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Admired and beloved by movie audiences for over sixty years, four-time Academy Award-winner Katharine Hepburn is an American classic. Now Miss Hepburn breaks her long-kept silence about her private life in this absorbing and provocative memoir. A NEW YORK TIMES Notable Book of the Year A Book-of-the-Month-Club Main Selection


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Admired and beloved by movie audiences for over sixty years, four-time Academy Award-winner Katharine Hepburn is an American classic. Now Miss Hepburn breaks her long-kept silence about her private life in this absorbing and provocative memoir. A NEW YORK TIMES Notable Book of the Year A Book-of-the-Month-Club Main Selection

30 review for Me: Stories of My Life

  1. 4 out of 5

    Layla

    Like listening to your grandma (your crazy, crazy grandma) tell you stories. Except that your grandma is Katharine Hepburn. Except that the stories are replete with digressions about that candy shop she used to visit as a child(of course, it's been torn down now), and that time she went to Italy with that writer and drove his Maserati, except she didn't drive and she needs glasses, and anyway, they almost had sex, but didn't, probably because he was eleven years younger, and also, she's decided Like listening to your grandma (your crazy, crazy grandma) tell you stories. Except that your grandma is Katharine Hepburn. Except that the stories are replete with digressions about that candy shop she used to visit as a child(of course, it's been torn down now), and that time she went to Italy with that writer and drove his Maserati, except she didn't drive and she needs glasses, and anyway, they almost had sex, but didn't, probably because he was eleven years younger, and also, she's decided to tell you this entirely in script form. Also, here's her recipe for currant cake. It's what separates us from the animals. It's kind of charming but also kind of horrible. And tedious. But I learned much more about Katharine Hepburn than I ever hoped to know, and it's made watching "The Lion in Winter" even more epic. Also, it's provided me with several new catchphrases. As Katharine Hepburn says, "FUCK THE ROOTS!" Upon re-reading this review years later, I can't believe I didn't mention this: much is made of her relationship with Spencer Tracy, while her relationships with women (ahem) are largely obscured. This is probably the greatest tragedy of this book. More stories about ladies; fewer stories about currant cake. Thank you.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Antigone

    Oh, she's a sly boots, our Kat. Those familiar with Ms. Hepburn are well aware of her salt o'the earth Yankee stoicism. And with that hardy pilgrim spirit comes the correspondingly stubborn, puritanical bent on the issue of privacy. What happens behind closed doors - well, they're closed for a reason, aren't they? The click of a latch, to Katharine, commands a certain respect. How then to profit in the field of memoir while leaving the meat of it all unsaid? You've got to hand it to her. She does Oh, she's a sly boots, our Kat. Those familiar with Ms. Hepburn are well aware of her salt o'the earth Yankee stoicism. And with that hardy pilgrim spirit comes the correspondingly stubborn, puritanical bent on the issue of privacy. What happens behind closed doors - well, they're closed for a reason, aren't they? The click of a latch, to Katharine, commands a certain respect. How then to profit in the field of memoir while leaving the meat of it all unsaid? You've got to hand it to her. She does her best. Those looking for dish must, perforce, look elsewhere. Yet what this work contains for me that merits such a healthy smattering of stars is its solid and sincerely pragmatic approach to life and aging. Hers is an honest account of where a silly choice will take you, the six car pile-up that occurs at the wall of one's limitations, how regret, like a bad peach, must be noted only long enough to properly discard. Mistakes will be made. Failure happens. The body runs down and falls apart. What can be fixed will be fixed, the rest one learns to live with. I've found part of the difficulty of growing older lies in the ever decreasing chorus of guiding voices. Those on the road ahead drop off, never to offer their advice again. Here is the ancient gravel of a girl who, on the page at least, is still speaking, still punching her fist in the air, still insisting, "You just go through it!" And that is a very fine thing to have.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Sophie

