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How to Make an Apple Pie and See the World

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Illus. in full color. An apple pie is easy to make...if the market is open. But if the market is closed, the world becomes your grocery store. This deliciously silly recipe for apple pie takes readers around the globe to gather ingredients. First hop a steamboat to Italy for the finest semolina wheat. Then hitch a ride to England and hijack a cow for the freshest possible Illus. in full color. An apple pie is easy to make...if the market is open. But if the market is closed, the world becomes your grocery store. This deliciously silly recipe for apple pie takes readers around the globe to gather ingredients. First hop a steamboat to Italy for the finest semolina wheat. Then hitch a ride to England and hijack a cow for the freshest possible milk. And, oh yes! Don't forget to go apple picking in Vermont! A simple recipe for apple pie is included.


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Illus. in full color. An apple pie is easy to make...if the market is open. But if the market is closed, the world becomes your grocery store. This deliciously silly recipe for apple pie takes readers around the globe to gather ingredients. First hop a steamboat to Italy for the finest semolina wheat. Then hitch a ride to England and hijack a cow for the freshest possible Illus. in full color. An apple pie is easy to make...if the market is open. But if the market is closed, the world becomes your grocery store. This deliciously silly recipe for apple pie takes readers around the globe to gather ingredients. First hop a steamboat to Italy for the finest semolina wheat. Then hitch a ride to England and hijack a cow for the freshest possible milk. And, oh yes! Don't forget to go apple picking in Vermont! A simple recipe for apple pie is included.

30 review for How to Make an Apple Pie and See the World

  1. 5 out of 5

    Calista

    I enjoy the absurdity of this book. It is wonderful. A girl wants to make an apple pie and her local market is closed and so she does what anyone would do. She gets a boat to Europe to collect the ingredients from the source. Did you know that cinnamon is grow from a kurundu tree? I didn’t. The best kurundu is grown in Sri Lanka. This girl travels with a chicken and a cow she picks up, you know, for freshness. Then she makes everything from scratch. That is some industriousness right there. As I I enjoy the absurdity of this book. It is wonderful. A girl wants to make an apple pie and her local market is closed and so she does what anyone would do. She gets a boat to Europe to collect the ingredients from the source. Did you know that cinnamon is grow from a kurundu tree? I didn’t. The best kurundu is grown in Sri Lanka. This girl travels with a chicken and a cow she picks up, you know, for freshness. Then she makes everything from scratch. That is some industriousness right there. As I said, this silly story amused me. I’m not sure how to describe the art. Maybe it’s a little surreal and a little impression. It’s ok and it does fit the nature of the story. There is an apple pie recipe at the back of the book and the niece wanted to make it. The kids thought this was funny. The nephew especially liked the part of the parachuting animals and girl at one point. They gave this 3 stars.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Kathryn

    4.5 stars. Okay, so I'm not sure why, but I loved this book!!! It is sooo cute! The illustrations are grand, and I love the idea of going all over the world to find ingredients for good ol' apple pie. I think I just really found the illustrations to my taste, and I love travel books, so this is perfect for me. The only reason I didn't give it five stars is probably overly-critical of me, but I wondered if the girl is paying for all the things she takes (um, just taking a cow from an English coun 4.5 stars. Okay, so I'm not sure why, but I loved this book!!! It is sooo cute! The illustrations are grand, and I love the idea of going all over the world to find ingredients for good ol' apple pie. I think I just really found the illustrations to my taste, and I love travel books, so this is perfect for me. The only reason I didn't give it five stars is probably overly-critical of me, but I wondered if the girl is paying for all the things she takes (um, just taking a cow from an English countryside???). I think it is implied whens he invites her friends from around the world to enjoy the pie with her at the end of the story, but just might be better for kids to have it spelled out--that is, that one shouldn't simply go picking apples from an orchard, and our heroine actually pays for what she takes.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Manybooks

