web site hit counter To Terra..., Vol. 1 - Ebooks PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

To Terra..., Vol. 1

Availability: Ready to download

The future. Having driven Terra to the brink of environmental collapse, humanity decides to reform itself by ushering in the age of Superior Domination (S.D.), a system of social control in which children are no longer the offspring of parents but progeny of a universal computer. The new social order, however, results in an unexpected byproduct: the Mu, a mutant race with The future. Having driven Terra to the brink of environmental collapse, humanity decides to reform itself by ushering in the age of Superior Domination (S.D.), a system of social control in which children are no longer the offspring of parents but progeny of a universal computer. The new social order, however, results in an unexpected byproduct: the Mu, a mutant race with extrasensory powers who are forced into exile by The System. The saga begins on educational planet Ataraxia, where Jomy Marcus Shin, a brash and unpredictable teenager, is nervously preparing to enter adult society. When his Maturity Check goes wrong, the Mu intervene in the great hope that Jomy, who possesses Mu telepathy and human physical strength, can lead them back home, to Terra...


Compare

The future. Having driven Terra to the brink of environmental collapse, humanity decides to reform itself by ushering in the age of Superior Domination (S.D.), a system of social control in which children are no longer the offspring of parents but progeny of a universal computer. The new social order, however, results in an unexpected byproduct: the Mu, a mutant race with The future. Having driven Terra to the brink of environmental collapse, humanity decides to reform itself by ushering in the age of Superior Domination (S.D.), a system of social control in which children are no longer the offspring of parents but progeny of a universal computer. The new social order, however, results in an unexpected byproduct: the Mu, a mutant race with extrasensory powers who are forced into exile by The System. The saga begins on educational planet Ataraxia, where Jomy Marcus Shin, a brash and unpredictable teenager, is nervously preparing to enter adult society. When his Maturity Check goes wrong, the Mu intervene in the great hope that Jomy, who possesses Mu telepathy and human physical strength, can lead them back home, to Terra...

30 review for To Terra..., Vol. 1

  1. 4 out of 5

    Mza

    I am enjoying this sci-fi melodrama in ways I didn't foresee. K. Takemiya's pages are as strangely built as they first appear -- panels angled like toppling dominoes, figures crossing with impunity from one panel into an adjacent one, widescreen bleeds evoking the vastness of space, and continuous overlapping, with no visual element being impermeable to any other -- but the bigger joy is how well-suited this chaos is to the story it tells. This is that rare experimental comix narrative whose exp I am enjoying this sci-fi melodrama in ways I didn't foresee. K. Takemiya's pages are as strangely built as they first appear -- panels angled like toppling dominoes, figures crossing with impunity from one panel into an adjacent one, widescreen bleeds evoking the vastness of space, and continuous overlapping, with no visual element being impermeable to any other -- but the bigger joy is how well-suited this chaos is to the story it tells. This is that rare experimental comix narrative whose experiments do not seem thought-out, but also aren't a mess. The permeability of panels, figures, backgrounds, balloons, and sound effects can be enjoyed as pure comix; but it can also be understood as the natural expression of a universe in which telepaths are the next stage of human evolution. I like messes (Al Columbia, Josh Cotter, C.F.); and I like the more labored, intellectual strain of experimentation that seems to be happening a lot in comix right now (Ware, Mazzucchelli, Dash Shaw); but To Terra belongs in a third category, which we might call incidental formalism, wherein visual strangeness is dictated and informed by genre requirements. How would you draw a sentient computer? How would you draw a mutant reading the mind of a human? Takemiya's answers are far different from those of anyone who has ever drawn the X-Men -- more mysterious and open-ended, sexually charged/damaged/innocent in a way that is absurdly Japanese yet still her own, and surprisingly personal and emotional. There's a lot of corn in here, and none of the characters thus far strike me as alive, but Takemiya's hundreds of casual innovations and her powerful sense of style animate the whole work and give the illusion that I am witnessing the artist's mind's eye directly. She's a genius.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Sean O'Hara