    When I "write" the story of my life, I will also title it ME. This was a gem of a good/bad book. Chuckle worthy Passages: Oh, I meant to tell you. I was standing on my head the other day and I got to thinking how probably unusual it is for someone of my age to do this. Everyone came and we made seventy-five dollars to buy a Victrola for the Navajo Indians. Putnam was a poet. He was sort of medium-sized and had a very handsome head. Any kind of English or WASP part I had a good chance for in those When I "write" the story of my life, I will also title it ME. This was a gem of a good/bad book. Chuckle worthy Passages: Oh, I meant to tell you. I was standing on my head the other day and I got to thinking how probably unusual it is for someone of my age to do this. Everyone came and we made seventy-five dollars to buy a Victrola for the Navajo Indians. Putnam was a poet. He was sort of medium-sized and had a very handsome head. Any kind of English or WASP part I had a good chance for in those days. And the half-boy, half-woman had been born. It was agony. We had to do it over and over again because of sound. Agony. I finally threw up and we had to try again the next day. It was wartime, 1942, and it was also rush hour. He was a man of considerable reputation with the ladies despite his rather sinister looks. It was thrilling. And thrilling is what we can do with ourselves if we really try. They represented his dream--a child's dream--that once-upon-a-time dream. It's come true--the prince--the princess. I'm riding a great white stallion. So we got the credit and George didn't. I wonder if I'm right. I think so. I think this weakness went a long way toward ruining Howard's life and making him into an oddball. It was she who told me how when certain guests would come to dinner they would set the table with the cheap china and glassware and when the dinner was over she (Beatrice) would break the cheap china and glassware and throw it away. I don't quite understand what this prived. I once said to Howard, "I think that if you picked your friends more carefully you wouldn't have to break so much china." I look back at our relationship and I think that we were both cool customers. You won't do anything else if you decide that you are going to resurrect and rearrange a human being. I'm like the Statue of Liberty to a lot of people. Why this is so I do not know. I've made forty-three pictures. Naturally I'm adorable in all of them He was his true self--a real cockney--slightly plump and full of beans. Another report about S.T.: "How can I do a picture with a woman who has dirt under her fingernails and who is of ambiguous sexuality and always wears pants?" John Wayne is the hero of the thirties and forties and most of the fifties. Before the creeps came creeping in. They both thought it was fun. It is fun. But is it? Well that's the end of the story about refurbishing the south bank of the swamp. They disgorged their passengers--they drove on. For once I had sensible luggage. You had two rather large suitcases, as I recall. I had one Vuitton suitcase and two sort of duffel bags--also Vuitton. But for some trivial reason I didn't like the name Joey. What kind of insecurity could so dominate a man that he could imagine that it meant any more than that? I meant exactly that--that I didn't like the name. I had a wonderful sleep, although the waterfall outside the window made a terrible noise. I have a happy nature--I like the rain--I like the sun--the heat--the cold--the mountains, the sea--the flowers, the--Well, I like life and I've been so lucky. Why shouldn't I be happy? I don't lock doors. I don't hold grudges. Really the only thing I'm not mad about is wind. I find it disturbing. I mean wind in the heavens.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Jessaka

