web site hit counter Eye of the World: The Graphic Novel, Volume Three - Ebooks PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

Eye of the World: The Graphic Novel, Volume Three

Availability: Ready to download

With the full permission and cooperation of the Jordan estate, adapted by well-known comics writer Chuck Dixon, The Eye of the World: The Graphic Novel has been hailed as an exciting interpretation of Robert Jordan's classic fantasy novel. It features brilliant interior art by Marcio Fiorito and Francis Nuguit, and stunning covers by Jeremy Saliba and Seamus Gallagher. It With the full permission and cooperation of the Jordan estate, adapted by well-known comics writer Chuck Dixon, The Eye of the World: The Graphic Novel has been hailed as an exciting interpretation of Robert Jordan's classic fantasy novel. It features brilliant interior art by Marcio Fiorito and Francis Nuguit, and stunning covers by Jeremy Saliba and Seamus Gallagher. It collects issues thirteen to eighteen of the comic book. Rand; his friends Mat, Perrin, and Egwene; the Aes Sedai Moiraine and her Warder, Lan Mandragoran; Thom the gleeman and Nynaeve, the village Wisdom, split into three groups while trying to escape the ancient, dead city of Shadar Logoth, where they are pursued by the deadly Mashadar. A disastrous river crossing leaves Perrin and Egwene on their own—until they meet a mysterious stranger who claims that he and Perrin share a remarkable ability. Meanwhile, Rand, Mat, pose as Thom’s apprentices as they sail downriver on a cargo ship.


Compare

With the full permission and cooperation of the Jordan estate, adapted by well-known comics writer Chuck Dixon, The Eye of the World: The Graphic Novel has been hailed as an exciting interpretation of Robert Jordan's classic fantasy novel. It features brilliant interior art by Marcio Fiorito and Francis Nuguit, and stunning covers by Jeremy Saliba and Seamus Gallagher. It With the full permission and cooperation of the Jordan estate, adapted by well-known comics writer Chuck Dixon, The Eye of the World: The Graphic Novel has been hailed as an exciting interpretation of Robert Jordan's classic fantasy novel. It features brilliant interior art by Marcio Fiorito and Francis Nuguit, and stunning covers by Jeremy Saliba and Seamus Gallagher. It collects issues thirteen to eighteen of the comic book. Rand; his friends Mat, Perrin, and Egwene; the Aes Sedai Moiraine and her Warder, Lan Mandragoran; Thom the gleeman and Nynaeve, the village Wisdom, split into three groups while trying to escape the ancient, dead city of Shadar Logoth, where they are pursued by the deadly Mashadar. A disastrous river crossing leaves Perrin and Egwene on their own—until they meet a mysterious stranger who claims that he and Perrin share a remarkable ability. Meanwhile, Rand, Mat, pose as Thom’s apprentices as they sail downriver on a cargo ship.

30 review for Eye of the World: The Graphic Novel, Volume Three

  1. 5 out of 5

    Tina Haigler

    I absolutely love this series! It's gorgeous and really brings Jordan's books to life. Each twist in the story just enriches the whole. These are amazing in every way. Bring on Vol 4! I absolutely love this series! It's gorgeous and really brings Jordan's books to life. Each twist in the story just enriches the whole. These are amazing in every way. Bring on Vol 4!

