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Le Temple du Soleil

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L'aventure amorcée dans Les 7 boules de cristal se poursuit ici. Arrivés au Pérou, Tintin et Haddock retrouvent Tournesol à bord du cargo Pachacamac, mais ils n’arrivent pas à le libérer, et les ravisseurs réussissent à leur échapper… En suivant leurs traces, Tintin apprend l'existence d'un mystérieux temple du soleil, dernière retraite de la civilisation inca. Mais person L'aventure amorcée dans Les 7 boules de cristal se poursuit ici. Arrivés au Pérou, Tintin et Haddock retrouvent Tournesol à bord du cargo Pachacamac, mais ils n’arrivent pas à le libérer, et les ravisseurs réussissent à leur échapper… En suivant leurs traces, Tintin apprend l'existence d'un mystérieux temple du soleil, dernière retraite de la civilisation inca. Mais personne ne veut l’y conduire, sauf un jeune indien quechua nommé Zorrino… Ils entreprennent donc le voyage en compagnie de Zorrino. Mais ils vont devoir traverser les Andes et la jungle, leur voyage ne sera long et difficile. De plus bientôt ils vont se rendre compte qu’ils sont suivis…


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L'aventure amorcée dans Les 7 boules de cristal se poursuit ici. Arrivés au Pérou, Tintin et Haddock retrouvent Tournesol à bord du cargo Pachacamac, mais ils n’arrivent pas à le libérer, et les ravisseurs réussissent à leur échapper… En suivant leurs traces, Tintin apprend l'existence d'un mystérieux temple du soleil, dernière retraite de la civilisation inca. Mais person L'aventure amorcée dans Les 7 boules de cristal se poursuit ici. Arrivés au Pérou, Tintin et Haddock retrouvent Tournesol à bord du cargo Pachacamac, mais ils n’arrivent pas à le libérer, et les ravisseurs réussissent à leur échapper… En suivant leurs traces, Tintin apprend l'existence d'un mystérieux temple du soleil, dernière retraite de la civilisation inca. Mais personne ne veut l’y conduire, sauf un jeune indien quechua nommé Zorrino… Ils entreprennent donc le voyage en compagnie de Zorrino. Mais ils vont devoir traverser les Andes et la jungle, leur voyage ne sera long et difficile. De plus bientôt ils vont se rendre compte qu’ils sont suivis…

