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He's the Sin-Eater, the man who takes the world's sins for himself by killing every sinner he sees - and he sees them everywhere! But the lethal lunatic bites off more than he can chew when he robs Spider-Man of a dear friend: police captain Jean DeWolff! How can the grieving hero track down a villain with targets everywhere he goes? Join the wall-crawler for a frantic sea He's the Sin-Eater, the man who takes the world's sins for himself by killing every sinner he sees - and he sees them everywhere! But the lethal lunatic bites off more than he can chew when he robs Spider-Man of a dear friend: police captain Jean DeWolff! How can the grieving hero track down a villain with targets everywhere he goes? Join the wall-crawler for a frantic search through New York City that culminates in a pivotal moment between Manhattan's two biggest solo stars - Spidey and Daredevil! COLLECTING: Peter Parker , the Spectacular Spider -Man (1976) 107-110, 134-136


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He's the Sin-Eater, the man who takes the world's sins for himself by killing every sinner he sees - and he sees them everywhere! But the lethal lunatic bites off more than he can chew when he robs Spider-Man of a dear friend: police captain Jean DeWolff! How can the grieving hero track down a villain with targets everywhere he goes? Join the wall-crawler for a frantic sea He's the Sin-Eater, the man who takes the world's sins for himself by killing every sinner he sees - and he sees them everywhere! But the lethal lunatic bites off more than he can chew when he robs Spider-Man of a dear friend: police captain Jean DeWolff! How can the grieving hero track down a villain with targets everywhere he goes? Join the wall-crawler for a frantic search through New York City that culminates in a pivotal moment between Manhattan's two biggest solo stars - Spidey and Daredevil! COLLECTING: Peter Parker , the Spectacular Spider -Man (1976) 107-110, 134-136

30 review for Spider-Man: The Death of Jean DeWolff

  1. 5 out of 5

    James DeSantis

    Pretty dark look into someone who loses all his mental stability. With the death of Jean Dewolff, both Spider-man and Daredevil seem to be chasing the same man. Sin Eater is out there killing people who he finds, well, sinful. It's simple enough but it's actually the look into someone's mind and how fractured it can become after years of doing a certain job. The second half deals with trying to fix past mistakes and watching how it all comes together to a bitter but nearly perfect ending really Pretty dark look into someone who loses all his mental stability. With the death of Jean Dewolff, both Spider-man and Daredevil seem to be chasing the same man. Sin Eater is out there killing people who he finds, well, sinful. It's simple enough but it's actually the look into someone's mind and how fractured it can become after years of doing a certain job. The second half deals with trying to fix past mistakes and watching how it all comes together to a bitter but nearly perfect ending really worked. I have to say Peter is kind of a dickhead in a lot of this. I wonder if it's because of the black suit, but was this even the venom side of him? Or he just wore a black suit? He just came off as irrational a lot of the time and talking out of his ass. But besides that I really enjoyed everything else, and though dated, the dialogue holds up reasonably well. A 3.5 out of 5, but I'll bump it to a 4 for that ending.

  2. 5 out of 5

    James

    I really enjoy reading these older Spidey books and I like Peter David. So here we have the best of both worlds. The Sin Eater is on the prowl. Armed with the shotty and a ski mask, he is here to dish out his own version of Justice, taking out people he believes are full of sin. During his killing spree, he manages once to escape Spidey and another heroe. This book definitely has a more serious tone to it as the Sin Eater is brutal with his approach. After the events of the first four issues, Pe I really enjoy reading these older Spidey books and I like Peter David. So here we have the best of both worlds. The Sin Eater is on the prowl. Armed with the shotty and a ski mask, he is here to dish out his own version of Justice, taking out people he believes are full of sin. During his killing spree, he manages once to escape Spidey and another heroe. This book definitely has a more serious tone to it as the Sin Eater is brutal with his approach. After the events of the first four issues, Peter Parker is second guessing himself. Will he be able to pull it together and save the day? I had got this book several months back. While I was online looking at the reading order to see where I was supposed to read the Sins Rising prelude in the Spencer run, I saw that this book had the first appearance of the Sin Eater that Spencer was about to use in his next arc. So I figured nows the best time to go on ahead and read this one. Pretty good stuff. Now let’s see what Spencer does with the character.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Ondra Král

