filled with authenticity. You don't have to like Slipknot to enjoy his books.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Boris

    Interesting thoughts and great stories, but it was tough to follow Corey Taylor's stream of consciousness writing style at times. Interesting thoughts and great stories, but it was tough to follow Corey Taylor's stream of consciousness writing style at times.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Jordan Anderson

    Let it be said that I don’t believe in ghosts, ghouls, or things that go bump in the night. Sure, I love horror films, and I love watching so called “paranormal” videos on YouTube, but it’s extremely rare that anything out there can spook me enough to lose sleep or ponder life beyond the grave. And that’s exactly the attitude I carried toward when embarking on Corey Taylor’s semi-biographical/pseudo science non fiction work in regards to spooks. Rather, I picked up A Funny Thing Happened because, Let it be said that I don’t believe in ghosts, ghouls, or things that go bump in the night. Sure, I love horror films, and I love watching so called “paranormal” videos on YouTube, but it’s extremely rare that anything out there can spook me enough to lose sleep or ponder life beyond the grave. And that’s exactly the attitude I carried toward when embarking on Corey Taylor’s semi-biographical/pseudo science non fiction work in regards to spooks. Rather, I picked up A Funny Thing Happened because, despite his brashness and his tendency to write in a steam of consciousness style, it’s hard to ignore the fact that he’s well read, well versed and probably smarter than your typical rock star. After all You’re Making Me Hate You (which came out after this one), was a bloody fantastic read about society’s absolute idiocy. I freakin loved that book and, needless to say, became a fan of Taylor the author. So, though I still don’t have any particular inclination to believe in ghosts, I still wondered how he’d approach the subject of the paranormal in a way I was familiar with. I’ll start out by saying that A Funny Thing Happened isn’t a typical paranormal studies book. Taylor approaches the subject in his typical manner, mixing humor and observations with science and supposedly true stories. I can’t fault him for being a master storyteller (the whole Mansion chapter was the perfect amount of sleaze and creep factor to keep me hooked) and being able to approach the controversial subject in such a readable way. The problem however comes with Taylor’s obvious superiority complex and the pseudoscience he uses to explain his experiences. Like I said, Taylor is an intelligent guy. Probably way smarter (or at least more talented) than a lot of his rockstar contemporaries. However, between the couple of books I’ve read and seeing his interviews, he comes off as having the attitude that he’s better than most of those rockstars...and even his readers. There’s no perfect example I can highlight in this book but his writing is definitely conceited and definitely has an air of superiority about it, mostly when he claimed everything in this book is 100% true. I’ll give him a bit of a pass as his talent to write a compelling book is hard to deny, and the fact that he is the lead singer of 2 monstrously successful bands but I can easily see this belief as off putting to those who’ve never experienced his style. The other complaint is the “evidence” Taylor uses to explain ghosts. It’s pretty complicated but it narrows down to a mix of parallel universes, pseudoscience along the lines of aliens, and the typical quantum entanglement/entropy/electro-magnetic pulse kind of stuff that ghost hunters love to elaborate on but can never prove without a shadow of a doubt. And this isn’t even a new supposition. These kind of beliefs have been around for years, so nothing he presents is exactly new or earth shattering. His denial of heaven and hell or any kind of god/superior entity also weakens his argument as he tries to poo-poo religion as a source, yet still seems to justify ghosts as spirits. I don’t see how you can have without the other, but that’s just me. For readability, A Funny Thing Happened is hard to put down and is super entertaining, thanks in large part to Taylor and his ability to tell a damn good story. For science or any kind of closure though, you’re probably better off reading something by a paranormal “expert” (if those even truly exist).

