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The Happy Bookers: A Playful History Of Librarians And Their World From The Stone Age To The Distant Future

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The author and artist humorously trace the steps of librarians through the centuries


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The author and artist humorously trace the steps of librarians through the centuries

30 review for The Happy Bookers: A Playful History Of Librarians And Their World From The Stone Age To The Distant Future

  1. 5 out of 5

    Kaethe Douglas

    Long ago, but as it happens, not very far away I had a copy of a book by Armour that my father picked up for me. Maybe it was the Academic Bestiary, maybe it was Running Around in Academic Circles, but there are a slew of his titles I've read at one time or another. College and University libraries all have various titles. Probably there's a rule of thumb about number of undergraduates multiplied by graduate students divided by number of poorly paid and benefitless adjuncts = number of Armour ti Long ago, but as it happens, not very far away I had a copy of a book by Armour that my father picked up for me. Maybe it was the Academic Bestiary, maybe it was Running Around in Academic Circles, but there are a slew of his titles I've read at one time or another. College and University libraries all have various titles. Probably there's a rule of thumb about number of undergraduates multiplied by graduate students divided by number of poorly paid and benefitless adjuncts = number of Armour titles in the library. Plus some fine print about the grants applied for to received ratio and something else about athletics standings. I don't know exactly, only library school graduates who advanced beyond high school algebra two are entrusted with the sacred formula. Anyway, despite having read quite a few of his books over the years, when I thought of him recently and looked up his bibliography I was staggered. He wrote a lot of books. Sure, you could get away with 125 pages, many of them line drawings of young women with bizarrely high breasts being chased by older men in a variety of historical costumes. But still. So having finished two months of Halloweeny books full of murder and monsters and such it looks as though mid-20th century popular USian humor may be my next big jag. There's a Bombeck in the queue. I'm not committing myself, there is no surer guarantee that I will immediately regret the idea. But maybe more Armour will make an appearance. And Mencken, I've always meant to read more of him. Library copy

  2. 5 out of 5

    Cricket Muse

    Armour, a prolific punster of over 50 books, creates a light-hearted history of the librarian. Written in 1976, it's a tribute to celebrating the double anniversary of the American Library Association and the Dewey Decimal system. Interwoven in all the puns are history nuggets about the library and their keepers. It is difficult not to laugh out loud at some of the humor. People overhearing your snickers will want to know what's so funny. Save time and hand them the book to enjoy. Armour, a prolific punster of over 50 books, creates a light-hearted history of the librarian. Written in 1976, it's a tribute to celebrating the double anniversary of the American Library Association and the Dewey Decimal system. Interwoven in all the puns are history nuggets about the library and their keepers. It is difficult not to laugh out loud at some of the humor. People overhearing your snickers will want to know what's so funny. Save time and hand them the book to enjoy.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Kristen Northrup

    Quick, cute read. (Caveat: I'm a librarian.) Heavy on the puns. Mostly British humor/vocabulary, but nothing too obscure. Many of the jokes about modern librarianship ring remarkably true despite being nearly 40 years old. The illustrations were unimpressive, however. Quick, cute read. (Caveat: I'm a librarian.) Heavy on the puns. Mostly British humor/vocabulary, but nothing too obscure. Many of the jokes about modern librarianship ring remarkably true despite being nearly 40 years old. The illustrations were unimpressive, however.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Maryellen

    Silly book filled with cheesy puns and jokes. For library staff who can laugh at themselves.

  5. 4 out of 5

    J

    Interesting font and frequent illustrations make this a short and fun book to read. It contains a tongue-in-cheek account of librarians. Light and good natured with subtle humor. Nothing controversial or inappropriate, except for one semi-nude illustration in the Ancient Egypt section. Initially, I thought it was not really my sense of humor, but I appreciated its intellectual quality and the fact that it didn't devolve into vulgarity or crassness in the name of humor. I did find it a little fru Interesting font and frequent illustrations make this a short and fun book to read. It contains a tongue-in-cheek account of librarians. Light and good natured with subtle humor. Nothing controversial or inappropriate, except for one semi-nude illustration in the Ancient Egypt section. Initially, I thought it was not really my sense of humor, but I appreciated its intellectual quality and the fact that it didn't devolve into vulgarity or crassness in the name of humor. I did find it a little frustrating that I couldn't always tell what was fact or fiction in this history book. Once the book entered modern history, I was able to relate to it more and found it mildly humorous. When the book got to Colonial America and onward, I really enjoyed it! Intellectual humor - subtle.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Terry

    Armour's humour seemed a bit forced in this outing. Maybe just dated. Still, one can't help but be intrigued, nearly three decades later with the chapter entitled "Librarians Today and in the Future." Armour's humour seemed a bit forced in this outing. Maybe just dated. Still, one can't help but be intrigued, nearly three decades later with the chapter entitled "Librarians Today and in the Future."

  7. 4 out of 5

    Sara

    I chose this book because it sounds very interesting and possible humerous which is always a bonus. I would be interested to learn about the history of librarians.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Krista the Krazy Kataloguer

    A must-read for librarians!

  9. 4 out of 5

    Katie

  10. 5 out of 5

    Iosephvs Bibliothecarivs

  11. 5 out of 5

    Dan Eggleston

  12. 5 out of 5

    Ann Nichols

  13. 4 out of 5

    Janice

  14. 5 out of 5

    Sue

  15. 5 out of 5

    Moonkiszt

  16. 4 out of 5

    OTIS

  17. 5 out of 5

    Cat.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Andrew Wencl

  19. 4 out of 5

    Laura

  20. 5 out of 5

    Marie

  21. 5 out of 5

    Rebecca

  22. 4 out of 5

    Cynthia

  23. 4 out of 5

    Beatrice Drury

  24. 4 out of 5

    Tammy

  25. 4 out of 5

    Charlene

  26. 4 out of 5

    Katrina

  27. 4 out of 5

    Cherie

  28. 5 out of 5

    Leah

  29. 4 out of 5

    Betsy

  30. 4 out of 5

    Maurynne Maxwell

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