web site hit counter Of Mice and Magic: A History of American Animated Cartoons; Revised and Updated - Ebooks PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

Of Mice and Magic: A History of American Animated Cartoons; Revised and Updated

Availability: Ready to download

In this revised and updated edition of Of Mice and Magic, Leonard Maltin not only recreates this whole glorious era from the silent days through the Hollywood golden age to Spielberg's An American Tail, he traces the evolution of the art of animation and vividly portrays the key creative talents and their sutdios. This definitive history of American animated cartoons also In this revised and updated edition of Of Mice and Magic, Leonard Maltin not only recreates this whole glorious era from the silent days through the Hollywood golden age to Spielberg's An American Tail, he traces the evolution of the art of animation and vividly portrays the key creative talents and their sutdios. This definitive history of American animated cartoons also brings Maltin's many fans up to date on the work being done today at the Walt Disney and Warner Bros. studios, and other developments in the world of animation.Drawing on colorful interviews with many of the American cartoon industry's principals, Maltin has come up with a gold mine of anecdotes and film history. Behind the scenes were genius animators and entrepreneurs such as Walt Disney, Chuck Jones, Tex Avery, Mel Blanc, and a legion of others, In all, Malitn has put together a glorious celebration of a universally loved segment of Americana. Includes the most extensive filmography on cartoons ever compiled, and sources for video rental.


Compare

In this revised and updated edition of Of Mice and Magic, Leonard Maltin not only recreates this whole glorious era from the silent days through the Hollywood golden age to Spielberg's An American Tail, he traces the evolution of the art of animation and vividly portrays the key creative talents and their sutdios. This definitive history of American animated cartoons also In this revised and updated edition of Of Mice and Magic, Leonard Maltin not only recreates this whole glorious era from the silent days through the Hollywood golden age to Spielberg's An American Tail, he traces the evolution of the art of animation and vividly portrays the key creative talents and their sutdios. This definitive history of American animated cartoons also brings Maltin's many fans up to date on the work being done today at the Walt Disney and Warner Bros. studios, and other developments in the world of animation.Drawing on colorful interviews with many of the American cartoon industry's principals, Maltin has come up with a gold mine of anecdotes and film history. Behind the scenes were genius animators and entrepreneurs such as Walt Disney, Chuck Jones, Tex Avery, Mel Blanc, and a legion of others, In all, Malitn has put together a glorious celebration of a universally loved segment of Americana. Includes the most extensive filmography on cartoons ever compiled, and sources for video rental.

30 review for Of Mice and Magic: A History of American Animated Cartoons; Revised and Updated

  1. 5 out of 5

    Michael Sparrow

    Still the gold standard for the subject. I read the first edition when it came out in hardcover and I still cherish both editions. When it was first published, it had so much that had never been described before and after almost forty years, no one has matched it. Essential!

  2. 4 out of 5

    Mark

    I love Leonard Maltin. His excitement for film (especially animated films) has always been a shining beacon in my life. It’s nice to read a book like this where he gets to write about his favorite subject with child like but authoritative glee. I wish he could update it, but I don’t think that’s going to happen at this point. Still, it’s a really fun history lesson for anyone who loves cartoons and animation.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Annelisa

    This is a thoroughly-researched book, one that documents the rise of animation from the silent period to the present. Maltin manages to cover nearly every animation studio, technique, key animators, and famous character that arose out of these studios. The visuals aid the text as well, and one can tell that he is passionate about the subject. But that passion can also be a downside. Often, Maltin's praise and love for everything (and believe me, this man likes EVERYTHING) seems to cloud his abil This is a thoroughly-researched book, one that documents the rise of animation from the silent period to the present. Maltin manages to cover nearly every animation studio, technique, key animators, and famous character that arose out of these studios. The visuals aid the text as well, and one can tell that he is passionate about the subject. But that passion can also be a downside. Often, Maltin's praise and love for everything (and believe me, this man likes EVERYTHING) seems to cloud his ability to critically examine these cartoons. He too readily heaps praise on the animators and their efforts, without realizing the negativity and problematic content within many of these works. For example, while discussing the infamous "Coal Black and de Sebben Dwarfs", arguably the most racist cartoon short created by the Merrie Melodies franchise, Maltin completely glosses over the racism in the piece, instead discussing the technique, voice talent, and usage of gags. The same goes when discussing the forgotten "Bosko"; he acknowledges that the character was supposed to be a little Black boy, but doesn't seem to see where the usage of Bosko was problematic or offensive. Even though he may have just wanted to talk about the cartoons themselves, there are certain things that cannot be ignored. Furthermore, Maltin's research isn't entirely comprehensive, as he tends to focus on theatrical versus television cartoons. This is not a bad read, but for me at least, it could have had more.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Ivan

