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As protesters lay siege to the Xavier Institute, Professor X lies in a coma, trapped within the shattered form of his evil twin, Cassandra Nova. Collecting: New X-Men (2001) 118-126


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As protesters lay siege to the Xavier Institute, Professor X lies in a coma, trapped within the shattered form of his evil twin, Cassandra Nova. Collecting: New X-Men (2001) 118-126

30 review for New X-Men, Volume 2: Imperial

  1. 5 out of 5

    Donovan

    "Oh my stars and @%#*ing garters." Let me start with the art. Frank Quitely, Ethan Van Sciver, and Igor Kordey (?) are all over the place. Their style is similar, sketchy, boldly lined and cinematic. But the characters look so unlike themselves and sometimes downright horrible. Wolverine can look fat and Japanese, Xavier like a starved villain, and everyone lumpy, skeletal, or big-headed. This is a long comic run, so the artwork is surprisingly off-putting. "Welcome to a world where the weird are "Oh my stars and @%#*ing garters." Let me start with the art. Frank Quitely, Ethan Van Sciver, and Igor Kordey (?) are all over the place. Their style is similar, sketchy, boldly lined and cinematic. But the characters look so unlike themselves and sometimes downright horrible. Wolverine can look fat and Japanese, Xavier like a starved villain, and everyone lumpy, skeletal, or big-headed. This is a long comic run, so the artwork is surprisingly off-putting. "Welcome to a world where the weird are kings." Grant Morrison, the beautiful bastard, is one of my favorite writers because his work is so different and intriguing. And he succeeded in keeping me turning these pages. This is hands down the strangest X-Men run I've read so far. Telepathic brains in jars, acidic vomiting, mutant organ farming. It's just a very fun, wacky world he's created here. So this is a mixed bag. Morrison stays grounded but just weird enough to keep things fascinating. But damn it, the artwork is off. There were rare panels or splash pages that I loved by Van Sciver and especially Quitely, but I mostly complained while reading. I'm curious if anyone else is bothered by the artwork, because I hoped it would improve...

  2. 4 out of 5

    Dimitris Papastergiou

    Superb! Highly recommended X-Men run!

  3. 5 out of 5

    Logan

    Definitely a Morrisoneitas read! So I really enjoyed New X-Men, Volume 1: E Is for Extinction, I thought it was a good, straight forward X-Men story, especially coming from Grant Morrison who writes comics that are anything but straight forward. This volume I'm afraid Morrison is back to writing weird stuff nobody can understand (Well at least just me). So the story picks up after Vol 1 left off with Professor Xavier in a coma and the X-Men in disarray. We see the villain from the first volume m Definitely a Morrisoneitas read! So I really enjoyed New X-Men, Volume 1: E Is for Extinction, I thought it was a good, straight forward X-Men story, especially coming from Grant Morrison who writes comics that are anything but straight forward. This volume I'm afraid Morrison is back to writing weird stuff nobody can understand (Well at least just me). So the story picks up after Vol 1 left off with Professor Xavier in a coma and the X-Men in disarray. We see the villain from the first volume making a return as the villains true plot all along comes to the fold blah blah. Plus the X-Men are dealing with racist humans who hate them yada yada yada! I won't say too much about the story, mainly because half of it blew over my head (Am I missing something here?), all I can really say is I didn't really enjoy it that much. A lot of it was either making me scratch my head wandering what was going on or plot points Marvel has beaten us over the head with, a 1000 times in X-Men stories. I wasn't a fan of the artwork either: Frank Quitely's artwork is serviceable, however it switches every now and then to two other artists. Overall it felt inconsistent and the artwork was just ugly in my opinion. Everybody looks fine for the most part, except Wolverine (My god what did they do to him?!). Overall, I'm really not trying to sound like a downer, I really did enjoy Vol 1 of this series and I bought Vol 2 with excitement! But I'm now just wishing I saved the money.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Thomas

