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The Study Quran is a historic and groundbreaking work, produced by a distinguished team of Islamic studies scholars led by Seyyed Hossein Nasr, which offers: A new English translation of the Quran that is accurate, accessible, and reliable in how it renders this sacred text. A wide-ranging verse-by-verse commentary that brings together the most respected and distinguished tr The Study Quran is a historic and groundbreaking work, produced by a distinguished team of Islamic studies scholars led by Seyyed Hossein Nasr, which offers: A new English translation of the Quran that is accurate, accessible, and reliable in how it renders this sacred text. A wide-ranging verse-by-verse commentary that brings together the most respected and distinguished traditions of metaphysical, spiritual, theological, and legal interpretation of the Quran within Islam. A helpful introduction to each surah that provides an overview and background of its teachings. Essays by fifteen internationally renowned scholars on how to read and understand the Quran and its role in shaping Islamic civilization. A beautiful two-color, two-column design that presents the sacred text and commentary in the spirit of traditional Quran manuscripts Maps, a time line of historical events, comprehensive indexes, and other features to aid reading The Study Quran provides a service never before available to readers of English: a scholarly yet accessible resource where one can quickly and easily explore how Muslims have interpreted the Quran through the centuries to the present day. An invaluable resource for scholars and students of all backgrounds, and especially to Muslims who want to deepen their understanding of their own tradition, The Study Quran is a much-needed guide in a time when confusion about the Quran and Islam is so prevalent.


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The Study Quran is a historic and groundbreaking work, produced by a distinguished team of Islamic studies scholars led by Seyyed Hossein Nasr, which offers: A new English translation of the Quran that is accurate, accessible, and reliable in how it renders this sacred text. A wide-ranging verse-by-verse commentary that brings together the most respected and distinguished tr The Study Quran is a historic and groundbreaking work, produced by a distinguished team of Islamic studies scholars led by Seyyed Hossein Nasr, which offers: A new English translation of the Quran that is accurate, accessible, and reliable in how it renders this sacred text. A wide-ranging verse-by-verse commentary that brings together the most respected and distinguished traditions of metaphysical, spiritual, theological, and legal interpretation of the Quran within Islam. A helpful introduction to each surah that provides an overview and background of its teachings. Essays by fifteen internationally renowned scholars on how to read and understand the Quran and its role in shaping Islamic civilization. A beautiful two-color, two-column design that presents the sacred text and commentary in the spirit of traditional Quran manuscripts Maps, a time line of historical events, comprehensive indexes, and other features to aid reading The Study Quran provides a service never before available to readers of English: a scholarly yet accessible resource where one can quickly and easily explore how Muslims have interpreted the Quran through the centuries to the present day. An invaluable resource for scholars and students of all backgrounds, and especially to Muslims who want to deepen their understanding of their own tradition, The Study Quran is a much-needed guide in a time when confusion about the Quran and Islam is so prevalent.

30 review for The Study Quran: A New Translation and Commentary

  1. 5 out of 5

    Michael Austin

    Like fundamentalists of every flavor, radical Islamists come to their wars of ideas armed with proof-texts—those decontextualized bits of scripture that can be strung together in chains to justify whatever one happens to believe. In the current historical moment, this means acts of violence and cruelty in the name of one of the world’s great religions. An irony of our age is that most Western opponents of radical Islam use the same proof texts to justify bigotry against all Muslims. Just Google “ Like fundamentalists of every flavor, radical Islamists come to their wars of ideas armed with proof-texts—those decontextualized bits of scripture that can be strung together in chains to justify whatever one happens to believe. In the current historical moment, this means acts of violence and cruelty in the name of one of the world’s great religions. An irony of our age is that most Western opponents of radical Islam use the same proof texts to justify bigotry against all Muslims. Just Google “Islam and Violence,” and you will find hundreds of proof-text pages with quote after quote from the Quran seeming to justify, and even require, acts of violence—which, of course, happens to be the same thing that most Islamist terrorists believe. Rarely do enemies agree so completely on first principles. The big problem though, is that (like most assertions supported by chains of oversimplified proof texts) the assertion is false. Or, at least, it is not always true, and it is not true in the ways that both violent Muslims and violent anti-Muslims assume when they start mining the Quran for reasons to fight. Into this rhetorical context comes the long-anticipated, ten-years-in-the-making, Harper Study Quran. Based on the wildly successful Harper Study Bible, and edited by practicing Muslims who are also trained and respected scholars, the Study Quran offers itself as an the first English translation to incorporate significant commentary designed to contextualize nearly every ayah (verse) in the sacred book. And I’ll be dag-nabbed if it doesn’t do it. By my rough estimates, about 90% of the book consists of verse-by-verse commentary keyed to the text by a practical (and merciful) two-color printing scheme that keys the text to the notes with bright red numbers. As I read this new Quran (and I read it straight through because I am weird like that), I found that I could not realistically read all of the commentary and still follow any kind of narrative flow. I read most of the text without the commentary, glancing down at the footnotes only when I felt that I needed more context to understand the basic meaning of a passage. The Study Quran supports this kind of reading, but it is really designed for intensive study of a passage or a theme. The editorial apparatus makes this kind of reading very easy. A comprehensive (and multi-colored) index allows readers to follow themes and ideas through the text, and a set of essays at the end of the volume brings together concepts like “Quranic Ethics, Human Rights, and Society” and “Conquest and Conversion, War and Peace in the Quran.” But however one reads it, the Study Quran’s overwhelming strength is that it provides, for nearly every verse in the Quran, both the context of its original recitation and a survey of 1400 years of scholarship. To understand why this is important, consider how the Quran is structured. Unlike the Bible, it contains very little sustained narrative, and the individual surahs (chapters) were not all revealed as discrete units, so each ayah has an independent context of original reception. The Quran, in other words, lends itself to proof texting even better than the Hebrew or Christian Bibles—and that’s saying something. The editors of the Study Quran patiently and painstakingly reconstruct, to the extent possible, the original context of each recitation in the entire book and make that reconstructed context available to any reader willing to devote the time attention required to understand it. The results are remarkable, and they have the wonderful added effect of limiting the ability of both adherents and detractors to manipulate the book’s meaning through uncritical prooftexting. Here is one example (though I wish I had the space for a dozen) of what happens when a passage often used to justify both violence and Islamophobia undergoes the Study Quran’s contextualizing treatment. In the 33rd Ayah of Surah 5 (The Table Spread), we read the following injunction: Verily, the recompense of those who wage war against God and His Messenger, and endeavor to work corruption upon the earth is that they be killed or crucified, or have their hands and feet cut off from opposite sides, or be banished from the land. Pretty gruesome, to be sure, and also pretty clear. But the editors of the Study Quran want us to know two things that no other single-volume English translation will tell us: 1) that this passage was recited in a specific instance and for a specific purpose; and 2) that there is a long tradition of Muslim scholarship and jurisprudence interpreting this verse. The context was a specific and extremely bloody attack upon the Muslim community in Madinah. After accepting a group of Bedouins into the community under the pretense of conversion, Mohammad allowed them to depart when they claimed that they were not comfortable with city life. He sent camels with them “for milk and sustenance” and a Muslim camel herder to help them on their way. “Once outside the city, however, they brutally maimed and killed the camelheard and made off with the camels the Prophet had given them to use (293). In context, then, the punishments in the passage were mandated against specific individuals who had acted with impunity to terrorize the Muslim community. And, the editors explain, the verse has NOT normally been interpreted as a general process for dealing with apostates: Given that the perpetrators were also, among other things, apostates . . . since they embraced Islam in the presence of the Prophet, then renounced it through their actions, a small minority have considered the verse to apply to apostates in general. It seems clear, however, that the severe punishments in this verse pertain specifically to those who commit various crimes brazenly and with exceptional brutality, violence and terrorization of innocent people. (293) This contextualizing commentary does not erase the violence in the text, of course. But it does limit its application among those willing to consider things like why a passage was originally given and what it has meant to fourteen centuries of devout Muslim scholars. And these are things that both Muslims and non-Muslims need to understand. For those who believe, as I do, that humanity’s survival into the next century will require us to understand and appreciate each other’s deepest beliefs, The Study Quran is a gift and a treasure. It does not make understanding Islam easy, but it makes it possible—if we are willing to invest the effort it takes to accept the gift and heft the treasure. And for English-speaking Muslims who are not terrorists and radical Islamists (which is about 99.9% of the total), it provides a valuable tool for deepening faith and demonstrating the shallowness of the proof-texters who constantly attack them. In an interview with CNN shortly after the volume’s publication, the lead editor, Seyyed Hossein Nasr argued that “the best way to counter extremism in modern Islam is a revival of classical Islam.” That is a tall order for any single book, but I suspect that, if a revival of classical Islam ever happens in the English-speaking world, the revivalists will all carry copies of the Study Quran–and the revolution will be extensively footnoted.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Barnaby Thieme

