web site hit counter Marvel Masterworks: The Fantastic Four, Vol. 6 - Ebooks PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

Marvel Masterworks: The Fantastic Four, Vol. 6

Availability: Ready to download

Stan Lee and Jack Kirby have been duly recognized as having had the most fruitful collaborations in the history of comic books. Together the two created most of the unforgettable characters that are today synonymous with the Marvel name. However, it was their pairing on Marvel's flagship title Fantastic Four, and their unprecedented 100-issue run on the title, which would Stan Lee and Jack Kirby have been duly recognized as having had the most fruitful collaborations in the history of comic books. Together the two created most of the unforgettable characters that are today synonymous with the Marvel name. However, it was their pairing on Marvel's flagship title Fantastic Four, and their unprecedented 100-issue run on the title, which would be their longest lasting legacy to the field. Marvel proudly presents its first new volume in the Marvel Masterworks series in over six years, a volume that is dedicated to the presenting some of the finest of the Lee/Kirby output on Fantastic Four. Included in this handsome hardcover volume is the classic tale, This Man…This Monster! and the first appearance of the Black Panther, as well as memorable confrontations with the Silver Surfer and the FF's nemesis, Dr. Doom. Displaying the wonderful work of these two creative titans at their peak, this book is one that no collector can afford to miss. Collects The Fantastic Four #51-60, Annual #4


Compare

Stan Lee and Jack Kirby have been duly recognized as having had the most fruitful collaborations in the history of comic books. Together the two created most of the unforgettable characters that are today synonymous with the Marvel name. However, it was their pairing on Marvel's flagship title Fantastic Four, and their unprecedented 100-issue run on the title, which would Stan Lee and Jack Kirby have been duly recognized as having had the most fruitful collaborations in the history of comic books. Together the two created most of the unforgettable characters that are today synonymous with the Marvel name. However, it was their pairing on Marvel's flagship title Fantastic Four, and their unprecedented 100-issue run on the title, which would be their longest lasting legacy to the field. Marvel proudly presents its first new volume in the Marvel Masterworks series in over six years, a volume that is dedicated to the presenting some of the finest of the Lee/Kirby output on Fantastic Four. Included in this handsome hardcover volume is the classic tale, This Man…This Monster! and the first appearance of the Black Panther, as well as memorable confrontations with the Silver Surfer and the FF's nemesis, Dr. Doom. Displaying the wonderful work of these two creative titans at their peak, this book is one that no collector can afford to miss. Collects The Fantastic Four #51-60, Annual #4

30 review for Marvel Masterworks: The Fantastic Four, Vol. 6

  1. 4 out of 5

    Mza

    ... v. athletic, action-packed, and histrionic, but also a reminder of why most superhero comix are a tough read for me, even the ones starring the most iconic and comforting heroes. I'm familiar with the Fantastic Four, and even though I'd never read these stories in particular (or the ones preceding them), there wasn't a significant barrier to entry, plot-wise. In defiance of decades of accumulated narrative baggage, superheroes generally don't change. Their curse is an eternal return to a sta ... v. athletic, action-packed, and histrionic, but also a reminder of why most superhero comix are a tough read for me, even the ones starring the most iconic and comforting heroes. I'm familiar with the Fantastic Four, and even though I'd never read these stories in particular (or the ones preceding them), there wasn't a significant barrier to entry, plot-wise. In defiance of decades of accumulated narrative baggage, superheroes generally don't change. Their curse is an eternal return to a status quo of waiting, flexed and charged, for danger to arrive. As it's impossible to care, in the conventional sense, what happens to the heroes, reading (as opposed to looking at) these comix becomes similar to watching sports or playing video games; the pleasure has to come from the authors' manipulation of well-known materials, structures, and strategies. Lee/Kirby's concern for the emotional problems of the Fantastic Four might still have been novel at the time (1966-67), but their cursory, corny treatment of how people talk about and act on their feelings would be greeted with rolled eyes by today's 12-year-olds. The stories' conceptual oddities -- monsters made out of pure sound, a futuristic African nation, the mute king whose voice contains disastrous potential, the giant dog who can teleport -- have stood up much better, which might explain why Marvel writers have revived and revised these inventions again and again, along with the heroes themselves. It's too bad that the inventions amount to trippy furniture placed inside a conventional, non-trippy house. The stories go where you think they're going to go. It's likely, though, that most people who pick this book up aren't seeking great writing, not even great children's writing, in the same way people don't listen to Black Sabbath for the lyrics. Here, Jack Kirby's drawings of bodies flying through the air are the ass-rocking music. He has never been surpassed in drawing BIG things: BIG, heavy, retarded, humongous machinery; BIG, dumb, cute, ugly monsters; BIG celestial objects; and BIG muscles. I don't know what to make of all these beefy things. They're not sexual things. They're not necessarily funny -- though, especially in combination with Stan Lee's pseudo-Elizabethan dialogue, they often are. Mostly they seem to be the brain belches of a man who has seen some extremely big things and is trying to tell you about them, and the only language available to him is spacecraft and beefy thighs. The language seems incomplete, but the terror and majesty of what this man has seen somehow come through, anyhow. Two biggest highlights of this book: 1) the Negative Zone collages (WANTED: a whole book of that), 2) the moment Doctor Doom betrays the Silver Surfer and steals his power cosmic. What a dick!