    While perhaps at times a bit too overly fantastical and whimsical for my picture book tastes (and although I do kind of wish that the unnamed main character had actually striven to collect more of her apple pie ingredients from local and not so much from international sources, from areas requiring overseas travelling), Marjorie Priceman's How to Make and Apple Pie and See the World does present to children the important and essential truth that without markets, that without grocery stores, makin While perhaps at times a bit too overly fantastical and whimsical for my picture book tastes (and although I do kind of wish that the unnamed main character had actually striven to collect more of her apple pie ingredients from local and not so much from international sources, from areas requiring overseas travelling), Marjorie Priceman's How to Make and Apple Pie and See the World does present to children the important and essential truth that without markets, that without grocery stores, making foods, making recipes is actually and generally rather potentially difficult. For not only do you need to procure the main ingredients for a given recipe (in this case a simple apple pie), but once you have obtained the raw materials (durum wheat, salt water, a chicken, cinnamon, a cow, sugar cane, apples), the former often will still need to be processed and changed in order to be actually make the recipe, to bake the apple pie desired; the collected durum wheat must be milled into flour, the salt has to be evaporated out of the sea water, the chicken must lay an egg, the cow must be milked and the milk then churned into butter and so on and so on), thus clearly showing and demonstrating in a fun and engaging fashion that individual food preparation used to be considerably more involved and complicated than it is now when much if not most of our produce, the ingredients for making recipes from so-called scratch is simply a matter of going to the local store (and perhaps to also point out that there are actually many areas of the world, where basic food preparation is still much more involved and complicated, still does entail amassing and then often processing raw materials into the ingredients required for a pie, a stew, well really anything). As to the accompanying illustrations (and Marjorie Priceman acts as both author and illustrator with How to Make and Apple Pie and See the World), while on their own, I find them a trifle too garish and cartoon like for my aesthetics, they do show a wonderful colour scheme and with their sense of fun and movement, act as a perfect complement to and for the engaging, often slyly humorous text (although I do have to wonder why the French chicken the main character collects looks more like a rooster than a chicken). Nevertheless, most highly recommended, and a perfect combination of fun and education, instruction and delight.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Lisa (not getting friends updates) Vegan

    The cover illustration seemed similar to the art style of Chagall, and I was expecting the inside illustrations to remind me of his work. They didn’t. But, I really loved them. The illustrations are very detailed and a great deal of fun. I particularly enjoyed the dogs, cats, birds, and wild animals, but “seeing the world” was enjoyable too, transport vehicles included. The story is a delight. I’d have LOVED it when I was a kid. An apple pie is so easy to make: go to the store and get the ingredi The cover illustration seemed similar to the art style of Chagall, and I was expecting the inside illustrations to remind me of his work. They didn’t. But, I really loved them. The illustrations are very detailed and a great deal of fun. I particularly enjoyed the dogs, cats, birds, and wild animals, but “seeing the world” was enjoyable too, transport vehicles included. The story is a delight. I’d have LOVED it when I was a kid. An apple pie is so easy to make: go to the store and get the ingredients and then make it and bake it, but if the store is closed… well, there’s an alternative way to gather those ingredients. The result is tremendously amusing and certainly gives a bit of a lesson on not only making an apple pie from scratch, but on how the original ingredients can be procured. There is an apple pie recipe included in the back of the book, which is a nice touch. It’s very (unnecessarily) non-vegan, but for vegan baking it would be very easy to veganize. Much thanks to Goodreads’ friend Kathryn whose review alerted me to this book.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Laura Harrison

    Classic Marjorie Priceman. One of my favorite Priceman titles. Wonderful!

  6. 5 out of 5

    Abigail

    A young girl, wanting to make an apple pie but finding that the local market is closed, when she goes to buy some ingredients, embarks on a whirlwind tour in this fantastical picture-book from Marjorie Priceman, gathering everything she needs in various countries around the world. Harvesting wheat in Italy and sugar-cane in Jamaica, obtaining a fancy hen (for eggs) in France, a very polite cow (for milk) in England, and the bark of a kurundu tree (for cinnamon) in Sri Lanka, she eventually finds A young girl, wanting to make an apple pie but finding that the local market is closed, when she goes to buy some ingredients, embarks on a whirlwind tour in this fantastical picture-book from Marjorie Priceman, gathering everything she needs in various countries around the world. Harvesting wheat in Italy and sugar-cane in Jamaica, obtaining a fancy hen (for eggs) in France, a very polite cow (for milk) in England, and the bark of a kurundu tree (for cinnamon) in Sri Lanka, she eventually finds herself stateside again, stopping off in Vermont for apples. Preparing each ingredient - this is definitely not the quickest way to make a pie! - she eventually prepares a delightful dessert. When she finds she needs ice cream, however, and discovers that the market is (still!) closed, what will she do...? I enjoyed How to Make an Apple Pie and See the World, which was chosen as one of our August selections, over in The Picture-Book Club to which I belong, where our theme this month is "traveling." The matter-of-fact silliness of the premise here, as the girl heads off on a great adventure, in order to get some common ingredients, is entertaining, and the colorful artwork appealing. I think young readers will find Priceman's book engaging, while also being led to think a little bit about where some of those common ingredients come from, or how they are produced. There's a world of work behind every product we buy, and it's nice to see a sweet little children's tale communicating that so effortlessly, without ever becoming didactic.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Shanna Gonzalez

