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The first print publication edited by Tavi Gevinson, the editor in chief of Rookie, the website for teenage girls Tavi Gevinson started her personal blog, Style Rookie, in 2008, when she was eleven years old. It was a place where, from the confines of her bedroom in the suburbs, she could write about personal style and chronicle the development of her own. Within two years, The first print publication edited by Tavi Gevinson, the editor in chief of Rookie, the website for teenage girls Tavi Gevinson started her personal blog, Style Rookie, in 2008, when she was eleven years old. It was a place where, from the confines of her bedroom in the suburbs, she could write about personal style and chronicle the development of her own. Within two years, the blog was averaging fifty thousand hits per day. Soon fashion designers were flying her around the world to attend and write about fashion shows, and to be a guest of honor at their parties.      Soon Tavi’s interests grew beyond fashion, into culture and art and, especially, feminism. In September 2011, when she was fifteen, she launched Rookie, a website for girls like her: teenagers who are interested in fashion and beauty but also in dissecting the culture around them through a uniquely teen-girl lens. Rookie broke one million page views within its first six days. Rookie Yearbook One collects articles, interviews, photo editorials, and illustrations from the highly praised and hugely popular online magazine.       In its first year, Rookie has established a large inclusive international community of avid readers. In addition to its fifty-plus regular writers, photographers, and illustrators (many of whom are teenage girls themselves), Rookie’s contributors and interviewees have included prominent makers of popular culture such as Lena Dunham, Miranda July, Joss Whedon, Jon Hamm, Zooey Deschanel, David Sedaris, Elle Fanning, Amy Poehler, Paul Rudd, John Waters, Chloe Sevigny, Liz Phair, Dan Savage, JD Samson, Ira Glass, Aubrey Plaza, Daniel Clowes, Carrie Brownstein, Paul Feig, Bethany Cosentino, Kimya Dawson, Fred Armisen, and Winnie Holzman.      As a young teenager, Gevinson couldn’t find what she was looking for in a teen magazine; Rookie is the one she created herself to fill that void. Her coolheaded intellect shines in Rookie, arguably the most intelligent magazine ever made for a teen-girl audience. Gevinson writes with a humble but keen authority on such serious topics as body image, self-esteem, and first encounters with street harassment. She’s equally deft at doling out useful advice, such as how to do a two-minute beehive, or how to deliver an effective bitchface. Rookie’s passionate staffers and faithful readers have helped make Rookie the strong community that it is.      To date, Gevinson has written for Harper’s Bazaar, Jezebel, Lula, and Pop, and is a contributing editor for Garage magazine. She has been profiled in The New York Times and The New Yorker, and has been on the cover of Pop, L’Officiel, Zeit Magazin, and Bust. As a speaker, she has made numerous presentations at venues such as IdeaCity, TEDxTeen, L2 Forum, and the Economist World in 2012 Festival. Last year Lady Gaga called her “the future of journalism.”


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The first print publication edited by Tavi Gevinson, the editor in chief of Rookie, the website for teenage girls Tavi Gevinson started her personal blog, Style Rookie, in 2008, when she was eleven years old. It was a place where, from the confines of her bedroom in the suburbs, she could write about personal style and chronicle the development of her own. Within two years, The first print publication edited by Tavi Gevinson, the editor in chief of Rookie, the website for teenage girls Tavi Gevinson started her personal blog, Style Rookie, in 2008, when she was eleven years old. It was a place where, from the confines of her bedroom in the suburbs, she could write about personal style and chronicle the development of her own. Within two years, the blog was averaging fifty thousand hits per day. Soon fashion designers were flying her around the world to attend and write about fashion shows, and to be a guest of honor at their parties.      Soon Tavi’s interests grew beyond fashion, into culture and art and, especially, feminism. In September 2011, when she was fifteen, she launched Rookie, a website for girls like her: teenagers who are interested in fashion and beauty but also in dissecting the culture around them through a uniquely teen-girl lens. Rookie broke one million page views within its first six days. Rookie Yearbook One collects articles, interviews, photo editorials, and illustrations from the highly praised and hugely popular online magazine.       In its first year, Rookie has established a large inclusive international community of avid readers. In addition to its fifty-plus regular writers, photographers, and illustrators (many of whom are teenage girls themselves), Rookie’s contributors and interviewees have included prominent makers of popular culture such as Lena Dunham, Miranda July, Joss Whedon, Jon Hamm, Zooey Deschanel, David Sedaris, Elle Fanning, Amy Poehler, Paul Rudd, John Waters, Chloe Sevigny, Liz Phair, Dan Savage, JD Samson, Ira Glass, Aubrey Plaza, Daniel Clowes, Carrie Brownstein, Paul Feig, Bethany Cosentino, Kimya Dawson, Fred Armisen, and Winnie Holzman.      As a young teenager, Gevinson couldn’t find what she was looking for in a teen magazine; Rookie is the one she created herself to fill that void. Her coolheaded intellect shines in Rookie, arguably the most intelligent magazine ever made for a teen-girl audience. Gevinson writes with a humble but keen authority on such serious topics as body image, self-esteem, and first encounters with street harassment. She’s equally deft at doling out useful advice, such as how to do a two-minute beehive, or how to deliver an effective bitchface. Rookie’s passionate staffers and faithful readers have helped make Rookie the strong community that it is.      To date, Gevinson has written for Harper’s Bazaar, Jezebel, Lula, and Pop, and is a contributing editor for Garage magazine. She has been profiled in The New York Times and The New Yorker, and has been on the cover of Pop, L’Officiel, Zeit Magazin, and Bust. As a speaker, she has made numerous presentations at venues such as IdeaCity, TEDxTeen, L2 Forum, and the Economist World in 2012 Festival. Last year Lady Gaga called her “the future of journalism.”