    This was good. A step up from the first volume. I have some major problems with the art - many characters are lumpy and, well, ugly in a way they have not been before. The costumes are hit and miss as well - I love the leather jackets, but the ribbed outfit Jean Gray is wearing is... ugh. I loved seeing Wolverine befriend a newly awakened mutant, I loved seeing Emma Frost and the Stepford Cuckoos, and I loved seeing the Phoenix make an appearance. The space part of the story arc was meh and I fee This was good. A step up from the first volume. I have some major problems with the art - many characters are lumpy and, well, ugly in a way they have not been before. The costumes are hit and miss as well - I love the leather jackets, but the ribbed outfit Jean Gray is wearing is... ugh. I loved seeing Wolverine befriend a newly awakened mutant, I loved seeing Emma Frost and the Stepford Cuckoos, and I loved seeing the Phoenix make an appearance. The space part of the story arc was meh and I feel like it is detracting from the forces brewing on Earth.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Keith

    Just reread this for the first time in a few years. I always remember the standout parts of the Morrison X-run as those illustrated by Frank Quitely, with vol 4's Riot at Xavier's being a jaw-droppingly beautiful piece of work (second only to his contribution to Endless Nights in terms of sheer aesthetics) and vol 1's E is for Extinction as the story that hit the reset button on superhero comics for the new millennium. But Imperial packs a wallop, doing all the heavy lifting required to expand up Just reread this for the first time in a few years. I always remember the standout parts of the Morrison X-run as those illustrated by Frank Quitely, with vol 4's Riot at Xavier's being a jaw-droppingly beautiful piece of work (second only to his contribution to Endless Nights in terms of sheer aesthetics) and vol 1's E is for Extinction as the story that hit the reset button on superhero comics for the new millennium. But Imperial packs a wallop, doing all the heavy lifting required to expand upon and complete the promises set by EifE. Not only that, but groundwork is laid for the entire rest of the series here; it's incredible how much exposition and setup is being handled in the background of the crazy, self-contained action piece dominating the foreground. Of course, Imperial also suffers from absolutely abhorrent art when Quitely isn't around -- this tends to be something that follows Morrison from series to series, which makes me wonder if he's difficult for artists to work with. For one of the top writers in mainstream comics, its seems like the talent he's paired with is often pretty lackluster, and it's a shame. Now that New X-Men isn't so shiny and new, I think much of this run is going to feel dated within the next few years due to the second- and third-tier art teams that dominate its pages. But the setpieces are inspired, the characters are engaging, the stakes high, the drama impactful. The first two volumes of NXM should be read back-to-back as a unified story -- rich, playful, titillatingly weird, uncomfortably probing, and brazenly cinematic in scope.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Lenny

    Is zero stars possible? I'm not finishing this, because comics should be FUN, dammit. Instead, this is an exhausting, overly complicated (and often downright confusing) slog with absolutely awful art by Ethan Van Sciver and Igor Kordey - truly some of the worst I've seen. (And I'm not counting the fact that Van Sciver is a Comicsgate POS, and had I known that at the time I wouldn't have even picked this up - thankfully I didn't buy it.) These two are all over the place to the point that characte Is zero stars possible? I'm not finishing this, because comics should be FUN, dammit. Instead, this is an exhausting, overly complicated (and often downright confusing) slog with absolutely awful art by Ethan Van Sciver and Igor Kordey - truly some of the worst I've seen. (And I'm not counting the fact that Van Sciver is a Comicsgate POS, and had I known that at the time I wouldn't have even picked this up - thankfully I didn't buy it.) These two are all over the place to the point that characters (Wolverine especially) are sloppy and distorted. I love my X-Men but I don't have time for this, even if it is important to X-Men canon; if I don't understand a footnote in future X-Men stories, so be it. I'm off to watch some X-Men Animated Series to make my eyes stop burning.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Miguel

    Didn't like the space parts and the story was just ok... but overall it was a good read with great character and good dialogue. My personal fav: Emma Frost and Beast . The first book was better. Tho, i want to read vol 3. Didn't like the space parts and the story was just ok... but overall it was a good read with great character and good dialogue. My personal fav: Emma Frost and Beast . The first book was better. Tho, i want to read vol 3.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Get X Serious