    Delectable is the word for this whimsical flight of fancy around the world. It begins with a girl opening a cookbook, and the narrator states, "Making an apple pie is really easy. First, get all the ingredients at the market. Mix them well, bake and serve. Unless, of course, the market is closed." In that case, it's time for a steamship voyage to Europe for semolina wheat, a train ride to France for a chicken (which will lay a fresh egg upon arriving home), a boat trip to Sri Lanka for cinnamon Delectable is the word for this whimsical flight of fancy around the world. It begins with a girl opening a cookbook, and the narrator states, "Making an apple pie is really easy. First, get all the ingredients at the market. Mix them well, bake and serve. Unless, of course, the market is closed." In that case, it's time for a steamship voyage to Europe for semolina wheat, a train ride to France for a chicken (which will lay a fresh egg upon arriving home), a boat trip to Sri Lanka for cinnamon (peeled from the kurundu tree under which a leopard is napping). On to England for a milk cow, and Vermont for apples. When the cheerful protagonist arrives home (by airplane, don't want the ingredients to spoil), she prepares the ingredients and serves up a warm pie for all her friends (sans ice cream, as the market is still closed). The book ends with a recipe for apple pie. This story is a wonderful early introduction to the concepts of trade, culture, and cooking, and for thoughtful readers may provide an opportunity to discuss the effect of globalization on national economies. It's infused with a lighthearted wit and and gives a whole new meaning to the phrase "As American as apple pie." A delicious excursion.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Dolly

    As we followed the main character around the world on her adventure to get 'authentic' ingredients for her apple pie, I couldn't help thinking of the If You Give... series by Laura Joffe Numeroff. I think it was just the (mostly) logical progression of actions, one after another. In any case, this was an entertaining book to read aloud and we loved the humorous illustrations. We enjoyed reading this book together. This story was selected as one of the books for the August 2012 - Traveling reads a As we followed the main character around the world on her adventure to get 'authentic' ingredients for her apple pie, I couldn't help thinking of the If You Give... series by Laura Joffe Numeroff. I think it was just the (mostly) logical progression of actions, one after another. In any case, this was an entertaining book to read aloud and we loved the humorous illustrations. We enjoyed reading this book together. This story was selected as one of the books for the August 2012 - Traveling reads at the Picture-Book Club in the Children's Books Group here at Goodreads. This book was also selected as one of the books for the October 2017 - Apples and Pumpkins reads at the Picture-Book Club in the Children's Books Group here at Goodreads.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Laura (Book Scrounger)

    This book is pretty fantastical, but still fun and a little bit educational (though not nearly as much as How to Dig a Hole to the Other Side of the World, which is also one of the few picture books I can think of off the top of my head that is also written from a second-person point of view). It involves a market that is closed and an apple pie that needs to be made -- and you are therefore instructed to jet off to numerous different countries to collect "only the best" ingredients for your pie This book is pretty fantastical, but still fun and a little bit educational (though not nearly as much as How to Dig a Hole to the Other Side of the World, which is also one of the few picture books I can think of off the top of my head that is also written from a second-person point of view). It involves a market that is closed and an apple pie that needs to be made -- and you are therefore instructed to jet off to numerous different countries to collect "only the best" ingredients for your pie -- France, Italy, Sri Lanka, etc. Not too wordy for little ones, and a nice introduction to the names of some other countries of the world, though little is said about them besides which ingredient they produce.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Randie D. Camp, M.S.