30 review for Le Temple du Soleil

  1. 5 out of 5

    Manybooks

    Le Temple du Soleil is the sequel to The Seven Crystal Balls (which I have unfortunately never managed to fully read) and while it is definitely a tale of both engaging high spirited adventure and often even rather majorly hilarious and funny in scope, especially with regard to Captain Haddock's antics and general attitudes (like the repeated times he gets spit in the face by llamas, for considering that llamas tend to only engage in this type of behaviour when and if they are seriously annoyed Le Temple du Soleil is the sequel to The Seven Crystal Balls (which I have unfortunately never managed to fully read) and while it is definitely a tale of both engaging high spirited adventure and often even rather majorly hilarious and funny in scope, especially with regard to Captain Haddock's antics and general attitudes (like the repeated times he gets spit in the face by llamas, for considering that llamas tend to only engage in this type of behaviour when and if they are seriously annoyed or feeling threatened in some way, that little salient factoid clearly and humorously demonstrates that the captain does, indeed, often behave inappropriately and like at best a gambolling and annoying curmudgeon, like a rampaging bull in the proverbial china shop) and that in general, Le Temple du Soleil is also quite a bit less majorly ethnically stereotyping than some of Hergé's earlier Tintin graphic novels (such as for example his Tintin au Congo which is simply terrible and patently unacceptable in EVERY WAY with regard to its in one's face overt racism), there nevertheless is ONE particular episode in Le Temple du Soleil that made me massively and lastingly annoyed and angry when I first read the latter as a teenager and yes still majorly frustrates me as an adult rereading Le Temple du Soleil. For while Hergé portrays the Incas as perhaps dangerously misguided in and with their attempts to safeguard their treasures and culture from outsiders (with violence, subterfuge and for Tintin and Captain Haddock with threatened execution for having found their temple) but generally and appreciatively still rather sympathetically depicted and basically for the most part simply concerned with keeping themselves hidden and their imperilled culture and amassed treasures intact and removed from the world, the author, Hergé also both describes and illustrates the Inca as basically simplistically and strangely superstitious. And this becomes especially apparent and clearly shown when Tintin uses that impending solar eclipse about which he had read in a newspaper to obtain freedom for himself and Captain Haddock. Yes, the Incas did historically worship the sun, and thus also and logically would likely still worship the sun in Le Temple du Soleil (and thus, I guess it might make sense to Hergé to have attempted to depict the Incas as superstitious with regard to the sun and of course also afraid of the darkness that a solar eclipse engenders). However, considering that the Incas are deemed and known to be an ancient and advanced civilisation and that solar eclipses do tend to happen regularly, in my opinion, the Incas of Le Temple du Soleil as very ancient, long-time sun worshippers would have and should have absolutely been aware of solar eclipses as a recurring phenomenon, thus making the method by which Tintin and Captain Haddock escape at best not only rather (if not actually quite) unbelievable but also and far more seriously, frustratingly paternalistic and borderline racially, culturally insulting if not decidedly bigoted in tone (not to mention the inconvenient truth that Tintin using a solar eclipse to basically shock and awe the Incas into letting him and Captain Haddock go does basically make no historical and factual sense whatsoever, considering how advanced the Incas as a civilisation are supposed to have been with regard to mathematics and astronomy, namely that they would almost certainly have been very much able to accurately predict solar eclipses). And indeed I still vividly remember the first time I read Le Temple du Soleil as a teenager (and in German translation, I should add). I had just finished reading a non fiction account on the Incas and their in many ways so advanced civilisation (for high school social studies) and I was happily reading along and actually quite enjoying myself, but to then encounter how Tintin uses the predicted solar eclipse and the supposed superstitions of his sun worshipping Inca captors to escape execution, that did in fact make me do a major and massive double take (a very much and eye-opening and "oh my gosh" moment for me). And even now, when rereading, I am still really only willing to grant at most a two and a half star ranking to and for Hergé's Le Temple du Soleil (not a horrible story by any means, and actually very much enjoyable in many ways, but certainly with still way way too much paternalism and attitudes of Euro-centric superiority present for me to consider raising the rating to three stars). And as such recommended only with the caveat that especially the "solar eclipse" episode warrants discussion and debate and should therefore also not just be deemed as simply a necessary plot device of Le Temple du Soleil, but an inherently problematic authorial attitude that requires at least being pointed out in a critical and very much questioning manner.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Piyangie

    The adventure that began in The Seven Crystal Balls continues in here. The search for the kidnapped Professor Calculus takes Tintin and Captain Haddock to Peru and into the heart of Incan civilization. Through many adventures and perils to their lives, the Tintin and the Captain manage to rescue Professor Calculus from the Incans and also to make them release the seven explores from the curse they were subjected to. I liked Tintin's adventures very much in this installment. They were quite inte The adventure that began in The Seven Crystal Balls continues in here. The search for the kidnapped Professor Calculus takes Tintin and Captain Haddock to Peru and into the heart of Incan civilization. Through many adventures and perils to their lives, the Tintin and the Captain manage to rescue Professor Calculus from the Incans and also to make them release the seven explores from the curse they were subjected to. I liked Tintin's adventures very much in this installment. They were quite intense. And the usual antics of Captain Haddock and mishaps that constantly meet him were hilarious. And, I mustn't forget about the detective duo. They were not second to Captain Haddock in amusing me. :) I remember that Prisoners of the Sun and The Seven Crystal Balls were my most loved Tintin adventures of childhood, and I think even years later it will be so.

