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I Was Saddam's Son: The True Story of an Iraqi Soldier's Secret Double Life

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Although it reads like a Clancy novel, this story of deception is true. Yahia describes his life as Uday Hussein's stand-in, bodyguard, confidant, and sometimes accomplice in the countless heinous crimes committed by this man and his father. Filled with photos of the author posing as Uday, as well as images of his life before his ordeal and more from his present life in hi Although it reads like a Clancy novel, this story of deception is true. Yahia describes his life as Uday Hussein's stand-in, bodyguard, confidant, and sometimes accomplice in the countless heinous crimes committed by this man and his father. Filled with photos of the author posing as Uday, as well as images of his life before his ordeal and more from his present life in hiding, this book takes readers through an incredible odyssey they will not soon forget.


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Although it reads like a Clancy novel, this story of deception is true. Yahia describes his life as Uday Hussein's stand-in, bodyguard, confidant, and sometimes accomplice in the countless heinous crimes committed by this man and his father. Filled with photos of the author posing as Uday, as well as images of his life before his ordeal and more from his present life in hi Although it reads like a Clancy novel, this story of deception is true. Yahia describes his life as Uday Hussein's stand-in, bodyguard, confidant, and sometimes accomplice in the countless heinous crimes committed by this man and his father. Filled with photos of the author posing as Uday, as well as images of his life before his ordeal and more from his present life in hiding, this book takes readers through an incredible odyssey they will not soon forget.

30 review for I Was Saddam's Son: The True Story of an Iraqi Soldier's Secret Double Life

  1. 4 out of 5

    Blair

    The Devil's Double is the ostensibly true life story on which the Lee Tamahori film of the same name, released earlier this year, was based. The movie, starring Dominic Cooper as both Saddam Hussein's son Uday and his body double or 'fiday', Latif Yahia, in the Iraq of the late 1980s, was hands down my favourite of 2011. This book was out of print at the time but, unsurprisingly, has been reissued in the wake of the film's success. Obviously, I had to get my hands on a copy and was keen to learn The Devil's Double is the ostensibly true life story on which the Lee Tamahori film of the same name, released earlier this year, was based. The movie, starring Dominic Cooper as both Saddam Hussein's son Uday and his body double or 'fiday', Latif Yahia, in the Iraq of the late 1980s, was hands down my favourite of 2011. This book was out of print at the time but, unsurprisingly, has been reissued in the wake of the film's success. Obviously, I had to get my hands on a copy and was keen to learn the truth of the story behind the dramatic, bloody film. Although I loved the film, I saw it more as an excessive action flick, in the style of gangster movies like Scarface (which it has frequently been compared to), than a realistic account of events in Iraq at that time. So the book offers something quite different, in that its events unfold over a much longer period of time and cover a great deal of political wranglings and governmental corruption in addition to Uday's outlandish behaviour. In places it can be dull, as Yahia does a lot of sitting around waiting, and rarely has close contact with Uday, for whom he is just another member of a vast body of staff. At other points, the deviant behaviour of Uday, his family and henchmen is so extravagant and disturbing as to be virtually beyond belief. Certain incidents (such as the murder of Kamel Hannah at a party, which is depicted in the film) stand out, but the book sometimes feels like a catalogue of horrendous crimes, and often makes for harrowing reading. This is a self-published book, so there are a number of minor errors and inconsistencies (eg sometimes it's 'fiday', other times it's 'fidai' - I'm not sure which is correct, and assume both are acceptable in English) but there's nothing significant enough to actually spoil the reading experience. The main trouble with Yahia's story is that aspersions have been cast on his account, most notably in this Guardian article, published at the time of the film's release. So there's no way of knowing whether everything (or, indeed, anything) contained within this book is genuinely true. Probably because I was already aware of this controversy, there were moments when I did have doubts about the veracity of the story and wondered how Yahia could possibly have known/observed these things unless he was either embellishing the truth, or was actually more closely involved than the narrative suggested. All in all I found this a very interesting read, but I ended up feeling frustrated that, without any other evidence, I couldn't be entirely convinced of its authenticity. It's certainly given me a different perspective on the film - not that I didn't take the underlying story seriously before, but now that I know more about the depravity of Saddam Hussein's regime, I'll probably find it harder to enjoy on the next watch. If you were as fascinated by the movie as I was (and you can manage to track down a copy), this book is nevertheless worth reading to provide a more in-depth perspective on the story that inspired it.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Betty