    Have you ever had that experience where you meet someone, and within a few minutes of talking to them you know your going to be friends for the rest of your life? That's how I felt after my first few minutes with The Study Quran. After spending years with Arberry's translation, I still regarded the mighty Quran with equal parts bafflement, alienation, and interest, and now that I've switched over to this as my primary reference, it's easy to see why. The Quran is an extremely complicated text, a Have you ever had that experience where you meet someone, and within a few minutes of talking to them you know your going to be friends for the rest of your life? That's how I felt after my first few minutes with The Study Quran. After spending years with Arberry's translation, I still regarded the mighty Quran with equal parts bafflement, alienation, and interest, and now that I've switched over to this as my primary reference, it's easy to see why. The Quran is an extremely complicated text, and for me at least, it demands an extensive commentary for reference, and that's exactly what this volume provides - running commentary several times the length of the work itself. The context in which various statements were made in the various Surahs is necessary for understanding much of the basic sense of the Quran. The commentary is conveniently arranged for easy reference, and is based on a number of prominent commentaries written over several centuries. I was drawn initially to this edition because of the involvement of the senior editor Seyyed Hossein Nasr, and I have not been disappointed. Working my way through its treasures, the world of the Quran has opened up to me like never before, and I'm regularly overpowered by its force and beauty. I feel a much deeper appreciation of how it works, and what its message is. In addition to the indispensable commentary, this edition includes introductory materials and several excellent supplemental essays written by major interpreters of Islam, such as William Chittick. Of the many books I've read on Islam, this one is far and away the most important in terms of bringing me into deep personal dialog with the tradition itself, and understanding the majesty and poetry of this masterpiece of our human heritage.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Nathan "N.R." Gaddis

    I made it through. I'm no expert on the Quran, but I can say that unlike 99% of USofAians, I'm at least conversant with it, have a basic Quranic literacy. And in today's world, I think it's important to be at least minimally conversant with it. And to my mind this edition is simply the one you need. The only other edition I'm aware of in English that might rival it is Ali's The Qur'an: Text, Translation, and Commentary. By all means, have both editions on your shelf! I made it through. I'm no expert on the Quran, but I can say that unlike 99% of USofAians, I'm at least conversant with it, have a basic Quranic literacy. And in today's world, I think it's important to be at least minimally conversant with it. And to my mind this edition is simply the one you need. The only other edition I'm aware of in English that might rival it is Ali's The Qur'an: Text, Translation, and Commentary. By all means, have both editions on your shelf!

  4. 5 out of 5

    Geoff

    I figure I'd better go ahead and mark this to-read and get on any list Trump is putting together for the camps, because all the cool kids will be hanging out there! I figure I'd better go ahead and mark this to-read and get on any list Trump is putting together for the camps, because all the cool kids will be hanging out there!

  5. 5 out of 5

    Tim

    No better single source in English for studying the Qur'an. Universal, inclusive, incredibly well-researched and accessible. I spent nearly a year reading this, and I plan to turn around and start it again. Hope to have more of an in-depth review soon. No better single source in English for studying the Qur'an. Universal, inclusive, incredibly well-researched and accessible. I spent nearly a year reading this, and I plan to turn around and start it again. Hope to have more of an in-depth review soon.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Tim

    Ever since it was released this has remained my primary source for an English translation/commentary on the Qur'an. Dr Nasr and the editors have worked hard to present a broad ecumenical perspective from classical Sunni, Shia and Sufi sources as well as references back through other traditions and have pulled it all together in a way never done before in English. Ever since it was released this has remained my primary source for an English translation/commentary on the Qur'an. Dr Nasr and the editors have worked hard to present a broad ecumenical perspective from classical Sunni, Shia and Sufi sources as well as references back through other traditions and have pulled it all together in a way never done before in English.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Jonathan

    I cannot imagine a better edition for someone outside the tradition - I am not qualified to comment on what this text may be like for believers - but for me the translation, the essays, the maps etc all helped get me closer than ever before. Highly recommended.

