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The best-selling guide for coping with changes in life and work, named one of the 50 all-time best books in self-help and personal development Whether you choose it or it is thrust upon you, change brings both opportunities and turmoil. Since Transitions was first published, this supportive guide has helped hundreds of thousands of readers cope with these issues by providin The best-selling guide for coping with changes in life and work, named one of the 50 all-time best books in self-help and personal development Whether you choose it or it is thrust upon you, change brings both opportunities and turmoil. Since Transitions was first published, this supportive guide has helped hundreds of thousands of readers cope with these issues by providing an elegantly simple yet profoundly insightful roadmap of the transition process. With the understanding born of both personal and professional experience, William Bridges takes readers step by step through the three stages of any transition: The Ending, The Neutral Zone, and, eventually, The New Beginning. Bridges explains how each stage can be understood and embraced, leading to meaningful and productive movement into a hopeful future. With a new introduction highlighting how the advice in the book continues to apply and is perhaps even more relevant today, and a new chapter devoted to change in the workplace, Transitions will remain the essential guide for coping with the one constant in life: change.


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The best-selling guide for coping with changes in life and work, named one of the 50 all-time best books in self-help and personal development Whether you choose it or it is thrust upon you, change brings both opportunities and turmoil. Since Transitions was first published, this supportive guide has helped hundreds of thousands of readers cope with these issues by providin The best-selling guide for coping with changes in life and work, named one of the 50 all-time best books in self-help and personal development Whether you choose it or it is thrust upon you, change brings both opportunities and turmoil. Since Transitions was first published, this supportive guide has helped hundreds of thousands of readers cope with these issues by providing an elegantly simple yet profoundly insightful roadmap of the transition process. With the understanding born of both personal and professional experience, William Bridges takes readers step by step through the three stages of any transition: The Ending, The Neutral Zone, and, eventually, The New Beginning. Bridges explains how each stage can be understood and embraced, leading to meaningful and productive movement into a hopeful future. With a new introduction highlighting how the advice in the book continues to apply and is perhaps even more relevant today, and a new chapter devoted to change in the workplace, Transitions will remain the essential guide for coping with the one constant in life: change.

30 review for Transitions: Making Sense of Life's Changes

  1. 5 out of 5

    Katie

    This was assigned work reading! Who knew bosses could assign you books! The last year has meant a lot of changes at work and the vast majority have been good ones, like, 99.99999%, but our department has had to get used to it, so that's where the assigned reading came from. Anyway, like most self-help-ish books, you kind of have to figure out what parts work for you and the part that I really valued was the idea of a "neutral" zone between the ending and a new beginning. And this neutral zone is a This was assigned work reading! Who knew bosses could assign you books! The last year has meant a lot of changes at work and the vast majority have been good ones, like, 99.99999%, but our department has had to get used to it, so that's where the assigned reading came from. Anyway, like most self-help-ish books, you kind of have to figure out what parts work for you and the part that I really valued was the idea of a "neutral" zone between the ending and a new beginning. And this neutral zone is a good thing and it's okay and even valuable that you feel all confused and lost and not sure what you want in that time period. That's really helped me when I look back at some of my own life transitions. This is also the book that made me want to read about Eleanor Roosevelt because of this passage: When Eleanor Roosevelt looked back on her own painful life transition at thirty-five, she wrote, "Somewhere along the line of development we discover what we really are, and then we make our real decision for which we are responsible. Make that decision primarily for yourself because you can never really live anyone else's life, not even your own child's." What she did not say was that her discovery came only after a terrible time of disenchantment and disorientation that almost killed her. She had discovered that her husband was having an affair with one of her most rusted friends. It was out of the shattered dream of domestic safety that she emerged, struggling against her own shyness and self-doubt, to become the important public figure in her own right that she remained for the rest of her life. I find that so very relatable. Flaw in the book: Lots of talk about "traditional cultures." It's wrong to group all cultures together and what does "traditional" mean anyway?