    A CHILLING LIFE STORY! ENGROSSING! When this author invited me to be his friend on GoodReads, I checked his profile and then accepted. When I learned that he was the man I had read about years before--the one who was forced into being a "body double" for Saddam Hussein's evil oldest son, Uday--I was intrigued enough to read the book he had written about his ghastly experiences. As you might know, political leaders have often been targets of assassination, and in Iraq there's an institution called A CHILLING LIFE STORY! ENGROSSING! When this author invited me to be his friend on GoodReads, I checked his profile and then accepted. When I learned that he was the man I had read about years before--the one who was forced into being a "body double" for Saddam Hussein's evil oldest son, Uday--I was intrigued enough to read the book he had written about his ghastly experiences. As you might know, political leaders have often been targets of assassination, and in Iraq there's an institution called fidal, which means "body double." Since Latif Yahia bore a striking resemblance to Uday, the government pulled him out of the front lines during the Iran-Iraq war, forcing him to submit to a transformation that made him the very image of Uday. Yahia served as Uday's double for approximately five years (1987-1991) before the government of Sadam Hussein released him, after torturing and imprisoning him. The demonic acts Yahia witnessed in those years is beyond belief; he describes them in this book in such graphic detail as to leave the reader gasping in disbelief: murder, rape, torture, nothing was too evil for Uday and his henchmen. Unappreciative of Yahia putting his life on the line for Uday on a daily basis, the evil spawn of Saddam also tormented him harshly one day while calling him "brother" on another. I felt sorry for the author's suffering and degradation as he witnessed things against his nature while pretending to go along with them. There will be those who disbelieve Yahia but it has been well-documented elsewhere, so I tend to believe his story. This book may not be an academic masterpiece, but it's easy to read and as riveting as a James Patterson thriller or a Dean Koontz horror. Spell-binding in its atrocities against the people of Iraq, the horrendous conditions described within its pages are hard to absorb. I cringed at the acts of inhumanity perpetrated by this barbaric family on its fellowman ... disgusting acts that are graphically described by this author. Latif Yahia relates that he had to smuggle his wife out of the country and was permitted no contact with friends and family during his bondage to Uday, and tells of his fleeing to Europe after his release from prison. I Was Saddam's Son screams for a sequel and would make a powerful movie, one that I hope would reveal more about the author's private life during the time of his persecution ... and after he resettled in Europe. I wonder what his relationships with his wife and children are like; if there were any repercussions from writing this book while the Husseins were still alive; and is he in danger now? (Dare I ask him in one of my GoodReads messages?) After reading this book, even the most soft-hearted readers will be glad the Husseins are dead so they can no longer persecute their own people ... if anyone had any previous qualms about that. Endnote: This review is of the first English language edition of this book, co-authored by Karl Wendl. Yahia also has two other published novels: The Devil's Double and The Black Hole: Latif Yahia Author of "I Was Saddam's Son" and "The Devil's Double" Which Have Sold Over One Million Copies Worldwide in Twenty Languages. Reviewed by Betty Dravis, 2008 author of 1106 Grand Boulevard, The Toonies Invade Silicon Valley, and Millennium Babe: The Prophechy

  3. 5 out of 5

    Redwinter

    Unique tale that Yahia Latif's one, forced to become the double of Saddam Hussein's son. As much as I consider myself relatively informed of what's going on in the world, I was surprised by the everyday horror of Iraqis' lives. There is a "1984" feeling, not being able to trust anyone completely, always afraid to be taken away for the slightest comment, if not out of pure bad luck. The systematic use of torture, the mass graves opposed to the vulgar exhibition of wealth and depravity of the Huss Unique tale that Yahia Latif's one, forced to become the double of Saddam Hussein's son. As much as I consider myself relatively informed of what's going on in the world, I was surprised by the everyday horror of Iraqis' lives. There is a "1984" feeling, not being able to trust anyone completely, always afraid to be taken away for the slightest comment, if not out of pure bad luck. The systematic use of torture, the mass graves opposed to the vulgar exhibition of wealth and depravity of the Hussein's family. Uday was a man without limits who took what he wanted and genunely enjoyed the suffering of others, when he bothered to care. It reminds me of Terry Pratchett's "small gods" and what Death says about Vorbis [spoilers?] "he was a murderer, and a creator of murderers". Both as a person and as a part of system, Uday was a murderer and a creator of murderers. Interesting reading to see what it looks like to be (almost) on the right side of the fence during Saddam's reign. Almost, because Latif's life has not been spared the incredible level of violent of this regime.

