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With the Federation's White Base now on Earth and his assault carrier loaded with civilians, Bright Noah must now navigate his ship safely through enemy occupied territory. Unfortunately on his tail are a host Zeon troops. Lead by the Commander of North American Earth Forces, Captain Garma Zabi, a fleet of aircraft is preparing to lay siege on the Federation ship with ambi With the Federation's White Base now on Earth and his assault carrier loaded with civilians, Bright Noah must now navigate his ship safely through enemy occupied territory. Unfortunately on his tail are a host Zeon troops. Lead by the Commander of North American Earth Forces, Captain Garma Zabi, a fleet of aircraft is preparing to lay siege on the Federation ship with ambitions to capture its new Mobile Suit. But before the Zeon make their move in the American desert, an old acquaintance of Garma's has arrived. Lt Char Aznable, known on the field of combat as The Red Comet, followed the White Base from space and is here to on a reconnaissance mission to gain information on the Federation's new suit. To prove his worth, Garma engages the Feds soon after his brief reunion. The results were not ideal. In fact, the Federation may have found new weapons for their defense in the process. And Garma, who led the charge himself, was fortunate to survive this first confrontation. Now with the White Base heading towards South America, and word of an insurgence movement developing, Garma must find a way to quash the Federation's plans...There is no turning back!


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With the Federation's White Base now on Earth and his assault carrier loaded with civilians, Bright Noah must now navigate his ship safely through enemy occupied territory. Unfortunately on his tail are a host Zeon troops. Lead by the Commander of North American Earth Forces, Captain Garma Zabi, a fleet of aircraft is preparing to lay siege on the Federation ship with ambi With the Federation's White Base now on Earth and his assault carrier loaded with civilians, Bright Noah must now navigate his ship safely through enemy occupied territory. Unfortunately on his tail are a host Zeon troops. Lead by the Commander of North American Earth Forces, Captain Garma Zabi, a fleet of aircraft is preparing to lay siege on the Federation ship with ambitions to capture its new Mobile Suit. But before the Zeon make their move in the American desert, an old acquaintance of Garma's has arrived. Lt Char Aznable, known on the field of combat as The Red Comet, followed the White Base from space and is here to on a reconnaissance mission to gain information on the Federation's new suit. To prove his worth, Garma engages the Feds soon after his brief reunion. The results were not ideal. In fact, the Federation may have found new weapons for their defense in the process. And Garma, who led the charge himself, was fortunate to survive this first confrontation. Now with the White Base heading towards South America, and word of an insurgence movement developing, Garma must find a way to quash the Federation's plans...There is no turning back!

30 review for Mobile Suit Gundam: THE ORIGIN, Volume 2: Garma

  1. 4 out of 5

    Nerdish Mum

    The story definitely picked up in volume 2 which I'm glad of as I found it a whole lot more enjoyable. I continued my love of Char/Red Comet and I was even treated to a shower scene with him! First time I've come across nudity (rear not frontal if you want to know) in a male in a manga (that I can remember anyway). I do still think the battle scenes suffer due to the use of grey scale, but they were a lot clearer than last time, but that might just be me getting more used to the style. I was dis The story definitely picked up in volume 2 which I'm glad of as I found it a whole lot more enjoyable. I continued my love of Char/Red Comet and I was even treated to a shower scene with him! First time I've come across nudity (rear not frontal if you want to know) in a male in a manga (that I can remember anyway). I do still think the battle scenes suffer due to the use of grey scale, but they were a lot clearer than last time, but that might just be me getting more used to the style. I was disappointed that we saw no more than a line from Sayla as I was really looking forward to seeing more from her, but I know how manga arcs work and I'm sure we'll come back to her again in the future. Amuro...oh Amuro...I am really not a fan of his so far and I think the relationship between him and his friend (I can't remember her name sorry) is so childish and silly - mainly on her side - that it takes away from the main story. What happens between Amuro and his mum is heartbreaking and as a mother, she is despicable; however I still didn't feel any sympathy towards Amuro, just disgust towards his mother. Characters have started to stand out more now there has been a bit more development, but there are still quite a few that are basically interchangeable for me. Overall though I really enjoyed this volume and I'm looking forward to volume 3 - which I already have - yay!