    "Oh my stars and fucking garters" is Beast's reaction upon finding nano-sentinels attacking the white bloods of our favorite mutants, and unbeknownst to him, that pretty much sums up Morrison's run on this title. It's like, ya know, X-Men, but with the fuck word. And I don't mean that it's just regular ol' X-Men with cussing. I mean it's gruesome, it's brutal, the characters are a little... uglier, morally and physically. I mean, the newest students at Xavier's are pretty fuckin' gross, which, r "Oh my stars and fucking garters" is Beast's reaction upon finding nano-sentinels attacking the white bloods of our favorite mutants, and unbeknownst to him, that pretty much sums up Morrison's run on this title. It's like, ya know, X-Men, but with the fuck word. And I don't mean that it's just regular ol' X-Men with cussing. I mean it's gruesome, it's brutal, the characters are a little... uglier, morally and physically. I mean, the newest students at Xavier's are pretty fuckin' gross, which, realistically, in a world of mutants is bound to happen. Frank Quitely's art isn't really doing them any favors, either, it's just making them look all that much grosser. It's worth noting that this is the same team (Morrison and Quitely) that went on to make All-Star Superman which is anything but gross/brutal/etc. It's Superman being the ultimate boy scout in the absolute best way possible. Whereas this X-Men run is the X-Men fucking up and killing people in the absolute best way possible. Hmmm, maybe we should get these two together more often... (see also: We3)

  9. 5 out of 5

    Martin

    Great story by Morrison involving the Shi'ar, Xorn, Cassandra Nova and introduces the new Angel, one of the worst mutants ever. Unfortunately this arc suffers terribly from inconsistent art: at one end of the spectrum we have the superlative art of Frank Quitely, and at the other we have the eyesore that is Igor Kordey's... "art". Somewhere in between we have Ethan Van Sciver, who can be great as well as not. So the art issues bring down the book's rating to 3 stars. Still recommended reading and Great story by Morrison involving the Shi'ar, Xorn, Cassandra Nova and introduces the new Angel, one of the worst mutants ever. Unfortunately this arc suffers terribly from inconsistent art: at one end of the spectrum we have the superlative art of Frank Quitely, and at the other we have the eyesore that is Igor Kordey's... "art". Somewhere in between we have Ethan Van Sciver, who can be great as well as not. So the art issues bring down the book's rating to 3 stars. Still recommended reading and essential just like the rest of Morrison's run, even if some of it was ret-conned by Marvel after he left the title.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Adam Fisher

    New mutants (Angel and the Stepford Cookoos), a battle with the "Third Race", the arrival of Xorn, and the epic battle with Cassandra Nova, who brings the might of the Shiar Empire with her! Jean Grey is amazing here! Bring on the Phoenix! Such a long and action packed Volume! Grant Morrison has breathed new life into the X-Men and I like it! One negative. I wish the artwork was better, though it's certainly not the worst I've seen. On to Volume 3... recommend. New mutants (Angel and the Stepford Cookoos), a battle with the "Third Race", the arrival of Xorn, and the epic battle with Cassandra Nova, who brings the might of the Shiar Empire with her! Jean Grey is amazing here! Bring on the Phoenix! Such a long and action packed Volume! Grant Morrison has breathed new life into the X-Men and I like it! One negative. I wish the artwork was better, though it's certainly not the worst I've seen. On to Volume 3... recommend.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Josh

    Good continuation to Volume 1. Really, the two of them should probably be packaged together. One complaint: The art is inconsistent. Some of the time it's great and then it will randomly be terrible. Issue #121 is a perfect example of this; it looks as though it was thrown together at the last minute to meet a deadline. All in all a good read though. Good continuation to Volume 1. Really, the two of them should probably be packaged together. One complaint: The art is inconsistent. Some of the time it's great and then it will randomly be terrible. Issue #121 is a perfect example of this; it looks as though it was thrown together at the last minute to meet a deadline. All in all a good read though.