  14. 5 out of 5

    Tex

    “A Funny Thing Happened On The Way To Heaven” (AFTHOTWTH) is the second book by Slipknot and Stone Sour front man Corey Taylor. This book is hard to explain - is it part of an unfinished thesis on the existence of ghosts broken down through scientific concepts or is it just a trip down memory lane of Taylor’s own experiences with the supernatural; from the creepy abandoned house snuck into as a child, to a theatre where he’s played, and even his own home? Whatever it is it’s entertaining. With hi “A Funny Thing Happened On The Way To Heaven” (AFTHOTWTH) is the second book by Slipknot and Stone Sour front man Corey Taylor. This book is hard to explain - is it part of an unfinished thesis on the existence of ghosts broken down through scientific concepts or is it just a trip down memory lane of Taylor’s own experiences with the supernatural; from the creepy abandoned house snuck into as a child, to a theatre where he’s played, and even his own home? Whatever it is it’s entertaining. With his own brand of razor sharp wit (there were multiple instances of laughing out loud on the train while reading this book) and zero fucks given approach Corey Taylor has shared what he knows is true (through his own experiences and those he’s shared) while fully admitting that he can’t explain why or how these brushes with the supernatural occurred. But that doesn’t stop him giving it a red hot go. My only issue was Taylor did tend to repeat a few concepts throughout the book (though he did bring these back to the point he was making at the time). Different to Taylor’s first book (but if you enjoyed that you’ll enjoy this) AFTHOTWTH still brings his unique twist on the subject matter at hand. The simple message in this book is you don’t have to necessarily believe what he says...but don’t outrightly disbelieve it either. As he says...”just WONDER”! AFTHOTWTH gets 3.5 unexplained hauntings out of 5.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Xanthi

    There was just too much rambling in this book to give it a higher rating. It was all over the place and needed stronger editing. I also found that the author skipped between colloquialisms and flowery writing, way to often. It was as if he was trying to be 'chatty' at times, and then switching to 'intellectual' when it suited him. His humour also dipped too far into arrogance. The section on religion, whilst necessary, given the topic, went on for far too long. He had some interesting points to m There was just too much rambling in this book to give it a higher rating. It was all over the place and needed stronger editing. I also found that the author skipped between colloquialisms and flowery writing, way to often. It was as if he was trying to be 'chatty' at times, and then switching to 'intellectual' when it suited him. His humour also dipped too far into arrogance. The section on religion, whilst necessary, given the topic, went on for far too long. He had some interesting points to make but then pretty much ruined it all by fantasizing about God and the Devil as females in bikinis, wrestling in jelly. I kid you not. Could have done without that sexist part, thanks. A lot of theory in this book and not enough actual ghost stories, which is what readers are probably expecting.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Laiky

    Although I have no reason to believe in ghosties myself, I found it fascinating just reading what Corey had to say about his experiences, his attempts at theorizing and the process of figuring things out for himself. But I think the most admirable thing about this book is how open minded Corey is in all of this. He is completely open to the fact that he may be wrong in all his postulations and he isn't trying to convince anybody of anything - just to open up genuine discourse around the subject Although I have no reason to believe in ghosties myself, I found it fascinating just reading what Corey had to say about his experiences, his attempts at theorizing and the process of figuring things out for himself. But I think the most admirable thing about this book is how open minded Corey is in all of this. He is completely open to the fact that he may be wrong in all his postulations and he isn't trying to convince anybody of anything - just to open up genuine discourse around the subject of hauntings, souls and poltergeists. Food for thought.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Andrea

    As a religious person I have no problem reading an atheist perspective. We all have a right to believe what we want. However, saying that your biggest problem with organized religion is hatred while spewing nothing but hate and vitriol towards religion makes you a hypocrite. You don’t have to spew hatred in order to defend your beliefs.

  18. 4 out of 5

    ClaireJ

    I love how Corey Taylor writes. He keeps me glued to the pages. I didn’t enjoy this as much as his first book but it was quite insightful and I love hearing stories about the paranormal. There were times I thought this is dragging when he tried to talk about more scientific based theories but it kept me interested to want to find out more about his experiences and ideas. A very clever, funny and honest read.