  2. 5 out of 5

    Timothy Boyd

    The Marvel Masterworks volumes are fantastic reprints of the early years of Marvel comics. A fantastic resource to allow these hard to find issues to be read by everyone. Very recommended to everyone and Highly recommended to any comic fan.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Nick Jones

    I haven't read much classic Marvel in this format, most Marvel stories from the 1960s I've encountered have been as scattered single issues included in trades collecting modern stories for the purpose of padding them out. It's quite a different experience to get a series of sequential issues, playing much better to the strengths of the material. The included stories of Fantastic Four had several upsides, the biggest being Stan Lee's ability to juggle multiple different storylines as events proc I haven't read much classic Marvel in this format, most Marvel stories from the 1960s I've encountered have been as scattered single issues included in trades collecting modern stories for the purpose of padding them out. It's quite a different experience to get a series of sequential issues, playing much better to the strengths of the material. The included stories of Fantastic Four had several upsides, the biggest being Stan Lee's ability to juggle multiple different storylines as events proceed. This tome starts out with the Inhumans trapped in their city and Johnny Storm desperate to find a way to rescue them in order to reunite with his paramour Crystal, a sub-plot that gets attention in most of the included issues and presumably reaches a conclusion in one of the future Marvel Masterworks volumes. The hero Black Panther is introduced early on, and even after his story is dealt with the results of his meeting with the Fantastic Four continue to resonate in later stories. Regardless of how short or long a story arc is, everything feels vitally important and consequential, with things building upon each other and mattering in a way that Marvel's modern output constantly fails to replicate. The shifts between the different plot threads can be a bit choppy, but you're always left feeling that the events have a greater meaning. Jack Kirby's art is instantly recognizable, perhaps being better served in wild cosmic stories like The New Gods, but fitting in well with the alternate dimensions, bizarre gadgets, and wild technological landscapes that frequently pop up in the adventures of the Fantastic Four. Stan Lee's writing is both the best and worst of the book, with dialogue boxes narrating the action with a plethora of two-dollar words that are ridiculously, wonderfully melodramatic; however, most characters' dialogue is written in exactly the same fashion, which comes off as clunky when anyone other than Doctor Doom is speaking. There's an unfortunate duality to the stories as well, dealing with a lot of surprisingly big themes while at the same time having characters do and say things that make them come across as complete idiots (Thing, Human Torch), callous monsters (Mr. Fantastic, Black Panther), or Stepford wives (Invisible Woman, Alicia Masters). This volume is also the point at which the Fantastic Four gained a sidekick in Wyatt Wingfoot, who joined the long list of completely uninteresting characters put into superhero stories simply for kids to have a regular Joe that they could project themselves onto. There's enough wild, manic fun and poignancy to the Silver Age Fantastic Four books that makes for an interesting read, but there's an equal amount in them that has aged poorly in the past fifty years. At least it's less hokey than what DC was putting out at the time, and worlds better than what DC or Marvel is putting out now.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Scott