  12. 4 out of 5

    AJ Kallas

    In future volumes Grant Morrison really tells some compelling stories about these fascinating characters. But volume 2 of his run seems unfocused and has art that is not fun to look at. I would have quit after this volume if not for the constant praise this run receives. And I'm glad I'm continuing. Some of the more interesting things that happen in the first two volumes get addressed later on, like X-Men being public, the destruction of Genosha, and the drama of relationships. All of that is gr In future volumes Grant Morrison really tells some compelling stories about these fascinating characters. But volume 2 of his run seems unfocused and has art that is not fun to look at. I would have quit after this volume if not for the constant praise this run receives. And I'm glad I'm continuing. Some of the more interesting things that happen in the first two volumes get addressed later on, like X-Men being public, the destruction of Genosha, and the drama of relationships. All of that is great. What isn't, is moving from one crazy thing to the next with no room to breathe or let characters react.

  13. 4 out of 5

    ⭐Anni⭐ (Book Princess)

    Quite confusing at times, but overall a fun and enjoyable story. Yes, it was weird af at times, but I guess that's just normal X-Men stuff... I really enjoyed the storylines on earth, the space parts mostly just confused me. The art ranged from weird to amazing, so it's kinda hard to rate. I loved seeing so much of Emma Frost, she's really becoming a favorite of mine. I'm gonna continue with this series. Quite confusing at times, but overall a fun and enjoyable story. Yes, it was weird af at times, but I guess that's just normal X-Men stuff... I really enjoyed the storylines on earth, the space parts mostly just confused me. The art ranged from weird to amazing, so it's kinda hard to rate. I loved seeing so much of Emma Frost, she's really becoming a favorite of mine. I'm gonna continue with this series.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Daniel Sevitt

    Lots happening here and Morrison doesn't give the reader much time to work our who is doing what to who. Quitely's artwork manages to maintain the frenetic pace as Cassandra returns from space in Xavier's body while everyone is being ravaged by nanobots and invaded by the Shi'ar imperial Guard. Seems kinda simple when you write it down. Lots happening here and Morrison doesn't give the reader much time to work our who is doing what to who. Quitely's artwork manages to maintain the frenetic pace as Cassandra returns from space in Xavier's body while everyone is being ravaged by nanobots and invaded by the Shi'ar imperial Guard. Seems kinda simple when you write it down.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Klaus

    Art is inconsistent but the storylines are good

  16. 5 out of 5

    Kat

    Read as individual issues. 3.5

  17. 5 out of 5

    Shannon Appelcline

    Germ-Free Generation (#118-120). Morrison's best arc to date. The idea of the U-Man stealing body parts from mutants is entirely cringeworthy, while it really feels like some of our main characters are in serious danger in a very tense action sequence. All around, delightful for both the world development and the plotting [5+/5]. Silence (#121). One of the 'Nuff Said stories. Perhaps, Morrison does better than most, and there's a great revelation about Cassandra Nova in this story, but as with mo Germ-Free Generation (#118-120). Morrison's best arc to date. The idea of the U-Man stealing body parts from mutants is entirely cringeworthy, while it really feels like some of our main characters are in serious danger in a very tense action sequence. All around, delightful for both the world development and the plotting [5+/5]. Silence (#121). One of the 'Nuff Said stories. Perhaps, Morrison does better than most, and there's a great revelation about Cassandra Nova in this story, but as with most of these 'Nuff Said stories, a regular story with dialogue would have been better [4/5]. Imperial (#122-126). Morrison closes out his first year by concluding the story of Cassandra Nova on the galactic scale. He makes great use of the Shi'ar and the Imperial Guard, and really uses them to portray the dangerous scope of Nova. We also get more great characterization (including a fun buddy romp with Scott and Xorn). However the best thing may be how Morrison opens up the scope of the school, giving some of the new students, the Cuckoos, a real focus in the story [5/5].