  8. 5 out of 5

    James Dunlap

    Um... okay, it's weird that this doesn't have a review yet. Anyways, I'm about 2/3rds of the way through The Study Qu'ran, and so, as someone who's read pretty much every word of that 2/3rds (i.e., as someone who has read more of it than most other folks who've reviewed it thus far) I can say with some confidence that I give it 4 stars. It doesn't get a perfect 5, because in my estimation there are flaws (esp. with the commentary), but comparatively speaking (meaning, as when compared to other W Um... okay, it's weird that this doesn't have a review yet. Anyways, I'm about 2/3rds of the way through The Study Qu'ran, and so, as someone who's read pretty much every word of that 2/3rds (i.e., as someone who has read more of it than most other folks who've reviewed it thus far) I can say with some confidence that I give it 4 stars. It doesn't get a perfect 5, because in my estimation there are flaws (esp. with the commentary), but comparatively speaking (meaning, as when compared to other Western / Anglo materials on Islam, up to and including other English Qu'ran translations and / or commentaries) this is a much needed and much appreciated effort. Where the SQ really shines is, surprisingly, in the supplemental material / background information that it provides vis-a-vis the stories of past Prophets in the Qu'ran. So, e.g., in Surah Yusuf and Surah Maryam (i.e., the chapters that relate the story of Mary and Joseph) the editors provided a plethora of heartbreakingly-beautiful background information in their commentary, -background info which fleshed out the overall narrative that Islam puts forth w/r/t these individuals so well that I actually found tears welling in my eyes. I was that moved. Moving beyond the stories of the Prophets, however, the remaining benefit is to be found sort of scattered, here and there. Some chapter's commentary I enjoyed more than others (e.g., Surah Muhammad [47] had a delightful commentary, even though it wasn't a "story of past Prophets" chapter, per se), and I like the occasional comments the editors provided from non-Qu'ranic exegetes, such as Muhyideen Ibn Arabi (although technically he could be considered a Qu'ranic exegete in a certain sense, even so he's most commonly associated with Islamic mysticism). Here and there, there were some interesting tid-bits relating to the etymology of certain Arabic words being translated, which were insightful. Also, some of the "controversial" verses were adequately dealt with (while others were not... more on that momentarily). There are a few complaints from readers on some other websites which I find rather picayune. For example, a lot of people complained that the translation was "archaic" or in "King James" English. And, I mean, yeah, technically I guess the translation does use "thee" and "thou," -But that's pretty much it. The actual translation doesn't use that many arcane words besides those, so it seems to me, if I may be blunt (and just a wee-bit sarcastic), that these nit-picky people are just so dadgum terrified of using their brains even the tiniest little bit that when they saw the first "thee" or "thou" their neurons just shut down completely and they took to the internet to leave their butthurt little comments; i.e. they wanted to show us all how mad they were that an ancient book of purported Divine guidance wasn't translated from the grandiose, poetic paleo-Arabic of the 7th century into a modern Young Adult novel. Point being, if you see this particular complaint regarding the translation choice of the authors, ignore it. Unless you are also a complete moron, in which case you might want to take heed and read something less challenging. Like a picture book. Also, some others complained that the paper / pages that this massive tome was printed upon is too thin. This upsets them because, I assume, they are flummoxed at the notion that they can't turn each page as though they are oblivious, violent gorillas, or that they can't wear their Freddy Kruger glove(s) while perusing this particular Qu'ran. The audacity of the publishers and authors choosing so delicate a vellum! I demand a 7 volume Qu'ran that, in totality, weighs 346 lbs and costs 1,200 U.S. dollars! -Because that's what a super-manly, thick-papered Study Qu'ran would be... so, again, in case you're not picking up my sarcasm, this complaint is otiose nonsense that should be disregarded. The paper thickness is fine, and makes complete sense. Just be a little more scrupulous, is all. There are, however, some valid criticisms that I have. For starters, the well-known complaint that the authors are all Perennialist Muslims... Now, I didn't make as big a deal out of this as a lot of other Muslims have, mainly because this Perennialist stuff is only salient in a few places in the commentary, but still, that said, yes, it's there, and no, I don't agree with it. I think it's pretty obvious that both the Qu'ran and other Islamic Sacred Texts simply won't abide the notion that all religions are equally valid paths to God. -The authors, if they wished to be inclusive, could've cited any number of authorities -even very early ones- that held to the notion that the punishment of Hell in Islam is temporary for all people (but who nevertheless held the view, the authorities in question I mean, that the practitioners of less valid faiths were susceptible to this possible punishment, however temporary it may be, and pending that Islam was presented to them in a holistic and correct fashion while they were free of any psychological defects, e.g., something akin to an amalgam of the views of Ibn Taymiyyah [who held that hell was temporary for all people] and Imam al-Ghazaali [who held that Christians who had been indoctrinated against Islam were exempt from following it] et. al...) -this would've at least been "orthodox," in addition to being inclusive. But no. Instead they had to add a bunch of modernist malarkey (just my opinion) about how the Qu'ran actually validates all faiths... a notion that any sensible person would reject after an objective reading of enough Islamic source material. Also, re: the whole Perennialism thing, it's also strangely inconsistent. On the one hand, the commentators state that they only want to present information as it's found in mostly pre-modern commentaries, which is fine, but then they depart from that method when they start commenting on the validity of prior religious dispensations. But then, when it comes to other areas where a more modern view should definitely be included (because, I mean, just because something is "ancient" doesn't mean it's more correct, and just because an interpretation is newer doesn't automatically render it false) -and so verses like 4:34 (i.e., the infamous "beat them" verse) -well, here the authors go out of their way to stick to the "only presenting ancient views" method -which is to say that they basically go out of their way to "prove" that this verse was revealed in order to justify a man striking his wife (and, it should be noted, their "evidence" is an anecdote in the hadith literature that, per my own research, appears to be apocryphal). Although, to be be fair w/r/t Q. 4:34, they do elucidate the whole "yes it says *strike* but still, this *striking* was so restricted in Islamic Law so as to render the point moot" argument pretty well. So, eh, 50/50 as far as their commentary on 4:34 is concerned. Likewise with the story about Mariyyah the Copt (see: the commentary of 66:1-5), which, to modern eyes, is going to appear rather salacious, meaning, it's going to make the Prophet (s) look rather bad (at least in the eyes of folk from Western societies who are so far removed from polygynous culture so as to easily misunderstand the anecdote [i.e., that of the whole Mariyyah-Hafsah-Ayesha fiasco] as it's found in the commentary, which will be through no fault of the reader, meaning that the entire story, when just given as though it's historical fact [as it is in TSQ], really just renders everything in a fairly immodest light -at least from the Western viewpoint... and however incorrect and anachronistic this might be on the reader's part is, of course, not the issue)... again, their going with the more traditional commentaries (which in this case have relied on an account that isn't rigorously authenticated) and ignoring other ancient materials that give an alternate (and considerably less salacious) explanation as to why these particular verses were revealed -and this latter story (which Muslims will recognize as "the story of the honey,") -is actually more authenticated than the one TSQ authors chose to emphasize (they only give the "honey" account a passing mention, by contrast)... well, I guess my point here is that I really think a lot more could've been done here to clarify this issue. A final bone of contention: The commentary on those verses regarding "those whom the right hand's possess" (typ. understood -incorrectly, IMO- as "concubines" in English vernacular)... i.e., the commentary on this issue as found in Surah 4 of TSQ... I think, in the age of ISIS, a heck of a lot more should've been done in this portion to establish the fact that such relations had to be consensual, i.e. that Islam in no way justifies "slave rape." In essence, it's my personal opinion that this specific portion was unsatisfactory, given current events. So, from the above criticism(s), one can see why a more traditional Muslim might be somewhat miffed at the non-ancient Perennialism stuff being in the commentary (however sporadically it shows up... I admit it's not even enough to really complain about, given the overall benefits of TSQ as a whole) -but then, in other places where a more inclusive language is actually needed, they completely forego any newer research or even adequate clarification for the sake of "sticking with the ancient commentators' opinions..." -Like, okay, if that's really what you want to do, fine... but then you need to delete the Perennialist parts of the commentary for the sake of consistency, in that case. You can't have your cake and eat it as well. Pick a lane and stay in it! One other minor complaint that's not really a complaint: If you read TSQ from beginning to end, the commentary repeats itself a lot and becomes a bit redundant. I don't really consider this a "complaint" per se, I guess, more of just highlighting a potential drawback for some readers. However, I understand the utility of this, in that some people will be using TSQ as a reference book moreso than anything else, and thus it's useful to have some of the info repeat in later portions of the commentary, lest someone be unable to find sufficient research-related info due to a piece of data only being available in one place throughout this whole, massive work... I get it, is what I'm saying... but some folks might find this a tad annoying, even if they recognize the utility of it. Now, as regards to my "criticisms" above, obviously, some are more serious than others, but overall I still give TSQ a whopping 4 stars because, man, when this work shines, it shines like the sun! It's informative, moving, fascinating, useful, and overall, quite delightful. It's a great Qu'ran to give to a non-Muslim, even with its flaws, because you can easily clear up any possible misconceptions that might arise from the 4 or 5 "problematic" parts of the commentary. This isn't true of any past translation, IMO. There are some "English" versions of the Qu'ran that I'd put in a garbage can before I put it in the hand of a non-Muslim (see the Hilali-Khan "translation" for example). By contrast, I'd give TSQ freely to anyone and feel that they were in *relatively* good hands, more or less. Which, given the dearth of even remotely acceptable "dawah" materials in English, is a HUGE relief. So, yeah, it has flaws. Most of them have been exaggerated by a few ignorant folk (though some haven't). Overall though, we are indebted to the individuals who labored so hard for God's sake in order to bring us this important first step in the much needed "intellectual" Islamic traditional canon, -a milieu which, until very recently, has been sorely lacking in English. So, again, a big "THANK YOU" to the translators / editors / commentators, and a well-deserved 4 star review here on goodreads, from me to you!