    Continuing to improve with more complicated and involved stories--one issue starts with an escape by the Sandman and the Wizard but shifts gears to Dr. Doom with the others still on the loose. There are still too many clichés, "I'll get you yet," and so forth, but the characterization is consistently getting more and more interesting. The Kirby-Sinnott artwork, while looking slightly primitive in direct contrast to coming from Colan in Iron Man vol. 3, is bold, exciting, and some of the King's b Continuing to improve with more complicated and involved stories--one issue starts with an escape by the Sandman and the Wizard but shifts gears to Dr. Doom with the others still on the loose. There are still too many clichés, "I'll get you yet," and so forth, but the characterization is consistently getting more and more interesting. The Kirby-Sinnott artwork, while looking slightly primitive in direct contrast to coming from Colan in Iron Man vol. 3, is bold, exciting, and some of the King's best work on the title so far. So much is involved in explaining the Silver Surfer's powers (as Dr. Doom uses them--I was not expecting to see Dr. Doom on the Silver Surfer's board) that I'm glad I didn't jump to volume 1 of his series yet, which I believe takes place after vol. 8 of this one. The material with the Inhumans is fleeting but exciting, although Johnny is getting a bit wearying. Whitey Mullins is back from the end of the previous volume, but doesn't do much here except annoy Johnny for a few panels. The major new characters here are the Black Panther and Wyatt Wingfoot. The greyish colorization of the Africans, as with Gabe Jones, is a bit annoying, and Lee's need to have every new superhero introduce himself in a big fight against an existing superhero (or in this case) is already old. I love the striking image of the carved panther above the banquet table almost as much as the wooden ship in the Tales of Asgard splash in The Mighty Thor vol. 3. Both characters appear throughout the volume, African and Native American, although Black Panther is almost a deus ex machina by the end, making cameos as he provides technology that appears to be beyond Reed's capabilities. Tony Stark gets a behind-the-scenes appearance, off-stage having made the working version of the device that finally defeats Dr. Doom at the end of the volume (as though you didn't know that was coming so you can complain about spoilers). Such self-deprecation and direct address to the reader is frequent from Lee throughout the volume, at one point Lee even telling the reader to create the sound effect instead of putting a big onomatopoeia in the panel.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Christopher

    For some reason these are the only Marvel Masterworks collections my library seems to receive. The first comics with Black Panther, Inhuman interludes, and the well known story where Dr. Doom usurps Silver Surfers board and cosmic powers (the culmination is honestly a huge, quick wrap let down though.) The more and more I read these, I'm dazzled by Jack Kirby's artwork. While I've loved more photo-realistic (John Cassady) or surreal (Jae Lee) comic artists, you can't beat Kirby's flowing movemen For some reason these are the only Marvel Masterworks collections my library seems to receive. The first comics with Black Panther, Inhuman interludes, and the well known story where Dr. Doom usurps Silver Surfers board and cosmic powers (the culmination is honestly a huge, quick wrap let down though.) The more and more I read these, I'm dazzled by Jack Kirby's artwork. While I've loved more photo-realistic (John Cassady) or surreal (Jae Lee) comic artists, you can't beat Kirby's flowing movement of character action and kinetic, crackling energy. It's like a three dimensional immersive cartoon; also complimentary, as he fully embraced the comic/cartoon in comic book, breaking artistic boundaries while fully embracing its juvenile tone: none of his totemic, statuesque villains or insanely detailed machines look realistic but they look so, so much fun. Once again I can't say I'm a fan of Stan Lee's overly grandiose dialogue for every single character, but at this point, you can't imagine Lee and Kirby without each other.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Molly Lazer