  4. 5 out of 5

    C. Scott

    A truly incredible tale. Imagine the biggest spoiled brat you've ever known, then remove all societal boundaries so that entitled brat is now allowed to steal, rape, and murder with impunity and you have the vile princeling Uday Saddam Hussein. Uday was the eldest son of Iraq's notorious autocrat - proof that not only was Saddam Hussein a terrible man, but a terrible father as well. It's said in this book that Saddam made Uday watch videos of torture and murder when the boy was only 7 years old. A truly incredible tale. Imagine the biggest spoiled brat you've ever known, then remove all societal boundaries so that entitled brat is now allowed to steal, rape, and murder with impunity and you have the vile princeling Uday Saddam Hussein. Uday was the eldest son of Iraq's notorious autocrat - proof that not only was Saddam Hussein a terrible man, but a terrible father as well. It's said in this book that Saddam made Uday watch videos of torture and murder when the boy was only 7 years old. The Devil's Double tells the story of Latif Yahia, an upper class Iraqi who just happened to bear a striking resemblance to Uday Hussein. They started off as classmates, school boy chums. After Yahia has gone off to college and is completing his compulsory military service he is called by Uday to become his "fiday," his official doppelganger. Just like dear old dad (or Josef Stalin) it is handy for Uday to have someone who can pretend to be him - especially when enemies and assassins are lurking about. And the Hussein family had plenty of enemies. It's an offer that Yahia really can't refuse, on pain of death. He's tortured until he agrees to say yes anyway. He is constantly guarded and watched to make sure he complies. So begins a life of forced servitude spent in posh imprisonment. Yahia is a firsthand witness to many hideous crimes by Uday ... torture, rape, murder - each more disturbing than the last. It is a truly bizarre story filled with incredible details... so why does it feel so boring? The answer is Latif Yahia. It's not that he's a poor writer (he was helped by Karl Wendl). I just can't get rid of the feeling that he is holding back. Perhaps it's the nature of Yahia's time spent impersonating another person, the years of self-abegnation, but our main protagonist remains a cypher. I don't blame him. He was tortured repeatedly. After one particularly harsh period of torture he says, "I have been clinging to a thread of hope and promising myself that the nightmare will come to an end. But it becomes more difficult and the pain overcomes my will, killing the hope within me. I no longer have the power to resist. I have become a mere tattered rag of a man and surrendered myself to them without a word or a groan." I still feel like it's possible that he was a less passive participant in the dark misdeeds perpetrated by Uday's crew. Yahia claims to have always been an unwilling witness, off to the side of the action, morally repelled. I don't know if I believe it. This is Yahia's story and it seems that he is working hard to make himself appear the innocent victim, leaving out any details about more active participation or peer pressure. In a later passage Yahia reproaches himself for never gunning Uday down when he had the chance saying, "Just one pull of the trigger would have been enough. But I did nothing. So I can't blame the others; we're all cowards, caught between fear and the desire to bask in the warmth of the regime. We love it and hate it equally. We revolve in its orbit. We have become puppets manipulated by the regime's wanton fingers." I think this is essentially the problem I have with this book: a fantastic tale with an unreliable narrator.

  5. 4 out of 5

    LC

    Interesting but difficult book to read because of the explicit content. I could only read a little bit at a time before getting overcome with emotion and disgust (the description of the torture and killings were likely accurate but also hard to fathom).