    So it's the future (yay!) and humanity has screwed up the Earth beyond recognition (boo!) To rectify their mistake, humanity as a whole decides to leave the planet temporarily and let it heal itself. While they're in exile, they set up a new order, Superior Dominion, with all dates being given in the years SD since the revitalization of Terra began. As the name implies, Superior Dominion isn't all roses and puppy dogs. In order to remake humanity in a mould that can live in harmony with Earth, SD So it's the future (yay!) and humanity has screwed up the Earth beyond recognition (boo!) To rectify their mistake, humanity as a whole decides to leave the planet temporarily and let it heal itself. While they're in exile, they set up a new order, Superior Dominion, with all dates being given in the years SD since the revitalization of Terra began. As the name implies, Superior Dominion isn't all roses and puppy dogs. In order to remake humanity in a mould that can live in harmony with Earth, SD has abandoned the natural order. Humans are grown in artificial wombs on colony worlds throughout the galaxy. When they're decanted, the babies are raised by specially selected foster parents and attend highly regimented schools run by computers called Mothers. As the children reach puberty, they're given tests to see if they're able to pass on to the next stage, where most of their memories of childhood are erased and they're sent to space stations to complete final brainwashing -- er, indoctrination. There's one flaw with the system. The Mother computers are designed with psychic powers to monitor children and make sure they're developing properly. But there's a certain subset of humanity, the Mu, who are born with their own psychic powers. Normally these are latent powers and rarely manifest, but the computers' psionic fields often unlock the powers in children. As such, SD thoroughly tests children to sieve out the Mu. The first half of the book tells of Jomy Marcus Shin, a Mu who's avoided detection until just short of his fourteenth birthday, when he's scheduled to move on to the next phase of his training. A group of rebel Mu detect his powers and plot to rescue him. Seems he has the potential to become the most powerful Mu ever, and they want to make him their leader. But first they have to convince Jomy to join them. The second part focuses on Keith Anyan, another young man who's completing his final education on space station E-1077. Keith has been singled out as one of the elites who will lead humanity on the recolonized Earth, but he's developed doubts about SD -- doubts that he hides for fear of what Mother would do if she found out. He encounters Seki Ray Shiroe, a recent arrival on the station who harbors the same doubts but is less circumspect about expressing, and Shiroe encourages him to investigate the truth. These two plotlines are obviously heading for a collision, but here in the first volume they only lightly graze each other. Truth be told, the story is a throwback to the American pulps of the '50s -- John Campbell would love this series (provided you didn't tell him the author was a Japanese woman) -- with a glaze of Japanese esotericism -- a combo that works surprisingly well. Still, story isn't the book's strong suit. It's entertaining but awfully silly in places. No, the real star here is the artwork. Though you can definitely see signs that this was written in the 1970s (The hair! Dear God, the hair!), the designs still look beautiful, particularly once the story heads into space. It's obvious that Takemiya saw Star Wars at some point while writing this (you can spot R2-D2 in the background of one scene) and was influenced in her depictions of spaceships. Vertical wisely published this series in a larger size than is typical for manga, so you can really enjoy the detail she put into the drawings.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Tatiana