  19. 4 out of 5

    BookMojo

    I went into this book not really knowing what to expect. I had read Taylor’s first books Seven Deadly Sins and House of Gold and Bones and loved both, so, I figured I would give this one a shot. None of Taylor's books are *anything* alike, so, if you've read the others, trust me when I say this is nothing like those. The premise of the book is Taylor taking a look at the paranormal and contemplating the questions we all wonder about at some point. Are ghosts real? Is there existence of life after I went into this book not really knowing what to expect. I had read Taylor’s first books Seven Deadly Sins and House of Gold and Bones and loved both, so, I figured I would give this one a shot. None of Taylor's books are *anything* alike, so, if you've read the others, trust me when I say this is nothing like those. The premise of the book is Taylor taking a look at the paranormal and contemplating the questions we all wonder about at some point. Are ghosts real? Is there existence of life after death? What happens to our “soul” when we pass? The book is written very well. It’s littered with Taylor’s signature biting sarcasm and wit, but is also approached from a very serious viewpoint. The subject matter is obviously not a joke to Taylor, yet he also maintains objectivity when looking at the evidence he presents. The book does not try to shove the paranormal down your throat. Taylor presents it as: “Here is what I have experienced. Here’s what it could be. Here’s what I’ve ruled out. Now you decide.” The objective nature of the book allows the reader to make up their own mind, all while spinning tales of Taylor’s own experiences throughout his life. I won’t lie, there are a few stories in this book that had the hairs on the back of my neck standing on end. One of my absolute favorite parts of this book is the end. I don’t mean that in a dickish way (i.e. - so glad it’s over!). Toward the end of the book, Taylor reveals to the audience his own theories and I was blown away by how closely they match my own. If you’re a science geek like yours truly, you know that energy can never be destroyed, only transferred. Think about that and just imagine the possibilities when you think of the human soul as simple energy. Taylor goes into great deal breaking this theory down, and for me, it was the most fascinating part of the book. For you audio book junkies out there, I purchased my copy of A Funny Thing from Audible. Thus far, Taylor has read all of his own audio books and I LOVE IT when authors do that. As a listener, you get every inflection the author intended, and you hear the tone as it was meant to be read. It makes it a totally different experience and A Funny Thing was no exception. SIDE NOTE: Other audio books read by their authors that I really enjoyed are Tough Shit by Kevin Smith and the entire Calliope Reaper-Jones series by Amber Benson. I think most people run on the assumption that most rock stars are mindless drinking machines. For the record, I am not one of said group of people. Taylor has proven time and time again that this is not the case. He’s got a highly intelligent, no bullshit way of looking at things and you can’t help but admire him for it. Seeing him tackle a subject such as the paranormal, a subject that could easily get him ridiculed, and see him turn out such a well-researched piece of art makes me smile. Overall, A Funny Thing was a great read. The stories he uses to illustrate his points are entertaining and keep the reader hooked. I recently received his next book, You’re Making Me Hate You (release date July 7, 2015; Da Capo Press) from Taylor’s publisher for review and will be losing myself in that this weekend. Release day review to come.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Dawn

    I'm not sure what I was thinking when I picked this up since I'm not a huge fan of Slipknot (I won't skip a song on Spotify but I'm not going to any concerts). Pretty sure the subject of the book is what got me (and that cool ass book cover!) I'm the type of person who believes in ghosts even though I've never had any sort of experience to tell me that they are real. In this book, Taylor talks about how everyone has an experience even if they're too chicken shit to tell others. Well, I really don I'm not sure what I was thinking when I picked this up since I'm not a huge fan of Slipknot (I won't skip a song on Spotify but I'm not going to any concerts). Pretty sure the subject of the book is what got me (and that cool ass book cover!) I'm the type of person who believes in ghosts even though I've never had any sort of experience to tell me that they are real. In this book, Taylor talks about how everyone has an experience even if they're too chicken shit to tell others. Well, I really don't have one so I just proved him wrong on that. Anyway, about the book.. I liked it. The first chapter or two dealt with religion and religious beliefs and that may be off putting to some people. Just get through that or skip the chapters if you want to get to the good stuff. This book is definitely an easy read, it's like Taylor was in the room just talking about this stuff to an audience. But because of this, he does go off on random thoughts and it was a bit confusing to follow. However, there was one chapter I did not read at all and that was his scientific reasons for the paranormal. Too science-y for my liking but hey, if you like that stuff, go for it! If I manage to find his first book, I'm definitely going to pick it up. Oh, and I may have saved a few of Slipknot's songs onto my Spotify list after this.+