  9. 4 out of 5

    Michael Fitzgerald

    We finally received this after about a month of waiting and it is truly worth the wait. This is the translation I have hoped to see for a long time, in beautiful English, but also with excerpts from a score of the principle commentaries (tafaasir) in the bottom half of the same page so that a reader can understand how many different perspectives there can be concerning a single verse. The book is printed on what I suppose is onionskin paper and beautifully bound. The only Arabic in the book is h We finally received this after about a month of waiting and it is truly worth the wait. This is the translation I have hoped to see for a long time, in beautiful English, but also with excerpts from a score of the principle commentaries (tafaasir) in the bottom half of the same page so that a reader can understand how many different perspectives there can be concerning a single verse. The book is printed on what I suppose is onionskin paper and beautifully bound. The only Arabic in the book is hand written basmalas. It is also completed by a number of scholarly essays and an extensive index. That this work is being sold for about 40 dollars is truly amazing. Undying thanks to all those involved. (less)

  10. 4 out of 5

    ʼIsmāʻīl

    I've heard this is a must read due to the incredible scholarly effort put into it. I've just recently come to learn about the scholarship of Caner Dagli whose work on Ibn Arabi is outstanding in particular, Maria Dakake imparted good impressions with a lecture I watched with her with Shaykh Hamza at Zaytuna, I know Muhammad Rustom recently translated a new section from the Ihya in English, and I think everyone is familiar with Dr. Nasr's work. The only person I'm unfamiliar with is Dr. Lumbard. I've heard this is a must read due to the incredible scholarly effort put into it. I've just recently come to learn about the scholarship of Caner Dagli whose work on Ibn Arabi is outstanding in particular, Maria Dakake imparted good impressions with a lecture I watched with her with Shaykh Hamza at Zaytuna, I know Muhammad Rustom recently translated a new section from the Ihya in English, and I think everyone is familiar with Dr. Nasr's work. The only person I'm unfamiliar with is Dr. Lumbard. To clear that up I listened to a podcast with him and Sami Yusuf and he went on to say that this project took roughly 10 years to complete! 10 years! And that's working on it diligently almost every day. That adds a little more clout as to why people are saying this is a must read.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Ben

    This edition of the Quran is very well done. Excellent introductory material to the study of the Quran from scholars who are also practitioners. Copious footnotes undergird the text, and a very helpful set of essays at the end give the reader a great introduction to an emic perspective on the study of the Quran and its role in the faith life of Muslims.