    I have only high praise for this well researched volume of film history - in particular animation. I thoroughly enjoyed reading about all the non-Disney studios and directors (no disrespect intended, but there were hundreds of others). I most especially liked the chapters dealing with Max Fleischer who was a true pioneer. He and his brother David introduced the world to Follow the Bouncing Ball, Koko the Clown, Betty Boop and also animated the Popeye the Sailor cartoons and later Superman. Now, I have only high praise for this well researched volume of film history - in particular animation. I thoroughly enjoyed reading about all the non-Disney studios and directors (no disrespect intended, but there were hundreds of others). I most especially liked the chapters dealing with Max Fleischer who was a true pioneer. He and his brother David introduced the world to Follow the Bouncing Ball, Koko the Clown, Betty Boop and also animated the Popeye the Sailor cartoons and later Superman. Now, Mr. Maltin, it's been decades since this book was updated and there has been a new Golden Age of animation in that time from The Simpsons to Little Mermaid, Lion King and Frozen, to Pixar, Roger Rabbit and the great work of Oscar winner Hayao Miyazaki. Please sir, an update.

  5. 5 out of 5

    David

    Last night (or, actually, early this morning), I finally finished “Of Mice and Magic: A History of American Animated Cartoons” (1987 “Revised and Updated Edition”) by Leonard Maltin. Easily one of the best nonfiction books that I’ve read in a long time. Now, I should qualify things a bit first. One, as I said above, this revised edition came out in 1987 (the first edition came out in 1980). So there is thirty-three years of animated cartoons not covered here (1987-2020). Also, some of the more “s Last night (or, actually, early this morning), I finally finished “Of Mice and Magic: A History of American Animated Cartoons” (1987 “Revised and Updated Edition”) by Leonard Maltin. Easily one of the best nonfiction books that I’ve read in a long time. Now, I should qualify things a bit first. One, as I said above, this revised edition came out in 1987 (the first edition came out in 1980). So there is thirty-three years of animated cartoons not covered here (1987-2020). Also, some of the more “social” aspects of the history are addressed differently than Maltin probably would today. (I saw one GoodReads reviewer mark him down for mostly glossing over the troublesome racial stereotypes in several cartoons. Maltin does mention them at times but does not ever really focus on it.) Also, to appreciate and enjoy this book as much as I did, one must already have at least a partial interest in the history of animated cartoons. If that is not a subject that one finds of interest, then he or she will probably be at the very least a bit overwhelmed (if not bored) by the level of historical detail presented here. However, for “cartoon buffs” like me, this is *the* book on the subject. There are loads of books out there specifically on the history of the Walt Disney Studios and their cartoons, and books also on some of the other studios like Warner Brothers. However, this book has chapters on *all* of the major and minor studios that produced theatrical cartoons (both shorts and feature films, although the focus is often on the theatrical shorts; animated features by the studios are covered as well but to varying levels of detail). Chapters on... Walt Disney/Disney Studios (over thirty pages), Max Fleischer/Fleischer Studios (Betty Boop, Popeye, Superman, etc.; over forty pages), Paul Terry and Terrytoons (Mighty Mouse, Heckle and Jeckle; over thirty pages), Walter Lantz (Woody Woodpecker, Andy Panda, Chilly Willy; nearly thirty pages), Ub Iwerks (when he was running his own studio after leaving Disney (for those who don’t know, Ub Iwerks was a major creative force/partner of Walt Disney in Disney’s early years and a co-creator of Mickey Mouse); ten pages), the Van Beuren Studio (Felix the Cat, etc; ten pages), Columbia/Charles Mintz and Screen Gems (Krazy Kat, The Fox and the Crow; twelve