  2. 5 out of 5

    Alexis

    This little book is one of the first that I've read that deals with all the psychological and relational shifts involved in a state of transition or change. I wish I'd read this earlier in my life. This could be read by anyone who has left school, gotten married, lost a partner, changed jobs or careers, lost a family member or had a baby. So in other words, everyone! It's not self-helpy and it's not esoteric. It's very practical and allows one to reflect on times of change. ***I first heard about i This little book is one of the first that I've read that deals with all the psychological and relational shifts involved in a state of transition or change. I wish I'd read this earlier in my life. This could be read by anyone who has left school, gotten married, lost a partner, changed jobs or careers, lost a family member or had a baby. So in other words, everyone! It's not self-helpy and it's not esoteric. It's very practical and allows one to reflect on times of change. ***I first heard about it from my friend Kaari, who mentioned it in her livejournal. I plan to get a copy for those tough times of rediscovery ahead in my life.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Bernice

    Our area received this book from AVR. Every section I read has been helpful during my time of transition. He just names the feelings and experiences I've been having and makes me feel less crazy. I'd recommend it to anyone in the midst of transition. I just finished the book yesterday. I'd say that there are some really good sections and some average parts. He is not writing a Christian book (I am not sure of his spiritual background), so keep that in mind. I do think it would be interesting to Our area received this book from AVR. Every section I read has been helpful during my time of transition. He just names the feelings and experiences I've been having and makes me feel less crazy. I'd recommend it to anyone in the midst of transition. I just finished the book yesterday. I'd say that there are some really good sections and some average parts. He is not writing a Christian book (I am not sure of his spiritual background), so keep that in mind. I do think it would be interesting to study people in transition in the Bible, like the Israelites as they leave Egypt. I like that he includes literary allusions, like Odysseus and Psyche and Amor. He made me want to re-read the Odyssey!

  4. 5 out of 5

    Glenn Williams

    Want to make sense of life's transitions? This is simply and outstanding book on navigating through life's transitions. Practical and enormously insightful (and even inspiring in places)m Bridges helps the reader to understand the difference between 'change' and 'transition', and ultimately, to appreciate that the ending of a chapter is the actual beginning of a new one. His ability to confront the questions we all ask when we find ourselves in a transition is remarkable. Questions such as Why is Want to make sense of life's transitions? This is simply and outstanding book on navigating through life's transitions. Practical and enormously insightful (and even inspiring in places)m Bridges helps the reader to understand the difference between 'change' and 'transition', and ultimately, to appreciate that the ending of a chapter is the actual beginning of a new one. His ability to confront the questions we all ask when we find ourselves in a transition is remarkable. Questions such as Why is letting go so difficult? and Why is this happening to me? He speaks to the key transition stages of: - Disengagement - Dismantling - Disidentification - Disenchantment - Disorientation He argues that it is not just the pace of change that leaves us disoriented, but the fact that many (he says of Americans) have lost faith that the transitions they are going through are really getting them somewhere. This is just one of the problems he addresses in the light of many people finding endings difficult. Endings are the first phase of transition. The second phase is a time of lostness and emptiness, and the third phase is when life resumes an intelligible pattern and direction that puts our life on a new trajectory. It is no wonder this book has had 41 printings! #dmingml

  5. 5 out of 5

    Camille

    My review may be biased, as I'm not a fan of self help books. I found the book itself to be a bit bland and repetitive. The prologue and epilogue alone covers the bases of the content in between. I think I may read this again once I find myself in a more significant transition. My review may be biased, as I'm not a fan of self help books. I found the book itself to be a bit bland and repetitive. The prologue and epilogue alone covers the bases of the content in between. I think I may read this again once I find myself in a more significant transition.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Loy Machedo

    William Bridges is an internationally known speaker, author, and consultant who advises individuals and organizations in how to deal productively with change. His ten books include an expanded third edition of his best-seller, Managing Transitions (2009), and the updated second edition of Transitions (2004), which together have sold over one million copies. He focuses on the Transition, or psychological reorientation, people must go through to come to terms with changes in their lives. His three William Bridges is an internationally known speaker, author, and consultant who advises individuals and organizations in how to deal productively with change. His ten books include an expanded third edition of his best-seller, Managing Transitions (2009), and the updated second edition of Transitions (2004), which together have sold over one million copies. He focuses on the Transition, or psychological reorientation, people must go through to come to terms with changes in their lives. His three-phase model of Endings, Neutral Zone and New Beginnings is widely known. Educated originally in the humanities at Harvard, Columbia, and Brown Universities, he was (until his own career change in 1974) a professor of American Literature at Mills College, Oakland, CA. He is a past president of the Association for Humanistic Psychology. The Wall Street Journal listed him as one of the top ten independent executive development Transitions - Moving, Change of Environment, College, New Jobs, Relationships, Divorce, Marriage, Child, Death in the Family, Job Loss are all challenges in life. In this book, the author provides solutions to deal with such transitions. According to the author, Transition by itself has three stages that overlap, come and go. 1. Endings: It is useful to identify what is ending in your life. 2. Neutral Zone: This can look and feel like Pointless, Aimless & Rudderless. 3. New Beginnings: The next phase. The book is also divided into three sections. The Need for Change The Transition Process And finally a very interesting Epilogue. In the Epilogue, Bridges uses the story of Psyche and Amor, and the trials of Psyche in her task to be reunited with Amor, to illustrate the power of transitions. Moment of Truth I felt the book really dragged itself out quite a bit. But then to think about it, I do not know how else could the author have said it differently. Many times I felt he was just repeating himself over and over again. Surprisingly, I myself went into a depression after reading this book and took a few days to contemplate about my life. So I believe this book has substance and may relate to people at different points of their life. Overall Rating 7 out of 10 for its wisdom. 4 out of 10 for boring me with its repetitive nature. Loy Machedo loymachedo.com | loymachedo.tv