30 review for Rookie Yearbook One

  1. 4 out of 5

    Ana Ruiz

    Things that Rookie did for MY LIFE: *Made my time at the toilet much more fun. *Turned me into a solid feminist with solid arguments. (I used to be just a quiet voice for equality. It sounds counterproductive, as if Rookie made of me one of those "ew boys suck" fourth graders, but what I really mean is that I now know things about women's situation that I wasn't previously aware about, such as our increased vulnerability to sexual harassment, the way many times people judge women more violently Things that Rookie did for MY LIFE: *Made my time at the toilet much more fun. *Turned me into a solid feminist with solid arguments. (I used to be just a quiet voice for equality. It sounds counterproductive, as if Rookie made of me one of those "ew boys suck" fourth graders, but what I really mean is that I now know things about women's situation that I wasn't previously aware about, such as our increased vulnerability to sexual harassment, the way many times people judge women more violently and how to embrace self confidence not only for ourselves, but for others too.) *My Goodreads "To Read" list and "Movies To Watch" list has grown twice in size. *I currently do not aprecciate a sundae if in a bowl. *I have stopped squandering my allowance on stupid things like Seventeen and makeup to usefully spend it on very valuable art supplies and used clothes. *I don't have time for my homework anymore. Sorry, got more important things to do. Like DIYs. (I'm sort of kidding.) *A lot of other very life changing things that I can't remember right now. I must add that I read this (the best teenage girl oriented magazine in the world) super rushed because I had to lend it to this one friend, and that other friend, and, come to think about it, wouldn't that one other friend love it? Anyways, I have to start getting more and more people hooked on Rookie. It's my way of changing the world, I guess. EDITED TO ADD: Because Rookies are awesome, and we want to share that awesomeness through our passion for books, I created a Goodreads group that concentrates on reading stuff that was recommended on our favorite online magazine. Check it out: http://www.goodreads.com/group/show/8...

  2. 5 out of 5

    Lord Beardsley

    So many feelings about this one, guys. I'm a 33 year-old woman, and I feel like the stuff I learned from this book has helped me for when I turn 34 in a few weeks. That being said, I wish I'd had access to this when I was 13 going-on-14 back in 1993/4, a time period which Rookie openly fetishizes (which doesn't make me feel a bit OLD at ALL…and a bit flattered as well). Girls these days have got it so good. And so bad. One half of me is super-jealous for all the access to music and culture that So many feelings about this one, guys. I'm a 33 year-old woman, and I feel like the stuff I learned from this book has helped me for when I turn 34 in a few weeks. That being said, I wish I'd had access to this when I was 13 going-on-14 back in 1993/4, a time period which Rookie openly fetishizes (which doesn't make me feel a bit OLD at ALL…and a bit flattered as well). Girls these days have got it so good. And so bad. One half of me is super-jealous for all the access to music and culture that I had to spend months digging in libraries and sending away for via the post to procure; and one half of me is so deeply grateful that I am not a teenage girl growing up in this world right now. Things have always been horribly unfair for girls, but the way things are now, I don't envy the young…I mostly feel really awful and sorry for them at having to grow up in a world that has doubled in fuckedupedness from when I was going through it all. While I adore Rookie and fucking fully respect Tavi Gevinson in what she is doing, I can't say that certain elements do not make me feel a tad frustrated. Don't get me wrong: this is not at her or her franchise, but at how the media constantly refers to her as THE ONE ICON OF HOPE FOR YOUNG FEMINISTS. I am sure that Tavi herself would be less-than-ready to proclaim herself thusly, just as Kathleen Hanna very vocally rejected the notion of her being THE VOICE OF RIOT GRRRL. While it is wonderful to have both these fan-fucking-tastic women in our midst, we must never forget the fact that both are lovely-to-look-at and white. They both recognize this, and try as hard as possible to discourage this myopic notion of white, able-bodied, insertprivledgehere definition. Etc. Etc. I just want the media to get beyond Tavi and dig around for other girls from different backgrounds who are also doing fantastic things. I think she'd agree with me. This might not be a fitting thing to put in my feelings on this book itself, but I'm speaking from a more global frustration I feel when the subject of Tavi and Rookie come up. That being said, Rookie offers itself as a platform for young women to be heard and that, above every criticism, is a noble pursuit. I hope that Rookie continues to strive to be an inclusive beacon in a world of exclusiveness and can serve as a gateway for other girls to get their voices heard. What Rookie is doing is precious and meaningful, and goddammit necessary. Media, just please don't use this opportunity to co-opt Tavi as an icon due to her good looks and fashion sense. I constantly struggle with the question of how she would be approached if she was, say, a chubby black girl from a less-fortunate background. I know, I know, it's not her fault. It's the media. But I can't help but voice this concern. Intersectionality is a constant reality and when talking about Rookie and the Tavi franchise, the critical part of my brain can't help but bring this up. I hope that doesn't make me a bad person. If it does, oh well. I still respect her enormously. And this website and book is a lighthouse in what can be a really dark, mean, and scary world. This is a testament to feminism and the sheer importance of grrrl power now (note: ZERO irony when I say that). While we feminist men and women have our many differences, the most vital thing we as humans who believe in the intrinsic principle of equality and are not afraid to call ourselves feminists is is to offer pure, unadulterated support and solidarity with our younger brothers and sisters. Lets lift up those on the margins and let their voices be heard. This is what Rookie has done and continues to do.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Meghan