    I have always liked Katharine Hepburn, so I bought this book years ago. All I remember is that she talked about her movies and not so much about herself. I really don't care to hear about these things; I wanted to know about her. I also recall back then that I found a brownie recipe that was supposed to be hers, so I tried it out, and my own recipe was so much better. I sent her one of my recipes, don't recall which one, and the woman in charge of her mail thanked me for it and said that Hepburn I have always liked Katharine Hepburn, so I bought this book years ago. All I remember is that she talked about her movies and not so much about herself. I really don't care to hear about these things; I wanted to know about her. I also recall back then that I found a brownie recipe that was supposed to be hers, so I tried it out, and my own recipe was so much better. I sent her one of my recipes, don't recall which one, and the woman in charge of her mail thanked me for it and said that Hepburn would try it. I should have known better than to think that she would reply since she never gives out autographs. Here is my brownie recipe: MY FAVORITE BROWNIES 1/2 c. plus 2 T. butter 1 c. sugar 1/4 t. vanilla Pinch of salt 1/4 c. flour 2 eggs 6 to 8 T. unsweetened cocoa 1 c. chopped walnuts, optional Mix first five ingredients. Add eggs and cocoa; mix well. Oil and flour an 8x8 inch cake pan or use one round cake pan. Bake at 325 degrees for 35 to 40 minutes. Comment: A darker chocolate makes for a richer brownie. Katharine Hepburn's Brownies ½ cup cocoa or 2 squares (2 oz.) unsweetened baker's chocolate. 1 stick (1/2 cup) unsalted butter. 1 cup sugar. 2 eggs. 1/4 cup flour. 1 teaspoon vanilla. Pinch of salt. 1 cup roughly chopped walnuts or pecans. Important note: The kind of butter you use is very important to the taste of of anything you cook. I use only organic real butter, not just butter, and I don't use margarine. I have actually found that I like cookies that have used shortening instead of butter, but I won't use shortening because it is unhealthy. As for lard, forget it. For example: This a.m. I buttered my toast, and it really tasted funny. I went to look at the carton, and it was regular real butter. My husband didn't buy organic for some reason. He can eat it himself. Note: The only difference I see in her recipe than in mine is that she uses more vanilla.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Ashley

    This is my favorite actress so I will try not to be too biased lol. One of my favorite autobiographies. It isn't a chapter book. It contains different stories of Kate's life as she remembers them. A must have book if you are a Kate fan. This is my favorite actress so I will try not to be too biased lol. One of my favorite autobiographies. It isn't a chapter book. It contains different stories of Kate's life as she remembers them. A must have book if you are a Kate fan.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Cherie

    I am not disappointed. I loved the storytelling and the pictures were lovely. A remarkable woman.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Barbara Rice

    God, I tried to slog through this. It's Katherine Hepburn. It ought to be witty and profound and clever, and instead it was tedious and boring and who cares? I left it in an airport. God, I tried to slog through this. It's Katherine Hepburn. It ought to be witty and profound and clever, and instead it was tedious and boring and who cares? I left it in an airport.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Mary Bellus

    I would recommend this book through part 3, but don't bother with the rest. The first 3 parts were pretty good. It was interesting to hear about her life growing up on the East Coast, and how she got into theater and movies. But by part 4 it turned into a random bunch of rambling stories about this person, or that strange conversation. There were two very brief chapters about her relationship with Spencer Tracy. At the end of the first one, she says, "more on Spencer later," but then the second I would recommend this book through part 3, but don't bother with the rest. The first 3 parts were pretty good. It was interesting to hear about her life growing up on the East Coast, and how she got into theater and movies. But by part 4 it turned into a random bunch of rambling stories about this person, or that strange conversation. There were two very brief chapters about her relationship with Spencer Tracy. At the end of the first one, she says, "more on Spencer later," but then the second "Spencer" chapter didn't deliver--it sort of left me wondering if their relationship wasn't a great one, because it seemed like she didn't have much to say about him (the saddest part to me is when she said, "I have no idea how Spencer felt about me. I can only say that I think that if he hadn't liked me, he wouldn't have hung around." WOW, how sad to not know how your husband of almost 30 years feels about you!!!). Basically it seemed like after she talked about making the movies, she didn't have much else to say. Also, I have to say (because it drove me nuts the entire time) that her writing style was SO ANNOYING. Very fragmented sentences--just trailing off into nothing--em dash here--em dash there--random person talking here... ellipses--another em dash. I wanted to scream WHAT THE HELL IS HAPPENING???? It got really old and I got older trying to stick with it and figure out what she was talking about.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Valerity (Val)