  7. 5 out of 5

    Rebecca Waring-Crane

    Engaging wisdom for navigating the inevitable in life -- change. I read this book as background for writing The Small Guide to Life's Big Changes. My focus is the practices that healthy people to use in times of change, so I found William's work with individuals in transition very helpful. Happily, I own a copy and underlined with abandon. No coincidence I'm sure, but as I read, I realized that I am processing my own transitions -- as a writer completing a project, as well as a human revisiting Engaging wisdom for navigating the inevitable in life -- change. I read this book as background for writing The Small Guide to Life's Big Changes. My focus is the practices that healthy people to use in times of change, so I found William's work with individuals in transition very helpful. Happily, I own a copy and underlined with abandon. No coincidence I'm sure, but as I read, I realized that I am processing my own transitions -- as a writer completing a project, as well as a human revisiting some unfinished business from previous transitions. The three phases Williams outlines 1) death 2) the neutral zone and 3) new beginning gave me a framework for what I face and insight into some of the feelings that well up as I do the work of the messy neutral zone. Along with varied stories of people Williams worked with in his first Transition Seminar, references to mythic stories enlivened the text and made for an interesting as well as instructive read.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Albert

    I believe this is considered a classic in its genre, and after reading it I can understand why. It provided me with some valuable insight and some reasonable ideas on how to use the new information: ideas that I could start to work with right away. The information felt timeless as well. I did feel the book could have been organized better. The major ideas were revisited several times in different places in the book, as if there was nothing more to say, so we'll just say the same thing a bit diff I believe this is considered a classic in its genre, and after reading it I can understand why. It provided me with some valuable insight and some reasonable ideas on how to use the new information: ideas that I could start to work with right away. The information felt timeless as well. I did feel the book could have been organized better. The major ideas were revisited several times in different places in the book, as if there was nothing more to say, so we'll just say the same thing a bit differently. Overall, a good use of my time.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Rev. Linda

    For a Januarymester Brite Divinity Course for those of us graduating soon --- From the Publisher: Whether it is chosen or thrust upon you, change brings both opportunities and turmoil. Since first published 25 years ago, Transitions has helped hundreds of thousands of readers cope with these issues by providing an elegantly simple yet profoundly insightful roadmap of the transition process. With the understanding born of both personal and professional experience, William Bridges takes readers st For a Januarymester Brite Divinity Course for those of us graduating soon --- From the Publisher: Whether it is chosen or thrust upon you, change brings both opportunities and turmoil. Since first published 25 years ago, Transitions has helped hundreds of thousands of readers cope with these issues by providing an elegantly simple yet profoundly insightful roadmap of the transition process. With the understanding born of both personal and professional experience, William Bridges takes readers step by step through the three stages of any transition: The Ending, The Neutral Zone, and, in time, The New Beginning. Bridges explains how each stage can be understood and embraced, leading to meaningful and productive movement into a hopeful future. With a new introduction highlighting how the advice in the book continues to apply and is perhaps even more relevant today, and a new chapter devoted to change in the workplace, Transitions will remain the essential guide for coping with the one constant in life: change.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Katie