  2. 4 out of 5

    Marlowe

    I took all the Wheel of Time-related graphic novels out from the library and brought them along on vacation. Unfortunately, I didn't realize that The Eye of the World comes in six volumes, and only brought the three my library has. I got to the end of the third pretty certain that a good chunk was missing and, sure enough, I'm only halfway through. Still, I figured I'd better write a review, since I don't know when I'll be able to get my hands on the next three volumes. I was quite surprised by h I took all the Wheel of Time-related graphic novels out from the library and brought them along on vacation. Unfortunately, I didn't realize that The Eye of the World comes in six volumes, and only brought the three my library has. I got to the end of the third pretty certain that a good chunk was missing and, sure enough, I'm only halfway through. Still, I figured I'd better write a review, since I don't know when I'll be able to get my hands on the next three volumes. I was quite surprised by how much of the first novel's plot I could remember. The middle books, particularly around where it became obvious that Jordan had completely dropped the reigns of the plot, are a blur, but I had distinct memories of everything covered in the graphic novels. I've found the same thing with A Song of Ice and Fire - where the first book is also quite well plotted, with a much tighter storyline than later books. In both cases, I feel like the authors started off with a very clear idea of a beginning, and then much vaguer notes for the rest of the series. It's a shame. Regarding the graphic novels specifically, I found the text to be much better than what I saw in the New Spring graphic novel. It was much easier to follow what was going on, and I think I would have been able to read it even if I hadn't read the book first. I'm not sure how much of that is a real difference in quality and how much is just because the plot of Eye of the World is so much more action-oriented, relying less on narrative (and therefore more easily exportable to a visual medium), though. The artwork was a little disappointing, though. The images looked messy, for lack of a better word - like coloured sketches. This meant that it was often difficult to tell one character apart from another - particularly in the beginning. Some of that might have been intentional, to show how ordinary the three Ta'veren are at the start of the story, but I don't feel like that came through very well. There were also quite a few consistency issues, particularly with Moiraine's forehead pendant (which changed shape and style frequently from panel to panel). Generally, though, I thought it was fine. It was certainly readable. I'm just scratching me head over who the intended audience might be for these. There isn't really a lot of added value for someone who has already read the novels, and I'm not sure how well someone who hasn't read the novels would be able to follow along with the graphic novel version. It seems a bit superfluous. Or perhaps they are looking for people like me, who are at the end of the novels and want a refresher on the series without having to tackle the doorstopper tomes for a second time.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Josh

    The Eye of the World comic has finally reached the halfway point of the book after 3 compilation graphic novels. It's very cool to relive the story of the Wheel of Time visually in this way, and it seems to follow it very faithfully. The only reason I only give it 4 stars is that I don't like the art style of the book. At times it seems too cartoonish, and it definitely doesn't have the level of detail and depth that I would prefer, and see in other works. I wish they would give other artists a The Eye of the World comic has finally reached the halfway point of the book after 3 compilation graphic novels. It's very cool to relive the story of the Wheel of Time visually in this way, and it seems to follow it very faithfully. The only reason I only give it 4 stars is that I don't like the art style of the book. At times it seems too cartoonish, and it definitely doesn't have the level of detail and depth that I would prefer, and see in other works. I wish they would give other artists a chance to contribute as the series continues on.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Amy

    Inconsistent artwork but still, I love seeing the story told visually. I just wish it wasn't taking so long. They just left Whitebridge at the end. Sigh. I guess it IS a good thing that they are not leaving anything important out of the adaptation. Inconsistent artwork but still, I love seeing the story told visually. I just wish it wasn't taking so long. They just left Whitebridge at the end. Sigh. I guess it IS a good thing that they are not leaving anything important out of the adaptation.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Laurel

    Perhaps it was the art, but something about this edition just didn't seem to connect with me as well as the 1st and 2nd editions. Still, if you're a fan, you'll want to pick this up. Perhaps it was the art, but something about this edition just didn't seem to connect with me as well as the 1st and 2nd editions. Still, if you're a fan, you'll want to pick this up.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Isabella

    Rating: 4.5 stars The quality of these graphic novels continues to astound me. Chuck Dixon did an amazing job of condensing The Eye of the World, and he managed to somehow walk the fine line between cutting too much so the story becomes merely a skeletal outline of it's original novel format, but not leaving too much in so that every page us chockablock full of 10+ centimetre-sized speech bubbles. But I do think that Volume Two was better than this volume. But good things first, right? We got to Rating: 4.5 stars The quality of these graphic novels continues to astound me. Chuck Dixon did an amazing job of condensing The Eye of the World, and he managed to somehow walk the fine line between cutting too much so the story becomes merely a skeletal outline of it's original novel format, but not leaving too much in so that every page us chockablock full of 10+ centimetre-sized speech bubbles. But I do think that Volume Two was better than this volume. But good things first, right? We got to see some more channeling this this volume, with Moiraine using more of the Five Powers that had not previously been illustrated in the graphic novels. She used Fire to get rid of some Trollocs and Halfmen and stuff: She also used a weave of Air, which I thought was depicted well: And there was also some weaves of Spirit, but I showed a picture in my review for the second volume, which I think is a better representation that anything in this volume. We also got to see Elyas in this volume! I really like Elyas' character, and his past is interesting to wonder about. Anyway, this is what Elyas looked like: His golden eyes are cool, and I look forward to seeing the goldening (shut up spellcheck, that's a word) of Perrin's in further volumes. We got a hint of it here, with his eyes a shade of lighter brown than his usual dark colouring (oooooooh I just had a thought about the TV show coming from Amazon and how cool golden eyes are going to look on Marcus Rutherford who's playing Perrin). Now for some icky things. Volume Three begins with the main cast escaping Shadar Logoth with Trollocs and Myrddraal on their heels before being separated and having to continue their journey apart in three individual groups. Perrin and Egwene end up with Elyas and then later the Tinkers, and for some reason, Egwene look really... strange: Is it just me, or does Egwene not look the best in this image. I'm not knocking the artists at all, they've been phenomenal in all that I've read so far, but... I can't explain it any other way than just saying she looks weird. And it was a consistent thing too. Specifically with Egwene's character. In this illustration, she looks like a freaking Wight from the Peculiar Children series. Don't believe me? Look it up, I'm not going to all the trouble to finding a picture and whatnot (seriously Goodreads, you need to find a better system for inserting images in a review). I guess I'm just disappointed, because Egwene looked really awesome up until now, and I hope this is only a one off event. But nothing is going to stop me from reading the rest of the volumes, because it's Wheel of Time, and when it comes to Wheel of Time, I loose all self control.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Claudia

