web site hit counter Borges and Memory: Encounters with the Human Brain - Ebooks PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

Borges and Memory: Encounters with the Human Brain

Availability: Ready to download

Imagine the astonishment felt by neuroscientist Rodrigo Quian Quiroga when he found a fantastically precise interpretation of his research findings in a story written by the great Argentinian fabulist Jorge Luis Borges fifty years earlier. Quian Quiroga studies the workings of the brain--in particular how memory works--one of the most complex and elusive mysteries of scien Imagine the astonishment felt by neuroscientist Rodrigo Quian Quiroga when he found a fantastically precise interpretation of his research findings in a story written by the great Argentinian fabulist Jorge Luis Borges fifty years earlier. Quian Quiroga studies the workings of the brain--in particular how memory works--one of the most complex and elusive mysteries of science. He and his fellow neuroscientists have at their disposal sophisticated imaging equipment and access to information not available just twenty years ago. And yet Borges seemed to have imagined the gist of Quian Quiroga's discoveries decades before he made them. The title character of Borges's "Funes the Memorious" remembers everything in excruciatingly particular detail but is unable to grasp abstract ideas. Quian Quiroga found neurons in the human brain that respond to abstract concepts but ignore particular details, and, spurred by the way Borges imagined the consequences of remembering every detail but being incapable of abstraction, he began a search for the origins of Funes. Borges's widow, Mar?a Kodama, gave him access to her husband's personal library, and Borges's books led Quian Quiroga to reread earlier thinkers in philosophy and psychology. He found that just as Borges had perhaps dreamed the results of Quian Quiroga's discoveries, other thinkers--William James, Gustav Spiller, John Stuart Mill--had perhaps also dreamed a story like "Funes." With " Borges and Memory," Quian Quiroga has given us a fascinating and accessible story about the workings of the brain that the great creator of Funes would appreciate.


Compare

Imagine the astonishment felt by neuroscientist Rodrigo Quian Quiroga when he found a fantastically precise interpretation of his research findings in a story written by the great Argentinian fabulist Jorge Luis Borges fifty years earlier. Quian Quiroga studies the workings of the brain--in particular how memory works--one of the most complex and elusive mysteries of scien Imagine the astonishment felt by neuroscientist Rodrigo Quian Quiroga when he found a fantastically precise interpretation of his research findings in a story written by the great Argentinian fabulist Jorge Luis Borges fifty years earlier. Quian Quiroga studies the workings of the brain--in particular how memory works--one of the most complex and elusive mysteries of science. He and his fellow neuroscientists have at their disposal sophisticated imaging equipment and access to information not available just twenty years ago. And yet Borges seemed to have imagined the gist of Quian Quiroga's discoveries decades before he made them. The title character of Borges's "Funes the Memorious" remembers everything in excruciatingly particular detail but is unable to grasp abstract ideas. Quian Quiroga found neurons in the human brain that respond to abstract concepts but ignore particular details, and, spurred by the way Borges imagined the consequences of remembering every detail but being incapable of abstraction, he began a search for the origins of Funes. Borges's widow, Mar?a Kodama, gave him access to her husband's personal library, and Borges's books led Quian Quiroga to reread earlier thinkers in philosophy and psychology. He found that just as Borges had perhaps dreamed the results of Quian Quiroga's discoveries, other thinkers--William James, Gustav Spiller, John Stuart Mill--had perhaps also dreamed a story like "Funes." With " Borges and Memory," Quian Quiroga has given us a fascinating and accessible story about the workings of the brain that the great creator of Funes would appreciate.

55 review for Borges and Memory: Encounters with the Human Brain

  1. 4 out of 5

    Richard Cytowic

    An Argentinian neuroscientist finds his work on memory anticipated by Borges' "Funes the Memorious." Funes can retain and recall countless details--what fails him is abstraction, the gist of generalization, and logical thought itself. This small book on memory shares some similarities with Luria's "The Mind of a Mnemonist," whose protagonist S Quiroga in fact discusses. An Argentinian neuroscientist finds his work on memory anticipated by Borges' "Funes the Memorious." Funes can retain and recall countless details--what fails him is abstraction, the gist of generalization, and logical thought itself. This small book on memory shares some similarities with Luria's "The Mind of a Mnemonist," whose protagonist S Quiroga in fact discusses.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Scott

    You can check out my review here. http://reviews.libraryjournal.com/201... You can check out my review here. http://reviews.libraryjournal.com/201...

  3. 5 out of 5

    Jake Bornheimer

    7/10 A well-written discussion of human memory as it related to Borges. Very easy reading if you have a bit of background knowledge of psychology. For me, the book didn't delve as deeply into the neuroscience as I hoped, nor did it discuss Borges as much as I would have liked. The content is good, however, it's just that I was already familiar with much of what Quiroga discusses. Some of the most interesting sections were the ones in which he describes findings by his fellow Argentine scientists. 7/10 A well-written discussion of human memory as it related to Borges. Very easy reading if you have a bit of background knowledge of psychology. For me, the book didn't delve as deeply into the neuroscience as I hoped, nor did it discuss Borges as much as I would have liked. The content is good, however, it's just that I was already familiar with much of what Quiroga discusses. Some of the most interesting sections were the ones in which he describes findings by his fellow Argentine scientists. I also enjoyed him quoting Borges' poetry, which I am less familiar with. Due to the shortness of the work he wasn't able to go fully into the studies that he did on the "Jennifer Aniston neuron". Though I will withhold judgement until I read the primary work, the interpretation he gave of the function of the conceptual neurons was not satisfying to me. To even compare them to the so-called "grandmother cells" makes little sense. He presents no evidence that the neurons are not just a component part of a chain that processes an abstract concept. The length of the book likely impacted this section, so i'll read his primary sources to get to the bottom of it. All that said, I do recommend this book to anybody slightly interested in either psychology/neuroscience or Jorge Luis Borges. Lots of interesting ideas inside.