pages), Warner Brother (or “Warner Bros.”; Porky Pig, Daffy Duck, Bugs Bunny, Elmer Fudd, Sylvester and Tweety, Foghorn Leghorn, Road Runner and the Coyote, Tasmanian Devil, Speedy Gonzales, etc.; nearly sixty(!) pages (and I should mention that these pages, while loaded with black and white photographs and eight color photos pages, are two columns of text per page making it a very text heavy book; which is not a bad thing as it lets Maltin cover a lot of history and personal anecdotes in each chapter)), MGM (Tom and Jerry, etc.; thirty pages), Paramount/Famous Studios (Popeye, Casper, etc.; twelve pages), UPA (“Gerald McBoing Boing”, Fox and the Crow, Mister Magoo, etc.; twenty pages), and “The Rest of the Story” (works produced by other studios and independent animators from the 1960s onwards, the phasing out of animated theatrical cartoons at most of the studios in favor of animated feature films and animation made specifically for television, including the Pink Panther, “Yellow Submarine”, “Heavy Metal”, Saturday morning shows turned into animated features like Care Bears, He-Man and She-Ra (“Secret of the Sword”), and the films of Ralph Bakshi (“Lord of the Rings” and his more adult films) and Don Bluth (“An American Tale”); twelve pages). And those are just the more well known characters I mentioned. Maltin follows the careers of seemingly all of the major animators, directors, writers, and (some of the) voice actors throughout their careers, way too many for me to list here. At Warner Bros alone: Chuck Jones, Bob Clampett, Tex Avery, Friz Freleng, Frank Tashlin, Robert McKimson, and famous voice man Mel Blanc. At Disney, Ub Iwerks, music man Carl Stalling, John Hubley, Jack Hannah, Ward Kimball, Frank Thomas, Ollie Johnston, Milt Kahl, Marc Davis, Wolfgang Reitherman, Eric Larson, and John Lounsbery (many of whom would as a group become referred to as Disney’s “nine old men”, a group of veteran animators who worked with Disney from “Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs” onwards). And several key figures moved from one studio to the other, the aforementioned Ub Iwerks who went from Disney to running his own studio, some time at Warners, and then back to Disney again, and Shamus Culhane, who spent time at Bray, Disney, Fleischer, Lantz, Warners, and Paramount. The last one hundred plus pages of this book are devoted to complete filmographies for each studio, a listing of Academy Award nominee and winner theatrical cartoons (these two being things one can easily find online these days at places like Wikipedia but which would have been an important resource back in the pre-internet days of 1980 and 1987), a glossary of animation terms, and a now out of date “Sources for Cartoons on Film and Video” (on 16 mm film and VHS). I could go on and on about this one but I won’t. I would have thought that a book from 1987 would be long out of print but I just checked and it’s still available from Amazon. I checked this copy out from my public library but will most likely be obtaining a copy for myself at some point. (Unfortunately, it is not available on eBook.) I give this one a rare (for me) five stars out of five on GoodReads.

  6. 5 out of 5

    April

    Absolutely amazing. Probably the best book on animation history I've read so far. Absolutely amazing. Probably the best book on animation history I've read so far.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Daniel MacDonald

    I read this for a class in collage and enjoyed it so much. If you like history of animation, I think you will also

  8. 4 out of 5

    Phil

    Later read unassigned parts for leisure after class was over

  9. 4 out of 5

    Michael Jantze

    Well-researched (the lists at the end of the book are wonderful) but written much like a filmed Maltin review: He's a bit too in love with his subject to offer insight or criticism. Well-researched (the lists at the end of the book are wonderful) but written much like a filmed Maltin review: He's a bit too in love with his subject to offer insight or criticism.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Fazzz14