    If you like reading about film stars, and stage actresses from long ago, this book should fit the bill. This memoir of Katharine Hepburn is very entertaining, as she grew up in a very unconventional family, and worked both on the stage and in the old movie studio system. She had a long and exciting life, and dated a lot of high profile men, like Howard Hughes, and for nearly 30 years Spencer Tracy.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Amy

    Ms. Hepurn's editor was napping on the job. Ms. Hepurn's editor was napping on the job.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Fangirl Musings

    Not sixty seconds ago did I finish reading Katharine's words, all of them, and I am floored with emotions. So many feelings, so many chaotic sensations tumbling through my body that I turn laughably poetic at just trying to express how deeply I am moved. I've read many novels in my life, many nonfictional works designed to engage me, make me think, entertain me, do something. And, yet, of the no doubt thousand bindings of paper and electronic ink I've perused, never, ever, have I felt as I do now Not sixty seconds ago did I finish reading Katharine's words, all of them, and I am floored with emotions. So many feelings, so many chaotic sensations tumbling through my body that I turn laughably poetic at just trying to express how deeply I am moved. I've read many novels in my life, many nonfictional works designed to engage me, make me think, entertain me, do something. And, yet, of the no doubt thousand bindings of paper and electronic ink I've perused, never, ever, have I felt as I do now. That is not hyperbole, or dramatization, that is simplistic fact. Oh, yes, I'm a fan of Kath's movie, sure. I have my favorites, and she's certainly unique on screen as she is...was...in life. But, reading Me: Stories of my Life gave me what I always have wished for, what I used to dream about as a little kid, seeing Desk Set for the first time with no real comprehension of the plot. All I knew was this pretty lady, with her pretty eyes and even prettier voice was fun. I liked her. Then, as I have until just tonight, I always wished to sit down with Kate, Kath, Miss Hepburn...to just...listen to her, and her words. Thank God she wrote this book, because I finally got that chance. Some would no doubt bemoan this book's meandering structure, its lighting-fast pace and jumpy sequencing, but not I. Rather, I feel blessed this book has such uniqueness, because, as is obvious, it's befitting of its creator. Oh, there are flaws, no question. Superfluous "wrongs," such as a few dialogue entrances between Kate and William Rose and some such thing about planting plants, removing plants? And, no reflection on Desk Set. Three flaws, really, when considering it now. And, that's it. Three parts of lackluster in a 418 page volume. Three moments. Is it any wonder she was so fascinating? It's cliche, but I laughed, I smiled...and, shockingly, I cried. Throughout the book, I had fun. It was engaging, and an intimate saga that satisfied me, but tears; that I absolutely did not expect. I read this to hear whatever Kate wanted to tell, and did not hold to any expectations in regards to Spence. In truth, Miss Hepburn held off on his subject until almost the very end, and such was perfectly fine by me, truly. First, she tells of a relationship which, for me, took the romance out of "Spence and Kate," for the picture she painted, and happily so, was one of total isolation and sacrifice on her part. In point of fact, Kate notes not even being sure if Spence loved her, or how he felt about her as a woman. Upon reading the above, well, I first got angry on her behalf. Stupid me. For, really, how could I? I'm not she, and she was happy...truly, truly happy with Spence. I thought I would surely read through the "Spencer" segment of her work with smiles, but certainty not emotional heart-wrenching. Damn, I was so wrong. Kath tantalized us with "Her and Spence," her first segment about him entitled "Spencer," at page 275. It's short, barely three pages, and ends with "But more about Spencer later. Don't be impatient. I wasn't." Oh, so typical Kate. I read that, and heard her voice, so clearly, so tangibly in my head, my ear. Classic Kate. Interestingly, the book somewhat concludes with Spencer, starting with the chapter "Love," all the way later at page 389. This is where my heart hurt for her, the story she relates with no martyrdom of how, frankly, she loved him and gave him her all, but never knew if Spencer was hers, truly hers. I'm angry here, but not long into the "Leaving the California House" chapter, I'm bawling. Bawling like a little baby with massive tears rolling down my face. I can't see the words on the page, so much I am crying. And, this emotional gut-punch concludes with the most beautiful, powerhouse, tell-all-subtly letter to Spencer that Kate wrote after his death. What's more, this is not by any means the first time I've heard this letter. Below is the link to Kate herself reading it, verbatim, and as within every viewing of the video, I cried right along with the transcript in the book. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aThAMG... But...what amazes me is that this work impacted me with a gut-slam of emotion at the end. Throughout my absorption of the book, and, hell, my whole inspiration and desperation for reading it was because I wanted to know. I desperately, tirelessness wanted to know how she thought, what she did, what her struggles, her triumphs, her goals, her family, her childhood, her career...what all that was like. Her father, mother, siblings, loss, love, growth. I sound like a stalker, and I probably am, being half (oh, hell, all) in love with Katharine Hepburn. I'm so many generations removed from her, and I bet she's laughing at me in the afterlife right this very minute. She pursued Hollywood for the goal of fame, but she wasn't much for being admired. What a contradiction. You were both, darling, and we miss you so terribly. You'd no doubt laugh at the cliche, but the world truly sucks more for your absence. Quotes: "Our house is gone - Victorian Gothic - three gables, trimmed with black lace. The driveway - the trees - gracious, simple - the brook - the daffodils. Gone. Even the brook has been put into a pipe. Well, that's the style today - pipe things - can things - freeze things - computerize things. Have to be careful about that. You can't develop a mind full of beauty or tender imagination and independence of spirit tearing along in a box without a bit of space and air - number XY-133-609-00. Well, yes, there are indeed so many of us and we've got to make room. " “Everyone knew everyone. They – that is, most of them – came from Washington Street in Hartford. They were Brainards and Brainerds and Davises and Bulkeleys and Buckleys and Goodwins. They were very nice – very Republican – very Aetna Life Insurance.” "All of a sudden I heard: "Kate! Kate! Come here!" His tone of voice made me leap out of the tub. I rushed in. Luddy was in flames - a trail of flames to the fireplace. The kerosene can in Luddy's hand burning and he couldn't drop it. I was stark naked. I belted Luddy in the stomach, knocked him down, grabbed a throw rug, smothered the fire on Luddy and knocked the kerosene can out of his poor hand - yelled, FIRE!" "He was an angel. However big the flop. "Well, I don't know, Miss Hepburn. They just love you. That's all I can say. I just hear what they say. You're the greatest." All those heartwarming lies. They keep you going. Those liars who love you and protect you. For better or for worse. Till death do us part. How lucky I've been." "Howard Hughes was a curious fellow. He had guts and he had a really fine mind, but he was deaf - quite seriously deaf - and he was apparently incapable of saying, "Please speak up. I'm deaf."...This was tragic...This is the real tragedy of any sort of personal defect. Just say it. Admit it. The person you say it to is not at all embarrassed. He or she just speaks up. He's just happy that he himself is not deaf. I think that this weakness went a long way toward ruining Howard's life and making him into an oddball." "Then we got Cary Grant for the $150,000 for three weeks' work. He said that he would do it and that he wanted first billing over me. "O.K.," I said, "that's easy." He gave his salary to the Red Cross." "It's rather the style now to romanticize certain of the older actors...No matter what you want to say, you just can't toss the parental figure. You can spit on it all you like, but eventually it has to come back. It's the strong thing to us, because it affects us very early on. It's something you can cling to." "John Wayne is the hero of the thirties and forties and most of the fifties. Before the creeps came creeping in. Before, in the sixties, the male hero slid right down into the valley of the weak and the misunderstood. Before the women began dropping any pretense to virginity into the gutter. With a disregard for truth which is indeed pathetic. And unisex was born. The hair grew long and the pride grew short. And we were off to the anti-hero and -heroine." "Now, why don't you stop, Kath - just admit it. You're dead and go in and take a bath and lie down...No, I'm not going to do that. I'm too proud. I'm going to stay out here and struggle until they quit or until I die." "And anyway, down went the tire and off came the lugs. Then he jacked her up again and on went the good tire so that the tire spun free. On went the screws again, and holding them with the handle wrench, he spun the tire, to wind one up. Great, thrilling - a ballet. So lovely - to change a tire, to know what you're doing. Head down, enjoying it." "Now I'm going to tell you about Spencer. You may think you've waited a long time. But let's face it, so did I. I was thirty-three. It seems to me I discovered what "I love you" really means. It means I put you and your interests and your comfort ahead of my own interests and my own comfort because I love you. What does this mean?...Think. We use this expression very carelessly. LOVE has nothing to do with what you are expecting to get - only with what you are expecting to give - which is everything." "I have no idea how Spence felt about me. I can only say I think that if he hadn't liked me he wouldn't have hung around. As simple as that. He wouldn't talk about it and I didn't talk about it. We just passed twenty-seven years together in what was to me absolute bliss. It is called LOVE."

