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Joyce's Iritis and the Irritated Text: The Dis-lexic Ulysses

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  Ulysses was written and proofread when James Joyce's vision was seriously blurred and impaired by iritis.  The illness required him to use a magnifying glass to enlarge words, separating them out of context and distorting the simple letters in them.  This book is the first study to consider the undermining effects of Joyce's iritis on the text of Ulysses. Gottfried examin   Ulysses was written and proofread when James Joyce's vision was seriously blurred and impaired by iritis.  The illness required him to use a magnifying glass to enlarge words, separating them out of context and distorting the simple letters in them.  This book is the first study to consider the undermining effects of Joyce's iritis on the text of Ulysses. Gottfried examines Ulysses much as Joyce must have tried to see it, in close readings of many small portions of the text, and with a quizzical eye.  He locates the particular density and opacity of Ulysses in two sites:  within the iritis in Joyce's eyes and within the body of the text with its irritated confusion of letters.  "No reader's eye can be trusted in seeing Ulysses,"Gottfried claims.  Instead, the reader is disoriented and infected with a particular kind of "Joycean dis-lexia," so that "a variety of instabilities arise from the reader's unclear view and reading of the novel."The Florida James Joyce Series, edited by Zack Bowen.  


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  Ulysses was written and proofread when James Joyce's vision was seriously blurred and impaired by iritis.  The illness required him to use a magnifying glass to enlarge words, separating them out of context and distorting the simple letters in them.  This book is the first study to consider the undermining effects of Joyce's iritis on the text of Ulysses. Gottfried examin   Ulysses was written and proofread when James Joyce's vision was seriously blurred and impaired by iritis.  The illness required him to use a magnifying glass to enlarge words, separating them out of context and distorting the simple letters in them.  This book is the first study to consider the undermining effects of Joyce's iritis on the text of Ulysses. Gottfried examines Ulysses much as Joyce must have tried to see it, in close readings of many small portions of the text, and with a quizzical eye.  He locates the particular density and opacity of Ulysses in two sites:  within the iritis in Joyce's eyes and within the body of the text with its irritated confusion of letters.  "No reader's eye can be trusted in seeing Ulysses,"Gottfried claims.  Instead, the reader is disoriented and infected with a particular kind of "Joycean dis-lexia," so that "a variety of instabilities arise from the reader's unclear view and reading of the novel."The Florida James Joyce Series, edited by Zack Bowen.  

5 review for Joyce's Iritis and the Irritated Text: The Dis-lexic Ulysses

  1. 5 out of 5

    Colin

    To be honest, I didn't read all of this. I bought it because I have iritis (but, thank god, I'm lucky enough to live in an age when science can keep it under control) and I am one of the few people who can honestly say they read Ulysses on a train journey. It was the Trans-Mongolian train so I had a bit longer than the average train ride would allow. Anyway, waffling aside, I only ever expected to read the introductory remarks. They were interesting but for my money a bit too repetitive. After th To be honest, I didn't read all of this. I bought it because I have iritis (but, thank god, I'm lucky enough to live in an age when science can keep it under control) and I am one of the few people who can honestly say they read Ulysses on a train journey. It was the Trans-Mongolian train so I had a bit longer than the average train ride would allow. Anyway, waffling aside, I only ever expected to read the introductory remarks. They were interesting but for my money a bit too repetitive. After that I skimmed and could see he was diving into minutiae where I could never, ever follow, so if you are a serious Joyce scholar you might enjoy the whole thing. Me, I'm happy with my brief fling with this book and now it goes back on the shelf.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Elizabeth

  3. 4 out of 5

    Reza رضا

  4. 4 out of 5

    Olivia

  5. 5 out of 5

    VeikkoPilvi

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