    Oh my, almost as soon as I opened this up and started reading, I got shivery goosebumps. This is exactly what I always wanted to read as a teenager.

  4. 5 out of 5

    paula

    In the end though, what kept me reading, what I kept not being able to get over, was this uncompromising, very specific expectation of and demand for consideration and respect. Tavi and her ladies understand what it is to be female in this culture - they embrace the girliness (to varying degrees), and they articulate very clearly how girls can enjoy their femininity while maintaining a firm grasp on the nature of true beauty. While they acknowledge that watching fashion can be a really fun hobby In the end though, what kept me reading, what I kept not being able to get over, was this uncompromising, very specific expectation of and demand for consideration and respect. Tavi and her ladies understand what it is to be female in this culture - they embrace the girliness (to varying degrees), and they articulate very clearly how girls can enjoy their femininity while maintaining a firm grasp on the nature of true beauty. While they acknowledge that watching fashion can be a really fun hobby (oh it is - I have bought and kept every September issue of Vogue since 1978), they remind girls that each model has spent three hours in a makeup chair and been Photoshopped all the way to Jesus and back. Full review on Pink Me: http://pinkme.typepad.com/pink-me/201...

  5. 4 out of 5

    Princess Peach

    Literally the best thing ever. You should all read it, and then buy copies for everybody you know and everybody you've ever met ever. Just saying. Literally the best thing ever. You should all read it, and then buy copies for everybody you know and everybody you've ever met ever. Just saying.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Heather

    Rookie Yearbook One features highlights from Rookie's first school year of existence, September 2011 to May 2012. Though I am definitely older than the intended audience (it's for teenagers; I'm 32) it was still a satisfying read. It's a mixture of advice pieces, personal essays, and other stuff from a mixture of teen and adult writers, on subjects including how to deal with a bad day, how to talk to your crush, racism, female masturbation, the male gaze, and street harassment. There are intervi Rookie Yearbook One features highlights from Rookie's first school year of existence, September 2011 to May 2012. Though I am definitely older than the intended audience (it's for teenagers; I'm 32) it was still a satisfying read. It's a mixture of advice pieces, personal essays, and other stuff from a mixture of teen and adult writers, on subjects including how to deal with a bad day, how to talk to your crush, racism, female masturbation, the male gaze, and street harassment. There are interviews with Joss Whedon, Daniel Clowes, David Sedaris, and other famous people; there's also a piece of interviews with groups of ordinary people in their late teens/early twenties in Manhattan diners late at night. It's smart and well-written and often funny and the advice pieces don't ever assume heterosexuality; it's upbeat without being saccharine; it's awesomely feminist: there's one great part where a reader of the website asks why being skinny is so fetishized by the mainstream media, and the answer is basically, because certain people/large corporations make a lot of money by making girls/women devote their resources, mental and otherwise, to the idea that they should try to attain this particular ideal of feminine beauty. Yup, that. The book also features art, in the form of collage-y page backgrounds and dividing pages (which I liked lots) and photography (which is mostly in the style of artsy fashion photography, like a teenage W magazine, which I was less interested in). My favorite pieces were probably all personal essays, like this one by Kevin Townley about being thirteen and discovering Rocky Horror Picture Show, or this one by Jenny Zhang about moving from a diverse neighborhood in Queens to a very white Long Island town in 7th grade, or these first-time-having-sex stories by Lena Dunham, Liz Phair, and others. I also really really love the "People Reviews" (1, 2) at the end of the book: they're funny/great vignettes of daily life, with the people at their center being rated 0-5 stars. Like, 1 star for a judgmental dentist, 5 stars for a girl who buys the last glazed donut at a local coffee place, and then, when it falls on the floor, asks the staff if the floor is clean, then says "don't judge me" and proceeds to eat it. Or 5 stars for a barefoot guy in orange shorts skateboarding down Liverpool Street in the winter in London, giving high fives to guys in suits. I would happily read a whole book of People Reviews—it's like the Metropolitan Diary section of the New York Times, except funnier and less cutesy.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Marissa

