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The Games Do Count: America's Best and Brightest on the Power of Sports

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What do Henry Kissinger, Jack Welch, Condoleezza Rice, and Jon Bon Jovi have in common? They have all reached the top of their respective professions, and they all credit sports for teaching them the lessons that were fundamental to their success. In his years spent interviewing and profiling celebrities, politicians, and top businesspeople, popular sportscaster and Fox & What do Henry Kissinger, Jack Welch, Condoleezza Rice, and Jon Bon Jovi have in common? They have all reached the top of their respective professions, and they all credit sports for teaching them the lessons that were fundamental to their success. In his years spent interviewing and profiling celebrities, politicians, and top businesspeople, popular sportscaster and Fox & Friends cohost Brian Kilmeade has discovered that nearly everyone shares a love of sports and has a story about how a game, a coach, or a single moment of competition changed his or her life. These vignettes have entertained, surprised, and inspired readers nationwide with their insight into America's most respected and well-known personalities. Kilmeade presents more than seventy stories straight from the men and women themselves and those who were closest to them. From competition to camaraderie, individual achievement to teamwork, failure to success, the world of sports encompasses it all and enriches our lives. The Games Do Count reveals this simple and compelling truth: America's best and brightest haven't just worked hard -- they've played hard -- and the results have been staggering!


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What do Henry Kissinger, Jack Welch, Condoleezza Rice, and Jon Bon Jovi have in common? They have all reached the top of their respective professions, and they all credit sports for teaching them the lessons that were fundamental to their success. In his years spent interviewing and profiling celebrities, politicians, and top businesspeople, popular sportscaster and Fox & What do Henry Kissinger, Jack Welch, Condoleezza Rice, and Jon Bon Jovi have in common? They have all reached the top of their respective professions, and they all credit sports for teaching them the lessons that were fundamental to their success. In his years spent interviewing and profiling celebrities, politicians, and top businesspeople, popular sportscaster and Fox & Friends cohost Brian Kilmeade has discovered that nearly everyone shares a love of sports and has a story about how a game, a coach, or a single moment of competition changed his or her life. These vignettes have entertained, surprised, and inspired readers nationwide with their insight into America's most respected and well-known personalities. Kilmeade presents more than seventy stories straight from the men and women themselves and those who were closest to them. From competition to camaraderie, individual achievement to teamwork, failure to success, the world of sports encompasses it all and enriches our lives. The Games Do Count reveals this simple and compelling truth: America's best and brightest haven't just worked hard -- they've played hard -- and the results have been staggering!

30 review for The Games Do Count: America's Best and Brightest on the Power of Sports

  1. 4 out of 5

    Lawrence Kao

    I picked up "The Games Do Count" whilst browsing in the bargain books bin in a Border's in San Francisco. Being a huge sports fan and a relatively recent MBA grad, I really thought this book would be perfect. I mean think about it, it's about the US's most powerful leaders and their experiences and takeaways from the universal activity, sports! And for $3, he steals second! (Whoa, I am lame). I cracked the book open immediately and realized I didn't really like it. In fact, the stories often tim I picked up "The Games Do Count" whilst browsing in the bargain books bin in a Border's in San Francisco. Being a huge sports fan and a relatively recent MBA grad, I really thought this book would be perfect. I mean think about it, it's about the US's most powerful leaders and their experiences and takeaways from the universal activity, sports! And for $3, he steals second! (Whoa, I am lame). I cracked the book open immediately and realized I didn't really like it. In fact, the stories often times were short and didn't have too much meaning. Most of the time it felt like a person would write about random stories from different parts of their lives and tried to piece them together. Oftentimes, there didn't seem like a point to the story nor were there any clear takeaways. It was just a bunch of men and women recalling reliving their youths. After plowing on, it actually started getting better. And as I got to the later chapters, I started empathizing more and more with these celebrities. The chapters featuring the heroes of United 93 were just absolutely tragic. I even found myself connecting with people I typically disagree with on a political or business level. I'm going to classify this type of book as a good on-the-go book. It's good for those short 15 minute tube and bus rides.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Ted Hinkle

    Began reading sometime ago; pulled off shelf recently to continue reading. These vignettes give insight into the influence of sport in a cross section of 74 American leaders and well-known personalities. Entertaining for those of comparable age to the personalities interviewed; could have an impact on our youthful readers if revised to include some contemporary personalities. I appreciated the memorial of Mark Bingham, Jeremy Glick, Todd Beamer, and Tom Burnett on Flight 93. I applaud Brian Kilm Began reading sometime ago; pulled off shelf recently to continue reading. These vignettes give insight into the influence of sport in a cross section of 74 American leaders and well-known personalities. Entertaining for those of comparable age to the personalities interviewed; could have an impact on our youthful readers if revised to include some contemporary personalities. I appreciated the memorial of Mark Bingham, Jeremy Glick, Todd Beamer, and Tom Burnett on Flight 93. I applaud Brian Kilmeade for helping us understand "The Games Do Count".