  2. 5 out of 5

    Devin (Mostly Manga)

    Wow, this volume was crazier than the last one. I really love how the villains are portrayed in this series, like they're just as human as the heroes. It's fun to watch the Federation and Zeon fight each other! Also, the colored gallery at the end was perfect. I can't get enough of these colored pages! Wow, this volume was crazier than the last one. I really love how the villains are portrayed in this series, like they're just as human as the heroes. It's fun to watch the Federation and Zeon fight each other! Also, the colored gallery at the end was perfect. I can't get enough of these colored pages!

  3. 4 out of 5

    Joshua

    I wanted giant robot battles. I got it. I wanted a science-fiction political war drama. I got it. I wanted to see at least one of these military studs have a shower scene. I got that to. Most of all I wanted a developing and nuanced arc from each of the characters in this book as we see them having to reassess and reevaluate who they are in the midst of this intergalactic conflict. I got it. Mobile Suit Gundam keeps giving me what I want. And I'll keep taking it. I wanted giant robot battles. I got it. I wanted a science-fiction political war drama. I got it. I wanted to see at least one of these military studs have a shower scene. I got that to. Most of all I wanted a developing and nuanced arc from each of the characters in this book as we see them having to reassess and reevaluate who they are in the midst of this intergalactic conflict. I got it. Mobile Suit Gundam keeps giving me what I want. And I'll keep taking it.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Matt Matt Tobin

    This series is so fantastic and just keeps getting better. Also how fantastic are those watercolours?

  5. 5 out of 5

    Scott wachter

    better than the first. I really like the characterization of Garma in this volume, it comes off a lot stronger than the tv series. Art continues to be absolutely astounding. Yaz is the king. is there some way for me to wallpaper my house with the colour pages in this thing? also the fangirliness of the clamp interview had me laughing so much.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Olivia

    Yoshikazu Yasuhiko's "Mobile Suit Gundam: THE ORIGIN" series continues to keep my attention, and help me ease into the science fiction, robot, space wars sub themes and genres of manga. Yes, I gave both of the first books a 3-star rating, which looks iffy at best, but I can say that despite the 3 stars I am not slowing down from continuing onward into Volume 3! I would love to see this as a anime series, given how each time I watched/read a match, battle, attack, etc. I could easily see the actio Yoshikazu Yasuhiko's "Mobile Suit Gundam: THE ORIGIN" series continues to keep my attention, and help me ease into the science fiction, robot, space wars sub themes and genres of manga. Yes, I gave both of the first books a 3-star rating, which looks iffy at best, but I can say that despite the 3 stars I am not slowing down from continuing onward into Volume 3! I would love to see this as a anime series, given how each time I watched/read a match, battle, attack, etc. I could easily see the action playing out on a screen. I could also hear the score as Amuro journeys back to his Mother's land, as Garma faces his foes, and as the refugees reclaim their land. It is a full sensory experience manga, if you have a full(er) experience with anime. Hopefully Volume 3 will arrive at the library soon, because one must find out what happens next to Amuro, Fraw, and the others.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Muhammad Bahy

    As you know, I read the previous graphic novel and I fell in love with the series, the characters, and the actions. After barely escaping the zeon fleet in space, the trojan horse has touched down and Earth, but due to the change of course, they entered the atmosphere miles away from Jaburo. Forced to traverse the unfamiliar environment of Earth, the ship and the Gundam encounter many enemies, including the new mobile suit, Gouf. Mobile Suit Gundam: The ORIGIN is a fantastic series. The last boo As you know, I read the previous graphic novel and I fell in love with the series, the characters, and the actions. After barely escaping the zeon fleet in space, the trojan horse has touched down and Earth, but due to the change of course, they entered the atmosphere miles away from Jaburo. Forced to traverse the unfamiliar environment of Earth, the ship and the Gundam encounter many enemies, including the new mobile suit, Gouf. Mobile Suit Gundam: The ORIGIN is a fantastic series. The last book was fantastic and this one is no exception. As I stated in the previous review, the art style is incredible. The characters were relatable as well. The plot was solid and had little to no plot holes. I enjoyed the book and I think all the people who enjoy action and graphic novels will too.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Bradley