    graphic novel manga 4Q 4P J/S G First off let me say that I don't like graphic novels, especially manga, just because I have a hard time reading backwards and most of the stories are just too bizarre and, well, stupid. (Please no one hate me for saying that - just an opinion) But I will say, I was pleasantly surprised by this manga. After retraining my brain to read right to left, I actually saw that this manga was intriguing and even relevant in a future sense of humanity polluting earth to the p graphic novel manga 4Q 4P J/S G First off let me say that I don't like graphic novels, especially manga, just because I have a hard time reading backwards and most of the stories are just too bizarre and, well, stupid. (Please no one hate me for saying that - just an opinion) But I will say, I was pleasantly surprised by this manga. After retraining my brain to read right to left, I actually saw that this manga was intriguing and even relevant in a future sense of humanity polluting earth to the point of it no longer being life sustaining. This is a sci-fi manga where almost all of humanity is shipped off earth to other planets and space stations, where babies are created in labs and fostered out, and where at age 14, children go through 'maturity' checks that place them in the hierarchy of human society and erase the memories gained in those first 14 years. Only the elite, may return to Terra (earth), where independence is valued above all else and no emotional attachments are made to anything or anyone except Terra. I was fascinated by this manga, and the Mu (have to read it to find out what this is) and would recommend this to any teen who likes graphic novels or wants to dabble in it. This is a good manga for just about any age group, and though the pictures are all black and white, the dialogue and story line work really well together. There are a few story tracks within the manga that come together in the end and those teens that feel they are different or who want to be different from the mainstream would really like this manga.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Lissibith

    To Terra has that sort of classic anime feel that just tells you it's from decades back. It follows very much in the style I expect from Osamu Tezuka's works -- a lot of interesting world building, a plot that sometimes seems to resolve itself a little too easy but at other times becomes sort of knotty and difficult to follow. The story is about a future where humans wrecked the world with pollution, and so the powers that be decided that humans had to be fixed. Otherwise, fixing the world would To Terra has that sort of classic anime feel that just tells you it's from decades back. It follows very much in the style I expect from Osamu Tezuka's works -- a lot of interesting world building, a plot that sometimes seems to resolve itself a little too easy but at other times becomes sort of knotty and difficult to follow. The story is about a future where humans wrecked the world with pollution, and so the powers that be decided that humans had to be fixed. Otherwise, fixing the world would be pointless because it would only be wrecked again. Babies are created, given to designated parents, and raised until they're 14. Then they have their maturity test and are, if they pass, sent onward for training and eventual relocation to Terra. But some of them are Mu -- humans with psychic powers -- and the fate for those people is not good. The story is about the growing unease -- from the mu who escaped humanity and from the people within the system who don't agree with how it's being carried out. I kind of loved the art in this. It gave a real sense of scale and scope, which is vital in a huge space opera like this. Unfortunately, for me at least, the story didn't hold up. Not overall -- it was an interesting premise and I liked a lot of the characters -- but there were just times when it lulled to the point where it almost lost me completely. I don't think I'll probably ever move on in this one. It was pretty good, but definitely not to my taste overall.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Brian James

    In the unspecified future, the home planet of human beings which has been renamed Terra, became inhabitable. The air was polluted, fish could no longer swim in the oceans or rivers, trees would no longer grow, and non-degradable toxins had built up underground. Humans searched the far reaches of space for a new home, but were never able to find a new Terra. Eventually they came to the conclusion that Terra wasn't the problem, humans were. The decision was made to reform humanity and a system was In the unspecified future, the home planet of human beings which has been renamed Terra, became inhabitable. The air was polluted, fish could no longer swim in the oceans or rivers, trees would no longer grow, and non-degradable toxins had built up underground. Humans searched the far reaches of space for a new home, but were never able to find a new Terra. Eventually they came to the conclusion that Terra wasn't the problem, humans were. The decision was made to reform humanity and a system was put in place to raise humans in a new way. Having handed control of humanity's course over to a computer called "Mother", children are born in test tubes and raised by designated parents. They are given an ideal and loving upbringing until the age of 14. It is at that point when all children must undergo the maturity evaluation. Those who pass have the majority of their memories erased and are sent to an educational space-station to complete their preparation to return to Terra. By the opening of this epic science-fiction graphic novel, there are rumblings of discontent in this seemingly perfect system. In the first volume of this trilogy from Keiko Takemiya, two storylines emerge, destined for a collision as the series progresses. Conflict between the Mu (human mutants with telepathic powers) and humans over control of Terra and the fate of humanity has begun with both sides being led by charismatic young leaders determined to secure the safety of their way of life. Outstanding art helps prop up this story whose text is a little too vague at times.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Michael