    This brings the artistic adaptation of The Eye of the World to the halfway point and the beginning of when the group has broken up and must make their own ways and the end of the volumes that the local library possesses so I don't know if I'll go any further into the illustrated collections. Having been re-introduced to the Wheel of Time series after starting it nearly 20 years ago, I will likely want to dive back into the actual written word version. The workers on The Spray basically all look al This brings the artistic adaptation of The Eye of the World to the halfway point and the beginning of when the group has broken up and must make their own ways and the end of the volumes that the local library possesses so I don't know if I'll go any further into the illustrated collections. Having been re-introduced to the Wheel of Time series after starting it nearly 20 years ago, I will likely want to dive back into the actual written word version. The workers on The Spray basically all look alike while the gleeman, Thom Merrilin, is completely different from the previous two volumes - personally I prefer the earlier version. I have to admit that reading these type of adaptations exposes a entire new group of readers to a variety of stories - be they considered literary classics or modern adventures. 2020-006

  8. 4 out of 5

    Peter

    The heroes reach the dead city of Shadar Logoth. It's the point in the series where the lore and worldbuilding take a magical, arcane twist. It kind of reminded me of Sindbad and his encounter with the genie, although Jordan has written the character of Mordeth in a much darker way. The notable change of illustrator does influence the style of the series but the storytelling is as fluid as the previous volume. The heroes reach the dead city of Shadar Logoth. It's the point in the series where the lore and worldbuilding take a magical, arcane twist. It kind of reminded me of Sindbad and his encounter with the genie, although Jordan has written the character of Mordeth in a much darker way. The notable change of illustrator does influence the style of the series but the storytelling is as fluid as the previous volume.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Justin

    Starting to dip in quality. Probably the last volume I intend to read.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Ms. Leigh-Reavis

    Excellent story. Because different artists illustrate the books, I sometimes am taken aback by the different renditions of the characters.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Dustin

    Holy cow! This was an action packed stretch. So many questions about Shadar Logoth, the metal tower, the White Bridge, and many more elements introduced here.

  12. 5 out of 5

    mykittyquest17

    3 stars It was okay.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Sharon Powers