  4. 4 out of 5

    HullabalooLane

    I wanted to like this book more than I did. It was both a neuroscience of memory primer and a recall of the work of Borges, the links between the two were somewhat spurious. Mostly because of the author's extremely literal interpretation. I will admit the author's method of referring to autistic people was largely what turned me off the book as he refers only to the medical model, the example of which is referred to in the book as highly embarrassing. If you have read Neurotribes, the same incid I wanted to like this book more than I did. It was both a neuroscience of memory primer and a recall of the work of Borges, the links between the two were somewhat spurious. Mostly because of the author's extremely literal interpretation. I will admit the author's method of referring to autistic people was largely what turned me off the book as he refers only to the medical model, the example of which is referred to in the book as highly embarrassing. If you have read Neurotribes, the same incident of Kim Peek interrupting the play is described entirely differently. This moment of cynicism on my behalf coloured how I read the rest of the book so I enjoyed it less.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Raghavendra

    A really interesting read. The author tries to use Borges' work as a way to introduce how memory works. It's intriguing how little we know about how memory works and how little we have learnt in the past 150+ years. The brain is another scientific frontier that man has yet to breach. and this book is a timely reminder of how fragile our beachhead is. The parallel track of reviewing Borges' work was a little heavy for me, primarily because I've never read Borges. I found his selected work excitin A really interesting read. The author tries to use Borges' work as a way to introduce how memory works. It's intriguing how little we know about how memory works and how little we have learnt in the past 150+ years. The brain is another scientific frontier that man has yet to breach. and this book is a timely reminder of how fragile our beachhead is. The parallel track of reviewing Borges' work was a little heavy for me, primarily because I've never read Borges. I found his selected work exciting and very refreshing. Worth the read. Good segue into reading more of Borges.

  6. 5 out of 5

    David

    Not as detailed as one would want - basically a research paper stretched out into a thin book. Quiroga summarises Borges' ideas about how memory and mind work and ties it to his own research with specific neuron triggers. The brain, it seems, is designed to classify and form abstractions, to work conceptually. Interesting stuff and certainly a nice companion to Borges' fantastic fictions. Not as detailed as one would want - basically a research paper stretched out into a thin book. Quiroga summarises Borges' ideas about how memory and mind work and ties it to his own research with specific neuron triggers. The brain, it seems, is designed to classify and form abstractions, to work conceptually. Interesting stuff and certainly a nice companion to Borges' fantastic fictions.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Cami Reads

    3.5

  8. 4 out of 5

    Oliver Ho

    This was pretty much exactly what I wanted: a primer on how memory works, tied in with an analysis and history of one of my favourite Borges stories. I will definitely dip into this book again to refresh my memory.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Csilcox

    http://csilcox-thebookshelf.blogspot.... http://csilcox-thebookshelf.blogspot....

  10. 4 out of 5

    Gary

    Pretty good. A bit more technical than Oliver Sacks, but not by much.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Hakan Tetik

  12. 4 out of 5

    Kunal

  13. 4 out of 5

    Oriana

  14. 5 out of 5

    Ece Erel

  15. 5 out of 5

    Ruy

  16. 5 out of 5

    Lesi

  17. 4 out of 5

    Salo

  18. 5 out of 5

    Sumeyye

  19. 4 out of 5

    Allison M.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Veronica Velez

  21. 4 out of 5

    Emanuel

  22. 5 out of 5

    Pierfrancesco Mitrotti

  23. 4 out of 5

    Leigh

  24. 5 out of 5

    Lindsay

  25. 5 out of 5

    Helmuth Chavez

  26. 4 out of 5

    OTIS

  27. 4 out of 5

    Ss

  28. 4 out of 5

    Vicente

  29. 5 out of 5

    Gabriel Vaianella

  30. 5 out of 5

    Scott Bagley

  31. 4 out of 5

    Paul Massignani

  32. 4 out of 5

    Jack

  33. 4 out of 5

    Katrina

  34. 5 out of 5

    Scott

  35. 4 out of 5

    Janna

  36. 5 out of 5

    Tn2012

  37. 4 out of 5

    Sara Gold

  38. 5 out of 5

    Lisa Kurt

  39. 4 out of 5

    Andrew

  40. 5 out of 5

    Jolie

  41. 5 out of 5

    Nina

  42. 5 out of 5

    Scott

  43. 4 out of 5

    Black

  44. 5 out of 5

    Leigh Bryan

  45. 4 out of 5

    Brumble

  46. 5 out of 5

    Diane

  47. 4 out of 5

    Patrick

  48. 4 out of 5

    Sameer

  49. 5 out of 5

    Tiffany Conner

  50. 5 out of 5

    Joshua

  51. 5 out of 5

    Laurence Kirmayer

  52. 4 out of 5

    Kurt Xyst

  53. 4 out of 5

    Katherine

  54. 5 out of 5

    Bcor

  55. 4 out of 5

    Lily

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.