    This book is HUUUUGE but real talk: I'll probably read it in three days. Ok, I finished it! Like I said, this book is huge, and if you're a regular reader of Rookie you'll notice that much of the content comes directly from the site, in kind of a best-of of the first year of the website's existence. This is a good thing, as some features were especially nice to revisit (interviews with Daniel Clowes and John Waters), and much of the art and layout has been reimagined in order to be more appropria This book is HUUUUGE but real talk: I'll probably read it in three days. Ok, I finished it! Like I said, this book is huge, and if you're a regular reader of Rookie you'll notice that much of the content comes directly from the site, in kind of a best-of of the first year of the website's existence. This is a good thing, as some features were especially nice to revisit (interviews with Daniel Clowes and John Waters), and much of the art and layout has been reimagined in order to be more appropriate for a printed book. A yearbook for a website is kind of a cool idea, creating something tangible and permanent out of something that exists as pixels on a screen. Knowing the extent of the comments section on the site, I imagine that for readers this IS essentially their yearbook for their online community, which is really nice to think about. Teenagers, feeling like weirdos, making friends with other kids through the magic of the internet. It's kind of like "Ask" by The Smiths, right? If I were a teenager, this is the sort of thing I'd beg for on a trip to Borders, and then come home and read it over & over & be inspired & bookmark important pages & read parts aloud to my friends over the phone. Reading it as an adult, I'm excited for the teens involved, and I wish there were more things like this when I was young. If you are an adult, should you bother? I don't know, if you are an interested person, you like to know what other people think about things... you know? Although several of the articles may not be exactly topical to my life, there is a lot of fun to be had here, and the idea of reading a teenage-driven book/website is very cool to me.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Katie J Smyza

    I would give my left boob to have had ROOKIE around when I was a teenager. I'm in my early 20s, but Rookie is still a fantastic guide to navigating your developing years as a girl. Inside this massive, fun, beautiful tome: - How to make a paper crown - How to throw a punch - Why Joni Mitchell is Literally the Best Thing Ever - A playlist for falling in love - A playlist for getting over a crush - First encounters with street harassment - How to bargain at a thrift store - SO. MUCH. MORE. If you know a te I would give my left boob to have had ROOKIE around when I was a teenager. I'm in my early 20s, but Rookie is still a fantastic guide to navigating your developing years as a girl. Inside this massive, fun, beautiful tome: - How to make a paper crown - How to throw a punch - Why Joni Mitchell is Literally the Best Thing Ever - A playlist for falling in love - A playlist for getting over a crush - First encounters with street harassment - How to bargain at a thrift store - SO. MUCH. MORE. If you know a teenaged girl, regardless of whether she listens to Beiber or the Misfits, get her this book!

  9. 5 out of 5

    Inge

    I cannot wait until we order this for our library's teen room. Here are some of my thoughts on this book (though my only complaint is the lack of plus-sized models in the yearbook. What's the deal with that?): http://magpielibrarian.wordpress.com/... http://magpielibrarian.wordpress.com/... I cannot wait until we order this for our library's teen room. Here are some of my thoughts on this book (though my only complaint is the lack of plus-sized models in the yearbook. What's the deal with that?): http://magpielibrarian.wordpress.com/... http://magpielibrarian.wordpress.com/...

  10. 5 out of 5

    Kelly

    This book is so greatttttt. I wish I could give it to my own teen self but I am so happy I can give it to other teen girls and show them that it is okay to love things and okay to be and like yourself (and that there will be times you don't, but it's okay -- you'll get through it). This book is so greatttttt. I wish I could give it to my own teen self but I am so happy I can give it to other teen girls and show them that it is okay to love things and okay to be and like yourself (and that there will be times you don't, but it's okay -- you'll get through it).

  11. 4 out of 5

    reese!

    i think the best way to describe rookie mag is this: i wish i had read it back when i was twelve or thirteen. there is so, so much good in this book that my young self could have benifitted from as an awkward and confused preteen. so many topics are explored that as a preteen/young teenager i had a multitude of questions about that i could never ask a parent or friend- body image, sex, masturbation, menstruation. i'd assume an unquenched anxious curiousity on these subjects is a universal cons i think the best way to describe rookie mag is this: i wish i had read it back when i was twelve or thirteen. there is so, so much good in this book that my young self could have benifitted from as an awkward and confused preteen. so many topics are explored that as a preteen/young teenager i had a multitude of questions about that i could never ask a parent or friend- body image, sex, masturbation, menstruation. i'd assume an unquenched anxious curiousity on these subjects is a universal constant for girls going through puberty- in which case i would recommend this to ANY young girl, but especially those who are particularly insecure or confused (maybe that's all of us too?). despite the fact that i think this is a perfect piece of literature for those a couple years younger than me- i still completely and thoroughly enjoyed it. something else rookie mag absolutely nails is a pointed focus on inclusivity. every discussion of romance uses gender neutral pronouns, and lots of articles are either focused on, or casually mention queerness or race (special shoutout to the inclusion of trans women! a few articles make the ill-advised connotation of women=vagina, but often the possibility of the reader being trans is mentioned and respected) overall, this is a super fun casual read- the articles vary over every topic imaginable, and often lead to more research on the topics you're interested in (for me- lots of googles about the riot grrl movement, zine culture, and midnight rocky horror showings) as well as wonderful photography and playlists. i super recommend this. mega recommend