  12. 5 out of 5

    A'isha Rahman

    Interesting tool of resource and commentary to learn about and from the various schools of Islamic Theology. Not a Quran in my opinion but more of a Tafsir.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Melanie

    Finally! Finally! Finally! I finished reading this! This is the third religious text I have read, the other two being Dianetics (Scientology) and The Holy Bible (Judaism, Christianity, and Islam). They've all been brutal reads. Being an atheist, religion and how it is that people can believe in it have always fascinated me. I am still at a loss. I'm probably going to hit Hinduism next, which will hopefully be more interesting. Can anyone suggest a text? Anyway, reading the Qu'ran did not give me m Finally! Finally! Finally! I finished reading this! This is the third religious text I have read, the other two being Dianetics (Scientology) and The Holy Bible (Judaism, Christianity, and Islam). They've all been brutal reads. Being an atheist, religion and how it is that people can believe in it have always fascinated me. I am still at a loss. I'm probably going to hit Hinduism next, which will hopefully be more interesting. Can anyone suggest a text? Anyway, reading the Qu'ran did not give me much information about why people believe it, but it did give me some info about what it is that they (ostensibly) believe. The Qu'ran has many references to the Old Testament of The Bible, and a few to the New Testament. In general, the god of the Qu'ran is the Old TEstament god and takes credit for all of his deeds, as he would if they were the same being. This version of god has just a few main points: 1. There is only one god who has no relatives whatsoever. No child, no parents, no siblings. Never had, never will. 2. God is pretty serious about you believing in him, it is his main criteria for entrance into heaven. Other good points are giving alms, doing good deeds, taking care of orphans and the poor. 3. You can do all the other stuff, but no worship of him is a ticket to hell. 4. Abraham, Moses, Jesus, and Mohammad are all prophets of more-or-less equal standing. 5. There are a few Old Testament stories that you should really pay attention to, chief of which is the story of exodus, but they are all about how god destroys civilizations who don't worship him. 6. God is a big advocate of peace. It's true, if people actually followed it, this god is pretty concerned about peace. 7. You are not responsible for the religious beliefs of others. God will judge them himself, he doesn't need your help. Again, too bad people don't follow this advice, including non-Muslims. 8. God guides who he will on the straight path, but he also guides who he will on the path to hell. This seems unfair to me, but it is in keeping with the god of the Old Testament. 9. There is a devil. He made some kind of deal with god and many people are led astray by him. This is regardless of point 8 on this list. 10. There is a Day of Judgement, no specific timeframe. Everything is kept in a record and you're going to be held accountable when the day comes. Obviously, you can't summarize the precepts of an entire religion in ten points, these are just my main takeaways. It is interesting to see how these teachings are reflected in today's worshippers. I'm thinking Islam is no more closely followed than either Christianity or Judaism. It seems everyone claims to be a devote follower without actually following it, or picking and choosing. The Islamic god is not as conflicted about so much as the other versions, so that's good. At any rate, the book was very, very difficult to read. It only took me about four months though, whereas the Holy Bible took me a year. I'm thinking it might be a lot better in the original Arabic. Possibly this is a terrible translation since the original is supposed to be poetic and this version struggled to be readable. Maybe someone can recommend a different interpretation that is more readable.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Vincent Hardy

    The Study Quran is exemplary. It is above and beyond everything I could have imagined in regards to translation of the Quran. Seyyed Hossein Nasr takes the complexities of the Arabic grammar used with each of the verses in the Quran and provides the reader with a simple yet profound meaning of verse, its literary context, and its history. Having read Yusuf Ali, Shakir, and Aqa Mahdi Puya's translation and commentaries with utmost respect to those translators, Seyyed Hossein Nasr builds the found The Study Quran is exemplary. It is above and beyond everything I could have imagined in regards to translation of the Quran. Seyyed Hossein Nasr takes the complexities of the Arabic grammar used with each of the verses in the Quran and provides the reader with a simple yet profound meaning of verse, its literary context, and its history. Having read Yusuf Ali, Shakir, and Aqa Mahdi Puya's translation and commentaries with utmost respect to those translators, Seyyed Hossein Nasr builds the foundation of the esoteric meaning of each verse tightly coupled with the narrations in the hadiths from both Sunni and Shi'ah school of thought, sparing no details. This book, after 9 years in the making with such vigor, is the ultimate guide (not a one-off) to ensure that the Quran is read and understood as it was meant to be 1400 years ago.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Kiran Rizvi

    This is a wonderful resource in English of Quran translation with number of commentaries. It includes commentaries from diverse branches (Sunni, Shia, Sufi etc) of Islam. What I am really admiring about this book as a reader and as a seeker of knowledge that I am provided different perspectives on the text without any bias or suggestive thought.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Timothy Margheim

    This was what I was hoping it would be: A very readable translation of the Quran with copious notes to help bridge the cultural gap between me and both the original and modern audiences of the text. It also included a number of essays which were useful background.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Muhammad

    Probably one of, if not, the worst translation I've ever read. Probably one of, if not, the worst translation I've ever read.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Gregory Casteel