  21. 5 out of 5

    Peach Berry

    Warning: Fan-girling ahead! Corey Taylor's second book discusses his fervent belief in the paranormal and summises his personal explanations as to what ghosts or spirits 'are'. Intrigued? You will be.. 'A Funny Thing...' cleverly mixes Taylor's very own special blend of pseudo intelligent writing with his below-the-belt humour and opinionated ranting. If you are a fan of his work, his music or his personality, you.will enjoy hearing about his experiences with the paranormal, particularly The Mansi Warning: Fan-girling ahead! Corey Taylor's second book discusses his fervent belief in the paranormal and summises his personal explanations as to what ghosts or spirits 'are'. Intrigued? You will be.. 'A Funny Thing...' cleverly mixes Taylor's very own special blend of pseudo intelligent writing with his below-the-belt humour and opinionated ranting. If you are a fan of his work, his music or his personality, you.will enjoy hearing about his experiences with the paranormal, particularly The Mansion chapter, though it does read like a 'who's who' in the Hollywood Rock N Roll Hall of Fame. If you are intrigued by the subject of the book, I urge you to read with an open mind, at the heart of the book, are some creepy stories and interesting theories, many of which mirror my own thoughts on the paranormal, as someone who falls fervently into the 'agnostic' category. I found Taylor's second book a brave choice, once more he gives just enough of himself to satisfy the fan base, whilst securing himself as an interesting, if slightly mad, anti-celebrity with a good story to tell and an amusing and touching way of telling it.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Mary

    I had not heard of Corey Taylor before and came upon this book by chance in the music section at Waterstones. He is a singer with Slipknot but this book is not about music. It is about ghosts and atheism and it appealed to me. Once I started reading it I could not stop! So much of what he said could have been me speaking. I have not had the dealings and meetings with ghosts that he has, but I am a strong believer. He writes with humour, doesn't try to make anyone believe him just states what has I had not heard of Corey Taylor before and came upon this book by chance in the music section at Waterstones. He is a singer with Slipknot but this book is not about music. It is about ghosts and atheism and it appealed to me. Once I started reading it I could not stop! So much of what he said could have been me speaking. I have not had the dealings and meetings with ghosts that he has, but I am a strong believer. He writes with humour, doesn't try to make anyone believe him just states what has happened and what he believes. There are touches of science in this book too, which I find interesting, though don't necessarily fully understand!Thermodynamics anyone?! I loved this book and am now keen to read his first one. I would recommend it wholeheartedly though not necessarily if you are religious and believe in God. I'd give more than 5 stars if I could!

  23. 5 out of 5

    Michele Parlialment

    Taylor has a comfortable way of writing...it's just like having a real conversation with a real person. Minus the fact that he NEVER uses contractions (I am not/ I'm not, it is/it's, etc.), which makes for weird language. Kind of like reading a first grade primer. The overall content is a little flat. The actual sharing of paranormal experiences are few with much too much pondering of what life is all about and over explanation of his own personal beliefs. It's almost like reading the journal of Taylor has a comfortable way of writing...it's just like having a real conversation with a real person. Minus the fact that he NEVER uses contractions (I am not/ I'm not, it is/it's, etc.), which makes for weird language. Kind of like reading a first grade primer. The overall content is a little flat. The actual sharing of paranormal experiences are few with much too much pondering of what life is all about and over explanation of his own personal beliefs. It's almost like reading the journal of an adolescent trying to figure out life as an adult. (did you see that? I used a contraction right there.) He's an amusing fellow, but I found myself skipping over pages where he ruminates compulsively about religion and relationships. Say it once and say it well. We get it. Move on.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Alley Kat