    Char, the red comet, is an asshole. A lovely, sexy, suave, charismatic, debonair asshole. Especially in color. Gotta` love the colored pages in Origin. As for a review, if you get your hands on the book itself just read the quote on the back by Joe McCulloch. He hits the nail on the head. *sigh* Fine. Here it is. "It's a good book. Very good, actually. Very good war comics, requiring no prior experience with anime or mecha or Gundam - just a well-made, old-fashioned war comic, full of thrills and Char, the red comet, is an asshole. A lovely, sexy, suave, charismatic, debonair asshole. Especially in color. Gotta` love the colored pages in Origin. As for a review, if you get your hands on the book itself just read the quote on the back by Joe McCulloch. He hits the nail on the head. *sigh* Fine. Here it is. "It's a good book. Very good, actually. Very good war comics, requiring no prior experience with anime or mecha or Gundam - just a well-made, old-fashioned war comic, full of thrills and spills and lucky breaks and narrow escapes and preening villains you'll love to hate and pigheaded heroes you may hate to love, and expert drawings by a master craftsman, and hard, sturdy violence." ~Joe McCulloch, The Comics Journal

  9. 4 out of 5

    Brian Rogers

    The second volume of this series was equally enjoyable. Again, I know nothing of the original incarnations of this series, but the story being told here is well done, with lots of humanity and way more time spent on the personalities and politics of the villains than I had expected. I'll certainly seek out volume 3. The second volume of this series was equally enjoyable. Again, I know nothing of the original incarnations of this series, but the story being told here is well done, with lots of humanity and way more time spent on the personalities and politics of the villains than I had expected. I'll certainly seek out volume 3.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Ben Zimmerman

    This was not nearly as good as the first volume. I feel like the localization team really blew it here. There were a lot of bizarre split sentences across speech bubbles. Some sentences have strange phrasing that doesn't make sense. There are also some awkward relics of the series being a tv show. Volume one is really good, so I hope the translation gets better in later volumes. This was not nearly as good as the first volume. I feel like the localization team really blew it here. There were a lot of bizarre split sentences across speech bubbles. Some sentences have strange phrasing that doesn't make sense. There are also some awkward relics of the series being a tv show. Volume one is really good, so I hope the translation gets better in later volumes.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Monika

    My son got me into the mobile suit series. Love the artwork. Really intricate panels, and the premise is an interesting take on space colonisation.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Aaron

    I wasn't sold on it with the first volume, but this one was awesome. I've never read any war comics, but this has to be among the best of them. I wasn't sold on it with the first volume, but this one was awesome. I've never read any war comics, but this has to be among the best of them.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Barry

    Now I can watch the shows with Evan this summer!

  14. 4 out of 5

    SimranDraws

    A massive improvement on the first. This one actually has an engaging story, even though Amuro is still a completely dull character.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Lauren Ford

    Why are all the bad guys so pretty?

  16. 4 out of 5

    usagi ☆ミ

    Okay it's official, Origin is now my favorite version of 0079-verse! Okay it's official, Origin is now my favorite version of 0079-verse!