  12. 4 out of 5

    Lee

    I've always admired Katherine Hepburn for being ahead of her time and unconventional in many ways. Thought surely this book would focus on her nearly 30 year love affair with Spencer Tracy. However, I barely managed to get through it. Mostly about mundane things, her growing up years, how much she loved and admired her parents and siblings, etc. Spencer only came in at the very end and there was no new ground covered. Lots of tidbits about making of various movies and the people she worked with I've always admired Katherine Hepburn for being ahead of her time and unconventional in many ways. Thought surely this book would focus on her nearly 30 year love affair with Spencer Tracy. However, I barely managed to get through it. Mostly about mundane things, her growing up years, how much she loved and admired her parents and siblings, etc. Spencer only came in at the very end and there was no new ground covered. Lots of tidbits about making of various movies and the people she worked with - her anxieties about trying to sing in several roles...lots of rambling on. I wouldn't recommend this to anyone unless they're really into that time period - the actors, directors, producers, etc.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Sharon

    I loved Katherine Hepburn and have read a lot about her. This is a very interesting account of her life, written with honesty and humility. She was a symbol of the social circle she was brought up in and the times she lived in. Fascinating, sad, triumphant. She lead a life without compromise.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Maryam

    What a woman, what a life! I could feel her energy while reading this book. And I loved it! She makes me want to work hard, have fun, explore, go on adventures, and most importantly live, live, LIVE!

  15. 4 out of 5

    Kaitlyn Smith

    I found this very fascinating. Quite a fast read for me for being so long, but throughly enjoyable. Hepburn is definitely an actor and woman that I admire in many ways. I find her quite entrancing. Really great read with a compelling voice from her narration.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Lily

    Katharine Hepburn has the most hilarious writing style. I truly believe that she sat in front of a tape recorder, soliloquized for a few hours, and her exact words were transcribed in this autobiography, stream of consciousness and all. What a powerhouse of a woman! Time and again (until she really became a star and no longer needed to prove herself) studio heads would underestimate her and she would just give them one look at they'd shut up. "Why should we listen to a woman who wears pants?" She Katharine Hepburn has the most hilarious writing style. I truly believe that she sat in front of a tape recorder, soliloquized for a few hours, and her exact words were transcribed in this autobiography, stream of consciousness and all. What a powerhouse of a woman! Time and again (until she really became a star and no longer needed to prove herself) studio heads would underestimate her and she would just give them one look at they'd shut up. "Why should we listen to a woman who wears pants?" She told some very charming stories about her childhood, talked about her first marriage to a man she still respects today, spent a long time describing her idolization and love for Spencer Tracy, and only spent a few short chapters rattling through her most famous film roles, almost as if she didn't believe anyone would be interested. She would literally say something like, "Philadelphia. That picture was directed by George Cukor. Made $XX. I had my pick of co-stars and I said, 'Get me Jimmy Stewart and Cary Grant.' They did." The Spencer Tracy stuff, Spence as she called him, was so interesting. It was such a contrast to see this brassy woman making herself so submissive and absolutely catering to his every need and worrying about him so much, completely fine being the other woman for thirty years. Here's a great and random quote of hers when describing John Wayne in Rooster Cogburn- "John Wayne is the hero of the thirties and forties and most of the fifties. Before the creeps came creeping in. Before, in the sixties, the male hero slid right down into the valley of the weak and misunderstood. Before the women began dropping any pretense to virginity into the gutter. With a disregard for truth which is indeed pathetic. And unisex was born. The hair grew long and the pride grew short. And we were off to the anti-hero and -heroine. John Wayne survived all of this." Oh Katharine! How of your time!