    This set of ten issues is well-known for a reason. From "This Man, This Monster" to the groundbreaking introduction of the Black Panther to the continuing saga of the Inhumans and Doctor Doom gaining the power cosmic, there is a lot of groundbreaking stuff going on here. The dynamics of the team continue to develop even though the characters spend long stretches of time split up. Wyatt Wingfoot is a welcome addition to the Fantastic Four family (though some of the descriptions of her that appear This set of ten issues is well-known for a reason. From "This Man, This Monster" to the groundbreaking introduction of the Black Panther to the continuing saga of the Inhumans and Doctor Doom gaining the power cosmic, there is a lot of groundbreaking stuff going on here. The dynamics of the team continue to develop even though the characters spend long stretches of time split up. Wyatt Wingfoot is a welcome addition to the Fantastic Four family (though some of the descriptions of her that appear in narrative captions are dated and a little racist), and his friendship with Johnny is something to really admire. My kids are particular fans of his. One thing I particularly appreciated about the last few issues, and this era of the FF in general, is that the threats actually seem real. There doesn't seem to be a guarantee that the FF will triumph in the end. Doctor Doom, in particular, is a genuine threat in a way that he doesn't really seem to be in modern comics. Or perhaps it's the opposite--that the FF aren't as superpowered as they are in the comics coming out now. Either way, the stakes feel higher, which makes for an extremely engaging read. Sue still has not reached her full potential as a character--and I don't think she will for quite some time. Reed still orders her around, telling her when to use her force fields to help out. But those moments when she does take the initiative and acts of her own volition show huge potential for her character. I read this with my four-year-olds, who are extremely into the Inhumans (and a little in love with Crystal themselves). They continue to enjoy the series. We actually read this as the last 10 issues of Omnibus #2, but I'm reviewing it here instead to track when we finish each set of 10 issues.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Chris W

    For silver age comics this is actually pretty good. Over the top as can be but tons of fun and Stan Lee doesn't let the plot stagnate. In this volume everything keeps moving forward and fast, each issue has a clear plan and a fun set up for the next issue. In this volume, you get the debut of Black Panther and Klaw, you get the return of Inhumans, Silver Surfer, Sandman and of course the Return of Doctor Doom and his comically evil self. All of these elements tie into each other leading to a fun For silver age comics this is actually pretty good. Over the top as can be but tons of fun and Stan Lee doesn't let the plot stagnate. In this volume everything keeps moving forward and fast, each issue has a clear plan and a fun set up for the next issue. In this volume, you get the debut of Black Panther and Klaw, you get the return of Inhumans, Silver Surfer, Sandman and of course the Return of Doctor Doom and his comically evil self. All of these elements tie into each other leading to a fun showdown with an overpowered Doom, where you actually see Reed come up with a unique and surprising way to beat him that was foreshadowed in the earlier parts of the volume. Although this volume suffers from issues of the 1960s era of comics its honestly fun, imaginative and has elements that are really good and could be incredible in the hands of modern era writers.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Daniel Q

    This book shows what I love and what I hate in Marvel comics. Here are some grandiose stories with superb art (by none less than Jack Kirby). But you will also find plots slugging through a lot of pages and even a few issues to a feeble conclusion. At each ending I've found myself musing "what for?". We got a lot of strong poses and words but very little actually happens. This feeling of going nowhere is what ultimately drove me way from the Fantastic Four back in the 80's. At least here you get This book shows what I love and what I hate in Marvel comics. Here are some grandiose stories with superb art (by none less than Jack Kirby). But you will also find plots slugging through a lot of pages and even a few issues to a feeble conclusion. At each ending I've found myself musing "what for?". We got a lot of strong poses and words but very little actually happens. This feeling of going nowhere is what ultimately drove me way from the Fantastic Four back in the 80's. At least here you get all issues together, instead of waiting each month for a big conclusion (that would not be there). Anyway, I still enjoyed it, mostly for the art and the nostalgia.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Michael

    Getting caught up with four volumes - way too many firsts to go into detail, but these stories are terrific. Okay, the awkward bits, like Reed telling Sue that she's "only" a female, don't age that well, but seeing the entire cosmology of the FF established, and develop (naturally and organically) is powerful stuff. The plot are adventurous and fun, and the character work still better than most superhero comics today. Highly recommended. Getting caught up with four volumes - way too many firsts to go into detail, but these stories are terrific. Okay, the awkward bits, like Reed telling Sue that she's "only" a female, don't age that well, but seeing the entire cosmology of the FF established, and develop (naturally and organically) is powerful stuff. The plot are adventurous and fun, and the character work still better than most superhero comics today. Highly recommended.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Christopher (Donut)