    Book Review by: Sharon Powers. I finished reading Robert Jordan's The Eye of the World on May 28, 2010--just over four years, ago. In the months that followed reading The Eye of the World, I read all the (then available) books in the series. I, like so many others, had fallen in love with the characters in the series of The Wheel of Time. And then, the graphic novels appeared, of course, beginning at the beginning, New Spring. And then, The Eye of the World: The Wheel of Time, The Graphic Novel. I Book Review by: Sharon Powers. I finished reading Robert Jordan's The Eye of the World on May 28, 2010--just over four years, ago. In the months that followed reading The Eye of the World, I read all the (then available) books in the series. I, like so many others, had fallen in love with the characters in the series of The Wheel of Time. And then, the graphic novels appeared, of course, beginning at the beginning, New Spring. And then, The Eye of the World: The Wheel of Time, The Graphic Novel. I began reading these, too. I completed volumes one and two, and now, I have finished volume three, the one I am reviewing, here, today. A graphic novel is, in form, a bound book with material similar to full novels. They can be hardcover or card stock and include topics of fiction and non-fiction, or even such things as anthologies or collections. The graphic novel is distinguished from comics or comic books even though the bulk of the material consists of art work. Comic books are printed on inexpensive bulk paper and graphic novels are printed on much higher quality of paper. Some are truly beautiful with glossy pages and beautiful illustrations. Moreover, comics contain advertising whereas graphic novels do not. Also, graphic novels invariably contain a story line that has a beginning, middle, and end; comic books tend to be episodic in nature. Comic books are much, much, shorter than graphic novels (some graphic novels I've seen approach 150 pages--an average seems to be around 100 pages. I mention these attributes to graphic novels because some purported-to-be graphic novels are nothing more than a few comics put together with a card stock cover. It is so disappointing when a title is described and billed as a graphic novel and you spend your money expecting to get a graphic novel, but end up with a glorified comic book. (See the Thor: The Dark World Prelude, A Graphic Novel by Marvel Comics). Now, let's take a look at The Eye of the World, Volume three, Graphic Novel to see how it stands up under scrutiny. This book has absolutely no advertising of any sort, anywhere in the book; so that's very good. The artwork is by Marcio Fiorito and Francis Nuguit, Lettered by Bill Tortolini, colors by Nicholas Chapuis, and is adapted by Chuck Dixon. The book is published by Tor (Tom Doherty Associates, LLC). The book is a full hardcover book with a full-color, glossy, dustcover. The images are beautifully rendered and colored and the art is on glossy paper that is, indeed, beautiful to look at. Additionally, it has 176 pages; it is in the English Language, the ASIN: B00GQ625KU. The story is adapted by Chuck Dixon, and it is clear that the story is adapted from The Wheel of Time Series, The Eye of the World(the novel). Remembering that it is a graphic novel, we know that not everything can be included from a full size book is 753 pages, distilling the book down to 176 pages of art and dialog, it seems that the adapter did a more-than-adequate job, he did a great job. The requirement of having a complete story arc is met: the story follows Jordan's book plot with a beginning, middle, and end. The book's glossy pages, beautiful art, colors, and design, exciting story arc, and well-constructed features make this one of the finest examples of graphic novel I have ever had the pleasure to read and review. I rate this beautiful book 5 stars out of 5. Thank you for taking time today to read my review. Sincerely, Sharon Powers.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Magila

    Not that they care, but I warned the publisher that if they produced another installment with inconsistent (and generally terrible) art and didn't take the time to put together a quality comic they'd be seeing 1s. Well, here is another 1. Robert Jordan is a genius, and his world building capabilities are near peerless. He absolutely deserves to be put into the same bucket at Tolkien, and I find it a bit offensive that Tor would jam out subpar graphic novels of the Wheel of Time. If they did a goo Not that they care, but I warned the publisher that if they produced another installment with inconsistent (and generally terrible) art and didn't take the time to put together a quality comic they'd be seeing 1s. Well, here is another 1. Robert Jordan is a genius, and his world building capabilities are near peerless. He absolutely deserves to be put into the same bucket at Tolkien, and I find it a bit offensive that Tor would jam out subpar graphic novels of the Wheel of Time. If they did a good job, I would buy them, give them to friends to turn them onto the series, etc. These, I grab from the library, shake my fist as I land on pages like 15, 41, 73, and 133, and shake my head at dozens of cells throughout the story. I fight back tears. Big ones. The colors look like a cross between bad cartoons, bad photoshop, and old cellular -out of focus- (cartoon) photography. Most of it looks half finished, and that's when I'm willing to overlook the stylistic issues I have with it overall. The writers/publishers are still struggling with trying to get all the content they want across on the pages, and end up putting way too much in also. Maybe adopting a 1 page blurb before each chapter would ease this. The letters are often times distracting, and make you really appreciate when they are done well. Overall, Boo. Please take more time to get future comics right. Sure, some people will buy these, and tell you how great they are, and how much they love them. However, you are probably either paying them, they don't have a good cross-section of graphic novels they've read to make comparison, or just love the WoT too much to say bad things about it. Avoid.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Michael

    Different artist; not as good.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Margot

