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Chinese and Chinese Mestizos of Manila: Family, Identity, and Culture, 1860s-1930s

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For centuries, the Chinese have been intermarrying with inhabitants of the Philippines, resulting in a creolized community of Chinese mestizos under the Spanish colonial regime. In contemporary Philippine society, the "Chinese" are seen as a racialized "Other" while descendants from early Chinese-Filipino intermarriages as "Filipino." Previous scholarship attributes this d For centuries, the Chinese have been intermarrying with inhabitants of the Philippines, resulting in a creolized community of Chinese mestizos under the Spanish colonial regime. In contemporary Philippine society, the "Chinese" are seen as a racialized "Other" while descendants from early Chinese-Filipino intermarriages as "Filipino." Previous scholarship attributes this development to the identification of Chinese mestizos with the equally "Hispanicized" and "Catholic" indios. Building on works in Chinese transnationalism and cultural anthropology, this book examines the everyday practices of Chinese merchant families in Manila from the 1860's to the 1930's. The result is a fascinating study of how families and individuals creatively negotiated thier identities in ways that challenge our understanding of the genesis of the ethnic identities in the Philippines. “…[This book] helps contribute to the revision of the existing literature on the Chinese and Chinese mestizos with a new perspective that highlights the emerging field of transnational studies.” - Prof. Augusto Espiritu, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign “…the author does an outstanding job and we recommend that citizens of the Philippine ‘nation,’ whether they see themselves as ‘Chinese’ or ‘Filipino’ would do well to read this work and understand the origins of the racial stereotypes that influence the way they look at particular members of Philippine society, particularly in Manila.” - Prof. Ellen Palanca and Prof. Clark Alejandrino, Ateneo de Manila University


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For centuries, the Chinese have been intermarrying with inhabitants of the Philippines, resulting in a creolized community of Chinese mestizos under the Spanish colonial regime. In contemporary Philippine society, the "Chinese" are seen as a racialized "Other" while descendants from early Chinese-Filipino intermarriages as "Filipino." Previous scholarship attributes this d For centuries, the Chinese have been intermarrying with inhabitants of the Philippines, resulting in a creolized community of Chinese mestizos under the Spanish colonial regime. In contemporary Philippine society, the "Chinese" are seen as a racialized "Other" while descendants from early Chinese-Filipino intermarriages as "Filipino." Previous scholarship attributes this development to the identification of Chinese mestizos with the equally "Hispanicized" and "Catholic" indios. Building on works in Chinese transnationalism and cultural anthropology, this book examines the everyday practices of Chinese merchant families in Manila from the 1860's to the 1930's. The result is a fascinating study of how families and individuals creatively negotiated thier identities in ways that challenge our understanding of the genesis of the ethnic identities in the Philippines. “…[This book] helps contribute to the revision of the existing literature on the Chinese and Chinese mestizos with a new perspective that highlights the emerging field of transnational studies.” - Prof. Augusto Espiritu, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign “…the author does an outstanding job and we recommend that citizens of the Philippine ‘nation,’ whether they see themselves as ‘Chinese’ or ‘Filipino’ would do well to read this work and understand the origins of the racial stereotypes that influence the way they look at particular members of Philippine society, particularly in Manila.” - Prof. Ellen Palanca and Prof. Clark Alejandrino, Ateneo de Manila University

35 review for Chinese and Chinese Mestizos of Manila: Family, Identity, and Culture, 1860s-1930s

  1. 4 out of 5

    Apolo Patron

    🤓😎 first book to finish this 2019 & honestly proud it's a non-fic. I've book drop a queer ya in trade for this one and no “readgrets” ✌🏼, actually just a reccom but there’s a deeper reason why i had an interest to this book. 😅😄 as a kid growing up in Binondo, always been fixated towards the chinese culture and later on the chinito i see on San Lorenzo Ruiz Church and countless malls in Divisoria. ❤️ being written by a scholar studying the Chinese/Chinese Mestizo or in layman’s term “chinoy” history 🤓😎 first book to finish this 2019 & honestly proud it's a non-fic. I've book drop a queer ya in trade for this one and no “readgrets” ✌🏼, actually just a reccom but there’s a deeper reason why i had an interest to this book. 😅😄 as a kid growing up in Binondo, always been fixated towards the chinese culture and later on the chinito i see on San Lorenzo Ruiz Church and countless malls in Divisoria. ❤️ being written by a scholar studying the Chinese/Chinese Mestizo or in layman’s term “chinoy” history, it is filled with facts & trivia that I could def. use on casual convos to any chinito 😂✌🏼 kidding aside, it is a great read since the book isn’t difficult to comprehend by anyone wants to know more about the rich history of this pious, filial & frugal individuals 😊 nerd inside me is really glad ive read tis & will def look for the author’s other title published by UST Press. couple of few chapters ive skipped but will get into it later on 🤣 🐖🐽🐷 happy chinese new year to all 😄