  18. 5 out of 5

    Cocaine

    When Grant Morrison wrote his first story way back when in the pages of Warrior it was with a story created by Dez Skinn. I think the series was called 'The Liberators' or something equally prosaic. In those days Grant, much like local lad Warren, appeared to be following in the wake of Alan Moore. That may or not have been the case. If it was then it certainly isn't now nor has it been the case for many years. Grant's style is very much his own. Reinventing any globally loved franchise like the When Grant Morrison wrote his first story way back when in the pages of Warrior it was with a story created by Dez Skinn. I think the series was called 'The Liberators' or something equally prosaic. In those days Grant, much like local lad Warren, appeared to be following in the wake of Alan Moore. That may or not have been the case. If it was then it certainly isn't now nor has it been the case for many years. Grant's style is very much his own. Reinventing any globally loved franchise like the X-men takes either a nutter with self aggrandisement impulses or a very, very brave man. Grant is the latter. Sixteen million mutants dead and with the X-men greatly reduced, that is precisely what Mister Morrison did - reinvent legend. Yeah, it's juvenile, yeah it's sci-fi dressed up a bit but gone are the gaudy, flesh clinging, figure hugging suits replaced by (not in the case of Emma Frost whose kit is every young man's fantasy)a dressed down version reminiscent of those worn in the films. The best chapter is the final one which, apart from the final panel, contains no dialogue, thought bubbles or captions. As comics go this is very good.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Lloyd

    Wow... Morrison really gets it rolling with the X-Men in this book. After introducing a whole new style of X-Men in the first volume ("E is for Extinction"), he plots a groundbreaking new battle in this one. From mutant obsessed fanatics looking to harvest mutant organs to augment themselves to Professor Xavier's evil twin sister taking control of the Imperial Guard in a plot to destroy mutantkind, this volume forges ahead to a new type of fight for our favorite mutants. Helped by now superstar art Wow... Morrison really gets it rolling with the X-Men in this book. After introducing a whole new style of X-Men in the first volume ("E is for Extinction"), he plots a groundbreaking new battle in this one. From mutant obsessed fanatics looking to harvest mutant organs to augment themselves to Professor Xavier's evil twin sister taking control of the Imperial Guard in a plot to destroy mutantkind, this volume forges ahead to a new type of fight for our favorite mutants. Helped by now superstar artists Ethan Van Sciver and Frank Quitely along with artist Igor Kordey, Morrison gets down an unforgettable chapter in the annals of the X-Men. If you're a fan of Morrison or of the X-Men YOU HAVE GOT TO READ THIS.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Umesh

    "Professor X tried to kill his twin sister while they were both still in the womb" - Grant Morrison is my hero!! "Professor X tried to kill his twin sister while they were both still in the womb" - Grant Morrison is my hero!!

  21. 5 out of 5

    Shane Perry

    Another fun read. Morrison captures the human hatred of mutants perfectly, ushering in an exciting new villain in the form of the U-men. Love seeing the overall narrative come together.

  22. 5 out of 5

    William Johnson

    I'd say more of a 3.5 due to the tonal shifts but still an engaging read. This edition covers issues #118 to #126. Arcs covered: Germ Free Generation (#118 to #120): Cyclops and Emma Frost are kidnapped by John Sublime (introduced in X-Men Annual 2001), whose new-age program is a front for mutant organ farming, in which Sublime's goal is to create the Third Species: humans who inherit mutant powers by having stolen organs grafted to their skin. Meanwhile, Beast recovers from his injuries sustained I'd say more of a 3.5 due to the tonal shifts but still an engaging read. This edition covers issues #118 to #126. Arcs covered: Germ Free Generation (#118 to #120): Cyclops and Emma Frost are kidnapped by John Sublime (introduced in X-Men Annual 2001), whose new-age program is a front for mutant organ farming, in which Sublime's goal is to create the Third Species: humans who inherit mutant powers by having stolen organs grafted to their skin. Meanwhile, Beast recovers from his injuries sustained by Beak and Wolverine tracks down a flying mutant named Angel who was kicked out of her home. Silence: Psychic Rescue in Progress (#121): Upon discovering Professor X is trapped within Cassandra Nova's body, which was being held prisoner at the X-Mansion, Jean and Emma go into Xavier's mind to release him from the mental cage Cassandra put him in. Part of the "'Nuff Said" event in which minimal to zero dialogue was used for the issues participating in the event. Imperial (#122 to #126): Cassandra Nova (posing as Prof X, using his body) has put the Shi'ar Empire in complete disarray, spreading the belief that fellow Shi'ar soldiers and politicians are infected with a mutant virus. Nova, through Lilandra, sends the Shi'ar to Earth to wipe out the X-Men and all living mutants. A captured Cyclops and Xorn try to escape Shi'ar captivity on board one of their starships, a Shi'ar soldier tries to warn Earth of the threat, Jean and Beast attempt to save the dying Prof X (within Nova's body), while Emma and her five proteges, the Stepford Cuckoos, help defend the school with a recovered Beak and a reluctant Angel.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Mr. Dietz