  17. 5 out of 5

    Ruth

    After a fairly simplistic introduction to the series in the first volume, Gundam: The Origin volume 2 starts to add additional layers and nuances that the first volume lacked as it worked to introduce the main characters and the basic setting. With the description of Zeon being based off a rogue colony in the first volume, it was a little surprising to learn that it had territories on Earth itself. However, this is partially explained through the desires of the refugees to set foot on Earth agai After a fairly simplistic introduction to the series in the first volume, Gundam: The Origin volume 2 starts to add additional layers and nuances that the first volume lacked as it worked to introduce the main characters and the basic setting. With the description of Zeon being based off a rogue colony in the first volume, it was a little surprising to learn that it had territories on Earth itself. However, this is partially explained through the desires of the refugees to set foot on Earth again. While most of the children had been born in colonies, most of the adults were actually from Earth proper. As a reader, I had supposed that with the technological levels of the colonies that they had been around much longer than they actually had been. It even seems that Side 7 was in fairly early construction when Amuro went there with his father as a young child--something I had realized. I assumed that all of the construction was upgrades or repairs, not basic creation. Reflecting on this connection to Earth, the idea that Zeon would have strongholds made much more sense. This also made the quotes of half of humanity being wiped out by war in less than a year make far more sense as well--if it were just 1 rogue colony as I had misunderstood, it didn't make sense. But if it were an overall movement to overthrow an established government all of it made much more sense to me. This, along with some of Char's facial expressions and actions, had me wondering if my first assumption that this series might work for a Gundam neophyte was misplaced. It's hard to tell if these were elements that were supposed to make sense over time or if I was already assumed to know this. It works either way for the most part, so I think it will be okay. It could also simply be my lack of familiarity with sci-fi and mecha that has me a little unstable--I'm not used to how the storytelling should be in stories like this. Even with less assured footing in my understanding of the world in which the story is set, it's still an interesting read. Mirai Yashima and Sayla Mass in particular have drawn me in. They're capable and ambitious young women, both who seem to have some interesting backstories (that I hope we'll eventually be privy to) and a sense of calm in danger that most of the other crew members (no matter how senior) seem to lack. They serve as a nice counter balance to Amuro Ray who has become a bit of a nuisance for me. From the art, it seems like the story is trying to express a mental and emotional fatigue (possibly even PTSD) from what he is experiencing, but the text is not getting the point across effectively and so the execution of making him an identifiable character is not working for me. It's not clear if the problem is with the writing or with the translation. Regardless, the lack of connection with Amuro is easily enough made up for by other interesting characters. The political intrigue, affinity to Earth (as well as perception of Earth-born as "elites"), and the unexpected actions of Char allow the second volume to build on the base that the first entry in the series provided.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Aaron

    MS Gundam: THE ORIGIN remains a dramatic and intelligent venture into the birthplace of modern mecha warfare. Overall, Gundam is as thoroughly messy and convoluted as it is brilliantly complex. And oftentimes, where there is clarity therein also lays, in some measure, a sense of chaos. The story of Amuro Ray and his fellow laypersons cum crewmembers aboard White Base is chaos before clarity. The signal for change, as evident in this second volume, Garma, rests in articulating the real, emotional MS Gundam: THE ORIGIN remains a dramatic and intelligent venture into the birthplace of modern mecha warfare. Overall, Gundam is as thoroughly messy and convoluted as it is brilliantly complex. And oftentimes, where there is clarity therein also lays, in some measure, a sense of chaos. The story of Amuro Ray and his fellow laypersons cum crewmembers aboard White Base is chaos before clarity. The signal for change, as evident in this second volume, Garma, rests in articulating the real, emotional response Amuro has to becoming a dog of war under the sharp eye of his commanding officer, Lieutenant Junior Grade Bright Noa. This shift toward more manageable character dynamics and away from the familiar but improbable, do-what-feels-natural roots of mecha and sci-fi manga/anime certainly bodes well for this property. All the more so with Yasuhiko's integration of Char's military aspirations into the tenuous bouts of success (or failure) the folks on White Base muster almost daily. Taking this another step further, readers are given Garma Zabi -- commander of Zeon's North American forces -- whose quest for glory is as blinding as one might imagine it to be for the youngest son of a tyrant. And so the layers begin to pile up. But in MS Gundam: THE ORIGIN, that's a good thing. While the Federation is merely limping by, searching and hoping for a better angle (or a better weapon) with which they might repel Zeon militia; Zeke forces are prone to bitter infighting and jealousy; all of which, in the end, merely proves that the enemy within is the most dangerous of them all. The Fed's biggest problems are a lack of resources, a lack of planning, and ineptitude. The Zekes are too prideful, and although prone to discerning their mistakes, loathe disclosing those mistakes to others in order to save face. It's a delicate dance that often gets more people killed than otherwise necessary. In Garma, the conflict between Char Aznable and Garma Zabi embodies the militaristic zealotry and interpersonal subterfuge likely to tear apart the Zeon leagues. And it's awesome to watch. Is Char too slick for his own good? Is the Zabi family's incestuous fascination with power too obvious for its own good? Indeed, the presence of White Base and RX78-02 have only exasperated matters. Yasuhiko's art finds stronger continuity in this volume than in the first. Previously, one-on-one mecha action was messy and hard to follow. In this book, the action is a lot clearer and more entertaining as a result. Additionally, select interludes with secondary characters like Sayla and Masaki prove informative, ensuring this doesn't become the All Amuro Show all too soon.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Sean O'Hara