  3. 5 out of 5

    David Sarkies

    The Inca curse takes Tintin and Haddock to Peru 17 February 2012 It took me a while to get around to reading this one (okay, it was a week, but then again I am re-reading all of my Tintin comics, and getting my hands on the ones that I don't have, though I have found that getting a copy of Tintin in the Congo is going to be an expensive endeavour) but I finally read it this morning and I must say that I absolutely loved it. This is an adventure story in the truest sense of the word. It pretty muc The Inca curse takes Tintin and Haddock to Peru 17 February 2012 It took me a while to get around to reading this one (okay, it was a week, but then again I am re-reading all of my Tintin comics, and getting my hands on the ones that I don't have, though I have found that getting a copy of Tintin in the Congo is going to be an expensive endeavour) but I finally read it this morning and I must say that I absolutely loved it. This is an adventure story in the truest sense of the word. It pretty much have everything in it: an ancient Inca conspiracy, treks through the mountains and the jungles, hilarious scenes with Captain Haddock getting himself into all kinds of trouble (would we expect any less from Herge?), numerous death-defying experiences, and the typical antics of the Thompson Twins. I love it. This story follows on from Seven Crystal Balls. Professor Calculus has been kidnapped, and Tintin and Captain Haddock travel to Peru to attempt to rescue him. Some have indicated that by travelling half-way around the world, and then treking for weeks over some very inhospitable terrain shows how much love they hold for Professor Calculus, and what is more surprising is that this is technically the second adventure that they go on after meeting him (and by saying this I consider Seven Crystals Balls and Prisoners of the Sun to be one long adventure). However, we must remember that both Tintin and Captain Haddock are very noble characters (despite Haddocks fits of rage, drunkenness, and somewhat bi-polar personality) and they will go to great lengths to not only help a friend, but to also right a wrong that has been perpetrated. One thing that we forget is that there is more to this story than just rescuing Calculus as there are also seven archaeologists who are in hospital due to a curse that has been placed on them. As I said, this is an adventure in the truest sense of the word. As we progress through the story we come to understand the difficulties and the length of the trek that they undertake. They pretty much travel into some of the remotest parts of Peru: by foot. They cross one mountain range, travel through a jungle, and then onto another mountain range on the other side, and the journey takes weeks. Further, it is a very perilous journey. Not only are they being stalked and hunted by the Inca, but there are also the natural dangers that they face. There is one hilarious scene where a tapir is charging through the forest, runs down Captain Haddock (who else?), and continues on without a blink. Then there is the scene where they are crossing a river and are being swarmed by alligators. Herge is simply a genius. As mentioned, this follows on from Seven Crystal Balls, and the theme regarding archaeology continues. The conclusion is that these archaeologists are not out to loot tombs of their treasures, but rather to explore an ancient civilisation to come to understand better how their culture worked. In many cases, these civilisations are long gone, and the only way we can understand them is through their relics. However, there is also the question of whether we have the right to remove them from where they were found. This is an ongoing debate, particularly in relation to treasures removed from Egypt as well as the Elgin Marbles which were taken from Greece to the British Museum. The problem with the Elgin Marbles is that Lord Elgin actually purchased them off the then Greek government. Is it right, though, for the Greeks to be willing to give up such treasures. I would say no, however I also believe that these artifacts are for the benefit of humanity as they help us to understand and learn more about these ancient cultures. These days, however, we find that many of them are placed in museums run by the government of the respective country, but what happens when we have countries like Greece going bankrupt and selling off their treasures to the highest bidder. I prefer these objects to be on display for the whole world to see, not locked away in some private collection, only for the entertainment of the wealthy oligarchy.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Melki

    A grand Peruvian adventure in which the Captain proves himself to be almost as annoying as Willie in Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom. He gets bit by mosquitos, laughed at by howler monkeys, licked by an anteater, bowled over by a tapir, sits on an alligator and is spat upon by multitudes of llamas. Through it all, he does manage to hang onto his cap, so there's that... A grand Peruvian adventure in which the Captain proves himself to be almost as annoying as Willie in Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom. He gets bit by mosquitos, laughed at by howler monkeys, licked by an anteater, bowled over by a tapir, sits on an alligator and is spat upon by multitudes of llamas. Through it all, he does manage to hang onto his cap, so there's that...

  5. 4 out of 5

    Mohammed Arabey

    Sequel to the previous one.. The 7 Crystal Balls. A cool journey in Latin America... To the Temple of Sun and the mysterious Inca atmosphere... Tintin and his friends rescuing the eccentric professor.. Well I don't know why I didn't read it earlier after finishing the previous one last April.. It sure fun to be back to this mega size pages of Tintin comics.. Sequel to the previous one.. The 7 Crystal Balls. A cool journey in Latin America... To the Temple of Sun and the mysterious Inca atmosphere... Tintin and his friends rescuing the eccentric professor.. Well I don't know why I didn't read it earlier after finishing the previous one last April.. It sure fun to be back to this mega size pages of Tintin comics..