    Grant Morrison continues to expand upon the groundwork laid in the first volume. The plot machinations of Imperial really make me appreciate just how much setup was crammed into E is for Extinction. I absolutely love Beak and Angel in this volume because of the way they're presented so grotesquely. If one of the central themes of the X-Men comics is acceptance, then the characters should be radically different from most humans. Everybody wants to be friends with the smooth-talking cool guy with Grant Morrison continues to expand upon the groundwork laid in the first volume. The plot machinations of Imperial really make me appreciate just how much setup was crammed into E is for Extinction. I absolutely love Beak and Angel in this volume because of the way they're presented so grotesquely. If one of the central themes of the X-Men comics is acceptance, then the characters should be radically different from most humans. Everybody wants to be friends with the smooth-talking cool guy with laser-beams for eyes, but are those same people as eager to hang with a guy who literally looks like a newborn chicken? Probably not so much. The space saga here is dramatic, but I don't feel as strong a connection to those characters. As others have said, the art style varies dramatically from issue to issue. I can get down with Quietly's style, but some of these issues just look sloppy.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Theo Kallström

    The breathtaking conclusion of the Cassandra Nova stroyline. It begins slowly and builds up momentum, ending in a splendid final issue (#126). The art shifts from being realistic and beautiful to quite messy and ugly, which is a shame. The storyline is all over the place as well, with a lot of padding and confusing parts thrown in. There are a few highlights here and there wheb the plot is slowly unfolded, but they are few and far between. Cassandra is also sadly underused until the very end and The breathtaking conclusion of the Cassandra Nova stroyline. It begins slowly and builds up momentum, ending in a splendid final issue (#126). The art shifts from being realistic and beautiful to quite messy and ugly, which is a shame. The storyline is all over the place as well, with a lot of padding and confusing parts thrown in. There are a few highlights here and there wheb the plot is slowly unfolded, but they are few and far between. Cassandra is also sadly underused until the very end and the Shi'iar don't really do anything. There is a silent issue in the middle of the story as well, and its mostly frustrating and superfluous, even if it includes an important plot point (which is returned to multiple times throughout the rest of the story, so it's quite a skippable issue). Overall, a monumental volume in X-Men history, but sadly inconsistent.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Clint

    Morrison has a lot of fun with all the new characters and conflicts he set up in vol1, and Quitely illustrates it amazingly in his distinct style. Unfortunately Quitely only draws 3 of the 9 issues here, and the other two artists attempt a similar style that ends up a noticeably shabby facsimile to my eyes. Their art is mostly acceptable if not great though, and thankfully Morrison’s mad writing IS great in each issue. The wordless pages explaining Cassandra’s genetic origin are memorably wild, Morrison has a lot of fun with all the new characters and conflicts he set up in vol1, and Quitely illustrates it amazingly in his distinct style. Unfortunately Quitely only draws 3 of the 9 issues here, and the other two artists attempt a similar style that ends up a noticeably shabby facsimile to my eyes. Their art is mostly acceptable if not great though, and thankfully Morrison’s mad writing IS great in each issue. The wordless pages explaining Cassandra’s genetic origin are memorably wild, and the Emma Frost’s Stepford Cuckoo mentees are great as a psychic hive mind of mean girls. And the resolution is satisfying and clever, reminding me how much more I appreciate superhero endings where someone is outsmarted instead of a hero just going Super Saiyan with their beam rays or whatever.