    Jeden z mých nejoblíbenějších Spider-Manů. Tak trochu splněný sen dělat na něm redakci překladu. V Spider-Man výběru si ho nenechte ujít.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Chris Gordon

    The Death of Jean DeWolff was excellent from beginning to end! This graphic novel ranks as high as Kraven's Last Hunt in my estimation – it's that worthy of praise. Definitely a refreshing read after the older '70s era Spider-Man comics – which I love, don't get me wrong, but they can admittedly get pretty campy. Spider-Man is faced with so many different obstacles, from Jean's death to coming to terms with the result of his fight with the Sin Eater, that this becomes a must read for Spidey fans The Death of Jean DeWolff was excellent from beginning to end! This graphic novel ranks as high as Kraven's Last Hunt in my estimation – it's that worthy of praise. Definitely a refreshing read after the older '70s era Spider-Man comics – which I love, don't get me wrong, but they can admittedly get pretty campy. Spider-Man is faced with so many different obstacles, from Jean's death to coming to terms with the result of his fight with the Sin Eater, that this becomes a must read for Spidey fans. You can feel the weight of the entire story fall on his shoulders, and the character development is exceptionally well done. You'd think that it would be hard to add even more layers of depth to a character as storied as Spider-Man, but The Death of Jean DeWolff manages to make him even more relatable, likeable, and all around better as a superhero. As well, the Sin Eater was a great addition to Spider-Man's rouges' gallery. I think this story, along with Kraven's Last Hunt, should be made into movies someday since they truly embody the spirit of Spider-Man and all the trials he has to overcome in order to become the greatest superhero on the market!

  5. 4 out of 5

    Siike Donnelly

    Gut wrenching and amazing I'm not sure that I ever read this story in its entirety. Its so well done. The writing, the art, it all works. The opening pages were so well done, recapping who Jean was before revealing that these memories were flashing before her eyes at the moment of her death were so powerful. This book explores what a single death means to characters like Spiderman and Daredevil, while also showing the ripple effects it has on other cops and the citizens of New York. If you've nev Gut wrenching and amazing I'm not sure that I ever read this story in its entirety. Its so well done. The writing, the art, it all works. The opening pages were so well done, recapping who Jean was before revealing that these memories were flashing before her eyes at the moment of her death were so powerful. This book explores what a single death means to characters like Spiderman and Daredevil, while also showing the ripple effects it has on other cops and the citizens of New York. If you've never read this before, do so now. You see how hard balancing morality is in the eyes of Peter Parker, and why he needs someone older like Mat Murdock to be there for him when he struggles with right and wrong. There are some beautifully written moments in this book and some very great twists. Stop reading my dumb review and buy it already. Seriously, this is one of the greats.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Kyle Berk

    The Death of Jean DeWolff is one of the two darker Spider-man stories you hear about in the same beat. This and Kraven's last hunt are spoken about often together, and I can sort of see why. Though Death of Jean Dewolff is much more of a Spider centric story. You've got the classic hallmarks of a Peter David story in his comedic timing which is excellent. Peter David always has excellent comedic chops. Weird I know considering I just said this was talked about in the same breath as Kraven's Last The Death of Jean DeWolff is one of the two darker Spider-man stories you hear about in the same beat. This and Kraven's last hunt are spoken about often together, and I can sort of see why. Though Death of Jean Dewolff is much more of a Spider centric story. You've got the classic hallmarks of a Peter David story in his comedic timing which is excellent. Peter David always has excellent comedic chops. Weird I know considering I just said this was talked about in the same breath as Kraven's Last Hunt. Jean Dewolff is one of the only cops to every work with Spider-man enthusiastically. At the beginning she's killed by a mysterious figure, the Sin Eater who for a villian in one or two stories I think is actually pretty good. The mystery itself is lukewarm but the narrative around it is strong I think. Featuring Spider-Man and Daredevil prominently as it questions what is right and what is wrong. Do the heroes go far enough or to they insert themselves where they don't belong. The follow up story is good, perhaps even better because of how down Spider-man is down on himself because his recklessness in the previous story crippled Sin Eater. The weak elements are certain things attached to Jean Dewolff after her death. Including an apparent crush on Spider-Man and a relationship with another officer. Both of which are unnecessary elements that add at best a single moment of pause in an otherwise very solid story. The art is the Marvel style all the way through with good coloring though oddly sometimes the art seems out of focus? Overall I see why it's a classic and I would recommend it. 4 stars. Good plot, unneeded details, good Spider-man.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Alan

