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Das Grab des Salomon

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Mit Das Grab des Salomon legt Daniel Keohane, bislang vorwiegend für exzellente Kurzgeschichten bekannt, die in zahlreichen namhaften Anthologien erschienen sind, einen Mysterythriller der Spitzenklasse vor. Mit beklemmend realistischer Liebe zum Detail schmiedet Keohane aus biblischen Mythen eine überzeugende,glaubwürdige Geschichte, die an Hochspannung kaum zu überbieten Mit Das Grab des Salomon legt Daniel Keohane, bislang vorwiegend für exzellente Kurzgeschichten bekannt, die in zahlreichen namhaften Anthologien erschienen sind, einen Mysterythriller der Spitzenklasse vor. Mit beklemmend realistischer Liebe zum Detail schmiedet Keohane aus biblischen Mythen eine überzeugende,glaubwürdige Geschichte, die an Hochspannung kaum zu überbieten ist.Seit tausenden Jahren wird vor der Welt ein Geheimnis verborgen, um es vor jenen zu schützen, die dessen Macht begehren. Päpste und Könige haben danach gesucht, Theologen über seine Existenz debattiert. Seit den Tagen des Königs Salomon wird immer ein Mensch auserkoren, um das Geheimnis zu bewahren, den Schatz vor einem Kult zu beschützen, der ihn für seinen eigenen dunklen Gott in Besitz nehmen will ... und seinem Ziel endlich nahe scheint.Als Nathan Dinneck, ein erst kürzlich geweihter Priester, in seine Heimatgemeinde gerufen wird, um dort als Pfarrer zu dienen, ahnt er nicht, dass er eine Reise antritt, die ihn mitten hinein in einen uralten Konflikt führt. Völlig unvorbereitet gerät er in einen Sog von Albträumen, dunklen Mächten und sehr realen Bedrohungen ... die seinen Glauben auf eine harte Probe und ihn vor eine Wahl stellen - die über seine Zukunft ebenso entscheiden wird wie über die der Welt.


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Mit Das Grab des Salomon legt Daniel Keohane, bislang vorwiegend für exzellente Kurzgeschichten bekannt, die in zahlreichen namhaften Anthologien erschienen sind, einen Mysterythriller der Spitzenklasse vor. Mit beklemmend realistischer Liebe zum Detail schmiedet Keohane aus biblischen Mythen eine überzeugende,glaubwürdige Geschichte, die an Hochspannung kaum zu überbieten Mit Das Grab des Salomon legt Daniel Keohane, bislang vorwiegend für exzellente Kurzgeschichten bekannt, die in zahlreichen namhaften Anthologien erschienen sind, einen Mysterythriller der Spitzenklasse vor. Mit beklemmend realistischer Liebe zum Detail schmiedet Keohane aus biblischen Mythen eine überzeugende,glaubwürdige Geschichte, die an Hochspannung kaum zu überbieten ist.Seit tausenden Jahren wird vor der Welt ein Geheimnis verborgen, um es vor jenen zu schützen, die dessen Macht begehren. Päpste und Könige haben danach gesucht, Theologen über seine Existenz debattiert. Seit den Tagen des Königs Salomon wird immer ein Mensch auserkoren, um das Geheimnis zu bewahren, den Schatz vor einem Kult zu beschützen, der ihn für seinen eigenen dunklen Gott in Besitz nehmen will ... und seinem Ziel endlich nahe scheint.Als Nathan Dinneck, ein erst kürzlich geweihter Priester, in seine Heimatgemeinde gerufen wird, um dort als Pfarrer zu dienen, ahnt er nicht, dass er eine Reise antritt, die ihn mitten hinein in einen uralten Konflikt führt. Völlig unvorbereitet gerät er in einen Sog von Albträumen, dunklen Mächten und sehr realen Bedrohungen ... die seinen Glauben auf eine harte Probe und ihn vor eine Wahl stellen - die über seine Zukunft ebenso entscheiden wird wie über die der Welt.