  17. 4 out of 5

    Penny Landon

    Ever since I discovered the appeal of classic movies, I have been a fan of Katharine Hepburn. Everything about her was unique and I really enjoyed watching her movies, whether they were full of comedy or bogged down with drama. After visiting a used bookstore, I found this biography and knew I had to read it. I have always wondered about her life and this seemed like the perfect book. To be honest this is the first biography that I chose to read for myself and I completely enjoyed it. Although t Ever since I discovered the appeal of classic movies, I have been a fan of Katharine Hepburn. Everything about her was unique and I really enjoyed watching her movies, whether they were full of comedy or bogged down with drama. After visiting a used bookstore, I found this biography and knew I had to read it. I have always wondered about her life and this seemed like the perfect book. To be honest this is the first biography that I chose to read for myself and I completely enjoyed it. Although there may be some people that would fault her for the fact that she chose to do a nonlinear biography, I thought that the format was easier to stomach. She chose the moments in her life she liked the best and wrote them down. Her personality came through tremendously and I found the inner dialogue that she has with herself interesting. It was a little like listening to a wise and quirky grandmother telling you about her life. I also, unlike other people, didn't mind the fact that there was so little about Spencer Tracy in this book. What little she mentioned about him was just right because she managed to get across her feelings about him completely. They had a complicated relationship that I don't even think Katharine herself understood. The letter she wrote to him after he died and the preceeding chapter was so touching that I found myself almost crying. Katharine was completely candid in this biography and I enjoyed it very much. I would recommend this book only to diehard fans of Katharine Hepburn. You really have to be a fan to appreciate everything about her biography.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Maggie

    I read the entire book with her voice in my head. Loved it!

  19. 4 out of 5

    Kathleen Peacock

    Interesting tidbits and anecdotes, though the book takes a bit of patience to get through. Those looking for insight into Hepburns relationship with Tracey will likely just end up a bit more puzzled.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Lynn Winkelmann

    So Good! I thought it would have slow parts, but I enjoyed it all, start to finish.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Khris Sellin

    Katharine Hepburn: Glamorous? Beautiful? Sophisticated? Great actress? Yes, yes, yes, and yes. Writer? NO. I know one reviewer inserted a bunch of silly quotes from the book. I'm just going to put in one: "Oh, I meant to tell you. I was standing on my head the other day and I got to thinking how probably unusual it is for someone of my age to do this." I think she spent too much time standing on her head - it made her a little dizzy, or should I say ditzy. No, I don't mean that. But that is the t Katharine Hepburn: Glamorous? Beautiful? Sophisticated? Great actress? Yes, yes, yes, and yes. Writer? NO. I know one reviewer inserted a bunch of silly quotes from the book. I'm just going to put in one: "Oh, I meant to tell you. I was standing on my head the other day and I got to thinking how probably unusual it is for someone of my age to do this." I think she spent too much time standing on her head - it made her a little dizzy, or should I say ditzy. No, I don't mean that. But that is the tone of the whole book, a chatty conversational style, whether she's talking about having dinner w/someone or the tragic death of her brother. She also rambles a lot, jumping to a different topic in the middle of a story. But all this chattiness and rambling also made her seem more down to earth than I had thought. But best to go elsewhere if you really want to know the story of her life.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Stewart Sternberg