    This 2 star rating is very personal. I can tell this book has value and helpful information but I couldn't connect with it. Maybe listening to it in audiobook format isn't the right route. I should prob have a real copy and be highlighting and making notes and lists. But I didn't do that. So I was left hearing things but not really connecting to any insight or advice. I literally cannot tell you one thing I took away from this that would help with transitions, change or anxiety. It's like I hear This 2 star rating is very personal. I can tell this book has value and helpful information but I couldn't connect with it. Maybe listening to it in audiobook format isn't the right route. I should prob have a real copy and be highlighting and making notes and lists. But I didn't do that. So I was left hearing things but not really connecting to any insight or advice. I literally cannot tell you one thing I took away from this that would help with transitions, change or anxiety. It's like I heard nothing, retained and learned nothing. I feel less for this book. Actually it stressed me out and increased my anxiety at times .... kind of made my anxiety and depression more acute depending on the chapter. Hey maybe that means I was being self reflective, but I just felt anxious and sorry for myself. I hope it's helpful to others, it wasn't for me.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Tiffany

    This book helped me name a lot of discomfort in my current situation (repatriating after four years overseas, changing jobs--maybe even careers, living with family instead of on my own, etc.). I appreciate the understanding I gained about the messiness of transition. The clarification of what is external change in our lives and what is internal transition was helpful. The author presented several prompts and suggestions of how to process and navigate the stages of transition. I'd recommend this This book helped me name a lot of discomfort in my current situation (repatriating after four years overseas, changing jobs--maybe even careers, living with family instead of on my own, etc.). I appreciate the understanding I gained about the messiness of transition. The clarification of what is external change in our lives and what is internal transition was helpful. The author presented several prompts and suggestions of how to process and navigate the stages of transition. I'd recommend this to anyone who is experiencing or about to experience a shift in her life. This is a book I will reread in the future.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Jade Pham Gift

    When going thru dramatic life changes, I often heard well-meaning friends said "when a door is closed, God open another..." or some variation of it which did not thing to easy the stress of going through it. This book was recommended to me by a friend, and it was very helpful to understand what I was dealing with and how I could cope with changes and managed the transition times, within my own power and stayed afloat, until I could find my own way thru and out of the situation. When going thru dramatic life changes, I often heard well-meaning friends said "when a door is closed, God open another..." or some variation of it which did not thing to easy the stress of going through it. This book was recommended to me by a friend, and it was very helpful to understand what I was dealing with and how I could cope with changes and managed the transition times, within my own power and stayed afloat, until I could find my own way thru and out of the situation.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Stephanie

    I barely got into this book before I had to return it, but it wasn't the right book for me at this time. I know lots of people have found it very helpful - and that's great! - but it wasn't the one for me. I barely got into this book before I had to return it, but it wasn't the right book for me at this time. I know lots of people have found it very helpful - and that's great! - but it wasn't the one for me.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Aaron

    I wish I had read this book several years ago when I went through a major transition in my life.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Jim Thomas

    Lots of words, not much meat.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Evan Steele

    3.5 stars. I can certainly see why this book has been so helpful to some. Bridges presents a very helpful paradigm for life change. He asserts that transition is something more than change and that it is best expressed in three steps Ending, Neutral Zone, and New Beginning. He commends that by correctly processing and journeying through each stage we can be in a significantly better position to embrace whats next. The book contains several helpful examples of people going through life changes. B 3.5 stars. I can certainly see why this book has been so helpful to some. Bridges presents a very helpful paradigm for life change. He asserts that transition is something more than change and that it is best expressed in three steps Ending, Neutral Zone, and New Beginning. He commends that by correctly processing and journeying through each stage we can be in a significantly better position to embrace whats next. The book contains several helpful examples of people going through life changes. Both real and fictional examples serve well to allow the reader to recognize transitions, barriers, sabotage, etc all from the helpful distance of someone else's problems. However, I would be very hesitant to call this a classic as the book plods along (and its not all that long.) The burdensome pace of the book is exacerbated by obscure references and unhelpful repetition. Perhaps someone in the midst of a very difficult transition would not find the book repetitive, but I sure did. I would recommend this book to anyone who is walking down the confusing road of transition. This book may serve as a guide to help categorize some of the pain and uncertainty. But overall it was not unique or useful enough to be something I widely recommend.