  2. 5 out of 5

    Lianita Stephanita

    So informative. I realized that the stereotype racial perception of chinese to filipinos and vice versa is still evident. It gave me a glimpse of old manila. Made me also want to read Teresita Ang See and Loreli De Viena's books. So informative. I realized that the stereotype racial perception of chinese to filipinos and vice versa is still evident. It gave me a glimpse of old manila. Made me also want to read Teresita Ang See and Loreli De Viena's books.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Galatea

    A pretty detailed history of some of the most visible Chinese and Chinese mestizos that lived in the Philippines and how they influenced current Philippine society It was pretty revealing in showing the historical structures that cause a lot of current typical cultural practices associated with Tsinoys, as well as the individual histories of success and oppression that they went through the author goes for the long game, starting with a chapter on the Minnan region, the main region where most Chin A pretty detailed history of some of the most visible Chinese and Chinese mestizos that lived in the Philippines and how they influenced current Philippine society It was pretty revealing in showing the historical structures that cause a lot of current typical cultural practices associated with Tsinoys, as well as the individual histories of success and oppression that they went through the author goes for the long game, starting with a chapter on the Minnan region, the main region where most Chinese came from, as evidenced by how today most Tsinoys don't speak Mandarin as their main Chinese dialect, but Hokkien, or "閩南語 (Minnan Hua, meaning 'Minnan Language')", also known as "咱儂話 (Lán-lâng-oē, meaning 'our language')", and then going from that to the broad strokes of the Spanish colonization up until 1850s, when he zooms in and starts talking about specific cultural, economic, and social practices that, amazingly enough for an academic book, never get boring. From the Spanish period up until today, certain things seem to remain constant. There is a long, storied history of Anti-Chinese racism in the Philippines, which in numerous times have resulted in outright massacres. Historically, most Chinese were employed as cheap hard labor, while the most financially prominent ones who achieved large financial success were usually scapegoated as "aliens" who contributed little to the Philippine economy, a sentiment that intensified in the American colonial period, with the Chinese Exclusion Act, which was signed in 1882 extended to apply to the Philippines in 1903, which, as the name suggests, excluded Chinese. the growing surge of Nationalism (and Imperialism) worldwide in the 20th century forced people to ask who /exactly/ counted as "Filipino", as "Chinese", and these were questions that were answered multiple times over, with the loud voices of the law, as well as the little whispers of individual action. That being said, we're still here, we have no idea what the fuck is going on, but at least this book helps. It's helped a damn lot, highly recommended.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Veroniks

    Chinese and Chinese Mestizos of Manila: Family, Identity, and Culture, 1860s-1930s by Richard T. Chu

  5. 5 out of 5

    Anson

    Excellent material if you want to study about Chinese diaspora and the history of the Tsinoy (Fil-Chinese) .

  6. 5 out of 5

    Uyen

  7. 5 out of 5

    Camille Joyce L

  8. 5 out of 5

    Jay Rald

  9. 5 out of 5

  10. 4 out of 5

    Kenneth Paul Ong

  11. 5 out of 5

    Ellyce

  12. 4 out of 5

    Fran

  13. 4 out of 5

    Mark Andrew

  14. 4 out of 5

    Kym

  15. 5 out of 5

    Robert Albano

  16. 5 out of 5

    Enoch Sales

  17. 4 out of 5

    Christa绮思

  18. 4 out of 5

    Joanne

  19. 4 out of 5

    Anh Le

  20. 5 out of 5

    Cj Santiago

  21. 4 out of 5

    Gershom Chua

  22. 4 out of 5

    David

  23. 5 out of 5

    Amora

  24. 4 out of 5

    Stef

  25. 4 out of 5

    Aishe

  26. 4 out of 5

    Julbs

  27. 5 out of 5

    Antonio Sy

  28. 5 out of 5

    captain America

  29. 5 out of 5

    Abegail Agana

  30. 5 out of 5

    A.

  31. 5 out of 5

    Mayre York

  32. 5 out of 5

    Caroline

  33. 4 out of 5

    Stefanie

  34. 5 out of 5

    Corette

  35. 4 out of 5

    Regine Abela

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