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Bodies of Tomorrow: Technology, Subjectivity, Science Fiction

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Anxieties about embodiment and posthumanism have always found an outlet in the science fiction of the day. In Bodies of Tomorrow, Sherryl Vint argues for a new model of an ethical and embodied posthuman subject through close readings of the works of Gwyneth Jones, Octavia Butler, Iain M. Banks, William Gibson, and other science fiction authors. Vint's discussion is firmly Anxieties about embodiment and posthumanism have always found an outlet in the science fiction of the day. In Bodies of Tomorrow, Sherryl Vint argues for a new model of an ethical and embodied posthuman subject through close readings of the works of Gwyneth Jones, Octavia Butler, Iain M. Banks, William Gibson, and other science fiction authors. Vint's discussion is firmly contextualized by discussions of contemporary technoscience, specifically genetics and information technology, and the implications of this technology for the way we consider human subjectivity. Engaging with theorists such as Michel Foucault, Judith Butler, Anne Balsamo, N. Katherine Hayles, and Douglas Kellner, Bodies of Tomorrow argues for the importance of challenging visions of humanity in the future that overlook our responsibility as embodied beings connected to a material world. If we are to understand the post-human subject, then we must acknowledge our embodied connection to the world around us and the value of our multiple subjective responses to it. Vint's study thus encourages a move from the common liberal humanist approach to posthuman theory toward what she calls 'embodied posthumanism.' This timely work of science fiction criticism will prove fascinating to cultural theorists, philosophers, and literary scholars alike, as well as anyone concerned with the ethics of posthumanism.


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Anxieties about embodiment and posthumanism have always found an outlet in the science fiction of the day. In Bodies of Tomorrow, Sherryl Vint argues for a new model of an ethical and embodied posthuman subject through close readings of the works of Gwyneth Jones, Octavia Butler, Iain M. Banks, William Gibson, and other science fiction authors. Vint's discussion is firmly Anxieties about embodiment and posthumanism have always found an outlet in the science fiction of the day. In Bodies of Tomorrow, Sherryl Vint argues for a new model of an ethical and embodied posthuman subject through close readings of the works of Gwyneth Jones, Octavia Butler, Iain M. Banks, William Gibson, and other science fiction authors. Vint's discussion is firmly contextualized by discussions of contemporary technoscience, specifically genetics and information technology, and the implications of this technology for the way we consider human subjectivity. Engaging with theorists such as Michel Foucault, Judith Butler, Anne Balsamo, N. Katherine Hayles, and Douglas Kellner, Bodies of Tomorrow argues for the importance of challenging visions of humanity in the future that overlook our responsibility as embodied beings connected to a material world. If we are to understand the post-human subject, then we must acknowledge our embodied connection to the world around us and the value of our multiple subjective responses to it. Vint's study thus encourages a move from the common liberal humanist approach to posthuman theory toward what she calls 'embodied posthumanism.' This timely work of science fiction criticism will prove fascinating to cultural theorists, philosophers, and literary scholars alike, as well as anyone concerned with the ethics of posthumanism.

30 review for Bodies of Tomorrow: Technology, Subjectivity, Science Fiction

  1. 4 out of 5

    Steen Ledet

    A critical reading of a cluster of SF novels, all of which engage with embodiment in different ways. However, Vint's argument never seem to truly come together, always positing the novels as ideologically marred. It seems to me that several of these novels and authors are in fact producing critical work, critiquing conceptions of the human; rather than working only through representations these novels also work through aesthetics. As such, Vint's work never reaches the level of Carl Freedman's * A critical reading of a cluster of SF novels, all of which engage with embodiment in different ways. However, Vint's argument never seem to truly come together, always positing the novels as ideologically marred. It seems to me that several of these novels and authors are in fact producing critical work, critiquing conceptions of the human; rather than working only through representations these novels also work through aesthetics. As such, Vint's work never reaches the level of Carl Freedman's *Critical Theory and Science Fiction*, where SF works *as* critical theory, instead of the object of critical theory.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Teghan

    Brilliant. Simply brilliant. Cyborg theory is a niche passion of mine and this collection of essays is fodder for the brain. The ideas suggested make you think and reconsider the world you inhabit in ways I am rarely challenged. I've read this book probably 4 times now and each time you get something new out of it. There are so many ideas packed in that one reading doesn't do it. Brilliant. Simply brilliant. Cyborg theory is a niche passion of mine and this collection of essays is fodder for the brain. The ideas suggested make you think and reconsider the world you inhabit in ways I am rarely challenged. I've read this book probably 4 times now and each time you get something new out of it. There are so many ideas packed in that one reading doesn't do it.

  3. 4 out of 5

    M

    Given that this book was finished in 2000, it is surprisingly current.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Pelin K├╝mbet

  5. 5 out of 5

    Cole Jack

  6. 4 out of 5

    Hanan

  7. 4 out of 5

    Becs

  8. 4 out of 5

    Christy

  9. 5 out of 5

    Kyem

  10. 4 out of 5

    Sachita

  11. 4 out of 5

    Kameron

  12. 4 out of 5

    Jesse

  13. 5 out of 5

    DodgingCommas

  14. 5 out of 5

    Anastasia Shevchenko

  15. 4 out of 5

    Alyssa Favreau

  16. 4 out of 5

    Shaun Duke

  17. 5 out of 5

    Jenn

  18. 5 out of 5

    Sarah

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    D.

  20. 4 out of 5

    UCRSTS

  21. 4 out of 5

    Cas

  22. 5 out of 5

    Kristina Jean Lareau

  23. 4 out of 5

    Laurie Carlson

  24. 5 out of 5

    Sean Donovan

  25. 4 out of 5

    L Timmel

  26. 4 out of 5

    Maria Ferrandez

  27. 5 out of 5

    Rhiannon

  28. 5 out of 5

    Laura Damagerose

  29. 4 out of 5

    Henny

  30. 4 out of 5

    Josephine Swarbrick

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