    In Corey Taylor's second book about his crazy life, he shares with us his experiences and encounters with ghosts and spirits. It also focuses on his personal life and his views on the religious aspects of life. I can't say I didn't enjoy this book, though it took awhile to get through. It was a bit boring at times and Corey Taylor surprisingly pulled a Dee Snider and used some pretty technical terms in this book. I found myself laughing several times in every chapter. The first chapter was probab In Corey Taylor's second book about his crazy life, he shares with us his experiences and encounters with ghosts and spirits. It also focuses on his personal life and his views on the religious aspects of life. I can't say I didn't enjoy this book, though it took awhile to get through. It was a bit boring at times and Corey Taylor surprisingly pulled a Dee Snider and used some pretty technical terms in this book. I found myself laughing several times in every chapter. The first chapter was probably the most terrifying of the ghost stories, though I didn't find myself truly frightened during a single one of them.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Andrea

    This is the second book I've read from Corey Taylor. The man has energy to burn! He digresses so much throught the book, I swear he needs to be on medication! But, it is Corey Taylor we are talking about. Any other book I would have stopped reading it immediately. I really enjoyed this book as well as his first book, "Seven Deadly Sins". He really knows what he is talking about and has a sense of humor as well. I have to say I am not a fan of Stone Soup or Slipknot, but this man can write! This is the second book I've read from Corey Taylor. The man has energy to burn! He digresses so much throught the book, I swear he needs to be on medication! But, it is Corey Taylor we are talking about. Any other book I would have stopped reading it immediately. I really enjoyed this book as well as his first book, "Seven Deadly Sins". He really knows what he is talking about and has a sense of humor as well. I have to say I am not a fan of Stone Soup or Slipknot, but this man can write!

  26. 4 out of 5

    John Bruni

    I'm of the opinion that everyone has at least had one experience with something that could be called supernatural. I certainly have a few. That's weird coming from me, an atheist. It's something I've tried to reconcile over the years, and I think this book helped. Because Corey Taylor is of the opinion that the two don't have much to do with each other. I thought about it and realized he is right. Just because ghosts exist doesn't mean that God does. It's weird, I know, but it makes sense when y I'm of the opinion that everyone has at least had one experience with something that could be called supernatural. I certainly have a few. That's weird coming from me, an atheist. It's something I've tried to reconcile over the years, and I think this book helped. Because Corey Taylor is of the opinion that the two don't have much to do with each other. I thought about it and realized he is right. Just because ghosts exist doesn't mean that God does. It's weird, I know, but it makes sense when you approach it from a scientific point of view. And Taylor does his best to do so. I don't know if I'm all in on his theories, but at the same time I also know what I have seen in my own life. I question if my imagination got the best of me, or if it was real, and I'm almost certain that in every case it really happened. That forces me to wonder why these things have happened. And how they happened. What, indeed, is a ghost? Is it just a dead person's left over energy? Or did they have such an influence on a place that their personality somehow got implanted on it? And just because these things can happen, it doesn't mean there is a God. It means there is science. Maybe science we don't understand. For example, we've always had magicians. They were so good in the Bible's Greatest Hits that they were considered supernatural. Miracles, even. But I'll bet you that Penn and Teller can figure out whatever they did and reproduce it live on stage. But then magic is a weird thing. Someone in ancient Greece saw a storm and assumed that some god was angry with them. So they created Zeus, who lived at the top of the biggest mountain, and whenever he was angry, he threw lightning bolts at people. But then someone figured out what lightning really was. What thunder really was. Sometimes we experience things that we just don't understand. Yet. But I'm convinced everyone has had some odd experience that they can't explain. Sometimes they'll say it was a ghost or something. Maybe it was? Or maybe we just don't understand the phenomenon just yet. I had the most experiences at my grandparents' house when I was a kid. I live with my grandmother now (Gramps has since passed) in a different house, and she is convinced that this house is haunted. I've (almost) never had an incident here. Sometimes I get the weird feeling of being watched when no one is there, but that's probably just in my head. My grandmother says she's seen people. The almost incident. We were screwing around with a Ouija board in the basement back in high school. One of the guys, his eyes rolled back in his head, and he suddenly stabbed himself in the leg with a pencil. Later he said that he saw someone coming down the stairs. At first he thought it was my grandfather, but then he saw it wasn't. That's when his eyes went back and something forced him to stab himself. Crazy, right? I say "almost" because he, too, is kind of crazy and has no problem with stabbing himself on occasion. Here's the real story. My mom was out bowling with the man who would eventually become my stepfather, and I was at my grandparents' place. I was allowed to watch Dr. Who, and if they were feeling generous, I'd get to watch the Dave Allen Show after. But then they forced me to bed. I hate to agree with everyone, but Tom Baker was my favorite Doctor, and I loved his curly hair and wished my very straight hair would be curly. Why not? My dad had curly hair and always kept it short so his Italian 'fro wouldn't show. Why couldn't I have curly hair? So I started curling my hair with my fingers while I was in bed. I sometimes still do this if I'm nervous or distracted. I tried to break myself of the habit, but it's one I'll probably take to my grave. So there I was, in bed and curling my hair, waiting for sleep that would probably never come. I've always had insomnia. Keep this in mind. What happened next, my grandparents tried to convince me was a dream. BUT I WAS WIDE AWAKE. I should also mention that the headboard of the bed was so close to the wall that you could maybe drop a sheet of paper down there. Nothing thicker than that. So I curled my hair in the near dark. The moon was bright through the window, so everything had a pale look. The hand that was on my head, twirling my hair? SOMETHING GRABBED ME. I still feel a chill while thinking about it. Because I looked up, and I SAW A HAND REACHING UP FROM BEHIND THE HEADBOARD, AND AS SOON AS I SAW IT, IT RETREATED. I screamed, and when my grandparents came in, they said it was just a dream. I told this story to one of my brothers years later, and he went pale. He then told me the same thing, more or less, had happened to him. Different house, though. And then he told me this story my mom had never told me about when it had happened to her, too. (Same house on that one.) So something happened. Something grabbed us. I don't know what it was. The universe is a weird place. When you think you're touching something, you're not. You're feeling the pressure of the atoms between you and that thing. When you look at something that is green, it's not. It's all colors except for green because that's the color the object reflects. So with illusions like that, why not ghosts? Or something that we just don't know yet? One last thing. About the book this time. Corey Taylor has a natural instinct for a horror story. He calls the first haunted house he experienced the Cold House. Just the phrase enough is chilling, no pun intended. I would love to see him write a collection of horror stories.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Lisa