    There was a time when I was a pretty much, or close to, a Peter David fan of sorts. Times change, and I don't know if it is the times or me that left me wondering more than a little bit why this story arc is considered a classic by many. The classic David hallmarks are there. Good, witty dialogue, attention to character, and a solid story. The concept of the sin-eater, as it exists in history is handled well. In 2018 the psychological issues that fuel the Sin-Eater character are far from earth sh There was a time when I was a pretty much, or close to, a Peter David fan of sorts. Times change, and I don't know if it is the times or me that left me wondering more than a little bit why this story arc is considered a classic by many. The classic David hallmarks are there. Good, witty dialogue, attention to character, and a solid story. The concept of the sin-eater, as it exists in history is handled well. In 2018 the psychological issues that fuel the Sin-Eater character are far from earth shaking. Actually, as the villain had to be a real driving factor in this type of story, the character failed in many aspects. The character returned for brief time after the initial story arc, and that return is included here. In some aspects the Sin-Eater's portrayal is improved, but we get the usual angst ridden Peter Parker that has almost always turned me off as a reader. If you want David I would say get the later half of his Hulk work, or his Star Trek work.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Jason

    I read this in preparation for the upcoming Spider-Man storyline. I had read at least an issue or two as a kid and was surprised at how good (and not-really-for-kids) it was. I did a double-take when Sin Eater calls Betty a "$Lut" - I was like, "is this the first time that word has appeared in a Spider-Man comic? Good clean Spidey? I was honestly riveted from start to finish. Looking forward to Spencer's take on the character. That's the thing about Peter David. He's not a flashy writer. He tells I read this in preparation for the upcoming Spider-Man storyline. I had read at least an issue or two as a kid and was surprised at how good (and not-really-for-kids) it was. I did a double-take when Sin Eater calls Betty a "$Lut" - I was like, "is this the first time that word has appeared in a Spider-Man comic? Good clean Spidey? I was honestly riveted from start to finish. Looking forward to Spencer's take on the character. That's the thing about Peter David. He's not a flashy writer. He tells everyday stories and he tells them really well. He is very well known in the biz, but still probably underrated. His Hulk run is epic, and it's probably because he was able to inject an everyday humanness into the story of the horror that is the Hulk. The rest of his stuff, who could even tell you what he's written? But he's everywhere. He's that writer where you finish an arc and have to take a few minutes to recoup and you're like "Wow- who wrote that?" And then you see it was Peter David and you're all, "Oh, of course!" and then you promptly forget it. Maybe it's having two first names. Who knows. And, honestly, sometimes those everyday stories are a little too "everyday" making them more humdrum. But when he's on, look out- and he is DEFINITELY on here. Great story.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Zach

    This is perhaps the the best writing to come out of the alien costume Spider-Man saga. The Death of Jean Dewolfe was such an entertaining read that I finished it in a night which I never do. It has such an amazing arc that wastes no time recalling previous back issues and throws you hog wild into one of the darkest chapters in Spider-Man. We love Spidey, it's cool and kind of scary to see him deal with such dark mature concepts. There were moments I didn't want to turn the page because I was act This is perhaps the the best writing to come out of the alien costume Spider-Man saga. The Death of Jean Dewolfe was such an entertaining read that I finished it in a night which I never do. It has such an amazing arc that wastes no time recalling previous back issues and throws you hog wild into one of the darkest chapters in Spider-Man. We love Spidey, it's cool and kind of scary to see him deal with such dark mature concepts. There were moments I didn't want to turn the page because I was actually afraid where it might go next. Sin-Eater is such an interesting villain for Spider-Man, no flair to him, no super powered mantra, simply just just a maniac with a shotgun can be one of the most terrifying enemies you can encounter. The imagery and concept of a gun bestowing Devine Right on any one individual should give any super hero pause and concern. Spider-Man Death of Jean DeWolfe is an essential for the the more mature and thought provoking Spidey audience. A fully realized story that comes full circle with repercussions for all and many final thoughts.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Michael