  6. 5 out of 5

    Gary

    First published in the original French in 1949 as Le Temple du Soleil (The Temple of the Sun), Prisoners of the Sun is the sequel to The Seven Crystal Balls. After Professor Calculus is kidnapped in The Seven Crystal Balls, for putting on the bracelet of the mummified Inca Rascar Capac, Tintin and captain Haddock travel to Peru to find him. After getting no help from the police, and after an attempt on Tintin's life, Tintin and Haddock come across a young Indian guide by the name of Zorrino. They First published in the original French in 1949 as Le Temple du Soleil (The Temple of the Sun), Prisoners of the Sun is the sequel to The Seven Crystal Balls. After Professor Calculus is kidnapped in The Seven Crystal Balls, for putting on the bracelet of the mummified Inca Rascar Capac, Tintin and captain Haddock travel to Peru to find him. After getting no help from the police, and after an attempt on Tintin's life, Tintin and Haddock come across a young Indian guide by the name of Zorrino. They then travel through mountain and jungle and eventually stumble across the hidden mountain temple where Calculus is imprisoned. Sentenced to death by the Incas for defiling their Temple, Tintin tricks the Indians by timing their execution (of which date the condemned are allowed to choose) to coincide with the solar eclipse. The terrified Incas then are convinced that Tintin has powers to control the sun, and release Tintin and his friends, giving them gifts and sending them home with Calculus. The eclipse incident is a misnomer as the Incas, as s worshippers of the Sun and experienced astronomers, the Incas would have been able to predict a solar eclipse almost as well as any modern scientist. Zorrino chooses to stay in the Temple. Full of action. adventure and colour.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Namratha

    My life is better (and cusses, richer), thanks to Captain Haddock and moments like these: My life is better (and cusses, richer), thanks to Captain Haddock and moments like these:

  8. 5 out of 5

    Dorin

    A comic book like Prisoners of the Sun would be impossible today; mainly because a few aspects are problematic in a very naïve way. There is a pinch of racism, a bit of superiority of the civilized man; things that we would be very ashamed of in 2019, when I read this. But it's a fun adventure; it's Indiana Jones before Indiana Jones happened; it's fun, it's interesting, it's also a bit educational, because you actually get to learn about places you never seen or heard about. And I bet that for A comic book like Prisoners of the Sun would be impossible today; mainly because a few aspects are problematic in a very naïve way. There is a pinch of racism, a bit of superiority of the civilized man; things that we would be very ashamed of in 2019, when I read this. But it's a fun adventure; it's Indiana Jones before Indiana Jones happened; it's fun, it's interesting, it's also a bit educational, because you actually get to learn about places you never seen or heard about. And I bet that for many people, this was one of the first contacts with that side of the world. It's an adventure as well as a learning experience, and at times the educational aspect becomes obvious. But remember, it's a book published in 1949.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Jazzy Lemon

    Tintin, Snowy, and Captain Haddock go in search of Professor Calculus and end up in Peru.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Mark

    The closing chapter in a two part story in which Tintin and Haddock are chasing the kidnappers of professor Calcalus and the action transports them to South America. It is here that they find out that the curse of the Inca's might lead them to their deaths. After an amusing trek through the mountains they end up in a place where the Inca's still rule and they find out that they like the professor will meet their untimely end. A good thing that modern things like a paper end up in these ancient p The closing chapter in a two part story in which Tintin and Haddock are chasing the kidnappers of professor Calcalus and the action transports them to South America. It is here that they find out that the curse of the Inca's might lead them to their deaths. After an amusing trek through the mountains they end up in a place where the Inca's still rule and they find out that they like the professor will meet their untimely end. A good thing that modern things like a paper end up in these ancient places which gives Tintin a change to escape. A bit of a cop out but still wonderfully employed by Herge. With this comic Herge & Jacobs separated their roads and Edgar jacobs never got a writing credit to his name but he created another classic and vastly more epic series with Mortimer & Blake. A pleasant read nonetheless.