  6. 5 out of 5

    Mohamad Fazeli

    I like the thrill of it. It has nice documentation of the area but lacked perspectives of other characters. I recommend it to people who want to know about Saddam's reign. I'm currently looking for a more holistic review of the time. I like the thrill of it. It has nice documentation of the area but lacked perspectives of other characters. I recommend it to people who want to know about Saddam's reign. I'm currently looking for a more holistic review of the time.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Berthine

    Warning: this book will leave you horrified.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Zahra Hamza

    Action book

  9. 4 out of 5

    Kalle Wescott

    Like you, I read for many reasons, including for pleasure, entertainment, and knowledge. I've been on a mostly non-fiction kick for a decade+. I also read to experience worlds I would not otherwise have access to, and in many cases would not want to be part of. So, recently, some of the more captivating material I've read has been about the Mafia, Seal Team Six, and the Hell's Angels and other biker gangs. In the latter category of experiencing other worlds, I just finished reading Latif Yahia's / Like you, I read for many reasons, including for pleasure, entertainment, and knowledge. I've been on a mostly non-fiction kick for a decade+. I also read to experience worlds I would not otherwise have access to, and in many cases would not want to be part of. So, recently, some of the more captivating material I've read has been about the Mafia, Seal Team Six, and the Hell's Angels and other biker gangs. In the latter category of experiencing other worlds, I just finished reading Latif Yahia's /The Devil's Double: The True Story of the Man Forced to be the double of Saddam Hussein's Eldest Son/ Uday, originally published in Arabic in 1992 and then more recently (2010) in English. It was also made in to a movie (Guardian article, below). Here's a review of the book: https://themuslimvibe.com/.../the-dev...... Fascinating and absolutely nuts. Started it thinking I would read a little before going to sleep, and *boom*! Then it was dawn.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Wendy Rosser-Soriano

    Excellent book. Some of the more disturbing parts will really stick with you long after reading, but well worth it.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Kev Reilly

    Perhaps Uday was worse than Saddam... Latif Yahia was a childhood 'friend' of one of Saddam Hussein who claims that in the late 1980s he was tortured, threatened & ultimately blackmailed into becoming Uday's double/decoy. This book chronicles mid 1988 until an unknown time in 1996. How much of this story is accurate, manipulated or completely false, is up for debate. Latif's tale has been questioned by some but the majority of it seems legitimate (the international community knew certain things at Perhaps Uday was worse than Saddam... Latif Yahia was a childhood 'friend' of one of Saddam Hussein who claims that in the late 1980s he was tortured, threatened & ultimately blackmailed into becoming Uday's double/decoy. This book chronicles mid 1988 until an unknown time in 1996. How much of this story is accurate, manipulated or completely false, is up for debate. Latif's tale has been questioned by some but the majority of it seems legitimate (the international community knew certain things at the time & some of the incidents documented have been confirmed as all but true in post-Saddam Iraq). The story focuses (almost equally) on Uday & Latif. Latif is shown as an innocent victim (& without giving away the end) continues down that path. Uday however, is shown to be a brutally violent narcissist (who at one point is even ordered to appear on a murder charge by his father Saddam). Uday is a sociopath who lacks empathy for everyone around him, even to his father & the 'whore' who he claims to love most in life. Latif's first-hand account of Uday's murder of one of Saddam's bodyguards (Kamel Hana Gegeo), is disturbing but facsinating at the same time. Having the audacity to murder a man that is close to his father in such a brutal manner infront of a house of party guests WHILE trying to sexually abuse a girl is astonishing. Although this sounds as it's one of the highly contested accounts of Latif's story, it's not. We know this to be true publicly as former/deposed Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak's wife Suzanne (who was at the party) acknolweged this event before Uday's demise in 2003 (& openly expressed her disgust at it). A very interesting read with an ending that you probably remember happening but didn't know what the cause of it was...