    [Please note that my "four star" rating is for the quality of this specific edition of the Qur'an—with a particular focus on its commentary and bonus features—and is not meant as an endorsement or a critique of the teachings of the Qur'an itself.] Whew! ... I finally finished reading it. It took me forever, because: (a) it's about 2,000 pages long; (b) I read each surah (chapter) twice—first just reading straight through the text, then re-reading it, verse-by-verse, along with the commentary; and [Please note that my "four star" rating is for the quality of this specific edition of the Qur'an—with a particular focus on its commentary and bonus features—and is not meant as an endorsement or a critique of the teachings of the Qur'an itself.] Whew! ... I finally finished reading it. It took me forever, because: (a) it's about 2,000 pages long; (b) I read each surah (chapter) twice—first just reading straight through the text, then re-reading it, verse-by-verse, along with the commentary; and (c) with all due respect to those who hold the Qur'an as sacred writ, it's not exactly a "page turner," so I must admit that it was a bit of a struggle to motivate myself to plow my way through it (more on this later). Nonetheless, I eventually did. And I'm glad I did. I should state up front that I am not Muslim. (I have nothing against Muslims, of course; it's just that Islam is not the religious tradition that I was raised in.) What I am is an amateur student of religion—and particularly of comparative religion. I want to understand the various belief systems of the world: what they teach, how they are practiced, how they are lived out in people's lives, how they are similar to each other, how they differ, etc. So I wanted to read the Qur'an in order to better understand Islam. Now, of course, I realize that scripture is not the same thing as religion. Merely reading the sacred texts of a particular faith tradition will not tell you everything that you might want to know about the teachings and practices of that tradition, much less about the lived experiences of its adherents. Even for the three Abrahamic faiths, which hold their scriptures as foundational, understanding what these religious traditions are all about will require more than simply reading their holy books. For one thing, scripture has to be properly interpreted in order to yield doctrine—and interpretations often differ, resulting in different doctrinal sub-traditions (sects, denominations, etc.) within a larger faith tradition. Also, as religious scholar Reza Aslan has argued, a distinction has to be drawn between the formal teachings of a faith tradition and the actual beliefs and everyday practices of its adherents. A religion as it is taught from the pulpit is one thing; a religion as it is lived out in the daily lives of ordinary believers may be quite another—yet both are aspects of that religion. Neither can simply be ignored if you want a complete picture of what that faith tradition is all about. So, if you want to understand any religion, you can't just read its scriptures and assume that this alone will make you an expert on the subject. However, it is certainly a good place to start. If you are going to read the sacred texts of any religious tradition—especially one that is not your own and that you have not formally studied—it is probably best to do so with the aid of a good commentary written by someone who knows a lot more about the subject than you do and can help you navigate the text better than you could do on your own. That is why I chose to read this particular edition of the Qur'an, which includes a very thorough verse-by-verse commentary that helps clarify the meaning of ambiguous passages and that discusses the various ways that each verse has traditionally been interpreted by Islamic scholars. This edition also includes a number of expository essays and other supplemental material which are designed to help the reader get the most out of the text. So there are three aspects of this edition that I need to discuss in this review: (1) the text of the Qur'an itself (in English translation); (2) the verse-by-verse commentary; and (3) the essays and other supplemental material that accompany the text and commentary. Since I am not Muslim, I want to be as respectful as possible in my treatment of a sacred text, a faith tradition, and a culture that are not my own and that I cannot even pretend to fully "grok". Yet I also want to be as forthright in my judgment as I am able to be, while still acknowledging the limits of my own comprehension. So, here goes: Let me begin by discussing the verse-by-verse commentary (I'll save my discussion of the text of the Qur'an itself for last): If you want to read the Qur'an in English translation, and you are neither Muslim yourself nor an expert on Islam, then this is definitely the edition that you want to get. The commentary is truly a godsend. I would not recommend trying to feel your way through the text without the help of a good verse-by-verse commentary like the one in this edition. If you do try to read it on your own, you'll just end up completely lost at sea, because the meaning of many passages is quite opaque, especially to anyone who is not familiar with the historical and cultural context behind those passages, or the Arabic idiom in which they are written. And even if you were able to puzzle out the surface meaning of some passage, that still might not help you understand how Muslims interpret the doctrinal implications of that passage. The exegesis of the Qur'an is not always as straightforward as you might think (or hope). The advantage of this particular commentary for helping readers understand how Muslims interpret the Qur'an is that it makes every effort to be as ecumenical as possible. Rather than simply presenting one possible interpretation of any given passage—the one favored by the editors—this commentary presents a number of different possible interpretations, representing various schools of thought within Islam: including Sunni, Shi'ite, and even (in some cases) Sufi interpretations. To put that into terms that might be a bit more familiar to non-Muslims, it would be as if a commentary on the New Testament gave an unbiased overview of differing Catholic, Protestant, and Orthodox interpretations of various passages, citing the writings of major theologians from each of these traditions. (I would love to find such a commentary on the New Testament, BTW.) Perhaps at this point I ought to mention that this is NOT a "critical" commentary on the Qur'an—its purpose is not to challenge the traditional teachings of Islam or traditional Muslim beliefs about the Qur'an itself; it seeks only to bring clarity to the meaning and doctrinal interpretation of the text. All of the members of the editorial team that produced the commentary are devout Muslims who regard the Qur'an as the Word of God, and they have tried to produce a commentary that faithfully reflects the teachings of their religion (with an acknowledgement of the diversity of views within Islam itself). Some students of religion may see this non-critical approach to the text as a shortcoming. I see it as an asset. After all, if you want to critique something, you first need to understand whatever it is that you're critiquing. If you are critiquing a set of religious beliefs, then you need to try your best to understand those beliefs as they are understood by those who believe them. And who better to learn from than devout believers themselves? (I don't mean to suggest that critical treatments of a subject ought to be avoided, even by beginners; only that it is usually better to hear the "pro" side of any argument before you listen to the "con".) The verse-by-verse commentary that accompanies the text in this edition of the Qur'an does an excellent job of explaining how devout Muslims understand their scriptures—and that is exactly what a novice student of Islam (or comparative religion) needs. Turning now to the expository essays and other supplemental material included at the end of this edition: I must confess that, for me—a curious outsider who wants to learn more about Islam—the essays were my favorite part of the entire volume. They offer a great deal of insight into various aspects of this fascinating, yet widely misunderstood, religion. Sure, I personally found some of these essays to be more engaging and more informative than others, but I believe that I learned something of value from each of them. My only complaint about the essays is that, at least in my opinion, the first essay—"How to Read the Quran"—should have been placed at the very front of the book, before the text of the Qur'an itself, because it would have been useful to have read that essay before reading the actual Qur'an (and let's face it, most people—including me—are not going to flip to the back of the book to read an essay before plunging into the Qur'anic text itself). One final note about the bonus materials at the back of the volume before I move on to discuss the text of the Qu'ran proper: There are maps! I love maps! In my opinion, any book that has maps is superior to any book that does not have maps. This book has maps! Yay! Okay, moving on ... Sadly, I don't read Arabic. (I'd love to learn—languages fascinate me, and Arabic seems like a lovely language—but life is short, there are only so many hours in the day, and choices have to be made. Perhaps one day I'll find the time, but I haven't thus far.) So I've never read the Qur'an in the original Arabic, which means that I cannot comment on the accuracy of this particular translation. Given the amount of care that the editors have so obviously put into this volume, it seems reasonable to me to assume that they made every effort to ensure that the English translation was as reliable as possible. But I am in no position to judge. Assuming, however, that the translation is reasonably accurate, I can comment on how well the English text reads. And frankly, with all due respect to the translators, it's a bit too stilted for my taste. It reads as if the translators were going out of their way to make the text sound as lofty as possible. It's not that the English itself is archaic—as in the King James Bible—it's just that it is very formal, even florid, bordering on poetic, with many word choices that are not common in everyday conversational English. I'm not sure to what extent this was dictated by the original Arabic text itself and to what extent it was a deliberate choice by the translators, but (at least for me) it was rather distracting. It is a bit like looking at a painting in a museum: it can be tempting to pay more attention to the artistry (the brush strokes, the color palate and shading, the perspective and composition) than to the actual subject the artist was trying to depict in the painting. Similarly, as I was reading this translation of the Qur'an, I found that my attention was drawn more to the style of the writing than to its meaning. This had the (presumably unintended) effect of "distancing" me from the text rather than drawing me in and helping me to more fully engage with what I was reading, intellectually and emotionally. Again, I can't be sure if that is the fault of this particular translation or if it is intrinsic to the style of the Qur'an itself, regardless of how it might be translated. And speaking of the style of the Qur'an itself ... with all due respect to those who hold it as the very Word of God ... honesty compels me to admit that I found it as dull as ditchwater—which is one of the reasons it took me so long to force myself to get all the way through it. The whole thing reads like something out of one of the more tedious of the Old Testament prophets—one of those books that you're always tempted to skip when reading through the Bible, because your eyes start to glaze over after just the first few verses every time you try to read it. The Qur'an is basically just one long, highly repetitive harangue against idolaters, unbelievers, and other assorted unrepentant sinners. There is no real narrative to speak of—at least not the sort of extended narrative, rich in detail, that you find in the Hebrew Bible and in the New Testament gospels. And the text of the Qur'an is extremely repetitive, which is one of the reasons I found it such a slog to get through. There were several occasions when I wondered if I might have somehow lost my place in the text, because the passage I was reading was virtually identical to a passage I had already read. While I'm sure that Islamic scholars are able to find rich nuances of meaning in these repetitions, not having the benefit of their insight, I'm afraid that I couldn't help but find them tedious. As for the specific teachings found in the Qur'an, I don't feel qualified to offer any commentary of my own. My goal in reading the Qur'an was to better understand Islam, not to critique it. I have my own theological views, of course, but I am not an authority on such matters; I claim no doctrinal infallibility for myself, and thus I am in no position to sit in judgment of the religious beliefs of others—especially those from a faith tradition that is not my own. I will say that reading the Qur'an has not changed my own way of thinking about theological or moral issues in any meaningful way. In fact, although I'm glad that I finally took the time to read the text, I must confess that I did not find it at all appealing, and I certainly didn't find it persuasive. Frankly, I found it rather off-putting. But that might tell you more about my own personal tastes and temperament than it tells you about the Qur'an itself. So, as the saying goes, "your mileage may vary."

