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Love Among the Ruins: A Romance of the Near Future

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From Wikipedia: "Love Among the Ruins is a satire set in a dystopian quasi-egalitarian Britain. The protagonist, Miles Plastic, is an orphan who at the beginning of the story is finishing a prison term for arson. Crime is treated very leniently by the state, and conditions in prison are actually quite superior to those among the population at large, leading to an understand From Wikipedia: "Love Among the Ruins is a satire set in a dystopian quasi-egalitarian Britain. The protagonist, Miles Plastic, is an orphan who at the beginning of the story is finishing a prison term for arson. Crime is treated very leniently by the state, and conditions in prison are actually quite superior to those among the population at large, leading to an understandably high recidivism rate. Upon release, Plastic goes to work at a state-run euthanasia center. The centers are not restricted to the terminally ill and are so popular that Plastic's sole responsibility is to stem "the too eager rush" of perfectly healthy but "welfare weary" citizens..."


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From Wikipedia: "Love Among the Ruins is a satire set in a dystopian quasi-egalitarian Britain. The protagonist, Miles Plastic, is an orphan who at the beginning of the story is finishing a prison term for arson. Crime is treated very leniently by the state, and conditions in prison are actually quite superior to those among the population at large, leading to an understand From Wikipedia: "Love Among the Ruins is a satire set in a dystopian quasi-egalitarian Britain. The protagonist, Miles Plastic, is an orphan who at the beginning of the story is finishing a prison term for arson. Crime is treated very leniently by the state, and conditions in prison are actually quite superior to those among the population at large, leading to an understandably high recidivism rate. Upon release, Plastic goes to work at a state-run euthanasia center. The centers are not restricted to the terminally ill and are so popular that Plastic's sole responsibility is to stem "the too eager rush" of perfectly healthy but "welfare weary" citizens..."

30 review for Love Among the Ruins: A Romance of the Near Future

  1. 4 out of 5

    M.

    Read for the PopSugar Challenge 2019 47.Two books that share the same title (1) A satire of moral relativism and progressive politics that could've been written just yesterday. This novel starring Miles Plastic as the product of an absurdly conceived welfare state, is drenched in sarcasm and wit. Waugh shows a world where criminals are rewarded in plush housing and comfortable lives, with assured jobs for the government, where contraception, sterilization and euthanasia are widespread, the latte Read for the PopSugar Challenge 2019 47.Two books that share the same title (1) A satire of moral relativism and progressive politics that could've been written just yesterday. This novel starring Miles Plastic as the product of an absurdly conceived welfare state, is drenched in sarcasm and wit. Waugh shows a world where criminals are rewarded in plush housing and comfortable lives, with assured jobs for the government, where contraception, sterilization and euthanasia are widespread, the latter being desired even "for difficult children". The classical Greek style illustrations add a particular oddness to the book. Next book to be paired with this one is Robert Clark's Love Among the Ruins

  2. 5 out of 5

    Jordan

    Very short dystopian novella published in 1952, in response to the socialist programs of Clement Atlee’s post-WWII Labour government. Accurately predicts the breakdown of traditional bonds, institutions, and ways of life—the subjects of the State in this story are so helpless they can’t even kill themselves, but queue up for days at the Ministry of Euthanasia—as well as the hollowing out of people’s souls. Left me wanting more. I wish Waugh had given this novel-length treatment. It would have ma Very short dystopian novella published in 1952, in response to the socialist programs of Clement Atlee’s post-WWII Labour government. Accurately predicts the breakdown of traditional bonds, institutions, and ways of life—the subjects of the State in this story are so helpless they can’t even kill themselves, but queue up for days at the Ministry of Euthanasia—as well as the hollowing out of people’s souls. Left me wanting more. I wish Waugh had given this novel-length treatment. It would have made an interesting comparison for Orwell’s near-contemporaneous 1984. As a dystopia, it falls closer to Brave New World with some of the hiveminded bureaucratic overtones of Zemyatin’s We. A good read nonetheless.