  12. 4 out of 5

    Joanna

    Much smarter and hipper than anything else, magazine-wise, for teenage girls. Definitely fills a void. However, it was not my void. I don't believe I have ever been or desired to be this cool, this sort of fashionable and idealistic and ambitious (the kind with a lot of self-aware pink florals in it) and frankly... now that I have recently turned thirty, I wonder if, in fact, I was ever this young. Rookie is fantastic, don't get me wrong, I just wish there were even more choices and voices out t Much smarter and hipper than anything else, magazine-wise, for teenage girls. Definitely fills a void. However, it was not my void. I don't believe I have ever been or desired to be this cool, this sort of fashionable and idealistic and ambitious (the kind with a lot of self-aware pink florals in it) and frankly... now that I have recently turned thirty, I wonder if, in fact, I was ever this young. Rookie is fantastic, don't get me wrong, I just wish there were even more choices and voices out there that have the legitimacy and promotion that is afforded Rookie. So yeah, it's not really all that different from all the other stuff that has legitimacy and promotion when you get down to it. I just have to breathe in and out and say to myself "It is a fashion magazine specifically for young white girls who dream about moving to New York City, accept its limitations, Rookie is okay!" I just have to wait for that magazine for youngish half-Filipinas who want to travel to comfortable places and live close to family and friends. "Joanna, you can write that magazine!" Baby, I live it.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Jessica

    Rookie is so important for girls today. Tavi is a hero.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Amelia

    Love love love love love love love love love love love love love love love. I don't care how old you are; read Rookie all day, every day. Love love love love love love love love love love love love love love love. I don't care how old you are; read Rookie all day, every day.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Autumn

    These girls do a really good job addressing teenage life and all its complexities. Also, the outfits are good and the references are cool. I'm saving it for my fake niece's 13th birthday. These girls do a really good job addressing teenage life and all its complexities. Also, the outfits are good and the references are cool. I'm saving it for my fake niece's 13th birthday.

  16. 5 out of 5

    shelby

    rookie holds such a special place in my heart. a place in my heart that both aches and bursts whenever i think about it. i was a late 17 year old when i found rookie in a corner of the internet and that first night i spent hours alone in the dark illuminated by the screen, going through page after page through the archives, completely amazed. where had this been all my life? my heart aches when i think about it because i'm regretful that i didn't have this sooner. oh, how my teenage life would h rookie holds such a special place in my heart. a place in my heart that both aches and bursts whenever i think about it. i was a late 17 year old when i found rookie in a corner of the internet and that first night i spent hours alone in the dark illuminated by the screen, going through page after page through the archives, completely amazed. where had this been all my life? my heart aches when i think about it because i'm regretful that i didn't have this sooner. oh, how my teenage life would have been different. i feel like this book could have saved me from a lot of sorrow. or at least given me a medium through which to channel it correctly. but despite all of that, it has still changed my life. i cherish these so dearly and when i saw the news that rookie was folding, i had to snatch all four of these yearbooks up. i could gush forever about all the art and writing and community this has fostered, but i'll save y'all (and myself) the time. rookie is brave, inclusive, and magical.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Carla

    3.5 rookie is an amazing website that i wish had been started just a bit earlier so that i would have had it as a resource during my teenage years. instead, reading this collection of articles from their first year becomes nostalgic and almost makes me wish i was back in high school exploring my ~carefree~ and artsy feminist side. lil bit of an awkward moment when tavi recommends watching woody allen movies but ignoring articles abt his personal life, but she was a teenager and i certainly hope s 3.5 rookie is an amazing website that i wish had been started just a bit earlier so that i would have had it as a resource during my teenage years. instead, reading this collection of articles from their first year becomes nostalgic and almost makes me wish i was back in high school exploring my ~carefree~ and artsy feminist side. lil bit of an awkward moment when tavi recommends watching woody allen movies but ignoring articles abt his personal life, but she was a teenager and i certainly hope she’s learned better by now. otherwise, a very sweet collection full of raw feelings on love, growth, and teenage bullshit.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Jade

    Why don't we start giving this out instead of the awkward American Girl book everyone my age received when they got their period? Seriously. This was so thoughtful and funny and honest and UGH WHY DIDN'T HAVE THIS WHEN I WAS 13? AND WHY IS ROOKIE CLOSING? THIS IS A TRAGEDY. But, yeah. Definitely start giving this out to pre-teens everywhere so they can live up to their full potential of being smart and politically active and sexually responsible. Please? Also, it was pretty. Why don't we start giving this out instead of the awkward American Girl book everyone my age received when they got their period? Seriously. This was so thoughtful and funny and honest and UGH WHY DIDN'T HAVE THIS WHEN I WAS 13? AND WHY IS ROOKIE CLOSING? THIS IS A TRAGEDY. But, yeah. Definitely start giving this out to pre-teens everywhere so they can live up to their full potential of being smart and politically active and sexually responsible. Please? Also, it was pretty.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Lott