    I love the logic of Priceman, it's priceless! So, if you would like to make a simple apple pie but your local market is closed...travel the world to find the best ingredients and then bake and enjoy your apple pie :). The text is rhythmic, rich, and fun to read aloud while capturing the charm and culture of the places one must travel to find the best cinnamon, eggs, milk, etc. The very last page made me smile... As much as I love this book, the illustrations didn't quite live up to the brilliance I love the logic of Priceman, it's priceless! So, if you would like to make a simple apple pie but your local market is closed...travel the world to find the best ingredients and then bake and enjoy your apple pie :). The text is rhythmic, rich, and fun to read aloud while capturing the charm and culture of the places one must travel to find the best cinnamon, eggs, milk, etc. The very last page made me smile... As much as I love this book, the illustrations didn't quite live up to the brilliance of the text and logic of Priceman.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Luisa Knight

    This was brilliantly clever! I loved every bit of it. And I now understand why it's always checked out at the library! Autumn is such a good time to make apple pie and what better book to read to get you in the mood. It will give you a list of ingredients, and if the market happens to be closed ... will tell you where each item can be found around the world. Be ready for a delightful imaginary journey ... and it does include a recipe! Ages: 3 - 7 #geography #global #culture #cooking **Like my review This was brilliantly clever! I loved every bit of it. And I now understand why it's always checked out at the library! Autumn is such a good time to make apple pie and what better book to read to get you in the mood. It will give you a list of ingredients, and if the market happens to be closed ... will tell you where each item can be found around the world. Be ready for a delightful imaginary journey ... and it does include a recipe! Ages: 3 - 7 #geography #global #culture #cooking **Like my reviews? Then you should follow me! Because I have hundreds more just like this one. With each review, I provide a Cleanliness Report, mentioning any objectionable content I come across so that parents and/or conscientious readers (like me) can determine beforehand whether they want to read a book or not. Content surprises are super annoying, especially when you’re 100+ pages in, so here’s my attempt to help you avoid that! So Follow or Friend me here on GoodReads! You’ll see my updates as I’m reading and know which books I’m liking and what I’m not finishing and why. You’ll also be able to utilize my library for looking up titles to see whether the book you’re thinking about reading next has any objectionable content or not. From swear words, to romance, to bad attitudes (in children’s books), I cover it all!

  12. 4 out of 5

    Robert

    This is a cute little story about how to make an apple pie. The fun begins with how to gather the ingredients if the market is closed. The little girl packs a suitcase to begin her world travels to track down what she needs. She takes a steamship to Europe to find semolina wheat in Italy, a hen in France (for the egg), a cow in England (milk), cinnamon in Sri Lanka, salt from the ocean, sugar from Jamaica, and apples from Vermont. I use this book as an introduction to the seven continents and how This is a cute little story about how to make an apple pie. The fun begins with how to gather the ingredients if the market is closed. The little girl packs a suitcase to begin her world travels to track down what she needs. She takes a steamship to Europe to find semolina wheat in Italy, a hen in France (for the egg), a cow in England (milk), cinnamon in Sri Lanka, salt from the ocean, sugar from Jamaica, and apples from Vermont. I use this book as an introduction to the seven continents and how people spread across the globe, specifically the crossing of Beringea from Asia to North America. The children enjoy this tale.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Jenny

    While somewhat ridiculous, this is a fun and creative story. A young girl wants to make a pie so she heads to the market. But the market is closed. So she travels around the world to gather the ingredients she will need for the pie...to Italy for the wheat, to Sri Lanka for the cinnamon, to England for a cow to get milk to make butter and so on. Finally, she returns home and makes her apple pie. A recipe is included. The illustrations really add to the charm and fun of the story. And it does hel While somewhat ridiculous, this is a fun and creative story. A young girl wants to make a pie so she heads to the market. But the market is closed. So she travels around the world to gather the ingredients she will need for the pie...to Italy for the wheat, to Sri Lanka for the cinnamon, to England for a cow to get milk to make butter and so on. Finally, she returns home and makes her apple pie. A recipe is included. The illustrations really add to the charm and fun of the story. And it does help children see how global our market often is (although it would be good to discuss with them the benefits of buying local).