    Issues 51-60- probably a peak for Lee and Kirby. Dr. Doom steals the Silver Surfer's cosmic powers and runs riot for three or four issues. Also Annual # 4 which is the Human Torch battling the original Human Torch, who 'serves' the Mad Thinker. I liked it better than 41-50, and probably better than 61-70, and don't like any of them well enough to keep going. Issues 51-60- probably a peak for Lee and Kirby. Dr. Doom steals the Silver Surfer's cosmic powers and runs riot for three or four issues. Also Annual # 4 which is the Human Torch battling the original Human Torch, who 'serves' the Mad Thinker. I liked it better than 41-50, and probably better than 61-70, and don't like any of them well enough to keep going.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Anne

    A coworker lent this to me so I could read the first appearance of Black Panther. That wasn't bad. Honestly, this was my very first exposure to the Fantastic Four, as well. And while this has a certain amount of charm, the overall storytelling was just a bit too simplistic for me. Between that and all the fighting I know I won't be picking up any more of these old timey marvel comics. A coworker lent this to me so I could read the first appearance of Black Panther. That wasn't bad. Honestly, this was my very first exposure to the Fantastic Four, as well. And while this has a certain amount of charm, the overall storytelling was just a bit too simplistic for me. Between that and all the fighting I know I won't be picking up any more of these old timey marvel comics.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Alex Andrasik

    The sagas here exceed the highly-regarded Inhumans and Galactus stories from the previous volumes. "This Man, This Monster!" The coming of the Black Panther! And the truly awesome epic in which DOOM truly comes into his own as the preeminent villain of the Marvel Universe. The sagas here exceed the highly-regarded Inhumans and Galactus stories from the previous volumes. "This Man, This Monster!" The coming of the Black Panther! And the truly awesome epic in which DOOM truly comes into his own as the preeminent villain of the Marvel Universe.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Brian J. Shoopman

    3.5 Stars.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Jdetrick

    And the Lee/Kirby train continues. By this time I'm ready for a new creative team, although I am enjoying the opportunity to watch Kirby's art improve as he has more space and time. And the Lee/Kirby train continues. By this time I'm ready for a new creative team, although I am enjoying the opportunity to watch Kirby's art improve as he has more space and time.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Tara Calaby

    The comics in this collection ranged between three and four stars for me, so it's really closer to a 3.5 rating. The comics in this collection ranged between three and four stars for me, so it's really closer to a 3.5 rating.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Kenneth Byrd

    Excellent classic tales and super writing and art Classic Jack Kirby and Stan Lee. Excellent art and writing! A must for any collection. Marvel comics at its best.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Aaron

    The Fantastic Four travel to the African nation of Wakanda and spar against the sovereign chieftain, a masked man known as the Black Panther. The Four befriend Black Panther and assist him against his father's murderer, a physicist named Klaw who pursues Wakanda's cache of the metal vibranium. Meanwhile, the city of Inhumans is shown trapped within a dome and the royal family attempts to escape. Lastly, the Silver Surfer explores the world he's confined to, finally meeting the one man who could The Fantastic Four travel to the African nation of Wakanda and spar against the sovereign chieftain, a masked man known as the Black Panther. The Four befriend Black Panther and assist him against his father's murderer, a physicist named Klaw who pursues Wakanda's cache of the metal vibranium. Meanwhile, the city of Inhumans is shown trapped within a dome and the royal family attempts to escape. Lastly, the Silver Surfer explores the world he's confined to, finally meeting the one man who could be a threat - Doctor Doom. (view spoiler)[The Black Panther continues to help the Four periodically as they deal with Doom's theft of the power cosmic from the Surfer. Black Bolt unleashes a cataclysmic yell which shatters the dome over Attilan, freeing the Inhumans. (hide spoiler)] Continuing my heavy research into key characters starring in the upcoming Civil War movie, this volume depicts the first appearance of Black Panther prior to him joining the Avengers. It also spends a good deal of time on fleshing out the Inhumans and the Silver Surfer/Doom plot thread, both of which spread themselves out and overlap over several issues. Considering the sheer volume of Silver Age comics that are unconnected one-shot adventures, it's this increasing complexity in the plot and interweaving of the efforts of different characters that make this volume distinct. The identifiable art by Jack Kirby also has to be mentioned, including full-page abstract depictions of Wakandan, Inhuman, and Latverian technology. All of this is countered by the dated relationships between the Four, especially the "absent-minded husband" Mr. Fantastic and the Invisible Girl, who notably served coffee and generally cowered when not involved in an action scene. I was also not really understanding the role of Wyatt Wingfoot, Johnny Storm's unpowered friend, who manages to stay alive despite being directly involved in the Four's adventures. Overall, a nice collection of FF that has very little filler and some good action involving characters I've become familiar with over the past few years.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Ed

