web site hit counter Churchyard Salad - Ebooks PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

Churchyard Salad

Availability: Ready to download

From the dust jacket: "Timothy Herring and his wife are returning from a visit to friends in Southern England when, on the Dorset-Wilshire border, they discover a tumble-down inn. This building was not only once the dower house of the nearby mansion of Markstone, but was built on the ruins of an early monastic church whose chancel apse is still standing and is being used a From the dust jacket: "Timothy Herring and his wife are returning from a visit to friends in Southern England when, on the Dorset-Wilshire border, they discover a tumble-down inn. This building was not only once the dower house of the nearby mansion of Markstone, but was built on the ruins of an early monastic church whose chancel apse is still standing and is being used as a woodshed. "Hearing that the inn is to be demolished, Timothy obtains permission to excavate the remains of the convent buildings which he is convinced are buried under the adjacent land. "While this work is being carried out, some extremely odd things happen. An attempt is made to set fire to the thatched roof, stone coffins are moved from place to place in the cellar which was once the crypt of the church, and the body of the young Lord Chilmarkstone is eventually found in one of them. "To protect a man whom Timothy is convinced is not the murderer, he goes to considerable trouble to find out the truth about Lord Chilmarkstone's death, and to account for the presence of three more bodies which the police find buried in the garden."


Compare

From the dust jacket: "Timothy Herring and his wife are returning from a visit to friends in Southern England when, on the Dorset-Wilshire border, they discover a tumble-down inn. This building was not only once the dower house of the nearby mansion of Markstone, but was built on the ruins of an early monastic church whose chancel apse is still standing and is being used a From the dust jacket: "Timothy Herring and his wife are returning from a visit to friends in Southern England when, on the Dorset-Wilshire border, they discover a tumble-down inn. This building was not only once the dower house of the nearby mansion of Markstone, but was built on the ruins of an early monastic church whose chancel apse is still standing and is being used as a woodshed. "Hearing that the inn is to be demolished, Timothy obtains permission to excavate the remains of the convent buildings which he is convinced are buried under the adjacent land. "While this work is being carried out, some extremely odd things happen. An attempt is made to set fire to the thatched roof, stone coffins are moved from place to place in the cellar which was once the crypt of the church, and the body of the young Lord Chilmarkstone is eventually found in one of them. "To protect a man whom Timothy is convinced is not the murderer, he goes to considerable trouble to find out the truth about Lord Chilmarkstone's death, and to account for the presence of three more bodies which the police find buried in the garden."

7 review for Churchyard Salad

  1. 4 out of 5

    William Bibliomane

    The fourth of Gladys Mitchell's pseudonymously-written Timothy Herring mysteries brings some of the fullest-yet development to not only the characters of Herring and his friend Parsons, but to Herring's new wife Alison, first met in the previous novel, Your Secret Friend. While that tale concerned itself (minorly, at least) with witchcraft, the curiously-titled Churchyard Salad (the reference is made clear by the first quote of the book, which the story further reinforce) instead takes on a bigg The fourth of Gladys Mitchell's pseudonymously-written Timothy Herring mysteries brings some of the fullest-yet development to not only the characters of Herring and his friend Parsons, but to Herring's new wife Alison, first met in the previous novel, Your Secret Friend. While that tale concerned itself (minorly, at least) with witchcraft, the curiously-titled Churchyard Salad (the reference is made clear by the first quote of the book, which the story further reinforce) instead takes on a bigger fish not only in a lost church hidden beneath the oddly-named pub, The Strike on All Angles, but in what appears to be an attempt to perform some sort of pagan rite around the long-dead Cult of Mithras (here rendered as Mithra). There are multiple mysteries, and some unexpected deaths revolving around lost heirs to the vast and valuable Chilmarkstone estates, on which the lost church of Saint Michael and the Angels sits. Further, there is a mystery to be solved surrounding missing heirlooms from the Chilmarkstone estate, and the deaths of the previous bearers of the title of Lord Chilmarkstone. To boot, there is the usual detailed exposition of architecture, folklore, and poetry, and Mitchell's sly sense of humour is once again at play (particularly risible is the firm of solicitors, Butt, Butt, Butt, and Stoppage). It is a shame that this is probably the most difficult to locate of the six Malcolm Torrie novels, because it really is a virtuoso Mitchell / Torrie performance. Full review to follow.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Marts (Thinker)

  3. 4 out of 5

    GeraniumCat

  4. 4 out of 5

    Leslie Smith

  5. 4 out of 5

    Karen

  6. 5 out of 5

    Charlotte Taft

  7. 5 out of 5

    Sheila

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.