49 review for Das Grab des Salomon

  1. 4 out of 5

    Nick Cato

    Nathan Dinneck becomes the pastor of a small Baptist church in Hillcrest, Massachusetts. He begins to have vivid nightmares and even faints during his initial message. Departing pastor Ralph Hayden (and especially the church's groundskeeper, Vincent Tarretti) eventually let Nathan in on the special ministry they believe God has called him to. Meanwhile, a mysterious new men's club has been meeting in town, and Nathan's father is a member, adding to the new Reverend's stress . . . not to mention Nathan Dinneck becomes the pastor of a small Baptist church in Hillcrest, Massachusetts. He begins to have vivid nightmares and even faints during his initial message. Departing pastor Ralph Hayden (and especially the church's groundskeeper, Vincent Tarretti) eventually let Nathan in on the special ministry they believe God has called him to. Meanwhile, a mysterious new men's club has been meeting in town, and Nathan's father is a member, adding to the new Reverend's stress . . . not to mention a growing romance-of-sorts with Elizabeth, a non-believer who he somehow bonds with. With a few flashbacks to Constantinople in 1204 A.D., we're introduced to a group of early Christians who have been overseers of the actual slates of the Ten Commandments. When their church comes under attack, a small group (led by a courageous nun) manage to get away with the sacred relics. Guess where they are today? While Keohane's novel fits well within the current religious-thriller genre, it also doubles as a supernatural horror yarn complete with a powerful, charismatic antagonist, a modern-day Old Testament blood cult and plenty of eerie atmosphere (it was also nice to see a strong female character taking charge during the ancient flashback scenes). SOLOMON'S GRAVE may be a bit familiar at times, but the suspense, pacing, and fine writing make it difficult to put down. I'm looking very forward to Keohane's next project.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Chris Jackson

    Solomon's grave is a chilling tale of a Baptist minister, Nathan Denneck, who is thrown into a search for the Ark of the Covenant. A mind-controlling Ammonite (demon worship) priest also seeks the Ark as a gateway for the hordes of Hell to invade Heaven. Keohane has a good grasp of suspense building, and creates characters who are believable and react in human ways... no superheroes here, just folks, which I like. The only negative, if this is one, is a fairly abrupt ending. I felt like I was bei Solomon's grave is a chilling tale of a Baptist minister, Nathan Denneck, who is thrown into a search for the Ark of the Covenant. A mind-controlling Ammonite (demon worship) priest also seeks the Ark as a gateway for the hordes of Hell to invade Heaven. Keohane has a good grasp of suspense building, and creates characters who are believable and react in human ways... no superheroes here, just folks, which I like. The only negative, if this is one, is a fairly abrupt ending. I felt like I was being set up for a sequel, which would be welcome...

  3. 5 out of 5

    Mike

    Nathan Dinneck has returned home as the pastor of the Baptist church he grew up in. Unfortunately he has brought with him recurring nightmares of a long march to a sacrificial altar; nightmares that have begun to bleed into his waking life. He has also returned home to find his parent’s relationship strained due to his father having turned from church and into the arms of the somewhat shady Hillcrest Men’s Club lead by the sinister Peter Quinn. Thus begins Solomon’s Grave by Daniel G. Keohane, a Nathan Dinneck has returned home as the pastor of the Baptist church he grew up in. Unfortunately he has brought with him recurring nightmares of a long march to a sacrificial altar; nightmares that have begun to bleed into his waking life. He has also returned home to find his parent’s relationship strained due to his father having turned from church and into the arms of the somewhat shady Hillcrest Men’s Club lead by the sinister Peter Quinn. Thus begins Solomon’s Grave by Daniel G. Keohane, a finalist for the 2009 Stoker Award for First Novel. The template for Keohane’s novel lends it on the one hand a prodigal son vibe while on the other it ties undeniably with the countless films and stories embodying the classic cliche about returning home only to find that you can’t really go home again. Solomon’s Grave includes a bevy of other familiar notes: a sleepy New England town, a lost love, ties to the ancient past, and a sinister organization with ties to the criminal underworld (and the underworld underworld). It’s all there but carefully constructed within a solid framework of biblical history and judeo-christian theology. My main issue with Solomon’s Grave is that it reveals a bit too much too fast so it never really builds an overarching atmosphere of fear or dread. With the novel split into several sections buffered by sojourns into the Crusades it becomes fairly obvious (or so one thinks) what the “secret” being protected is and the villains of the story are revealed outright pretty early in the proceedings. Indeed, the novel seems predisposed against maintaining an air of mystery at all. There are still several scenes, including the climax, that manage to convey a tangible threat of physical, and spiritual threat to the characters. As Lovecraft puts it the supernatural tales must contain: "A certain atmosphere of breathless and unexplainable dread of outer, unknown forces must be present; and there must be a hint, expressed with a seriousness and portentousness becoming its subject, of that most terrible conception of the human brain — a malign and particular suspension or defeat of those fixed laws of Nature which are our only safeguard against the assaults of chaos and the daemons of unplumbed space." But what if those “unknown forces” are countered with a known, if not necessarily quantifiable, source? In the case of Solomon’s Grave that is exactly what happens. While the threat of the novel is most certainly a malign and powerful force the carefully constructed faith and overt hand of God in the events of the hero’s life subverts the supernatural threat. In a novel in which Christian theology is accepted as real providing an outside threat is difficult since, given that the constraints of the novel assert the truth of a Christian God, no outside threat can trump that truth (did that even make sense?). The weak point then, as in many a Bible tale, is the man (such as the titular Solomon). Unfortunately, for Solomon’s Grave Keohone goes slightly too far in casting Nathan Dinneck as a paragon of faith and virtue. Reverend Dinneck is the exact antithesis of ‘Salems Lot’s doubting Father Callahan, the Reverend never once doubting the power of his faith and his conviction in God remains an unwavering constant throughout the novel. None of that makes Solomon’s Grave a bad novel. Indeed Dinneck’s relationship with God and his family and friends are one of the novel’s strongest points and, while Dinneck’s faith might never wane the tension generated by less certain faith of those around, especially in the face of the novel’s threats, makes for some particularly gripping reading. However Solomon’s Grave certainly functions less well as a novel of supernatural horror; it’s ultimate message one that seems to reinforce the message of hope and redemption that embodies the Christian faith a fact that, for this reader at least, stands counterpoint to the atmosphere of hopelessness and dread that defines horror as a genre.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Lea Armstrong