  17. 5 out of 5

    David

    I always meant to read this book, but never did until a friend gave it to Tom. So I nabbed it and turns out that I found it helpful. Not sure I would have liked the original edition, based on what the author says about it, but this edition was certainly worth a read. Of course, what makes it wise is that it draws on a lot of different stories and examples to remind us that we must sort it all out for ourselves. But it does offer some helpful insights about how that can work, and the always-helpf I always meant to read this book, but never did until a friend gave it to Tom. So I nabbed it and turns out that I found it helpful. Not sure I would have liked the original edition, based on what the author says about it, but this edition was certainly worth a read. Of course, what makes it wise is that it draws on a lot of different stories and examples to remind us that we must sort it all out for ourselves. But it does offer some helpful insights about how that can work, and the always-helpful reminder to be patient with ourselves (Americans in particular need that reminder, I feel). I would recommend it to those in transition, and perhaps also those who are feeling stuck and in need of a change.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Melissa

    This book is extremely helpful, well written and enjoyable. The stories included, from other cultures, mythology and the author's own experience, make it all very relatable and accessible. It would be helpful for anyone going through absolutely any kind of transition to read this book. I plan to suggest it to several friends, colleagues past and present as well as family members. I am very glad to have read it, and will look to read more of William Bridges' books, some of which are for even more This book is extremely helpful, well written and enjoyable. The stories included, from other cultures, mythology and the author's own experience, make it all very relatable and accessible. It would be helpful for anyone going through absolutely any kind of transition to read this book. I plan to suggest it to several friends, colleagues past and present as well as family members. I am very glad to have read it, and will look to read more of William Bridges' books, some of which are for even more specific needs.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Terri

    I read "Transitions: Making Sense of Life's Changes" by William Bridges, considered a classic in the genre in preparation for a workshop that I am co-facilitating in October. I found the material presented here useful and thought-provoking. Bridges takes us through his theoretical model of how we move through transition in our lives: "endings," "the neutral zone," and "new beginnings." And, as is the intent, inspired me to apply these concepts to transitions in my own life. Some things that I fo I read "Transitions: Making Sense of Life's Changes" by William Bridges, considered a classic in the genre in preparation for a workshop that I am co-facilitating in October. I found the material presented here useful and thought-provoking. Bridges takes us through his theoretical model of how we move through transition in our lives: "endings," "the neutral zone," and "new beginnings." And, as is the intent, inspired me to apply these concepts to transitions in my own life. Some things that I found particularly useful at this time in my life include: p. xii - "...change is situational. Transition, on the other hand, is psychological. It is not those events, but rather the inner reorientation and self-redefinition that you have to go through i order to incorporate any of those changes into your life. Without a transition, a change is just a rearrangement of the furniture. Unless transition happens, the change won't work..." p. 7 - "Rule number one: When you're in transition, you find yourself coming back in new ways to old activities." p. 11 - "...rule number 2: Every transition begins with an ending. We have to let go of the old thing before we can pick up the new one - not just outwardly, but inwardly..." p. 15 - "Rule number three: Although it is advantageous to understand your own style of endings, some part of you will resist that understanding as though your life depended on it." p. 17 - "...rule number four: First there is an ending, then a beginning, and an important empty or fallow time in between. That is the order of things in nature." p. 24 - "My work with individuals in transition makes me believe that in a culture as diverse as ours no one model of adulthood fits everyone - or even anyone - exactly. Yet because you can catch glimpses of yourself in all of them, they are worth drawing upon in the task of charting the course of your own life." (It is important to emphasize that we are all different and move through these stages differently. And one way is not the "best" way for everyone.) p. 25 - the riddle of the Sphinx - "What animal walks on four feet in the morning, two feet at noon, and three feet in the evening, yet has only one voice?" (Oedipus tells us, "The human being.") p. 128 - "My point is simply that the inner ending is what initiates the transition. You see, change can lead to transition; but transition can also lead to change." p. 159 - "The lesson in all such experiences is that when we are ready to make a new beginning, we will shortly find an opportunity." However, the book seemed repetitive and dated. Though this 2004 "updated and expanded" 2nd edition (the original was first published in 1980) contains a useful model for the process of transitioning in life, the examples need updating for a 2018 audience. I also wondered if there are more contemporary works on the issue of transition that might contain current research and examples on the issue of transitioning. In addition, much of the book seemed repetitive - same stuff, different words, almost in an effort to fill pages (the book is still a slim 184 pages). Overall, a good and useful read. I learned a lot about myself and where I am at at this time in my own life.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Johnny Stork, MSc