    I love Corey Taylor. He's one of my fave musicians vocally and lyrically. He's soo funny and intelligent,I love reading his books or listening to his interviews. The ghost stories in this book were great but there wasn't a lot of them. I want to give this a four star rating because it was funny. But it did have a lot of ramblings about his theories and I wasn't very interested in that so I skimmed a lot and that's why it's a low rating. Sorry Corey I love Corey Taylor. He's one of my fave musicians vocally and lyrically. He's soo funny and intelligent,I love reading his books or listening to his interviews. The ghost stories in this book were great but there wasn't a lot of them. I want to give this a four star rating because it was funny. But it did have a lot of ramblings about his theories and I wasn't very interested in that so I skimmed a lot and that's why it's a low rating. Sorry Corey

  28. 4 out of 5

    Justin

    I did enjoy this audiobook and its ideas very much. Many times I felt like I was listening to my own subconscious as I've thought these things many times but never wrote them down... Or said them aloud. But rock star millionaires who are shamelessly and eternally proud of themselves like Taylor can. I did enjoy this audiobook and its ideas very much. Many times I felt like I was listening to my own subconscious as I've thought these things many times but never wrote them down... Or said them aloud. But rock star millionaires who are shamelessly and eternally proud of themselves like Taylor can.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Amber

    Not quite as humorous a read I have come to expect from Corey, but this book still had its moments. Alternating between ghost stories, ghost hunting, and theories about energy and the soul, this was an interesting read. Not sure where I fall on the spectrum of ghost belief, but it is always interesting to hear about the experiences of others.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Nerita

    I've been a fan of Slipknot and Stone Sour for years so I thought that it was time for me to read Corey Taylors books for once. I have to say that it was a funny adventure where the author deals with paranormal activity and casual debauchery in his life. I've been a fan of Slipknot and Stone Sour for years so I thought that it was time for me to read Corey Taylors books for once. I have to say that it was a funny adventure where the author deals with paranormal activity and casual debauchery in his life.

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