  12. 5 out of 5

    Angele

    Interesting and Educational, Excellent Book, Latif Yahia has seen things most people cannot even imagine. As a double for Uday Hussein, son and possible successor of Saddam, Latif witnessed acts of depravity and torture that almost sound like something out of a Marquis de Sade novel. This book will open your eyes to the relative value of human life; to the ruling elite of Iraq, people are as expendable as bad batteries. Yahya himself endured harsh torments at the hands of a man who called him a " Interesting and Educational, Excellent Book, Latif Yahia has seen things most people cannot even imagine. As a double for Uday Hussein, son and possible successor of Saddam, Latif witnessed acts of depravity and torture that almost sound like something out of a Marquis de Sade novel. This book will open your eyes to the relative value of human life; to the ruling elite of Iraq, people are as expendable as bad batteries. Yahya himself endured harsh torments at the hands of a man who called him a "brother"- one can only, with a great deal of dread, contemplate the atrocities meted out to enemies. After reading this book, I came to the conclusion that the only thing worse than Saddam is his oldest brat, and I would personally throttle the life out of that demon myself if given the opportunity. Even if only a fraction of it is true (and I believe most of it is accurate, as I've seen several of the tales about Uday in other sources), the entire Saddam Hussein regime is following nicely down the path paved by the likes of Hitler and Stalin. The big difference is that the Iraqi government is doing these things, as we speak. Enjoy this book, I reccommend this book 100%, Great read.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Eve

    This is a book I've been interested in reading ever since I saw trailer for the film, starring Dominic Cooper, whose look for the film is excellent and convincing. The story is about an Iraqi soldier, Latif, who is forced into becoming the body double, or 'fiday', of Uday Saddam Hussain, Saddam Hussain's eldest son. Sadly the film didn't live up to expectations, and it's one that I would actually recommend seeing before reading the book. The book was gripping, often fast paced, and hard to put d This is a book I've been interested in reading ever since I saw trailer for the film, starring Dominic Cooper, whose look for the film is excellent and convincing. The story is about an Iraqi soldier, Latif, who is forced into becoming the body double, or 'fiday', of Uday Saddam Hussain, Saddam Hussain's eldest son. Sadly the film didn't live up to expectations, and it's one that I would actually recommend seeing before reading the book. The book was gripping, often fast paced, and hard to put down. It was also incredibly graphic in parts, when describing Uday's more sadistic acts, including the rape of a bride on her honeymoon and the murder of her groom, the capture, rape and torture of a 14 year old girl, and the murder of his father, Saddam Hussain's trusted friend, Kammel Hannah, at a party. Although I learnt a lot about the Saddam regime at the time of the Gulf war, it is hard to say exactly how much of the novel is true. Some events, like the murder of Kammel Hannah are verifiable, but how much of Latif's story is true is up for debate, as even he is sketchy with the details when pressed by journalists.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Roger Charles

    A great read that is truly hard to believe. Do I believe it? YES but it's so extreme it could only happen in a dictatorial society, I guess, for Uday Hussein lived truly wheels off. He had no boundaries or rules. None. Hard to believe but I no doubt it all happened as Latif states in his book. The book also examines one's resolve to do right and one's values. It's a book that may give insight on how Nazis in Germany did all those horrific killings during WWII. Self preservation is a huge motivato A great read that is truly hard to believe. Do I believe it? YES but it's so extreme it could only happen in a dictatorial society, I guess, for Uday Hussein lived truly wheels off. He had no boundaries or rules. None. Hard to believe but I no doubt it all happened as Latif states in his book. The book also examines one's resolve to do right and one's values. It's a book that may give insight on how Nazis in Germany did all those horrific killings during WWII. Self preservation is a huge motivator. Mr Latif had the courage to go it alone and walk away when his physical being was at it's weakest. A great book showing many sides of the human spirit.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Katherine Johnson

    While it took over 8 months to finally track down a copy I can honestly say it was well worth the wait. Yahia paints a picture of absolute horror, made all the more painful when the reader remembers the book is autobiographical. After finishing I was left in a place of relief in Yahia's escape, but also disturbed by the sheer disregard for human life seen in these pages. If you come across a copy of this I urge you to read it, not only because of it's rare nature, but because underneath the pain While it took over 8 months to finally track down a copy I can honestly say it was well worth the wait. Yahia paints a picture of absolute horror, made all the more painful when the reader remembers the book is autobiographical. After finishing I was left in a place of relief in Yahia's escape, but also disturbed by the sheer disregard for human life seen in these pages. If you come across a copy of this I urge you to read it, not only because of it's rare nature, but because underneath the pain there is a desperate plea by the author to have his story acknowledged.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Silke