  3. 4 out of 5

    Semi-Academic Eric

    This may be necessary reading for educators that seem to want to cut out sports. Although I did not grow up with much of this in my earlier education, there seem to be lessons that are best learned while actively engaged in these types of activities. It made me more interested in playing these games that sometimes we have taken for granted. More importantly, it made me more interested in making sure to provide opportunities for our children to participate in sports.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Sean

    It's a nice book. The chapters are pretty short and are quick reads. For me, there are too many typos. For instance Tony Danza boxed in the Golden Gloves not the Golden Globes; Dr. J's name is Julius Erving, not Julius Irving. Those kind of errors, and they're all over the place, just detracted from my enjoyment of the book. In a book about sports, wouldn't you think that there wouldn't be so many sports reference errors? It's a nice book. The chapters are pretty short and are quick reads. For me, there are too many typos. For instance Tony Danza boxed in the Golden Gloves not the Golden Globes; Dr. J's name is Julius Erving, not Julius Irving. Those kind of errors, and they're all over the place, just detracted from my enjoyment of the book. In a book about sports, wouldn't you think that there wouldn't be so many sports reference errors?

  5. 4 out of 5

    Judine

    I've only read 15 or 20 of these profiles, but I like that so many of the people talk about how their participation in sports influenced what they're doing now - and they're doing everything from acting to politics. I also appreciate that the sports include what many people in my part of the country consider "minor" sports - like soccer and horseback riding. It provides a good balance. I've only read 15 or 20 of these profiles, but I like that so many of the people talk about how their participation in sports influenced what they're doing now - and they're doing everything from acting to politics. I also appreciate that the sports include what many people in my part of the country consider "minor" sports - like soccer and horseback riding. It provides a good balance.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Ryan

    The people I found interesting had a few nice stories. But, albeit it could be my issue, I didn't care about most of these people. And the ones I wanted to read were super short. An easy book to read a chapter if you have a few minutes here and there but I skipped quite a few due to lack of interest. The people I found interesting had a few nice stories. But, albeit it could be my issue, I didn't care about most of these people. And the ones I wanted to read were super short. An easy book to read a chapter if you have a few minutes here and there but I skipped quite a few due to lack of interest.

  7. 5 out of 5

    John Desmond

    A collection of essays written by some of the most famous people in America. They tell the story of how participation in sports influenced their lives, how they applied lessons of teamwork, dedication, etc. to their successes off the field. After a while, the stories begin to sound the same, however.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Reid Corcoran

    Their stories illustrate what the games are supposed to mean to our kids. NOWHERE in the book does it talk about the importance of the games to the guy pacing the siadelines, veins bulging, living vicariously through his offspring!

  9. 5 out of 5

    Katie

    The overall intention of this book, to show that sports are an important part of character development, was really appealing to me. I agree that participation in sports helps to shape a person and influence them all their life. However, there were lots of typos. Worth a casual read.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Dave

    The stories were not that remarkable but it was interesting to see what value sports played in these lives. Same old theme for me... great theme but not that great of a book. The author is one of the anchors on Fox and Friends on morning TV. Smart guy.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Nick Lloyd

    Famous people played sports too? The hell you say. Some crack reporting there, third-smartest host of Fox and Friends.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Jeff

    Loved this book. From the perspective of leaders, sports figures, CEO's and others, it's a great way to see how organized sports and coaches affected/changed their lives. Loved this book. From the perspective of leaders, sports figures, CEO's and others, it's a great way to see how organized sports and coaches affected/changed their lives.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer

    This book provides insight into the part that sports have played in the lives of an interesting assortment of successful people.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Glenn Liguori

    X

  15. 4 out of 5

    Raymond Bial

    Very insightful book. Kilmeade did a very good job of assembling an interesting array of well-known people who share their experiences in a variety of sports.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Louis Picone

    great concept for a book - it just got a little long & repetitive. I would have preferred cutting about 10 of the stories

  17. 4 out of 5

    Annie McBride

    Have you ever felt like a loser? In the book, The Games Do Matter, by Brian Kilmeade, you will learn to overcome those feelings. One great thing was how Brian gave small details which added much more to the story. For example, he wrote about the small changes in the people's lives and how they overcame feeling like a loser to being on top of the world. The conflicts made it interesting because we got to see each step of the way they took to be the best they could be. John was always bullied in h Have you ever felt like a loser? In the book, The Games Do Matter, by Brian Kilmeade, you will learn to overcome those feelings. One great thing was how Brian gave small details which added much more to the story. For example, he wrote about the small changes in the people's lives and how they overcame feeling like a loser to being on top of the world. The conflicts made it interesting because we got to see each step of the way they took to be the best they could be. John was always bullied in high school, but he got a new person in his life and that changed everything about him. The dialogue was great because it showed the relations and how the character's personality was. Like when Tony didn't believe in himself and then his new dad came in and said he could do it, that dialogue was great because it was very uplifting and inspiring. Overall, many people would like this book, but mainly it would be for sportspeople or people who want to hear a story about an underdog or someone who had a bad childhood but pushed themselves to get to the top.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Marlena

    I picked this book up years ago because I saw Condoleeza Rice was one of the folks featured in it. I finally got to read it only to discover Hannah Storm (I looked up to her so much as a kid) was in it too. Great takeaways from celebrities, politicians and others. I did not play sports (two left feet) but I covered sports and have worked in sports for a very long time so the stories resonated with me.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Jonathan Bechtel

    I would give this book a 3.5 if I could.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Hiral Patel

  21. 5 out of 5

    Chet

  22. 5 out of 5

    Jim Flowers

  23. 5 out of 5

    Melissa Coffin

  24. 4 out of 5

    Patricia D Williams

  25. 4 out of 5

    James Kerr

  26. 5 out of 5

    Michael Powell

  27. 5 out of 5

    Bob Krusenklaus

  28. 4 out of 5

    Mohammad

  29. 4 out of 5

    Joe Andersen

  30. 4 out of 5

    Natalie Wilson

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