    This volume reprints both the original Sin Eater storyline and the follow up done a few years later. The original story received a lot of attention when it came out, and was reprinted in trade paperback at a time when comics were almost never reprinted. The original story features the death of Jean De Wolff, a character who was kind of, sort of, Spider-Man's Commissioner Gordon. The story begins with her murder, and unfortunately the mystery isn't as compelling as it needs to be. Daredevil guest This volume reprints both the original Sin Eater storyline and the follow up done a few years later. The original story received a lot of attention when it came out, and was reprinted in trade paperback at a time when comics were almost never reprinted. The original story features the death of Jean De Wolff, a character who was kind of, sort of, Spider-Man's Commissioner Gordon. The story begins with her murder, and unfortunately the mystery isn't as compelling as it needs to be. Daredevil guest stars and both him and Spider-Man seem to act a bit off. The story seems to want to feel important, but it never quite reaches its ambitions. The second story is far less ambitious, and is as much an Electro story as it is a follow-up to The Death of Jean DeWolff storyline. This story is far less ambitious, but is a fun story with some great Sal Buscema art.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Patrick.G.P

    A more gritty and serious Spider-Man story, about a mass murderer loose in New York city. The first part here is really quite excellent, with a dark theme of morality running through it. Also nice that Daredevil shows up to weigh in his thoughts on law and morality as a lawyer. The second part of the story was rather off I thought, the writing seemed detached and a lot of the art was dull. Overall a decent Spider-Man story, although not as good as I had hoped it would be.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Danilo Otašević

    Ovo jeste jedna od najesencijalnijih priča o Spajdermenu, ali ipak prva priča nije bila na očekivanom nivou. Ta prva priča je ponudila nekoliko zanimljivih koncepta, ali radnja nije dovoljno vešto izbalansirale iste. S druge strane, druga priča je fenomenalna od početka do kraja i zaslužuje taj legendarni status koji poseduje.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Chris W

    3.5 Stars: Sin-eater isn't the greatest villain and Spider-Man seems quite underpowered here. But the meaning of deaths to Spider-Man, Daredevil and how they are affected by it is honestly the best part. The volume does well when it explores that aspect, when it shows Spidey start to lose self control. 3.5 Stars: Sin-eater isn't the greatest villain and Spider-Man seems quite underpowered here. But the meaning of deaths to Spider-Man, Daredevil and how they are affected by it is honestly the best part. The volume does well when it explores that aspect, when it shows Spidey start to lose self control.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Benjamin Lewis

    Not a great representation of mental illness, but a compelling story of Peter Parker. It's good to see more grounded fights with Spidey. "A wise man speaks softly and carries a big stick, [and scarcely decides to use it.]" After this, I recommend "Daredevil: Born Again." Not a great representation of mental illness, but a compelling story of Peter Parker. It's good to see more grounded fights with Spidey. "A wise man speaks softly and carries a big stick, [and scarcely decides to use it.]" After this, I recommend "Daredevil: Born Again."

  15. 4 out of 5

    Caleb Abel

    Probably the second best Spider-Man arc I've read after Kraven's Last Hunt. Combined with Sin-Eater released a later follow-up series, this collection really delves into Peter's anger and fears of his own power in ways you don't see very often. Probably the second best Spider-Man arc I've read after Kraven's Last Hunt. Combined with Sin-Eater released a later follow-up series, this collection really delves into Peter's anger and fears of his own power in ways you don't see very often.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Andres Pasten

    La primera historia es buena, la segunda es algo pobre.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Andy