    Solomon's Grave is Daniel Keohane's first book. Although this is not your typical Bible read it does teach us something about Faith. It opens up the mind about whether or not Evil can manifest itself into something unseen and the power God has if you believe. I read this book after I read Keohane's second book, "Margaret's Ark". As with his second book it lags in areas and becomes a bit of a struggle but after you pretend to read through the boring parts it is a good read. The other issue I had Solomon's Grave is Daniel Keohane's first book. Although this is not your typical Bible read it does teach us something about Faith. It opens up the mind about whether or not Evil can manifest itself into something unseen and the power God has if you believe. I read this book after I read Keohane's second book, "Margaret's Ark". As with his second book it lags in areas and becomes a bit of a struggle but after you pretend to read through the boring parts it is a good read. The other issue I had was the ending...it doesn't address Dennick's decision not to contact his mother. I was disappointed that she was somewhat forgotten although Keohane did attempt to pacify us by telling us the mother, Beverly, was sitting by the window waiting...still it wasn't enough.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Kleblanc

    Very DaVinci Code type book. It was an easy read and I really enjoyed it and looked forward to picking it up.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Alyssa

  7. 4 out of 5

    Julia

  8. 5 out of 5

    Andrew Keohane

  9. 5 out of 5

    Linda Keohane

  10. 4 out of 5

    Kristi

  11. 5 out of 5

    Dragon Moon Press

  12. 4 out of 5

    Travis

  13. 4 out of 5

    Steve Samson

  14. 4 out of 5

    Richard

  15. 4 out of 5

    Donna Peake

  16. 4 out of 5

    Steve Van Samson

  17. 4 out of 5

    Donna Martin

  18. 4 out of 5

    Marilyn S

  19. 5 out of 5

    Brian

  20. 4 out of 5

    Deb Carleen

  21. 4 out of 5

    Daryl

  22. 5 out of 5

    Ron Geagan

  23. 5 out of 5

    Beth

  24. 5 out of 5

    OTIS

  25. 5 out of 5

    Tracy Carbone

  26. 4 out of 5

    Paolo Caracciolo

  27. 5 out of 5

    Judy cogdill

  28. 5 out of 5

    Stefanie

  29. 5 out of 5

    Gabrielle Harbowy

  30. 5 out of 5

    Scott Bickle

  31. 5 out of 5

    Sariah

  32. 4 out of 5

    E.J. Stevens

  33. 5 out of 5

    Tracyene

  34. 4 out of 5

    Dustin Crazy little brown owl

  35. 5 out of 5

    Les Gehman

  36. 4 out of 5

    Jason

  37. 4 out of 5

    Jan

  38. 5 out of 5

    Kevin Lucia

  39. 5 out of 5

    Kate Jonez

  40. 5 out of 5

    Benjamin Ethridge

  41. 5 out of 5

    Steffi

  42. 5 out of 5

    Arizona

  43. 5 out of 5

    Amanda Keohane

  44. 4 out of 5

    Jan

  45. 5 out of 5

    Cheri Harwood

  46. 5 out of 5

    Charlotte

  47. 5 out of 5

    Midu Hadi

  48. 5 out of 5

    Heather

  49. 4 out of 5

    Audrey Keohane

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