    This third volume in the graphic novel adaptation of The Eye of the World begins with the group's entrance into the fallen city of Shadar Logoth and ends with their separation after fleeing the city--Perrin and Egwene across the river and into the company of Elyas; Rand, Mat, and Thom meanwhile hitching a ride on a river boat. Although one could say that a lot happens in this installment, I actually felt like the pacing fell dramatically away and I didn't breeze through this one so easily. Someth This third volume in the graphic novel adaptation of The Eye of the World begins with the group's entrance into the fallen city of Shadar Logoth and ends with their separation after fleeing the city--Perrin and Egwene across the river and into the company of Elyas; Rand, Mat, and Thom meanwhile hitching a ride on a river boat. Although one could say that a lot happens in this installment, I actually felt like the pacing fell dramatically away and I didn't breeze through this one so easily. Something about the art, too, seemed less consistent and engaging. Almost as if a new artist had taken over-- though I know from the masthead that this wasn't the case--the characters didn't look consistently the same from page to page.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Shaun

    The story is just as good as ever, but the art is what bugs me in this one. It's not bad per se. It's just very noticeably different from the previous two books. Worse, it's not very consistent. An example, in the first chapter Moraine's blue stone she wears on her forehead keeps changing style very visibly. It's annoying as heck. I understand different artists are going to have different interpretations of the characters, but I wish they would stick with 1 basic character design. Also, not to v The story is just as good as ever, but the art is what bugs me in this one. It's not bad per se. It's just very noticeably different from the previous two books. Worse, it's not very consistent. An example, in the first chapter Moraine's blue stone she wears on her forehead keeps changing style very visibly. It's annoying as heck. I understand different artists are going to have different interpretations of the characters, but I wish they would stick with 1 basic character design. Also, not to vary so much in the very same chapter. I can handle them being different book to book, but page to page? Ridiculous.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Sarah

    Not a complete fan of the artwork in this one, but still nice.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Michelle Morrell

    Still loving these graphic adaptations of the first Wheel of Time book. I didn't like the art as much as the first two, it seemed a little overly-stylistic, something that might feel dated sooner rather than later. Though it was still gorgeous. We see Aridhol, Mordeth, Elyas, Bayle Doman, the Tinkers and Whitebridge. Still loving these graphic adaptations of the first Wheel of Time book. I didn't like the art as much as the first two, it seemed a little overly-stylistic, something that might feel dated sooner rather than later. Though it was still gorgeous. We see Aridhol, Mordeth, Elyas, Bayle Doman, the Tinkers and Whitebridge.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Gautam Surath

    The pace continues to be maintained and the taveran are now well and truly on the run. The graphics have not improved though the novel continues to grab the essence of the original books quite nicely. Tower of Genjhi makes an appearance and now its even more amazing that Jordan had the foresight to add it this early in his journey. Onwards!

  21. 5 out of 5

    Ema-Lilly Dream

    These books are so beautiful. Sometimes painfully so. The artwork is vibrant and colorful. The characters are slowly rounding out. The story is unfolding, and the stakes are getting higher. We meet a new character, whom I really like. So, all in all, this book is just a beautiful book, with a pretty good story line.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Kirsty Cabot

    Another great instalment of the Wheel of Time series in graphic novel form. As mentioned in the previous reviews for the graphic novels, what i enjoy most is reading the story with illustrations. After reading the series in novel form, it is an interesting way to re read.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Stephanie

    If you are going to have three different people illustrating a graphic novel you should make sure they can draw the characters so they look the same in each novel.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Lonnie Smith

    I am quite enjoying the visual representation of one of my favorite series of books, though I am getting frustrated that they keep changing artist.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Garrett Mccutcheon

    A continuation of Volumes 1 and 2. If you've read and enjoyed the first two you will probably continue to enjoy this series. A continuation of Volumes 1 and 2. If you've read and enjoyed the first two you will probably continue to enjoy this series.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Shannon

    As always, this adaptation is wonderful. It's incredibly true to the source material without having too much exposition. The artwork is good, and of course I already loved the story! As always, this adaptation is wonderful. It's incredibly true to the source material without having too much exposition. The artwork is good, and of course I already loved the story!

  27. 4 out of 5

    Donald

    Solid adaptation. Inconsistent artwork, some of which is borderline bad.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Amber

    I am really enjoying the graphic novel versions and am enjoying reading bits and pieces to my kids. The books themselves ran on and on and these are a nice quick entertaining read.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Christian McKay

    Slightly better than the first two. Still feels like bashing my head against a wall. Still, and who knows why, feel the need to finish.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Michael Nash

    Still doing an adequate job adapting a story not well suited to comic book adaptation, but the artwork in this volume goes from acceptably bad to actually awful.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.