  11. 4 out of 5

    ❀ wambui ❀

    Stuck in work and I had a coworker share this with me. Honestly, for me Tintin did not age well. I'd have no doubt enjoyed this as a kid but now I can't get myself to dispense disbelief as the writing is awful. There are literally zero stakes in this book and the Captain who I loved as a kid was just a grumpy old bat and not funny. Not timeless. Stuck in work and I had a coworker share this with me. Honestly, for me Tintin did not age well. I'd have no doubt enjoyed this as a kid but now I can't get myself to dispense disbelief as the writing is awful. There are literally zero stakes in this book and the Captain who I loved as a kid was just a grumpy old bat and not funny. Not timeless.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Pardis Ahmadi

    in the time of no internet, tintin came to my rescue.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Rossdavidh

    Reading adventure stories from another time, is rather like reading adventure stories from another country. It is not only the names and clothes that differ; the basic attitudes and assumptions differ as well. This is a good thing, in my opinion (although opinions differ). In Tintin, we could plausibly make the accusation that members of other cultures are portrayed as exotic noble savages, if we wanted to be 21st century self-righteous about it. But really, what is the point in that? It was writ Reading adventure stories from another time, is rather like reading adventure stories from another country. It is not only the names and clothes that differ; the basic attitudes and assumptions differ as well. This is a good thing, in my opinion (although opinions differ). In Tintin, we could plausibly make the accusation that members of other cultures are portrayed as exotic noble savages, if we wanted to be 21st century self-righteous about it. But really, what is the point in that? It was written by a Belgian in the early part of the 20th century; of course it looks and sounds different now. For the standards of the time, the fact that non-European characters are often prominent characters, and friends of the protagonist, makes it a guilt-free pleasure. In "Prisoners of the Sun", the exotic culture of the day is the Inca civilization, imagined to be still in existence in remote ruins in the Andes. Tintin, young reporter (who never seems to be reporting back to anyone, by the way) and his usual companion Captain Haddock (there mostly for comedic effect) are looking for their friend Professor Calculus. If you haven't ever read any Tintin, imagine something like a "Young Indiana Jones", where he's accompanied by an adult alcoholic buffoon. There's also a small white terrier of some sort named Snowy, who seems to have the ability to effortlessly sail through customs in every exotic location Tintin travels to. Who knows, maybe they didn't have as much quarantining of animals at the border in those days. Tintin's age is not exactly apparent, but he seems to be maybe late teens? He's handy with a firearm, that's for certain. Good fun, and the art style is simple and enjoyable to look at. I can easily understand how it achieved such success.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Settare (on hiatus)

    The text below is included in ALL of my reviews for the Tintin series. If you've already read it, please feel free to skip to the last part which is about this book: I am a lifelong fan of Tintin and Hergé. Tintin is the earliest memory I have of being exposed to books and stories, my dad started to read Tintin to me when I was less than three years old and continued to do so until I learned to read on my own. I have loved these stories my whole life, and I know all of them by heart, in Persian, The text below is included in ALL of my reviews for the Tintin series. If you've already read it, please feel free to skip to the last part which is about this book: I am a lifelong fan of Tintin and Hergé. Tintin is the earliest memory I have of being exposed to books and stories, my dad started to read Tintin to me when I was less than three years old and continued to do so until I learned to read on my own. I have loved these stories my whole life, and I know all of them by heart, in Persian, in English, and in French. But, as a devout fan, I think it's time to do the hard but right thing: confess that these books are far from perfect. They are full of stereotypes, they are racist, whitewashed, colonialist, orientalist, and many other problematic "ists" for the modern reader. Not to mention a complete lack of female characters in the entire franchise. The only reoccurring woman, Bianca Castafiore, is not even a good character, she's a mocking parody of the poor dear Maria Callas that Hergé hated. Other women present are her maid Irma (in approximately 20 frames), Alcazar's wife, a seer, some landladies, and some other very minor characters that play no important role. Anyway. In the past few years, I've struggled to decide how I feel about these books. Will I dismiss them? Consider "the time they were written in" and excuse them? Love them in secret? Start disliking them? I don't know. So far I haven't reached a fixed decision, but I will say this: I am aware that these books are problematic. I acknowledge that. I don't stand for the message of some of these books. At the same time, I won't dismiss or hide my love for them because they were an integral part of my growing up, and they have shaped some of my fondest memories, fantasies, and games. I still love the adventures of Tintin very much. And I have a soft spot for my dear old Captain Haddock, stupid and ridiculous as he is. Le Temple du Soleil or The Prisoners of the Sun is one of those shining "classic middle-period Tintin" ones which are the best and most interesting in the series. In search of the professor, Tintin, Milou, the Captain, and Zorrino (and of course the detectives in their tail) go on an epic adventure in the Peruvian Andes. The mixture of sceneries in this book is simply beautiful. Then, they basically discover Macchu Picchu (the actual inspiration for Herge) and the Quechuan people who live in it. Now here it gets a bit complicated. The Quechuans aren't bad people in the end. They live in a theocratic totalitarian (and secret) society, they worship the sun and they are simpletons: Tintin easily tricks them into believing he can control the sun. I don't know if that's innocent fun or it's offensive towards anyone. Colonialist undertones are there, obviously. I try not to get fed up in it and read it as "the fun adventure in the Andes and the Inca Trek to Macchu Picchu". One of my absolute favorite Haddock moments is the mountain scene where the Lamas are running away, the captain curses and shouts at them and he causes and avalanche. :))))) That's iconic.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Harish Challapalli