  19. 5 out of 5

    Sagheer Afzal

    After reading the many rave reviews of this commentary I decided to make it my source of reference whilst reading the Quran during this month of Ramadan. Normally I have always used Muhammad Asad's and Abdullah Yousuf Ali, the one by Taqi Usmani is in my opinion is slipshod and careless. A Quranic commentary must contain the following features: 1) It provides the context for the chapters and important verses. 2) It gives you a succinct and contextual analysis of the Arabic words. 3) The English of After reading the many rave reviews of this commentary I decided to make it my source of reference whilst reading the Quran during this month of Ramadan. Normally I have always used Muhammad Asad's and Abdullah Yousuf Ali, the one by Taqi Usmani is in my opinion is slipshod and careless. A Quranic commentary must contain the following features: 1) It provides the context for the chapters and important verses. 2) It gives you a succinct and contextual analysis of the Arabic words. 3) The English of the text is good, not idiomatic but reasonably easy to understand. The Study Quran pretty much satisfies these criteria, but there were quite a few verses where the translations seemed either superfluous or redundant. I have highlighted some of the ones below in which the translators perhaps missed the point. A) In Surah Imran verse 52, it translates the Arabic word for the helpers of Jesus as 'Hawiriyoon', this is literally translated 'One who whitens clothes by washing them' The Study Quran however translates this words as 'apostles' due to an Ethipian Arabiv verb. Now, I must confess I was somewhat baffled by this tangent. Ethiopians at that time did not speak Arabic. Muhammad Asad gives what I believe the correct context, he refers to them as the Essenes, for whom the wearing of white robes and immersing them in water was an established practice. In fact Pope Benedict XVI actually stated during his Easter message in 2007, that he believed that Jesus celebrated the Passover supper according to Essene rights. Raising the possiblility that the Propher Jesus may have been part of the Essene brotherhood. B) In the 38th Chapter (Surah Saad) an incident involving the Prophet David and the complainants with 99 Ewes is described. This does bear a certain similarity to the biblical version. However The Study Quran seems to provide no further analysis. C) The tribes of Gog and Magog are described twice in the Quran. In Surah Anbiyaa; they are described as: 'Until the Gog and Magog (people) are let through (their barrier), and they swiftly swarm from every hill.' The context does bear some similarity to their description in the Book of Revelations: 'Gog and Magog, to gather them together to the war: the number of whom is as the sand of the sea. And they went up over the breadth of the earth.' This also tallies with some of the Hadith about Gog and Magog but strangely this is not mentioned in any of the commentaries by Asad, Abdullah Yousuf Ali or Study Quran. That said Study Quran does do the job required and is worth the money you pay for it.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Sjervey

    It took me several months to read this immense volume. First impressions: While the Quran is written in beautiful Arabic poetic form, no effort was made to translate this in verse. In fact, it is a canon of Islamic thought that translation of the poetry of the Quran is impossible, so no translation will be able to provide a sense of the poetry of the original. The Quran is quite repetitive. This makes sense when you realize that it was first revealed to a non-literate people. Even Mohammad was ill It took me several months to read this immense volume. First impressions: While the Quran is written in beautiful Arabic poetic form, no effort was made to translate this in verse. In fact, it is a canon of Islamic thought that translation of the poetry of the Quran is impossible, so no translation will be able to provide a sense of the poetry of the original. The Quran is quite repetitive. This makes sense when you realize that it was first revealed to a non-literate people. Even Mohammad was illiterate. He committed the Quran to memory pieve by piece and shared it to others who likewise memorized it, until it was finally written down. Oral traditions need to use formulaic expressions to facilitate memorization. The Quran is no exception. The Study Quran is encyclopedic, providing translations and commentary for every verse (ayat) and including in each commentary a discussion of the contributions of other commentaries as well. In addition, there are 15 essays at the end which help consolidate by topic the material that has preceded. Nevertheless, like Judaism and Christianity, Islam continues to probe its scripture for a clearer understanding and after one reading I feel like I have barely scratched the surface. I am Roman Catholic and I was surprised to find that Islam respects all of the Judeo-Christian tradition with only some exceptions. Unfortunately, some differences are major. The Quran contradicts the Gospels on the subject of the crucifixion, insisting that Jesus never died, but ascended into Heaven. Because they believe that this understanding of theirs has been divinely revealed, there seems to be no room for discussion on this matter. But I am reluctant to make that an absolute statement. Prayerful theological reflection can often open up new roads. One aspect of Islam very much like that of Christianity is the range of beliefs among followers. Islam has its fundamentalist followers just as Christianity does. Generally, Fundamentalists are more eager to take symbolic language literally and to be more strident in imposing their views precisely because those views are shaped on more tenuous grounds. Reading The Study Quran reveals Islam, like Christianity and Judaism, to be a religion of peace and love. What is needed to insure world peace would seem to be for Christians to lovingly reach out to fundamentalist Christians and for Moslems to reach out lovingly to fundamentalist Moslems and for all people of good will in both religions to support those efforts.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Ben Truong