    If you love animated cartoons you will absolutely love this book. It not only analyzes the born and the rise of American cartoons in a technical way, but every studio, cartoon characters and their shorts are described with such a charming fascination that its a real joy to read. It is a journey in the history of this beautiful art, deep, chronological, filled with original pictures, sketches, interviews and anecdotes, but without ever losing that romantic amazed point of view worthy of the eyes If you love animated cartoons you will absolutely love this book. It not only analyzes the born and the rise of American cartoons in a technical way, but every studio, cartoon characters and their shorts are described with such a charming fascination that its a real joy to read. It is a journey in the history of this beautiful art, deep, chronological, filled with original pictures, sketches, interviews and anecdotes, but without ever losing that romantic amazed point of view worthy of the eyes of a child. I always say this book is the (Woody Allen's) Midnight In Paris of animation. It's a pity the book ends with the 80's, but after all the real Cartoons are the ones from the Golden Age of animation, who created, defined, and perfected the medium, and from this point of view nothing is missing here.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Galen Wilson

    The parts that are history-oriented are pretty strong, and it has a great catalogue of films to watch. The analysis of particular films and artists is pretty weak though; an auteur study this is not. I also think it's pretty weak in looking to the future. I get that it is called "A History of AMERICAN cartoons," but it felt odd that even in the 1988 edition he didn't nod to how studios in Japan were picking up the mantel of quality animation in the 80s. The parts that are history-oriented are pretty strong, and it has a great catalogue of films to watch. The analysis of particular films and artists is pretty weak though; an auteur study this is not. I also think it's pretty weak in looking to the future. I get that it is called "A History of AMERICAN cartoons," but it felt odd that even in the 1988 edition he didn't nod to how studios in Japan were picking up the mantel of quality animation in the 80s.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Jeff Lewonczyk

    I mean, it's a history of American theatrical animation up to the late 1980s, and it's full of great stories, fascinating insights and authoritative background on some of my favorite cartoons - I ate it up like a Road Runner who found a free pile of Acme birdseed in the middle of the road. I mean, it's a history of American theatrical animation up to the late 1980s, and it's full of great stories, fascinating insights and authoritative background on some of my favorite cartoons - I ate it up like a Road Runner who found a free pile of Acme birdseed in the middle of the road.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Dom Perry

    For schooool

  14. 5 out of 5

    Lenore

    Used this in a film History class for a paper on macabre Silly Symphony Cartoons and Fantasia (1945). Super helpful.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Lauren

    This is a great book, though a trifle too long. Eventually it turns into a series of reviews, but still, I will use this as a resource for teaching animation!

  16. 5 out of 5

    Garrett Cash

    Much like Leonard Maltin, I too grew up in wonder of the cartoons that I saw as a child. I fed off of all the different studios output such as the Disney shorts/features, Warner Brothers' Looney Tunes, MGM's Tom and Jerry, The Pink Panther, and Hanna-Barbera's television lineup. I somehow missed Fleischer and UPA cartoons until I had just entered middle school. They were so different than anything that I had seen previously that I was truly shocked. When I was really young I remember being in wo Much like Leonard Maltin, I too grew up in wonder of the cartoons that I saw as a child. I fed off of all the different studios output such as the Disney shorts/features, Warner Brothers' Looney Tunes, MGM's Tom and Jerry, The Pink Panther, and Hanna-Barbera's television lineup. I somehow missed Fleischer and UPA cartoons until I had just entered middle school. They were so different than anything that I had seen previously that I was truly shocked. When I was really young I remember being in wonder of some of the names that I saw on my favorite cartoons. Who is Chuck Jones? Who is Scott Bradley? Who is Tex Avery? I was especially interested in finding out how the characters at the Warner Brothers studio and the MGM studios progressed. The Tom and Jerry cartoons were especially interesting to me in this regard. There were a few variations of the duo that I disliked when I was a kid, especially the Gene Deitch incarnation. Whenever one of them would come on I would groan in disgust and wait for one of the better ones to come on. The Cartoon Network would play the great ones and then throw that junk at you right in the middle of it! I also grew up with a partial distaste for Chuck Jones because his Tom and Jerry cartoons were so bland, but then I would see his Daffy Duck or Wile E. Coyote cartoons and wonder: "How did the same man make these?" All of this to say, the cartoons that Maltin discusses in this book were all extraordinarily important to my development. They still continue to influence and fascinate me. I have done much online research of these men since I was a kid, and some of my questions have been answered. I found out that men like Bob Clampett, Tex Avery, Chuck Jones, Friz Freleng, Joe Barbera, etc. are all highly revered by critics, but I still had many unanswered questions. I figured that it would be incredibly interesting if I could read some of the best works on the history of animation in America, and Maltin's book stood out to me since I am familiar with his passion for the subject from seeing many of his Disney cartoon commentaries. Maltin did not disappoint me. Not only did I learn so much about the overall history of animation, but I learned a ton about studios that I love and studios that I've never heard of. I enjoyed the fact that Maltin did not avoid chronicling the studios that ultimately did not produce any noteworthy work such as Terrytoons, or Ub Iwerks ill-fated solo studio. If you'd like a passionate history on a much neglected topic even in the modern era, I would definitely recommend Maltin's book. Unfortunately the book only goes up until about 1988, I believe. It's sort of funny to see Maltin hoping for a renaissance in great animation from Disney or WB at the time, when in fact that it what happened almost immediately after this revised version of the book was published. The Disney Renaissance took place and Warner Brothers started making the great animated televisions shows ever made. So there's a lot of great stuff that is not covered, but when you view this book as a concentrated history of American animated shorts from its beginnings until roughly the early 60's, then it works perfectly. Not even to mention that over a hundred pages at the end of the book is an incredible filmography of every cartoon put out by the discussed studios. This definitely makes the book a must own for any animation fan as a reference. I also have Michael Barrier's Hollywood Cartoons checked out from the library as well, so I'll be reviewing that soon!