    Today after coming from The secret of the unicorn movie, I was inspired to read the comics!! During my childhood I used to watch the adventures of tintin cartoon!! Instantly I fell in love with the story!! After a long time I got an opportunity to read the series!! The prisoners of the sun is one of my favorites among the comic series!! Tin-tin as usual with his spontaneous nature dealt with the problem!! It was awesome when he chose the date of sacrifice!! Do read the comic, if u get an opportunit Today after coming from The secret of the unicorn movie, I was inspired to read the comics!! During my childhood I used to watch the adventures of tintin cartoon!! Instantly I fell in love with the story!! After a long time I got an opportunity to read the series!! The prisoners of the sun is one of my favorites among the comic series!! Tin-tin as usual with his spontaneous nature dealt with the problem!! It was awesome when he chose the date of sacrifice!! Do read the comic, if u get an opportunity!!

  16. 5 out of 5

    Tetty Marlinda

    #49 for 2018 Genre: Children Comic

  17. 5 out of 5

    Lili P

    This book is so fun! The adventure is classic and the characters are perfect.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Sherrymoon

    "Billions of blue blistering barnacles!!!" ....That has been a very funny Tintin. I like these Comics since my childhood. Maybe i read the Inca adventures now for the third or forth time, but this time with the Tintin App on my Laptop, so i could make the cute pictures from time to time very big to admire Herges paintings....i like them so much. My own little snowy or Struppi i have adventures with on the Philippino Jungle Islands. http://sherrysmoon.tumblr.com/post/171511924038 "Billions of blue blistering barnacles!!!" ....That has been a very funny Tintin. I like these Comics since my childhood. Maybe i read the Inca adventures now for the third or forth time, but this time with the Tintin App on my Laptop, so i could make the cute pictures from time to time very big to admire Herges paintings....i like them so much. My own little snowy or Struppi i have adventures with on the Philippino Jungle Islands. http://sherrysmoon.tumblr.com/post/171511924038

  19. 4 out of 5

    Ashley Capes

    Another superb adventure - great finish too. I remember being surprised by the ending when I first read it as a kid and this time around it's fun to see Haddock stressing and Tintin kicking back :D Loved the 'through the waterfall section' and the various animals tormenting Haddock in the jungles too. Probably the best 'two-part' adventure in the series for me. Another superb adventure - great finish too. I remember being surprised by the ending when I first read it as a kid and this time around it's fun to see Haddock stressing and Tintin kicking back :D Loved the 'through the waterfall section' and the various animals tormenting Haddock in the jungles too. Probably the best 'two-part' adventure in the series for me.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Laura

    From BBC Radio 4 Extra: With Professor Calculus in grave danger, the boy reporter and dog Snowy lead a rescue.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Kellyn Roth

    I wonder why animals hate Captain Haddock so much ...