    The earthbound section of Gundam 0079 was always my least favorite part of the series, a bunch of filler meant to pad the series to 50 episodes (ironic since it ended up being cut short). When Tomino wrote the Gundam novels, showing how he would've told the story if not for studio interference, one of the biggest changes was getting rid of this whole part, and it worked quite well, streamlining the story into a nice, concise epic. So I was pleasantly surprised to find what an awesome job Yasuhiko The earthbound section of Gundam 0079 was always my least favorite part of the series, a bunch of filler meant to pad the series to 50 episodes (ironic since it ended up being cut short). When Tomino wrote the Gundam novels, showing how he would've told the story if not for studio interference, one of the biggest changes was getting rid of this whole part, and it worked quite well, streamlining the story into a nice, concise epic. So I was pleasantly surprised to find what an awesome job Yasuhiko does here. He follows the basic outline of 0079, but the result is completely different. First he makes the setting more concrete, doing away with the vague somewhere-on-Earth of the anime. We get maps showing which areas Zeon and the Federation control, where the White Base is, what path they have to take for Jaburo (which is located in Brazil). I especially like the detail that Garma is using the Chateau Marmont for his HQ -- now there's a guy with style. Garma gets a big boost in this telling of the One Year War, becoming a cool, sympathetic character instead of a mere level boss like the anime, which makes Char's actions at the end so much more Shakespearian. Oh, and best part of this volume -- Bright Slap! "Not even my own father ever hit me before!"

  20. 5 out of 5

    Dana

    I wrote a more comprehensive review of the first volume here. While I think the show itself did a good job of developing its villains, the manga goes even further. The extra characterization just adds more depth to the story, and Garma's romance with Icelina feels more meaningful here. So does his relationship with Char, which then adds even more punch to the inevitable betrayal. Amuro is also better handled, which helps to make his attitude more sympathetic than annoying. That, and there’s grea I wrote a more comprehensive review of the first volume here. While I think the show itself did a good job of developing its villains, the manga goes even further. The extra characterization just adds more depth to the story, and Garma's romance with Icelina feels more meaningful here. So does his relationship with Char, which then adds even more punch to the inevitable betrayal. Amuro is also better handled, which helps to make his attitude more sympathetic than annoying. That, and there’s great smaller character-building scenes sprinkled in among the action, including the scene with Bright and Masaki on the ship, and Sayla and Mirai on the beach, that are very endearing. In addition to the characterization, the plot itself is much more grounded - the ship isn’t just jumping around from place to place on Earth, it’s following a set course that makes sense given the difficulties faced by the White Base crew. It also does a better job of clarifying the political situation, so it’s clear why Zeon has such a presence on Earth in the first place. As always, the art is beautiful, and the presentation by Vertical is fantastic.

  21. 4 out of 5

    John

    Continuing his retelling of the First Gundam story, Yoshikazu continues to follow the plot of the original while changing and fleshing out details here and there. This time we get a more concrete look a the locations where the events are happening, and the character of Garma Zabi is better developed. [spoilers] Of course, by making Garma less of a one dimensional character, it makes Char look worse when he does what he does to Garma. In the anime, his vengeance could arguably be said to be makin Continuing his retelling of the First Gundam story, Yoshikazu continues to follow the plot of the original while changing and fleshing out details here and there. This time we get a more concrete look a the locations where the events are happening, and the character of Garma Zabi is better developed. [spoilers] Of course, by making Garma less of a one dimensional character, it makes Char look worse when he does what he does to Garma. In the anime, his vengeance could arguably be said to be making Zeon stronger, as the Zabis are presented as being largely incompetent. Here, Garma looks like he could easily develop into a skilled commander if his career wasn't cut short. It will be interesting to see how Char's character continues to develop as this telling of the story continues.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Mike