  26. 5 out of 5

    C

    Continuing on with the great x-read of '17: This one was a page-turner. It really moves at a breakneck pace (good and bad as that may be) and keeps you reading. It is exciting (a bit confusing regarding Xorn considering that Marvel apparently never collected the issue where he came from, but that is a nitpick regarding the trades and not the story itself so I digress...) and a truly decent -and quick - read. I did find the U-men plot to be not that great and it ended so abruptly... Just odd. The ar Continuing on with the great x-read of '17: This one was a page-turner. It really moves at a breakneck pace (good and bad as that may be) and keeps you reading. It is exciting (a bit confusing regarding Xorn considering that Marvel apparently never collected the issue where he came from, but that is a nitpick regarding the trades and not the story itself so I digress...) and a truly decent -and quick - read. I did find the U-men plot to be not that great and it ended so abruptly... Just odd. The art, though. Ugh. It's a personal taste thing, but man do I hate the art on this series so far.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Terry Collins

    Takes the promise and the excitement of the first collection, and revs it up to 11 ... sketchy and uneven artwork in places (diverse talents on various issues), but the story and the craziness on display is amazing (along with some touching human moments - my favorite being Professor X's mind falling into fragmented pieces, as bits of memories such as his good dog Gus, are lost to Jean Grey's horror). Also, there are truly some chilling moments of evil on display here, which normally, comics do Takes the promise and the excitement of the first collection, and revs it up to 11 ... sketchy and uneven artwork in places (diverse talents on various issues), but the story and the craziness on display is amazing (along with some touching human moments - my favorite being Professor X's mind falling into fragmented pieces, as bits of memories such as his good dog Gus, are lost to Jean Grey's horror). Also, there are truly some chilling moments of evil on display here, which normally, comics do NOT pull off when aimed at mainstream readers.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Francisco Becerra

    The book begins with a solid, classic Morrison: weird, nasty, mixing high fantasy with everyday issues. It seemed that after a very slow and somewhat boring beginning with Nuevos X-Men: E de Extinción it gained traction. Somewhat I was expecting something of the caliber of his tenure with Doom Patrol or the Invisibles. Alas, the last third is a waste and unfulfilling, and the end was predictable and rushed. The book begins with a solid, classic Morrison: weird, nasty, mixing high fantasy with everyday issues. It seemed that after a very slow and somewhat boring beginning with Nuevos X-Men: E de Extinción it gained traction. Somewhat I was expecting something of the caliber of his tenure with Doom Patrol or the Invisibles. Alas, the last third is a waste and unfulfilling, and the end was predictable and rushed.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Christopher (Donut)

    An excellent wrap-up of the story arc in volume one. Those who say Kordey's art is harder to look at than Quitely's have a point. I always thought Quitely looked semi-underground, but Kordey is one step closer to underground than that. I would post at least one awesome splash page which totally redeemed him, but I can't find it on the Internet. I will say that I stopped following the X-Men right about the time X-Factor started (Jean Grey lives!), but I did not feel at sea here, much. An excellent wrap-up of the story arc in volume one. Those who say Kordey's art is harder to look at than Quitely's have a point. I always thought Quitely looked semi-underground, but Kordey is one step closer to underground than that. I would post at least one awesome splash page which totally redeemed him, but I can't find it on the Internet. I will say that I stopped following the X-Men right about the time X-Factor started (Jean Grey lives!), but I did not feel at sea here, much.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Henry Blackwood

    Enthralling. This is a perfect way to continue from an incredibly strong start. There doesn’t seem to be any fat on this story, everything is connected, everything has a place and more importantly, everything is interesting. The execution in the storytelling is nothing less than stellar from Morrison here. This is one of the strongest starts I’ve ever read to a comic run. The only thing that I find weird is Beasts dialogue. It seems a little strange at times.

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