    N.B.: This review and rating will not include any commentary on the text of this religious text, because I feel woefully inadequate to make any review or rating on it. However, this review would focus on the functionality of this particular edition of the text. The Study Quran: A New Translation and Commentary is a Quran for those who want to really study and go in-depth with the scripture. This particular addition collects all 114 surahs with copious of notes, which in most cases take up the bul N.B.: This review and rating will not include any commentary on the text of this religious text, because I feel woefully inadequate to make any review or rating on it. However, this review would focus on the functionality of this particular edition of the text. The Study Quran: A New Translation and Commentary is a Quran for those who want to really study and go in-depth with the scripture. This particular addition collects all 114 surahs with copious of notes, which in most cases take up the bulk of the page. To say there are copious of notes would be an understatement as these notes covers at times eighty percent of the page, leaving a small part for the original text. With addition to the copious notes there are fifteen scholarly essays about the Quran that were in-depth and wonderful written. Three appendixes, maps, and a color coded index for both the text and the additional notes are provided. There were two minor quibbles I had with this Study Quran that I quickly dismissed quickly afterward. The first was that I would have liked the original Arabic side-by-side with the translation, so one who knew the language could compare and contrast, but then I thought I would not make the same demand with any Study Bible, which was written in several languages, so I dismissed it. The second was that there was no concordance, but I found that the col0r-coded index served just as well as one. All in all, The Study Quran: A New Translation and Commentary is a wonderful tool that guides the reader through the Quran and gives copious notes for those who want to study the scripture more in depth.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Ashkan

    No matter how you read the Quran and how you came to your knowledge of Islam and its holy book, you simply have to have this book if you're interested not only in its translation but also in Tafsir and the numerous hadiths that accompanies it from the view point of Shia and Sunni sects. No doubt that because of religious excess of all kind this book will be serving a crucial role in dialogues and changes yet to come. If you are interested in Islam in anyway be it sociology of religion, its histo No matter how you read the Quran and how you came to your knowledge of Islam and its holy book, you simply have to have this book if you're interested not only in its translation but also in Tafsir and the numerous hadiths that accompanies it from the view point of Shia and Sunni sects. No doubt that because of religious excess of all kind this book will be serving a crucial role in dialogues and changes yet to come. If you are interested in Islam in anyway be it sociology of religion, its history or even its modern legal forms then you have to have this book on your reading list. It took me a long to read it but one has to remember that this book is meant to be a continuing reference guide for those interested in Islam and as such even if you return to it from time to time or you want to read parts of it only as your inquiry may require, it is still a great book to have.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Genna

    I am not comfortable using a star rating on or reviewing other people's religious texts. That's not my place. That said, the work that went into the translation and notations in this particular Quran is boggling. Years ago I set out to read a paperback copy of a Quran that I'd found in a used book sale and, after a few pages, I realized that I didn't have the cultural background to get anything useful out of it. There are so many things I understand about my own religion just because I grew up w I am not comfortable using a star rating on or reviewing other people's religious texts. That's not my place. That said, the work that went into the translation and notations in this particular Quran is boggling. Years ago I set out to read a paperback copy of a Quran that I'd found in a used book sale and, after a few pages, I realized that I didn't have the cultural background to get anything useful out of it. There are so many things I understand about my own religion just because I grew up with it always in the background and I just did not have that with Islam. So I got this and, while I still am not even slightly qualified to comment on the underlying work, I am deeply impressed by the footnotes, essays, and general care put into this. I read every footnote and it took me years, but I am so glad I put in the effort. This is a truly impressive text.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Willy Marz Thiessam

    A well put together precise edition of the Quran. Great references and glosses that read effortlessly and put you in touch with the extensive scholarship that is out there. You will not feel overloaded but you well feel well versed after spending time with this book. Excellent work all round, well done. This a great addition to anyone's collection who needs an invaluable source on the Quran and its scholarship. A well put together precise edition of the Quran. Great references and glosses that read effortlessly and put you in touch with the extensive scholarship that is out there. You will not feel overloaded but you well feel well versed after spending time with this book. Excellent work all round, well done. This a great addition to anyone's collection who needs an invaluable source on the Quran and its scholarship.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Nausheen

    "So where are you going?" [81:26] This is a heavy translation in every sense of the word. Nasr provides context (Shi'i and Sunni, and many Sufi references as well) and related ahādith for every single verse, which was not just useful (particularly for Muslim readers), but also fascinating. It's also packed with essays and an informative introduction -- properly completing this and digesting will take many months beyond Ramadan. "So where are you going?" [81:26] This is a heavy translation in every sense of the word. Nasr provides context (Shi'i and Sunni, and many Sufi references as well) and related ahādith for every single verse, which was not just useful (particularly for Muslim readers), but also fascinating. It's also packed with essays and an informative introduction -- properly completing this and digesting will take many months beyond Ramadan.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Nabeela

    As an English speaker this translation of the Quran is a simple and easily understandable way to build a relationship with the Quran. The language is accessible and the foot notes and additional commentary add dimension to the interpretation that is helpful. It allowed me to study the Quran in a familiar way which isn't an experience I have had before in other English translations of the Quran. As an English speaker this translation of the Quran is a simple and easily understandable way to build a relationship with the Quran. The language is accessible and the foot notes and additional commentary add dimension to the interpretation that is helpful. It allowed me to study the Quran in a familiar way which isn't an experience I have had before in other English translations of the Quran.

  27. 4 out of 5

    nadia

    Very helpful translation This extensive notation and coverage of a wide variety of tafsir (interpretation) in this book helped me answer many questions I've had about different aspects of the Quran over the years. Very helpful translation This extensive notation and coverage of a wide variety of tafsir (interpretation) in this book helped me answer many questions I've had about different aspects of the Quran over the years.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Shawn Smith

    Very good project. The footnotes and cross referencing, as well as essays, are very helpful.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Elle

    A good English translation of the Quran. Commentary is traditional and conservative and does not include more recent interpretations.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Mohammed

    Amazing translation for understand more deeply

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