    Rookie Yearbook has been with me for about seven years, give or take, when I first saw it at a friend's house and got intrigued. While reading it, it's given me interesting interviews, nice playlists, dreamy pictures and some good advice, even when it gets a bit cheesy. Also, I really like the stickers that came with it. When thinking about Rookie, I just think about lying on my bed on the weekend and reading this to get in a better mood. Rookie Yearbook has been with me for about seven years, give or take, when I first saw it at a friend's house and got intrigued. While reading it, it's given me interesting interviews, nice playlists, dreamy pictures and some good advice, even when it gets a bit cheesy. Also, I really like the stickers that came with it. When thinking about Rookie, I just think about lying on my bed on the weekend and reading this to get in a better mood.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Xena

    This was really good! I'm a fan of the website, so it was really great to see the articles in print. It's really colourful and beautiful, and the illustrations are gorgeous. The photo shoots are all really interesting as well. I was lucky enough to get a signed copy by Tavi and I wasn't expecting it when I ordered it so it was really cool. This was really good! I'm a fan of the website, so it was really great to see the articles in print. It's really colourful and beautiful, and the illustrations are gorgeous. The photo shoots are all really interesting as well. I was lucky enough to get a signed copy by Tavi and I wasn't expecting it when I ordered it so it was really cool.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Ayla

    <3 <3 LOVE this so much it is an extension of myself now

  22. 5 out of 5

    Kat Wawrykow

    3.5 Stars This would have spoken to the younger me in high school, who felt starved for creativity and exploration in art in my small town. As someone a bit older, it still made me those things, but I found myself flipping past the essays I didn’t need anymore. You did great Tavi ✨

  23. 4 out of 5

    Heather

    I really wish I had this when I was a teenager. No-nonsense advice from a wide variety of perspectives. I thought this would mostly be about fashion, but it's more about life, with essays that are still very much worth reading in my late twenties. I really wish I had this when I was a teenager. No-nonsense advice from a wide variety of perspectives. I thought this would mostly be about fashion, but it's more about life, with essays that are still very much worth reading in my late twenties.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Sam Sansone

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. In the book, “Rookie Yearbook One “, is a book that analyzes high school, friends, love, breakups, depressions, and other topics related to life. It describes what it is like to deal with these things and how to face them the right way. It is basically guide on what not to do. What is really interesting about this book is it gives you insider from real life experiences. It discuss real life events that happened that were very embarrassing but were helpful to learn from. In my opinion, I thought In the book, “Rookie Yearbook One “, is a book that analyzes high school, friends, love, breakups, depressions, and other topics related to life. It describes what it is like to deal with these things and how to face them the right way. It is basically guide on what not to do. What is really interesting about this book is it gives you insider from real life experiences. It discuss real life events that happened that were very embarrassing but were helpful to learn from. In my opinion, I thought that this book was very interesting. It discussed topics that I was very interested. It was very helpful when it talked about real life experiences because I was able to learn from that person’s mistake, and know what to do if I was in that situation. For example, “ I tried to hang out with the popular girls-the ones who knew about fashion, wore makeup, and were a hit with the dudes. Unfortunately, the things I liked other than fashion magazines and makeup were talking about what i saw last night on the news, and feminism, and how gay people ought to be married,” (Gevinson, 18). This showed me how I should always be myself around new people I meet, and that shouldn’t change myself to fit in. There are the right people out there that will like me for who I really am and not some modified version of me. In this book there were really cool pictures and artwork that was inside that would really express how to author felt. Each picture went with what the author was explaining in the story. Some strengths in this book is it really is a very unique book. It gives you a different intake on life experiences and how you should handle them. A weakness with this book is it mostly relates to girls not boys. If it had more things to do with boys it would be the perfect book. This did change my opinions about many things like how to act around other people, what not to do in very embarrassing situations, if I need help with any stress that is going on in my life I can always talk to someone, a etc. Before I learned these new things, I would do the complete opposite. Around people I thought were cool, I would change little parts of how I acted and what I liked just to fit in. This book showed me that your true friends are the people who like you for the real you and don’t try to change you. This book was really interesting and I would definitely recommend this book to anyone who wants to learn what not to do in certain situations. It was very fun and enjoyable to read. I would really only recommend it to the girls because it talk about mostly girly things. It changed my mind about things I thought about before and the way I would react to certain situations.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Nicole