    I'v seen the movie last september and I found it great, and I became interested in the subject and wanted to know more. The books tells the real story of Uday Husseins fidday (double). I heard some people tell before about the cruelty that happened in Iraq and couldn't believe it. After reading I was shocked about the cruelty, but I also think that the world must know what happened and maybe still happen in other countries. How people can torture other people with this cruelty. We can't ignore t I'v seen the movie last september and I found it great, and I became interested in the subject and wanted to know more. The books tells the real story of Uday Husseins fidday (double). I heard some people tell before about the cruelty that happened in Iraq and couldn't believe it. After reading I was shocked about the cruelty, but I also think that the world must know what happened and maybe still happen in other countries. How people can torture other people with this cruelty. We can't ignore this and everybody should read this book.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Rebes

    I was interested in this book b/c it seemed like it'd be interesting. It was, because it was like watching a train wreck. It was an easy read in the sense of its being a linear narrative. It was a difficult read because of everything awful the regime was and did and represented. And then it just...ends. And that's it. I was interested in this book b/c it seemed like it'd be interesting. It was, because it was like watching a train wreck. It was an easy read in the sense of its being a linear narrative. It was a difficult read because of everything awful the regime was and did and represented. And then it just...ends. And that's it.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer Bucholtz

    This was an amazing non-fiction book about a man recruited (i.e. forced) to be the body double for Uday Hussein during the late 1980's and early 1990's. I could not put the book down. I knew the Hussein regime was brutal, but this book really opened my eyes to the daily atrocities Saddam and his son, Uday, committed. This was an amazing non-fiction book about a man recruited (i.e. forced) to be the body double for Uday Hussein during the late 1980's and early 1990's. I could not put the book down. I knew the Hussein regime was brutal, but this book really opened my eyes to the daily atrocities Saddam and his son, Uday, committed.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Rich

    Good book about the abuses of Uday the son of Saddam Hussein by his look a like. I played a role in the end drama but I'm glad I'm not mentioned. Other players, American and Iraqis, are also not mentioned. It is not a book for the squimish. There are some graphic descriptions of torture. Good book about the abuses of Uday the son of Saddam Hussein by his look a like. I played a role in the end drama but I'm glad I'm not mentioned. Other players, American and Iraqis, are also not mentioned. It is not a book for the squimish. There are some graphic descriptions of torture.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Mousa

    In this book, you will know something that you might heard about it from having double for some people who are protecting them from danger. You can see how Iraq's people were suffering from Saddam and his son. In this book, you will know something that you might heard about it from having double for some people who are protecting them from danger. You can see how Iraq's people were suffering from Saddam and his son.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Amy

    Disturbing truth This book was very hard to read at some points due to the graphic crimes, but I'm always a fan of the victim. What he had to do to survive and save his family is beyond imaginable. I can't fathom the atrocities he has seen in his days. Disturbing truth This book was very hard to read at some points due to the graphic crimes, but I'm always a fan of the victim. What he had to do to survive and save his family is beyond imaginable. I can't fathom the atrocities he has seen in his days.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Rosey Higgins

    WOWZA!! What a great book!! There are some parts that are very hard to read due to the brutality of the Torture that was inflicted upon a Nation! I look forward to reading the next book!

  23. 4 out of 5

    Linda

    This book contains horrible scenes about torture that I wish I'd never read, as they are etched in my memory forever. If you can stomach it, it will give you an insight into how cruel Saddam's system of oppression was. This book contains horrible scenes about torture that I wish I'd never read, as they are etched in my memory forever. If you can stomach it, it will give you an insight into how cruel Saddam's system of oppression was.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Anna

    Real story - brutal, but true as the life in Iraq as copy of dictator's son. Change from a normal, average person into a brutal man. Real story - brutal, but true as the life in Iraq as copy of dictator's son. Change from a normal, average person into a brutal man.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Soofy2002

    We are all victim ...

  26. 4 out of 5

    Steve Kitch

    amazing details into the real life of saddam and the troubles in iraq post 1980.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Alasdair

    Mediocre at best, I'm afraid. Mediocre at best, I'm afraid.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Kathrina

    Movie production begins this summer.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Abdulrahman

    A thrilling autobiography , poorly written

  30. 4 out of 5

    Dara

    I can not find a copy of this book anywhere!!!!! Any Suggestions?

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