  14. 4 out of 5

    ABC

    Follow a girl around the world as she searches for apple pie ingredients in various countries: Italy, France, Sri Lanka, England, Jamaica and Vermont in the U.S. The illustrations are very nice. There are two world maps included, one of which is well-drawn, the other one sucks. (Both maps leave out New Zealand though.) There is an apple pie recipe at the back of the book, but we haven't made it. Follow a girl around the world as she searches for apple pie ingredients in various countries: Italy, France, Sri Lanka, England, Jamaica and Vermont in the U.S. The illustrations are very nice. There are two world maps included, one of which is well-drawn, the other one sucks. (Both maps leave out New Zealand though.) There is an apple pie recipe at the back of the book, but we haven't made it.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Heather

    Our favorite Five In a Row book, so far! Today we made salt water so we can see the salt left after the water evaporates! Tomorrow we're going to the farmer's market to buy cinnamon (not ground) and sugar cane! After a visit to the N GA orchards, we'll be baking apple pie! No trip to Jamaica or France...alas Our favorite Five In a Row book, so far! Today we made salt water so we can see the salt left after the water evaporates! Tomorrow we're going to the farmer's market to buy cinnamon (not ground) and sugar cane! After a visit to the N GA orchards, we'll be baking apple pie! No trip to Jamaica or France...alas

  16. 4 out of 5

    Jana

    I read this book to my 5th grade students. It was a cute book. We talked about each location and talked about the sequence of each of the steps. One of my students noticed that the illustration for the chicken that was picked up in France for the eggs was a rooster. Not many eggs coming from that! Anyway, we had a good time reading it.

  17. 5 out of 5

    SamZ

    It's really very easy to make an apple pie - unless the store is closed. Buckle up and follow this girl to the source to find each of the ingredients to bake this pie from scratch. It's really very easy to make an apple pie - unless the store is closed. Buckle up and follow this girl to the source to find each of the ingredients to bake this pie from scratch.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Angela

    Good But Apple Cake: a Recipe for Love by Julie Pashkis is a shorter more simple version for younger audiences in Storytime.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Karen

    Ellie read this book to us during morning time. Cute book...krb 10/30/17

  20. 5 out of 5

    Bekah

    How to Make an Apple Pie and See the World, by Marjorie Priceman, is about a young woman who decides to make an apple pie. She teaches the reader how to do it. She says that you go to the market, buy all the indredients, mix them up, and serve the pie. But, if by any chance the market is closed, you have to go elsewhere to get your ingredients. The young woman travels all over the world to get the greatest wheat for her flour, eggs, milk for her butter, cinnamon, salt, apples, and sugar. She tra How to Make an Apple Pie and See the World, by Marjorie Priceman, is about a young woman who decides to make an apple pie. She teaches the reader how to do it. She says that you go to the market, buy all the indredients, mix them up, and serve the pie. But, if by any chance the market is closed, you have to go elsewhere to get your ingredients. The young woman travels all over the world to get the greatest wheat for her flour, eggs, milk for her butter, cinnamon, salt, apples, and sugar. She travels to places like Sri Lanka, Jamaica, Vermont, England, and more, all to make the perfect apple pie. Then, she gets home, prepares all the ingredients, and makes the perfect apple pie. I give this book 5/5 stars. It was a very cute and creative story. I like that it took a simple thing like baking an apple pie, and made an excting story out of it by going many places to get her ingredients. A story like this has the opportunity to spark curiosity and adventure in children. It was very well written, and I loved the illustrations.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Lynn Davidson

    A cleverly educational story about getting the ingredients to make an apple pie when the corner store is closed. Funny ending to a story that shows the reader all the work involved in far off places in the world, in the preparation of those ingredients. Fun illustrations.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Kate

    This is a children’s picture book about gathering the ingredients necessary to bake a pie and travelling the world to collect the ingredients right from the source

  23. 5 out of 5

    Chloe Thomason

    Summary: In this book, the main character wants to make an apple pie, but the store is closed. She details her journey around the world gathering all she needs to make an apple pie. She ends up traveling all around the world and ends up back in Vermont to get the apples. Evaluation: I really enjoyed this book and the descriptions of the different countries and the goods that came from that country to make the apple pie. This book was fun to read and is engaging. I think the author does a great jo Summary: In this book, the main character wants to make an apple pie, but the store is closed. She details her journey around the world gathering all she needs to make an apple pie. She ends up traveling all around the world and ends up back in Vermont to get the apples. Evaluation: I really enjoyed this book and the descriptions of the different countries and the goods that came from that country to make the apple pie. This book was fun to read and is engaging. I think the author does a great job of matching products to countries and ending up right back at home. Teaching idea: This would be a great way to teach producers and consumers. It is important for students to understand where products come from and how they producers meet the needs of consumers. I would teach this vocabulary while reading the book, since most students will not know these terms. It would fit in with grade level economic standards.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Candace

    Highly recommend! This book was recommended by Kiwi Crate to go with this month's box. What a wonderful and fun story! Loved reading it to my preschoolers. Highly recommend! Highly recommend! This book was recommended by Kiwi Crate to go with this month's box. What a wonderful and fun story! Loved reading it to my preschoolers. Highly recommend!