  22. 4 out of 5

    Asraful Shumon

    Ah come on, make a movie out of the story--The Seven crystal balls and prisoner of the sun! It will be box office hit for sure.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Naveen N. Bhat

    Published starting in 1946, this is Hergé's first official post-WWII series. Completing an arc begun in The Seven Crystal Balls, the story follows Tintin, Snowy, and Captain Haddock as they continue their efforts to rescue Professor Calculus by travelling through Andean villages, mountains, and rain forests, before finding a hidden Inca civilisation. The welcome change I noticed was Snowy finally had actual lines again, instead of being resorted to simply barking in the last few comics. Good to Published starting in 1946, this is Hergé's first official post-WWII series. Completing an arc begun in The Seven Crystal Balls, the story follows Tintin, Snowy, and Captain Haddock as they continue their efforts to rescue Professor Calculus by travelling through Andean villages, mountains, and rain forests, before finding a hidden Inca civilisation. The welcome change I noticed was Snowy finally had actual lines again, instead of being resorted to simply barking in the last few comics. Good to have ol' Snowy back!

  24. 4 out of 5

    Shivam Kalra

    My first Tintin and I thoroughly enjoyed it. Plus, I got some great insight into Herge and what made him write Tintin.

  25. 5 out of 5

    itchy

    once again, motor-mouth archibald provide reliably comedic dialogue like, "stand back, anachronisms!" "politicians"? once again, motor-mouth archibald provide reliably comedic dialogue like, "stand back, anachronisms!" "politicians"?

  26. 4 out of 5

    Lotte

    Or: Captain Haddock and the llamas. What confused me is that sometimes haddock and Tintin adresses each other with "Tu " and in other times with "vous". Same goes for Tintin and the Inca. Or: Captain Haddock and the llamas. What confused me is that sometimes haddock and Tintin adresses each other with "Tu " and in other times with "vous". Same goes for Tintin and the Inca.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Settare (on hiatus)

    The text below is included in ALL of my reviews for the Tintin series. If you've already read it, please proceed to the last part of the review. I am a lifelong fan of Tintin and Hergé. Tintin was the earliest memory I have of being exposed to books and stories, my dad started to read Tintin to me when I was less than three years old and continued to do so until I learned to read myself. I have loved these stories my whole life, and I know all of them by heart, in Persian, in English, and in Fren The text below is included in ALL of my reviews for the Tintin series. If you've already read it, please proceed to the last part of the review. I am a lifelong fan of Tintin and Hergé. Tintin was the earliest memory I have of being exposed to books and stories, my dad started to read Tintin to me when I was less than three years old and continued to do so until I learned to read myself. I have loved these stories my whole life, and I know all of them by heart, in Persian, in English, and in French. But, as a devout fan, I think it's time to do the hard but right thing: confess that these books are far from perfect. They are quite problematic. They are racist, whitewashed, colonialist, orientalist, full of stereotypes, you name it. Not to mention a complete lack of female characters. (Bianca Castafiore, the main recurring female character, is a mocking relic of the poor dear Maria Callas that Hergé hated. Other female characters are too minor to be considered at all: Castafiore's maid Irma, the landladies, and Alcazar's wife are present in approximately 20 frames. There are no other significant women around, ever). In the past few years, I've struggled to decide how I feel about these books. Will I dismiss them? Consider "the time they were written in" and excuse them? Love them in secret? Start disliking them? I don't know. So far I haven't reached a fixed decision, but I will say this: I am aware that these books are problematic. I fully acknowledge that. I don't stand for the "white savior"/colonialist message of most of these books. At the same time, I won't dismiss or hide my love for them because they were an integral part of my growing up, my childhood memories and fantasies and games, and I do, still, love them all. And captain Haddock has a special place in my heart, crude and vulgar and stupid and ridiculous as he is. Le Temple du Soleil is one of my favorite books in the series, and it started my infatuation with Inca history, Machu Picchu, and the allure of the Andes. It's full of colonialist undertones but still, despite that, it's an adventure of a lifetime. The captain's relationship with Lamas is to die for.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Qudwatu Nabila