    This was at once an undisciplined ramble, a woman over years reminiscing and straying here and there through her memory without a solid reason for her digressions. And yet, it is Hepburn. You will feel her through the book.and get to know her well. And although fiercely independent, she surrendered all herself to Tracy. Oh, by the way, that's barely touched upon in the book except for a passage at the end. That thirty five year relationship with her absolute love is only brushed. Funny, flawed, u This was at once an undisciplined ramble, a woman over years reminiscing and straying here and there through her memory without a solid reason for her digressions. And yet, it is Hepburn. You will feel her through the book.and get to know her well. And although fiercely independent, she surrendered all herself to Tracy. Oh, by the way, that's barely touched upon in the book except for a passage at the end. That thirty five year relationship with her absolute love is only brushed. Funny, flawed, uncompromising..the autobiography is different from any I've read and will not be liked by some folk. It is a conceit and maybe a transgression.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Sally

    A pretty hefty book, but then would you really expect less from Katharine Hepburn? She is a good story-teller, this is one of the better autobiographies.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Alisa

    I love Katharine Hepburn, even more so after reading her book.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Jacqueline Masumian

    This somewhat fragmented memoir by Katharine Hepburn is remarkable in many ways. The first is that she wrote it when she was 89 years old. Another is the way her voice, indomitable, energetic, yet thoughtful, comes through onto the page. Made up largely of sentence fragments, her story is told in her very distinctive tone, addressing the reader directly as though they were in the same room. The book is remarkable also in the way Hepburn speaks of herself; she is self-effacing and bragging almost This somewhat fragmented memoir by Katharine Hepburn is remarkable in many ways. The first is that she wrote it when she was 89 years old. Another is the way her voice, indomitable, energetic, yet thoughtful, comes through onto the page. Made up largely of sentence fragments, her story is told in her very distinctive tone, addressing the reader directly as though they were in the same room. The book is remarkable also in the way Hepburn speaks of herself; she is self-effacing and bragging almost with the same sentence. She describes herself more than once as a "me-me-me" sort of person, yet she is highly attuned to those around her, her friends, colleagues, and assistants, praising them for their brilliance, intelligence, loyalty, and kindness to her. A complex individual, Katharine Hepburn has provided in this memoir (one of several she's written) a window into her professional and private life, and the book has much to recommend it, including humor. The scene in which she and two friends (all in their seventies) decide one day that on their own they'll landscape a weedy slope at her Connecticut home is one of the funniest things I've ever read. Quite a woman, quite a book.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Crystal

    Slow at parts, but overall I enjoyed it. Kate is probably my favorite actress. Loved her and Cary Grant together. Also liked learning more about her relationship with Spencer Tracy. The book has many photos throughout which I loved. I wish more bios would do that. Recommended for any old Hollywood fan.

  27. 4 out of 5

    BarbaraW

    Direct, to the point. How a privileged, head strong girl made it in Hollywood in the early 30s. No discussion about either war which she lived thru, thank God. Shows her vulnerability. Her highs and lows. Admits she's got s BIG ego. Pictures made it special too. Direct, to the point. How a privileged, head strong girl made it in Hollywood in the early 30s. No discussion about either war which she lived thru, thank God. Shows her vulnerability. Her highs and lows. Admits she's got s BIG ego. Pictures made it special too.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Beverly Stotz

    This took me 6 months to read. I loved Katharine Hepburn but this book killed me slowly. Some funny, some privileged, some just dry as a bone, some maniacal ranting. I don’t know. I’m a bit disappointed.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Miladylc

    This book was more like a book of facts

  30. 4 out of 5

    Mark

    Not much to rave about here, folks. A longer review is at www.cloquetriverpress.com. Peace. Mark Not much to rave about here, folks. A longer review is at www.cloquetriverpress.com. Peace. Mark

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