    This volume continues in the same vein as the first, expanding and refining the story from the original anime series. The story focuses largely on Garma and Char, and we see first see how cold and calculating Char really is. Their interactions, and the Icelina subplot is expanded a bit, but doesn't stray far from the series. Amuro's return to his hometown is cranked up with a car chase and battle with a Zeon patrol, but it is also very similar to the TV version. (This is not a complaint on my par This volume continues in the same vein as the first, expanding and refining the story from the original anime series. The story focuses largely on Garma and Char, and we see first see how cold and calculating Char really is. Their interactions, and the Icelina subplot is expanded a bit, but doesn't stray far from the series. Amuro's return to his hometown is cranked up with a car chase and battle with a Zeon patrol, but it is also very similar to the TV version. (This is not a complaint on my part. I think the changes improve the story, but they are limited in scope). Most of the differences are subtle touches to make the characters more three dimensional or shore up weak spots in the plot.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Kelly Lynn Thomas

    An excellent follow up to volume one. The character development in this volume is even better than what we see in volume one, though that may come at the expense of some fighting. There's still lots of fighting, though. Because they're on earth you get to see different kinds of fighting than just mobile suit battles, which is kind of fun. I have the same complaint about the mobile suit battles I did in volume one, though -- it's kind of hard to decipher what's going on. The panels are too busy. An excellent follow up to volume one. The character development in this volume is even better than what we see in volume one, though that may come at the expense of some fighting. There's still lots of fighting, though. Because they're on earth you get to see different kinds of fighting than just mobile suit battles, which is kind of fun. I have the same complaint about the mobile suit battles I did in volume one, though -- it's kind of hard to decipher what's going on. The panels are too busy. The interplay between Char and Garma is awesome, especially as the book goes on.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Dominic Tiberio

    A bit of a throw-away in the series but it does have some solid moments and the use of the color sections was very well done. Garma is an interesting side-story but didn't quite have enough impact as is the case with Amuro's mother. The battles still always seem to be a bit confusing in how they are drawn which makes figuring out what is happening more difficult than it needs to be but that's a minor issue. A solid story and series and a true classic! A bit of a throw-away in the series but it does have some solid moments and the use of the color sections was very well done. Garma is an interesting side-story but didn't quite have enough impact as is the case with Amuro's mother. The battles still always seem to be a bit confusing in how they are drawn which makes figuring out what is happening more difficult than it needs to be but that's a minor issue. A solid story and series and a true classic!

  25. 4 out of 5

    Mathew Carruthers

    This installment of the series is holding my interest enough to move on to volume 3. The plot keeps moving at a frantic pace and the illustrations keep it moving from battle scene to battle scene. The more of this series I read, the more it seems to borrow stylistically from the artwork of Moebius, but maybe the same could be said of any comics portraying futuristic cities and machinery with fine line ink work.

  26. 5 out of 5

    brightredglow

    A lot of stuff that I liked with a few drawbacks that I can dismiss in hindsight. Definitely gets into the clash of civilian vs military; Amuro's ambivalence at times; and Char's manipulations that will likely have long-range impact. A lot of stuff that I liked with a few drawbacks that I can dismiss in hindsight. Definitely gets into the clash of civilian vs military; Amuro's ambivalence at times; and Char's manipulations that will likely have long-range impact.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Alexander Case

    I've got a review scheduled to go up on Bureau42 in a few weeks. In short, I enjoyed this manga, though it has some issues with the flow of the action early on. I've got a review scheduled to go up on Bureau42 in a few weeks. In short, I enjoyed this manga, though it has some issues with the flow of the action early on.

  28. 5 out of 5

    mwr

    As usual--Vertical has some tremendous production values. Many color pages, and a good deal of CLAMP art at the end. Quality stuff.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Paolo

    A consistent effort to show the effects of war on the people both in the ships and in the refugee camps, all the while keeping fans gripping the edge of their seats with all that hot mecha action.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Jenna Black

    Honestly so far I don't think there's a single likeable character in this manga. Honestly so far I don't think there's a single likeable character in this manga.

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