    The Death of Jean DeWolff is one of the (justly) more famous Spider-Man stories, one I'm familiar with but never read until Marvel published their nice new hard-cover edition. Peter David (in his first major comic role) knocks it out the ballpark telling a dark, complex and important story. The original 4-parter (PP: Spectacular Spider-Man 107-110) takes a different approach to most other Spidey stories at the time, as we start off with the unwitnessed brutal death of a long time multi-comic cha The Death of Jean DeWolff is one of the (justly) more famous Spider-Man stories, one I'm familiar with but never read until Marvel published their nice new hard-cover edition. Peter David (in his first major comic role) knocks it out the ballpark telling a dark, complex and important story. The original 4-parter (PP: Spectacular Spider-Man 107-110) takes a different approach to most other Spidey stories at the time, as we start off with the unwitnessed brutal death of a long time multi-comic character. For new readers this may jar somewhat if they've never met Jean in previous encounters but it's a bold start. We gradually get to met the Sin-Eater who proceeds to go on a bloody rampage, killing violently while crossing paths with Spidey and Daredevil in a who-dunnit thriller. It feels real. Spidey is upset and angry about losing a friend and being betrayed. We see the consequences of him losing his control and how far he can potentially go if not restrained. On the flipside we see Matt Murdock acting weak at the risk of exposing his secrey identity directly resulting in the loss of life and his response to dealing with this. Two very different approaches and an interesting debate about justice, vigilantes, the right to innocence and how the state deals with this. This is all set on a backdrop of civil unrest, racial tensions and mistrust of the police. The art by Rich Buckler is fantastic, real, gritty and unflinching. The events shocking and bloody (feel the genuine fear at the shot-gun blast conclusion to the 3rd issue) and the identity of the Sin Eater will come as a shock to most. It's also nice to see JJJ acting more like a powerful and intelligent human being rather than the extreme comic relief he can sometimes be (note his calling out of racism by a black preacher). Given the events, the way it's handled and the outcome it's impressive to think this all occurred in the pages of Spectacular S-M rather than the mainstream Amazing. The final section with Pete and Matt changed their dynamic forever more (well until OMD) with lasting implications for both. The second part of this collection is the less satisfying but nicely handled follow up, set approximately one year later. The art is different and less gripping, the introduction of Electro shifts the focus slightly (though Max is handled well in this instance) and we see Pete trying to live with the consequences of his previous loss of control. This was set post-wedding and I find MJ annoying here (relegated back to nagging, petty wife status). Still it's a tragic story, creating a definite end to a great story from the past. Well worth reading for fans old and new.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Stephen Snyder

    What a wonderful way to relive, what is in my opinion, both the best and the darkest Spider-Man story ever! I originally read this story when it first came out in 1985, and its deeply felt impact has remained with me over these many years. Peter Parker finds himself at war with himself as he is confronted with the question, "Are there definite boundaries between right and wrong, and if there aren't and you are forced to take action, how do you decide which action to take?" For many years, this qu What a wonderful way to relive, what is in my opinion, both the best and the darkest Spider-Man story ever! I originally read this story when it first came out in 1985, and its deeply felt impact has remained with me over these many years. Peter Parker finds himself at war with himself as he is confronted with the question, "Are there definite boundaries between right and wrong, and if there aren't and you are forced to take action, how do you decide which action to take?" For many years, this question has resonated in my thoughts. A MUST READ for any Spider-Man fan! Kudos to Peter David on creating a masterpiece that shall remain a legend for many more years to come. Thank you Franklin Public Library for processing my interlibrary loan request for this book, and thank you James V. Brown Library for being so generous in lending it to me.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Shannon Appelcline

    Death of Jean DeWolff (107-110). I was expecting this to be a good story for the '80s, but it turns out to be pretty phenomenal for any era. There's perhaps a bit more attention to superhero tropes here than if the story had been written in the modern day, but besides that it's pretty amazing. A lot of that is because David focuses on the real world: with criminals with much more genuine mental problems than the normal super-villains of comics … and real people paying the consequences. Killing o Death of Jean DeWolff (107-110). I was expecting this to be a good story for the '80s, but it turns out to be pretty phenomenal for any era. There's perhaps a bit more attention to superhero tropes here than if the story had been written in the modern day, but besides that it's pretty amazing. A lot of that is because David focuses on the real world: with criminals with much more genuine mental problems than the normal super-villains of comics … and real people paying the consequences. Killing off a supporting character just to get things started is pretty shocking, and the rest of the story follows right on from there. The interactions between Daredevil and Spider-Man are not just great, but really revelatory. All around, a terrific arc [9/10]. The Sin-Eater Returns (134-136). This is an interesting story because it deals with the real-world psychological repercussions of the previous arc, to both Peter and to the Man who was Sin-Eater. David unfortunately decides to use the cliche of the Sin-Eater becoming a multiple personality who talks to himself, but otherwise this is an interesting storyline, though not nearly as good as the original [7/10]. However, I'm thrilled that Marvel decided to include this story in the new edition!