    I have likely read well over a thousand books to date, maybe more. I have read hundreds in the categories of spirituality, comparative religion, mythology, psychology, self-development and Buddhism. Many of the hundreds stand out for various reasons. I now have a new one that I can HIGHLY recommend to everyone from young to old, satisfied or unsatisfied with their life. I can also HIGHLY recommend this book for anyone facing the stress, the uncertainty, the fear associate with transitions in the I have likely read well over a thousand books to date, maybe more. I have read hundreds in the categories of spirituality, comparative religion, mythology, psychology, self-development and Buddhism. Many of the hundreds stand out for various reasons. I now have a new one that I can HIGHLY recommend to everyone from young to old, satisfied or unsatisfied with their life. I can also HIGHLY recommend this book for anyone facing the stress, the uncertainty, the fear associate with transitions in their life. Moving away from your family home for the first time, changing jobs/careers, ending a relationship, facing retirement - life is filled with transitions and most of us fall into a predictable pattern of dealing with these transitions - not all of which are healthy or productive. I can’t recall the last time I read a book which had so many directly applicable insights into my own life – RIGHT NOW! I am not just impressed by this book I am BLOWN AWAY! I can’t imagine anyone NOT getting something meaningful, directly applicable, personal and illuminating, out of this exceptional book.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Raphael Donaire

    The book is the sake of good reflections about life, endings, changes, and transitions. William Bridges shared with us a mental model to deal with moments of complete and in-depth marks on our experience. Every transition rises, defining and dealing with an end. This phase has five different moments: - Disengagement: the separation of what you have lost; - Dismantling: taking apart the structure; - Disidentification: the way that loss destroys the old identity you had - Disenchantment: disillusioned The book is the sake of good reflections about life, endings, changes, and transitions. William Bridges shared with us a mental model to deal with moments of complete and in-depth marks on our experience. Every transition rises, defining and dealing with an end. This phase has five different moments: - Disengagement: the separation of what you have lost; - Dismantling: taking apart the structure; - Disidentification: the way that loss destroys the old identity you had - Disenchantment: disillusioned by something that once held meaning and significance; - Disorientation: feeling bewildered and lost as part of your slip away; After that, you will face a moment of deep reflection and thoughts that calls the neutral zone. At this point, you realize the ending and try to forecast the new beginning. The last phase it's the new cycle that will inaugurate in your life. That moment could be excited but brings a lot of doubt and skepticism. Go toward this phase requires planning skills, anxiety control, and self-awareness. I genuinely recommend that book if you are attempting to understand life and professional movements.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Susan Kavanaugh

    This is a book for anyone living a life. It is only "self help" in that it gives you a clearer idea of what change and transition are. With this clarity, one gains a great deal more patience with themselves and others in transition. I read this in the midst of processing a spouses death, but will recommend and reread it frequently in good and bad situations. They all require skills in juggling the uncertainties of shifting sands. This is a book for anyone living a life. It is only "self help" in that it gives you a clearer idea of what change and transition are. With this clarity, one gains a great deal more patience with themselves and others in transition. I read this in the midst of processing a spouses death, but will recommend and reread it frequently in good and bad situations. They all require skills in juggling the uncertainties of shifting sands.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Jessica

    Wonderful break down of the transition process and helped to add clarity to not just my present transition but all past ones as well. Definitely a heavy focus on work/career transitions. The section on the Neutral Zone was eye opening and I realized how much I inherently do some of the things suggested but picked up a few more tools. His commentary on the myth of Psyche and Amor in the epilogue was great.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Rachel

    This book was very helpful and spot on for me in terms of my current life transition and very encouraging in the process. I see myself giving away many copies of this book in the future, although probably only to people 30 or older.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Dave

    Pretty good book so far...

  26. 5 out of 5

    Micah Grant

    This was a great book about how we deal with change. I found organizational applications, but I can see very many examples of how this can be applied in my own personal and family life.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Peter