    This is definitely a step backwards in quality from the previous sets of issues. Issue 51 (“This Man, This Monster”) is an all time great, but none of the rest match up. The Black Panther stuff is certainly interesting and historically important, but it also doesn’t make a ton of sense, is kinda dumb and and also kinda racist. Issues 54, 55 and 56 are straight up bad. Issues 57 through 60, the Doomsday arc where Doom gets the Power Cosmic are pretty good, though, excluding the terrible deus ex m This is definitely a step backwards in quality from the previous sets of issues. Issue 51 (“This Man, This Monster”) is an all time great, but none of the rest match up. The Black Panther stuff is certainly interesting and historically important, but it also doesn’t make a ton of sense, is kinda dumb and and also kinda racist. Issues 54, 55 and 56 are straight up bad. Issues 57 through 60, the Doomsday arc where Doom gets the Power Cosmic are pretty good, though, excluding the terrible deus ex machina. And the Annual (old Human Torch vs new Human Torch) is very good.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Joseph

    more goofy silver age adventures from Lee and Kirby. the subplot with the Inhumans is probably the best thing about this book, although I also really enjoyed the introduction of the Black Panther. nevertheless, the bickering and back and forth between the men of the FF is really getting old, as is Sue Storm's woe-is-me damsel routine. at least she gets some good licks in against Dr Doom in this volume. i like the addition of Wyatt Wingfoot. nice to have another non-FF member around (in addition to more goofy silver age adventures from Lee and Kirby. the subplot with the Inhumans is probably the best thing about this book, although I also really enjoyed the introduction of the Black Panther. nevertheless, the bickering and back and forth between the men of the FF is really getting old, as is Sue Storm's woe-is-me damsel routine. at least she gets some good licks in against Dr Doom in this volume. i like the addition of Wyatt Wingfoot. nice to have another non-FF member around (in addition to Alicia Masters) to round out the cast and bring some new relationship dynamics to the book.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Bob

    Gems include ‘This Man…This Monster!’, debuts of Black Panther & Prester John, Ben v. Silver Surfer, Johnny & Wyatt journey w/ Lockjaw, FF’s rematch w/ Klaw, Mad Thinker reactivates the original Human Torch, Doom steals the Surfer’s Power Cosmic, Black Bolt speaks, & Inhumans v. racist hunters

  21. 5 out of 5

    Edward Davies

    The Black Panther makes his first appearance in this volume reprinting issues 51 to 60 and annual number four, plus Doctor Doom steals the power cosmic from The Silver Surfer. More intergalactic fun mixed with home spun family moments in this must have collection.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Jamil

  23. 5 out of 5

    Sam Poole

    Yay!

  24. 4 out of 5

    Brett

  25. 5 out of 5

    Domenico Cinalli

  26. 4 out of 5

    John Wyatt

  27. 4 out of 5

    Daphne Crafnord

  28. 4 out of 5

    Francisca

  29. 5 out of 5

    Rocky

  30. 4 out of 5

    Edward Grey Seville

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...