    I have heard of Tavi Gevinson and Rookie magazine. Maybe even checked the website out before but it never really appealed to me. It has always been at the back of my mind that Tavi is a rolemodel who achieved much in such a short span of time but I could not relate to her. Until a Youtuber who I like recommended Yearbook 3 as a gift for feminists individuals. So I thought of giving Yearbook 1 a try before I decided whether I wanted to continue reading. On first glance the style of the book and v I have heard of Tavi Gevinson and Rookie magazine. Maybe even checked the website out before but it never really appealed to me. It has always been at the back of my mind that Tavi is a rolemodel who achieved much in such a short span of time but I could not relate to her. Until a Youtuber who I like recommended Yearbook 3 as a gift for feminists individuals. So I thought of giving Yearbook 1 a try before I decided whether I wanted to continue reading. On first glance the style of the book and vintage feel does not really appeal to me. But the writing in the various articles is good and I am surprised by the contributions by names like Joss Whedon, Zooey Deschanel and more. I liked how candid most of the articles were and how the topics did not shy away from awkward or tough ones like eating disorders, anxiety, recovering from sexual assualt just to name a few. The articles I did like were: Sep 11 "Let it out" "Great expectations" Oct 11 "How to Bitchface" that was hilarious XD "Never been kissed" "Do it yourself" "Season of the witch" like how the writer tied up the theme of halloween to girls wanting to band together "Everybody farts" lol Nov 11 "Literally the best thing ever: The golden girls" "Fight like a girl" yay for equality! "The perfect girl" Dec 11 "Surviving a small town" Jan 12 "An actually useful article about dressing for a party" "Midnight snacks: a taxonomy" "How to not care what other people think of you" "We're called survivors because we are still here" this was heartbreaking Feb 12 "How to approach the person you like without throwing up" "The year of my eating disorder" I am able to relate to feeling insecure about my body, I compare myself quite frequently to others. Like her butt is nice, ohh she is the perfect kind of slim, I wished I had her curves. Just some of the things I thought. But I am trying to change my mindset. "Other Girls" "Bad romance" Mar 12 "Thrifting master" "Taking yourself seriously" "Absolute beginners" its great that Rookie is not afraid to talk about subjects that are usually deemed awkward. Apr 12 "On containing multitudes" "How to clean your room in 10 mins" XD haha "Break up breakdown" "Full disclosure" This was eye opening. "Ruining our life" May 12 "Lift skills 101" "Breaking in a broken heart" "It happens all the time" this shocked me. I did not know it is so widespread. The comments too. "Just wondering" One of the articles I did not like was "About A Boy" and it was because I could not understand it. But overall I really enjoyed this. Recommended!

  26. 4 out of 5

    Davenport Public Library

    Get this book for any teen girl you know. Tavi’s online zine, Rookie Mag, has been collecting accolades since the fifteen-year-old blogger started it from her Midwestern bedroom. Tavi has been a respected style blogger since 2008, when she began her fashion blog Style Rookie at the tender age of eleven. Since then, she’s been invited to attend and review fashion shows all over the world, but it’s not just clothes anymore; this clever writer and all-around gifted young woman has created a magazin Get this book for any teen girl you know. Tavi’s online zine, Rookie Mag, has been collecting accolades since the fifteen-year-old blogger started it from her Midwestern bedroom. Tavi has been a respected style blogger since 2008, when she began her fashion blog Style Rookie at the tender age of eleven. Since then, she’s been invited to attend and review fashion shows all over the world, but it’s not just clothes anymore; this clever writer and all-around gifted young woman has created a magazine where teens can go for conversations with other teens about school, friends, music and movies, feminism, body image and self esteem, fashion, sex, and all the minutiae of teenage life that seems so monumental to those who are living it. She writes about the problems and the questions that real, modern teens have. She’s frank and funny and I wish I’d been even one-tenth as smart and confident as she is when I was a teenager. What I’m getting at is: here is a great, realistic role model. And a great book! Rookie: Yearbook One is an ink & paper retrospective of the online magazine’s first year. It contains a lot of writing by Tavi, but it’s been touched by dozens of others; Miranda July, Lena Dunham, Aubrey Plaza, Joss Whedon, Patton Oswalt, and many others make appearances – either in pieces they’ve written for the magazine or as the subject of one of Tavi’s excellent interviews (I love how she is just as comfortable grilling Whedon about his modern-day interpretation of the sexual politics of “Much Ado About Nothing” as she is sharing a laugh with Plaza about how much they love the film “Reality Bites”). These are articles that matter, ideas that resonate, and interviews that are exciting and in-depth; it’s also lighthearted (you’ll love the section on how to cry without anyone catching you), and the graphic design of the book is phenomenal. If you have any taste for collage (and a little bit of the ridiculous) your eyes will pop at the juxtaposition of textures, photos, and hand-drawn illustrations. It’s just amazing, and I wish so much that I’d had it when I was a teenager!

  27. 5 out of 5

    Marino Wada

    I strongly believe that "Rookie year book" is the most attractive book for girls. First of all, there are lots of cute pictures and illustrations. This book consists of articles, interviews, illustrations, and pictures. Some of pictures are related to article like how to make up or costume ideas for some events. It is little hard to imitate, but these pictures made me want to try it. Also, it will give you much inspiration. There are many kind of pictures. For example, some are focused on school I strongly believe that "Rookie year book" is the most attractive book for girls. First of all, there are lots of cute pictures and illustrations. This book consists of articles, interviews, illustrations, and pictures. Some of pictures are related to article like how to make up or costume ideas for some events. It is little hard to imitate, but these pictures made me want to try it. Also, it will give you much inspiration. There are many kind of pictures. For example, some are focused on school girls, camping girls, country side, and more. Even if you are not good at reading, you can enjoy it. Another reason why I love this book is some free gifts. They are so adorable. This "Rookie year book one" included stickers designed by Rookie illustrators, a paper crown, and flexi disc. Rookie year book's free gifts are unique. I think cootie catcher from "Rookie year book two" is the most unusual free gift in the world. Most importantly, I thought that there are great articles in this book for teenage girls. Articles are about girls, love, styling, school life, and more! In my opinion, every girls should have interested in these topics, so reader might be able to feel sympathy in it. In addition, most of articles were written by young women. So it is useful for English learners to study real recent girl's language. If you have any trouble in your heart, I recommend to reading it. Finally, the editor of this book, named Tavi Gevinson, is only 17 years old still now. She was strongly stick to make a book for girls. Actually, some people say this book is heavier and little bit expensive than other books. This is composed of 352 pages and size is big. As a result, it isn't portable. It is true about these negative points, but this book is extremely valuable for covering these negative points. There are huge interesting articles and huge lovely pictures. For the above 4 reasons, I completely agree that this is a book of the girls, by the girls, and for the girls.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Olivia Johnson