    Another book I had to read for the Pragmatic course assignment. I enjoyed this assignment very much! I remember watching the cartoon version of this story, even though it might be the previous part of it. I like Tintin. I always love his kind and friendly attitude; it feels like he is always capable of making new friends wherever he goes. I always love his adventure. Reading the comic (and watching the cartoons) are like going around the world, exploring various cultures, and meeting many kinds o Another book I had to read for the Pragmatic course assignment. I enjoyed this assignment very much! I remember watching the cartoon version of this story, even though it might be the previous part of it. I like Tintin. I always love his kind and friendly attitude; it feels like he is always capable of making new friends wherever he goes. I always love his adventure. Reading the comic (and watching the cartoons) are like going around the world, exploring various cultures, and meeting many kinds of people. When I was a kid, I never thought about signs or stereotypes. When I knew Tintin for the first time, what came to my mind was that Tintin and Captain Haddock were good people and that the Indians were bad (even though some of them, mostly young boys, were good). But, after years later, when I read Tintin comic again, many other thoughts come to my mind. This might be like what they say: "Reading the same book at different time will create different impacts." Are the Indians really that bad to the point that they will kill people for wearing a treasure? Are they really that primitive that they believe the sun was obeying Tintin? I'm not going to think deeply about that this time. I'm also not going to try answering those questions. That's not the point of my Pragmatic assignment. Haha. But, well, maybe I can do that another time.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Andy

    Arguably this is better than the first part but I can't bring myself to elevate it to 3 stars. Being tired and grumpy has something to do with it but the plot seems rushed and reads more like a travelogue through the Peruvian landscape than a taut action thriller. The art work is exception here though. The train sequence, climbing in the mountains and the waterfall all work nicely but the jungle sequence with a sudden parade of native animals just feels like a trip to zoo. A lot of 'days pass' an Arguably this is better than the first part but I can't bring myself to elevate it to 3 stars. Being tired and grumpy has something to do with it but the plot seems rushed and reads more like a travelogue through the Peruvian landscape than a taut action thriller. The art work is exception here though. The train sequence, climbing in the mountains and the waterfall all work nicely but the jungle sequence with a sudden parade of native animals just feels like a trip to zoo. A lot of 'days pass' and the finale involves them relaxing in luxury quarters before an obvious cop out ending (ok, maybe more obvious now than it would have been at the time), an improbable reverse face and reward of great riches. The Captain is particularly annoying with his brand of (admittedly innovative) cursing and buffoonery though when you add in the Thom(p)son's stupid slapstick and inane word play or the one note Calculus (being deaf only goes so far in the humour department) it's difficult to figure out who's more irritating. I'm thinking Tintin is not for me but I'm now in that situation where I've read so far I kind of need to see it through to the end. Plus, some of the remaining stories look intriguing. Hmmm. There's always hope.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Martin Tuozzo

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. I definitely agree with other readers that this two-parter is one of Herge's best, but IMHO it is mostly due to the impressive boost provided by "Seven Crystal Balls", and its terrifying main plot. Although I have enjoyed very much this second part (especially the quest for the Temple) I find the ending ridiculous and unworthy of such a great storyline. This secluded, modern day Incas (whose existence all the world ignores) travel to Europe following the Sanders-Hardiman expedition, put its memb I definitely agree with other readers that this two-parter is one of Herge's best, but IMHO it is mostly due to the impressive boost provided by "Seven Crystal Balls", and its terrifying main plot. Although I have enjoyed very much this second part (especially the quest for the Temple) I find the ending ridiculous and unworthy of such a great storyline. This secluded, modern day Incas (whose existence all the world ignores) travel to Europe following the Sanders-Hardiman expedition, put its members in an induced comatose state that no modern medicine can decipher, are smart enough to return unscathed fooling our heroes and the police in the process, and yet fail to recognize an eclipse? Even disregarding the fact that the Incas were very well acquainted with Astronomy, the ending of the book transforms the former perpetrators of an incredible revenge into a group of easily scared ignorants, all too eager to embrace Tintin's performance as the true representative of Pachacamac (Inti, actually). I see a great inconsistency in that. Although chock-full of great moments, and enjoyable as it may be, this could have possibly been the best of all Tintin's two-parters, but, it is marred by the unsuitable ending. Nevertheless, worth reading.

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