  25. 4 out of 5

    David

    How to Make an Apple Pie and See the World by Marjorie Priceman follows a determined young cook who, when she discovers the market is closed, travels to different parts of the world to get the ingredients to make apple pie. Priceman's whimsical illustrations are in watercolor. Most are double page spreads. Appealing animals should attract readers (I loved seeing different cats). My favorite image is of Sri Lanka. Other fave images are steamship, wheat, train, boat, Banana boat, plantation, parac How to Make an Apple Pie and See the World by Marjorie Priceman follows a determined young cook who, when she discovers the market is closed, travels to different parts of the world to get the ingredients to make apple pie. Priceman's whimsical illustrations are in watercolor. Most are double page spreads. Appealing animals should attract readers (I loved seeing different cats). My favorite image is of Sri Lanka. Other fave images are steamship, wheat, train, boat, Banana boat, plantation, parachutes, ingredients, and final picture. Quibbles: It should be made clear that the girl is buying ingredients and not just taking them. Stowing away on a banana boat seems a poor concept to encourage - I know it's a fantasy, but still.... I like the concept of showing travel, cultures and commodities, but buying local saves lots of money and energy, and our little Midwest farm used to produce apples, wheat, milk, eggs, and more. Despite my quibbles, I really enjoyed this. I applaud the author for producing such a useful book to show how food can come from around the world. Showing the original product and how to transform it into a useful item is very valuable. Recipes can be made into a geography lesson. Opportunities for using this in schools abound: it could be used for cooking, geography, math, science (history of certain products, hybrids, etc) animal study, and more. Recommended for school and public library collections. 4 stars. For ages 4 to 8, cooking, travel, food, humor, multi-cultural, fantasy, sequencing, prediction, geography, read-aloud, mapping, social-studies, science, recipes, and fans of Marjorie Priceman.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Holly

    Plot Summary: A little girl wants to make an apple pie, but the grocery store is closed! She embarks on a journey across the world, stopping in different countries to pick up each ingredient to make the apple pie, which includes carrying a cow and chicken with her. Personal Evaluation: This sweet picture book has the happiest illustrations and a fun text that students would love to hear read aloud. It will give students an appreciation for where our food actually comes from – not just the grocery s Plot Summary: A little girl wants to make an apple pie, but the grocery store is closed! She embarks on a journey across the world, stopping in different countries to pick up each ingredient to make the apple pie, which includes carrying a cow and chicken with her. Personal Evaluation: This sweet picture book has the happiest illustrations and a fun text that students would love to hear read aloud. It will give students an appreciation for where our food actually comes from – not just the grocery store, but it begins as part of the land somewhere in the world. Memorable Literary Element: The character of the little girl in this book provides such an adventuresome spirit to the story. Her expressions and body language represented through the pictures, and the way the narrator tells the story, you believe it is the little girl telling it. The words she uses (“Better yet, bring the chicken with you. There’s less chance of breaking the egg that way.”) add humor to this delightful character. Illustrations: Such pretty watercolor illustrations have a less than concrete feel to them. They are full-page, soft-edged and flowing, with a sense of whimsy. The page of the English countryside where the little girl meets the cow is a great example, with ivy growing up the wall of the house, and the castle in the background.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Aida Rascanu

    How to make an apple pie and see the world by Marjorie Priceman made a strong impression on me for multiple reasons. It is a story about a girl who wants to bake an apple pie but realizes she does not have the ingredients. Instead of giving up on the idea at the first hurdle (the market was closed), the protagonist decides to go on a journey around the world to gather the necessary ingredients, and one by one she visits different countries. Set in the 1920s, the charm of the story is in how the p How to make an apple pie and see the world by Marjorie Priceman made a strong impression on me for multiple reasons. It is a story about a girl who wants to bake an apple pie but realizes she does not have the ingredients. Instead of giving up on the idea at the first hurdle (the market was closed), the protagonist decides to go on a journey around the world to gather the necessary ingredients, and one by one she visits different countries. Set in the 1920s, the charm of the story is in how the protagonist chooses the ingredients (e.g., the chicken rather than the egg, the cow and not the milk etc.). The story is slowly turning into a mystery. "What will be the next ingredient?” or “Where will she travel next?" are just few questions that pop up spontaneously in the mind of the reader, making it irresistible to turn the page to find out. The text is melodic, easy to read, ironic in some places. The illustrations are extraordinary, colourful, detailed. Details of the time and place (the Italian city, the French railway station, the cruise ship), all the particularities (the dresses of the characters, the hairstyle etc.) denote a special care of the illustrator in order to respect the ambiance. We hardly wait to get the other book of Marjorie Priceman.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Brandi