  3. 5 out of 5

    David Streever

    Largely a polemic against the English welfare state, the unlikely and implausible future we're asked to consider in this novella is one in which criminals have more rights and a better life than non-criminals. The idea that this is somehow likely or plausible is bizarre and outlandish; all sorts of libertarian thinkers have pointed to this book as the future that they think our world is leading to. Waugh is a talented writer. He's no Ayn Rand. Regardless, I still didn't enjoy reading this book. Largely a polemic against the English welfare state, the unlikely and implausible future we're asked to consider in this novella is one in which criminals have more rights and a better life than non-criminals. The idea that this is somehow likely or plausible is bizarre and outlandish; all sorts of libertarian thinkers have pointed to this book as the future that they think our world is leading to. Waugh is a talented writer. He's no Ayn Rand. Regardless, I still didn't enjoy reading this book.

  4. 5 out of 5

    sch

    Read three times, each time with greater pleasure. Don't miss the illustrations, which are included in the Kindle edition of the "Complete Stories." Read three times, each time with greater pleasure. Don't miss the illustrations, which are included in the Kindle edition of the "Complete Stories."

  5. 5 out of 5

    Cole Brumley

    Prescient. Yes?

  6. 5 out of 5

    Val

    This is a futuristic political satire, where life in prison is preferable to life outside it. Speculative fiction is not Waugh's forte, but this book is still very funny. This is a futuristic political satire, where life in prison is preferable to life outside it. Speculative fiction is not Waugh's forte, but this book is still very funny.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Ralph Jones

    Love Among the Ruins: A Romance of the Near Future by Evelyn Waugh is a sad love story. The protagonist, Miles Plastic, lives in a world where inmates are treated better than the good people who live outside of prison. Hence, the inmates sometimes relapse. Plastic was almost finishing his prison term for arson until he fell in love with Clara, a bearded woman. The story picks up after they started the romance between them, and it ended in a tragic tone.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Franc

    An interesting and enjoyable bit of speculative fiction from Evelyn Waugh. Speculative in the sense of "engaged in, expressing, or based on conjecture rather than knowledge." Interesting to see Waugh's detailed specifications for the handbasket he imagined England going hell in. Enjoyable because all Evelyn Waugh's fiction is enjoyable. An interesting and enjoyable bit of speculative fiction from Evelyn Waugh. Speculative in the sense of "engaged in, expressing, or based on conjecture rather than knowledge." Interesting to see Waugh's detailed specifications for the handbasket he imagined England going hell in. Enjoyable because all Evelyn Waugh's fiction is enjoyable.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Kristen

    EVELYN WAUGH WROTE DYSTOPIAN FICTION?!?! YAY. Extremely eager to get ahold of this, especially after contemplating the extreme and disturbing relevance of Ray Bradbury's 2BR02B and working on my own dystopian euthanasia-centric show-trial story. Good consort for the Gulag Archipelago. EVELYN WAUGH WROTE DYSTOPIAN FICTION?!?! YAY. Extremely eager to get ahold of this, especially after contemplating the extreme and disturbing relevance of Ray Bradbury's 2BR02B and working on my own dystopian euthanasia-centric show-trial story. Good consort for the Gulag Archipelago.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Thomas

    Some interesting themes and ideas.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Patrick St-Amand

    Like a tasty little snack this novella satisfies with satire and oddness in a dystopian setting.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Liudmila Morris

    Kinda interesting dystopian idea but it feels unfinished

  13. 4 out of 5

    Evgeniy Lapin

  14. 4 out of 5

    Charles

  15. 4 out of 5

    Anaatasiia Shevchuk

  16. 5 out of 5

    Amanda

  17. 5 out of 5

    Jose

  18. 4 out of 5

    Lilith

  19. 4 out of 5

    Rachel Smith

  20. 5 out of 5

    James Ingram

  21. 5 out of 5

    David Rappoport

  22. 5 out of 5

    Ellinem

  23. 4 out of 5

    OTIS

  24. 5 out of 5

    Sean

  25. 5 out of 5

    Linda

  26. 5 out of 5

    Claire

  27. 5 out of 5

    Tania

  28. 5 out of 5

    Kaitlyn

  29. 4 out of 5

    Ollie

  30. 4 out of 5

    Nikki

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