  17. 4 out of 5

    Rosanna P.

    By far one of the most interesting history books I have ever read and certainly my favourite school book, Of Mice and Magic tells the story of animation, from lightning sketch to almost modern day. If you like cartoons or animation in any way and would like to learn more about them, or if you're an aspiring animator, this is certainly a book for you! Highly recommend it! By far one of the most interesting history books I have ever read and certainly my favourite school book, Of Mice and Magic tells the story of animation, from lightning sketch to almost modern day. If you like cartoons or animation in any way and would like to learn more about them, or if you're an aspiring animator, this is certainly a book for you! Highly recommend it!

  18. 5 out of 5

    Kurt Zisa

    A historical look at animation, Maltin does not fail to disappoint. In depth looks at Disney and the Warners does not shy away from animations dark corners - thus giving a comprehensive look at the medium. One problem is the book is out of date as the latest Disney entry is the Rescuers which is 20+ years old. Nonetheless a great look at animations early history and relevance.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Ayala

    It's pretty wordy and repetitive. Leonard Maltin is such a Disney fanboy and I was rolling my eyes through the whole chapter. At this point, it's become outdated, but it's still a good reference to learn about american animation from its beginnings to UPA era stuff It's pretty wordy and repetitive. Leonard Maltin is such a Disney fanboy and I was rolling my eyes through the whole chapter. At this point, it's become outdated, but it's still a good reference to learn about american animation from its beginnings to UPA era stuff

  20. 5 out of 5

    Adam

    A fascinating look at the early days of animation and what has happened since. Occasionally it felt too much like a textbook (which, to be fair, it is), but overall a delightful read, especially when accompanied by YouTube videos of classic cartoon shorts.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Jim Berkin

    The definitive guide to classic cinema animation, organized by studio. Maltin gives both extensive history as well as aesthetic reviews of the major classic cartoons by Disney, Warners, UPA and others. This should be part of any film library.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Michael P.

    Superb history of animated films in America. I cannot recomment it more highly.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Gijs Grob

    Uitgebreide geschiedenis van de Amerikaanse animated cartoon-industrie van Disney to UPA. Behandelt eerst de geluidsloze films en dan iedere studio apart. HET standaardwerk over dit onderwerp.

  24. 4 out of 5

    David Willard

    I cannot conceive of a better book on the history of animation.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Kara

    The best book about the history of animation ever written

  26. 4 out of 5

    Teri Temme

    Extremely interesting! My first animation book. Fascinating industry.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Taniya chiane nickole dickerson

  28. 5 out of 5

    Mark Arnold

  29. 4 out of 5

    James

  30. 5 out of 5

    V

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.