    Okay so I'll start off by saying that i have never before in my life written a review for a book. So hopefully I can find a way to string together words that correctly describe how much this book means to me. I have always been a girl that reads others personal stories about something that I'm curious about so, obviously, this book was a "must read" for me. I bought this book on a trip to Oregon right before we were about to drive back home to Washington. I had seen it on tumblr and mainly, this Okay so I'll start off by saying that i have never before in my life written a review for a book. So hopefully I can find a way to string together words that correctly describe how much this book means to me. I have always been a girl that reads others personal stories about something that I'm curious about so, obviously, this book was a "must read" for me. I bought this book on a trip to Oregon right before we were about to drive back home to Washington. I had seen it on tumblr and mainly, this one girls Instagram. I thought this girl was pretty cool and she was a year older and in high school so i thought "wow, this book must be cool.". When i saw Rookie Yearbook One in a Powells bookshop, I ran to my mom squealing about how it was only 12 dollars, and how it was the best book and i had to get it. I bought it and read it almost in its entirety during the car ride home and ignored my dad's constant request to "put the book away, you're going to get carsick!" I found everything in the book to be somehow useful, funny, or just plain interesting. I loved being able to read what adults thought of when they looked back on their highs school years. I loved the stickers that were added. I loved the advice columns. I loved to mystical photos they included. I loved the illustrations on every page. I loved the glitter. Most importantly, I loved the ways this book helped me feel more confident about myself, ready for high school, and like i could accomplish anything. Thank you Tavi for being the role model I've always been looking for.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Lisa

    If Rookie had been around when I was thirteen it would have been my religious text. Rookie Yearbook One is a compilation of essays from the website of the same name (rookiemag.com) which explores every teenage-life-related topic. The visionary behind it all is Tavi Gevinson. I discovered Tavi when I saw a video on YouTube of her speaking at a conference. She was eloquent, thoughtful, incredibly insightful, a little quirky, and very relatable. I had to know more. Book one celebrates the "freshman If Rookie had been around when I was thirteen it would have been my religious text. Rookie Yearbook One is a compilation of essays from the website of the same name (rookiemag.com) which explores every teenage-life-related topic. The visionary behind it all is Tavi Gevinson. I discovered Tavi when I saw a video on YouTube of her speaking at a conference. She was eloquent, thoughtful, incredibly insightful, a little quirky, and very relatable. I had to know more. Book one celebrates the "freshman year" of rookiemag.com and just like a regular school year covers the months from August to May with each month focusing on a different theme. Articles, photo collages, playlists, interviews, and other entries relate to the monthly theme. The content touches a spectrum of emotions - it'll make you laugh, cry, get angry, bring out your inner feminist. I read several quotes that reminded me of my best friend - I could definitely hear her saying in reference to her husband "But I have a spaceship and he doesn’t, so who’s weird now?" Flipping through the pages of rookie is like sitting down and chatting with your best girlfriends. It always helps to know you're not the only one trying to make your way through this thing called life.

  30. 4 out of 5

    SA

    When I was the age Gevinson was when she started this, I was making 'zines by hand and mailing them to penpals around the country; I was scavenging beaten copies of literary journals and whatever "alternative" magazines I could get my hands on, furtively buying copies of Bitch and McSweeney's; poring over the ever-growing communities on the internet trying to find something I aligned with. (The definition of "alternative" in rural southern Tennessee being rather wider in those days.) But I wonde When I was the age Gevinson was when she started this, I was making 'zines by hand and mailing them to penpals around the country; I was scavenging beaten copies of literary journals and whatever "alternative" magazines I could get my hands on, furtively buying copies of Bitch and McSweeney's; poring over the ever-growing communities on the internet trying to find something I aligned with. (The definition of "alternative" in rural southern Tennessee being rather wider in those days.) But I wonder if something like Rookie had been around, would I have had to strive so hard to feel connected to the outside world? It's a bit weird to read it now, older by a factor of two, a decade's worth of life changing (and life confirming) experiences behind me. But at the same time, if I had a niece or a friend's kid dealing with the doom of teenagerhood, I would furtively cover this in brown paper packaging and pass it on like a secret, something to pull out from under the bed when you're home from school, marking up the toes of Chucks and looking out the window waiting for whatever's beyond. I'm glad this exists.

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