  20. 4 out of 5

    Yuri

    this comic is special to me since it's one of the first spider-man stories I read to completion. this comic is special to me since it's one of the first spider-man stories I read to completion.

  21. 4 out of 5

    YourFriendlyNeighborhoodSpidey

    The first half of this collection was SO good--I loved the characterization of Spider-Man and Daredevil and their different ideological approach to dealing with the Sin-Eater. The second half was less impressive to me. I've never been a fan of Mary-Jane (thanks mostly to Kirsten's Dunst's performance in the Sam Raimi trilogy, as this is one of my first forays into the comics) but I was somewhat pleasantly surprised to find that my dislike of Mary Jane in this collection had little to do with tha The first half of this collection was SO good--I loved the characterization of Spider-Man and Daredevil and their different ideological approach to dealing with the Sin-Eater. The second half was less impressive to me. I've never been a fan of Mary-Jane (thanks mostly to Kirsten's Dunst's performance in the Sam Raimi trilogy, as this is one of my first forays into the comics) but I was somewhat pleasantly surprised to find that my dislike of Mary Jane in this collection had little to do with that leftover taste in my mouth. I just don't find her to be a compelling character. I did find one moment in the beginning where Spider-Man found Jean's clippings of news stories about him and his subsequent assumption of why that was to be misleading, especially as a driving motivation that went unresolved. Other than that I really enjoyed this collection!

  22. 5 out of 5

    Garrett

    When I was a kid, the Death of Jean DeWolff / Sin-Eater storyline shook me to my core. It hurt my feelings and gave me a little bit of comic book PTSD. It was so relentlessly dark and uncompromising and because the antagonist was simply a shotgun-wielding maniac on a rampage, it was super plausible. This volume has a back-up resolution that I had never read before, and because it was also by Peter David, it was totally worth it. Very well done, sympathetic and no holds barred. These are the good When I was a kid, the Death of Jean DeWolff / Sin-Eater storyline shook me to my core. It hurt my feelings and gave me a little bit of comic book PTSD. It was so relentlessly dark and uncompromising and because the antagonist was simply a shotgun-wielding maniac on a rampage, it was super plausible. This volume has a back-up resolution that I had never read before, and because it was also by Peter David, it was totally worth it. Very well done, sympathetic and no holds barred. These are the good Spider-Man comics when there was a lot going on with him other than the Aunt May jeopardy of the month. This is a volume every old school fan needs on the shelf.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Khairul Hezry

    One of the more memorable stories in the Spider-Man canon. Jean De Wolff, a popular supporting character, was killed off-panel and that starts off the hunt for the serial killer Sin-Eater. I'm not sure but Sin Eater was probably inspired by the Son of Sam serial killings that terrorised New York at the time. A few years later, this story tangentially contributed to the birth of popular (and by now over used) Spidey villain, Venom. One of the more memorable stories in the Spider-Man canon. Jean De Wolff, a popular supporting character, was killed off-panel and that starts off the hunt for the serial killer Sin-Eater. I'm not sure but Sin Eater was probably inspired by the Son of Sam serial killings that terrorised New York at the time. A few years later, this story tangentially contributed to the birth of popular (and by now over used) Spidey villain, Venom.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Simone

    Se volete leggere la mia recensione, cliccate qui! http://ascwblog.blogspot.it/2016/12/l... Se volete leggere la mia recensione, cliccate qui! http://ascwblog.blogspot.it/2016/12/l...

  25. 5 out of 5

    Liam Martin

    A

  26. 5 out of 5

    Nicholas Phillips

  27. 4 out of 5

    Cory

  28. 5 out of 5

    Citizen Of R'lyeh

  29. 4 out of 5

    Kim Wong

  30. 5 out of 5

    Matthew Cullen

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