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Mary Shelley's Frankenstein: A Routledge Study Guide and Sourcebook

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Mary Shelley's Frankenstein is one of the most widely studied works of English literature, and Frankenstein's creature is a key figure in the popular imagination. This sourcebook examines Mary Shelley's novel within its literary and cultural contexts, bringing together material on: *the contexts from which Frankenstein emerged *the novel's early reception *adaptation and Mary Shelley's Frankenstein is one of the most widely studied works of English literature, and Frankenstein's creature is a key figure in the popular imagination. This sourcebook examines Mary Shelley's novel within its literary and cultural contexts, bringing together material on: *the contexts from which Frankenstein emerged *the novel's early reception *adaptation and performance of the work (from theatre to pop music) *recent criticism. All documents are discussed and explained. The volume also includes offers carefully annotated key passages from the novel itself and concludes with a list of recommended editions and further reading, to allow readers to pursue their study in the areas that interest them most. This sourcebook provides an ideal orientation to the novel, its reception history and the critical material that surrounds it.


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Mary Shelley's Frankenstein is one of the most widely studied works of English literature, and Frankenstein's creature is a key figure in the popular imagination. This sourcebook examines Mary Shelley's novel within its literary and cultural contexts, bringing together material on: *the contexts from which Frankenstein emerged *the novel's early reception *adaptation and Mary Shelley's Frankenstein is one of the most widely studied works of English literature, and Frankenstein's creature is a key figure in the popular imagination. This sourcebook examines Mary Shelley's novel within its literary and cultural contexts, bringing together material on: *the contexts from which Frankenstein emerged *the novel's early reception *adaptation and performance of the work (from theatre to pop music) *recent criticism. All documents are discussed and explained. The volume also includes offers carefully annotated key passages from the novel itself and concludes with a list of recommended editions and further reading, to allow readers to pursue their study in the areas that interest them most. This sourcebook provides an ideal orientation to the novel, its reception history and the critical material that surrounds it.

33 review for Mary Shelley's Frankenstein: A Routledge Study Guide and Sourcebook

  1. 5 out of 5

    John Robin

    Had I read just Frankenstein on its own I would have had a different experience, but the scholarly notes, especially the introductory essay, gave me a full and satisfying experience reading all about the significance of this book. Most interesting to me was the process behind writing Frankenstein. That Mary Shelley released substantial revisions of the text in 1831, 13 years after first publishing it, was only half the intrigue: comparing these revisions to the story text itself revealed quite a Had I read just Frankenstein on its own I would have had a different experience, but the scholarly notes, especially the introductory essay, gave me a full and satisfying experience reading all about the significance of this book. Most interesting to me was the process behind writing Frankenstein. That Mary Shelley released substantial revisions of the text in 1831, 13 years after first publishing it, was only half the intrigue: comparing these revisions to the story text itself revealed quite a window into the relationship between Mary and Percy with his domineering hand. Even to understand some of the context around writing this story, during their travels in Europe staying with Lord Byron, paints a picture for me of an introspective woman who listens to the wild fancies of industrious men dreaming of the unlimited possibilities for humanity through the new innovations of science (then, in the 1810’s, a vast new frontier), and how she sees the madness in their thoughts, the way they reach above nature to assert themselves over this realm and thus throw themselves in conflict. Frankenstein, at its core — for me, anyway — is very much an exploration of these two extremes in conflict, and it’s still a relevant question today as we stare yet further into the vast new frontier of innovation: what will we become as we, like Victor Frankenstein, create a new humanity through innovation that continues to change us, make us less in tune with nature? The prose is very well-written, compared to the overly florid prose of Dickens’ early work; where far too many semicolons and colons are used. Mary Shelley’s voice is contained and certain of itself, unimposing. This book also included ‘A Fragment’ by Lord Byron and ‘The Vampyre’ by Dr. Polidori (credited to Lord Byron but only later traced to the doctor). These styles were harder to read, particularly Polidori with his long paragraphs and long sentences (though interesting to see the use of punctuation — despite being more difficult to read, it was consistent). To see echoes of these stories in Mary Shelley’s own, and then in the later Dracula by Bram Stoker, changed my perspective. Though gothic stories and ghost stories predate Mary Shelley, Frankenstein is very much the originator of a darker thread that would go on to define much of later horror. I highly recommend for those considering reading Frankenstein, this edition by Penguin Classics, and that you read all the introduction and the appendices.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Charles

  3. 4 out of 5

    Igor Goldkind

  4. 4 out of 5

    Mark

  5. 5 out of 5

    Ekaple

  6. 4 out of 5

    DB Nielsen

  7. 4 out of 5

    Edmon Castell

  8. 5 out of 5

    Alannah Clarke

  9. 5 out of 5

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  10. 5 out of 5

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  11. 5 out of 5

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  12. 4 out of 5

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  13. 5 out of 5

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  14. 4 out of 5

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  16. 4 out of 5

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  17. 5 out of 5

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  18. 5 out of 5

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  19. 5 out of 5

    qngru

  20. 4 out of 5

    Nirimba College

  21. 4 out of 5

    A Ek

  22. 4 out of 5

    BookDB

  23. 5 out of 5

    Kavita Nathan

  24. 5 out of 5

    Liis

  25. 4 out of 5

    João Sodré

  26. 4 out of 5

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  27. 5 out of 5

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  28. 5 out of 5

    Ryan Dacoregio

  29. 4 out of 5

    Đăng Đàm

  30. 4 out of 5

    Zach Linge

  31. 4 out of 5

    Wendy Otero

  32. 5 out of 5

    Martha Severson

  33. 4 out of 5

    Aykut

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