    How to Make Apple Pie and See the World follows a young girl in her quest to gather ingredients for a delicious apple pie. This book shows the diversity of the world as the young girl travels across the globe to gather wheat from Italy, eggs from France, cinnamon from Sri Lanka, milk from England, and sugar from Jamaica. This book could be used to teach about the wonders of the world. As the girl travels from country to country, the class can too! Students can learn about the culture and cro How to Make Apple Pie and See the World follows a young girl in her quest to gather ingredients for a delicious apple pie. This book shows the diversity of the world as the young girl travels across the globe to gather wheat from Italy, eggs from France, cinnamon from Sri Lanka, milk from England, and sugar from Jamaica. This book could be used to teach about the wonders of the world. As the girl travels from country to country, the class can too! Students can learn about the culture and crops of the countries visited in the book. This book could also be incorporated during the Fall for some fun apple activities. The book comes with a recipe for a delicious apple pie that could be made with some help from the teacher. Marjorie Priceman effectively allows readers to travel the world and see the various cultures displayed with her bright and vivid illustrations and descriptive text. Priceman states that she has visited many of the countries visited in the book and tried to incorporate their cultures as best she could throughout the book. This book is a beautiful reminder of how it takes a bunch of different ingredients to bake a tasty apple pie.

  29. 5 out of 5

    K.B. Shinn

    Every so often I’ll find books that I want to buy for my goddaughters. This is one of them. How to Make an Apple Pie and See the World was published in 1996 and featured on the show Reading Rainbow. The narrator wants to bake an apple pie, but discovers the grocery store is closed. Part recipe book and part geography lesson, the narrator travels all over the world to gather ingredients to bake a pie. Featuring bright, whimsical illustrations, she takes a steamboat to Italy for semolina wheat, bor Every so often I’ll find books that I want to buy for my goddaughters. This is one of them. How to Make an Apple Pie and See the World was published in 1996 and featured on the show Reading Rainbow. The narrator wants to bake an apple pie, but discovers the grocery store is closed. Part recipe book and part geography lesson, the narrator travels all over the world to gather ingredients to bake a pie. Featuring bright, whimsical illustrations, she takes a steamboat to Italy for semolina wheat, borrows a cow from England for fresh milk, and sails to Sri Lanka for cinnamon. (Apples are picked in Vermont.) The book is geared specifically to children grades K-2, but older children will still get a kick out of it. There’s even an apple pie recipe in the back that they can make with Mom and Dad. Presumably, you only have to go as far as your own pantry to make it, unless you’d rather take a grand trip around the world and come back with a ingredients and a live cow. Author Marjorie Priceman is a two-time Caldecott Award winner, and has written a companion book called How to Make a Cherry Pie and See the USA.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Danielle Truitt

    I truly enjoyed reading How to Make Apple Pie and See the World. It is about a little girl who wants to make an apple pie to share with friends. When she goes to the market she realizes that the market is closed. But that does not stop her. She goes on an adventure around the world to gather her self the freshest ingredients for her pie. I have a true love for traveling and learning about different cultures and this is the perfect book to help spark that same love in children. The story provid I truly enjoyed reading How to Make Apple Pie and See the World. It is about a little girl who wants to make an apple pie to share with friends. When she goes to the market she realizes that the market is closed. But that does not stop her. She goes on an adventure around the world to gather her self the freshest ingredients for her pie. I have a true love for traveling and learning about different cultures and this is the perfect book to help spark that same love in children. The story provides the reader with great points about how far our food really does come to reach our homes. For teachers this is a great book that could be used across many different subject areas. The story is great for teaching sequence, or beginning, middle and end. Also there are great geography lessons using the places that she visited that could be introduced. There is also a great science lesson about where food comes from and how farmers have to prep the food so it’s ready to sell. A definite must for classroom libraries.

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