    This book is written for anybody who is looking to gain clarity about how to move forward with their life. There are a number of plusses about this book and I want to highlight three of them. First, Bridges writes in a very conversational, easy to understand style that draws the reader in. This probably came from the fact that he was a former literature professor before moving into consulting. It reads like a story about how a leader needs to act while leading individuals through a difficult or This book is written for anybody who is looking to gain clarity about how to move forward with their life. There are a number of plusses about this book and I want to highlight three of them. First, Bridges writes in a very conversational, easy to understand style that draws the reader in. This probably came from the fact that he was a former literature professor before moving into consulting. It reads like a story about how a leader needs to act while leading individuals through a difficult or confusing time in the organization's history. I particularly liked the large number of relevant quotes he uses to support the point he is making. Those provide context from a disparate international group including the Russian writer Leo Tolstoy, the American writer Mark Twain, Linus Pauling the American chemist, Mae West the American actress, Septima Poinsette Clark the American civil rights activist, Wolfgang Von Goethe the German philosopher, and Charles Du Bos the French critic. Second, he explains the difference between change and transition which is a very important concept for individuals to understand no matter what their situation. Bridges explains that, "With a change, you naturally focus on the outcome that the change produces...Transition is different. The starting point for dealing with transition is not the outcome but the ending that you'll have to make to leave the old situation behind." Third, Bridges provides very useful checklists for individuals to use while they are learning the three step model of transition. These checklists do a very practical job of helping the leader understand how well they are doing with the transition efforts they are attempting in their organization. In conclusion, this book can be a valuable tool for anybody who is in a transition or looking to make one.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Joel Wentz

    This is a straight-up "self help" book, and it doesn't pretend to be anything other than that. If you love that type of writing, you'll love this, and if you're skeptical, you will likely have a hard time with it. That being said, the writer covers a lot of ground here. It isn't exclusively about work/vocational decisions, but wisely addresses the transitions that also happen in relationships and family-life, connecting the common threads between these experiences. There is definitely practical This is a straight-up "self help" book, and it doesn't pretend to be anything other than that. If you love that type of writing, you'll love this, and if you're skeptical, you will likely have a hard time with it. That being said, the writer covers a lot of ground here. It isn't exclusively about work/vocational decisions, but wisely addresses the transitions that also happen in relationships and family-life, connecting the common threads between these experiences. There is definitely practical advice throughout, but the writer also speaks directly to the broader, psycho-spiritual, internal dynamics that happen to someone experiencing a significant transition, which are crucial to pay attention to for the sake of personal health. There are helpful anecdotes sprinkled throughout the book that also shed light on the more esoteric points the author makes. Overall, I found it interesting and helpful, and would easily recommend this to someone who is in the midst of upheaval or discerning a possible change in their life. Someone who isn't in that stage of life may find it hard to connect with, and those who are completely opposed to anything related to the self-help genre will also have a difficult time with it.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Dan Wilson

    I was loaned this book as I am personally going through some rather significant life transitions, and I will say that this book helped me get a good perspective on where I currently am in the midst of things. But that was in the first two chapters. After that, I didn't really get anything new from the book, and found myself getting irritated with Bridges' reliance on ancient greek myth as a framing device for his theories around dealing with life transition. I just don't have much patience nowad I was loaned this book as I am personally going through some rather significant life transitions, and I will say that this book helped me get a good perspective on where I currently am in the midst of things. But that was in the first two chapters. After that, I didn't really get anything new from the book, and found myself getting irritated with Bridges' reliance on ancient greek myth as a framing device for his theories around dealing with life transition. I just don't have much patience nowadays for "wisdom of the classic Greeks" or for literary revisionism. I found the stories of people in his group sessions to be far more compelling and would rather he had focused on expanding stories of actual people and showing how they exemplified the struggles and successes in navigating life transition, rather than going on about Oedipus and Ulysses. It just felt like a lot of padding to turn a really good article into a full book. So, totally worth reading, but if find your attention drifting after the first couple of chapters, feel free to put it away. You got what you needed to out of it.

  30. 5 out of 5

    La

    A dear friend sent me this book as I made my latest transition with a move across the country and into a new career. I received it with not much hope, but opened it anyway. When I first moved, I fought against the sadness and the stagnation. Why was I sad when I was moving to such opportunity? What kept me from embracing my new life with gusto? After reading Transitions, I realized that I was trying to ignore the natural order of things. I had to let the old life end and live in a neutral zone unt A dear friend sent me this book as I made my latest transition with a move across the country and into a new career. I received it with not much hope, but opened it anyway. When I first moved, I fought against the sadness and the stagnation. Why was I sad when I was moving to such opportunity? What kept me from embracing my new life with gusto? After reading Transitions, I realized that I was trying to ignore the natural order of things. I had to let the old life end and live in a neutral zone until the next beginning appeared. I don't know that I am complete with my own transition yet, but I recommend this book to anyone experiencing a transition of their own. Seeing the words on the page describing exactly what I was experiencing helped me to accept my place in my transition and find the patience to endure. I do feel like my new beginning is taking place. I'm certainly ready for it.

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