    Sci-fi trilogy about a future when Man has mostly left Earth because we've polluted it so badly, and now humanity allows a computer designed to keep them docile and in-line. Many humans develop telepathic powers, and are called Mu rather than human, and were killed for many generations, until a few escaped and began to rescue all the future Mu. This leads to a war, a ultrapowerful Mu who wants to reunite with humanity, and the Mu trying to get back to Earth. The leader of the humans was genetica Sci-fi trilogy about a future when Man has mostly left Earth because we've polluted it so badly, and now humanity allows a computer designed to keep them docile and in-line. Many humans develop telepathic powers, and are called Mu rather than human, and were killed for many generations, until a few escaped and began to rescue all the future Mu. This leads to a war, a ultrapowerful Mu who wants to reunite with humanity, and the Mu trying to get back to Earth. The leader of the humans was genetically engineered by the computer to resist telepathy. It's kinda vague at times, one of my complaints with some fantasy/sci-fi manga, and the characters don't have any really strong character arcs other than their role as plot-movers. Some of the characters' relationships are confused and difficult to follow. Still, it's got some pretty entertaining sequences, including a few characters trying to learn secrets about their pasts, and the conflict is pretty well realized. The art is solid. Overall... dunno... it was all right, not a favorite, but not anything I regret reading.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Freddy

    I don't know anything really about this author and just picked up the first volume by chance at the library because I wanted something sci-fi and outerspace-y. I don't read a whole lot of modern manga either so I'm not one to judge the style or story compared with other manga from the 2000s, but I found this story very ambitious, maybe even a little too much so. I think the story is interesting enough, about a group of sem-humans that have telepathic abilities and are shunned by the regular huma I don't know anything really about this author and just picked up the first volume by chance at the library because I wanted something sci-fi and outerspace-y. I don't read a whole lot of modern manga either so I'm not one to judge the style or story compared with other manga from the 2000s, but I found this story very ambitious, maybe even a little too much so. I think the story is interesting enough, about a group of sem-humans that have telepathic abilities and are shunned by the regular humans because of it. I found it a little overly dramatic and somewhat boring at times. Maybe because the basic plot is a little cliché- humans expelled themselves from earth because of pollution and then decided to return to it after a renewal period. Or maybe I found it boring because the characters don't seem very appealing, they're cold or don't seem relatable or they overreact to everything. I think the Mu story by itself is more compelling. I don't know if I'll read the next volume but probably will because, quarentine!

  8. 4 out of 5

    Chris

    It was alright.

  9. 4 out of 5

    S

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Great idea. Quite well done. I think the anime adopted it better since it tried the thread better.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Assikatsum

    I stumbled upon all three volumes of this series at the library, and decided to give it a go. Scifi, adventure, mystery, dystopian, yay! Story: The futuristic society is interesting, the "Maturity Check" reminds me of ya-dystopian stories. I found this first part interesting, but kind of wished things would move along faster in the story. I don't know what to say: the mystery intrigues me (Terra, the Mu, what is really going on here?), but if I didn't have volume2 available straight away I might I stumbled upon all three volumes of this series at the library, and decided to give it a go. Scifi, adventure, mystery, dystopian, yay! Story: The futuristic society is interesting, the "Maturity Check" reminds me of ya-dystopian stories. I found this first part interesting, but kind of wished things would move along faster in the story. I don't know what to say: the mystery intrigues me (Terra, the Mu, what is really going on here?), but if I didn't have volume2 available straight away I might not continue reading (but because I've got it, I'll read the entire story). Style: I'm not a fan of big-eyed characters, but the story matters most. The big black'n'white pictures are beautiful.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Hannah Givens

    Of all three volumes: The idea is that in a fully computer-dependent society, and by that I mean on ONE particular computer, a group of psi-powered mutants (the Mu) have been exiled from society and for some reason think that going back to Terra will solve all their problems. I liked this, but it's totally incomprehensible. All the characters are exactly the same except for the goals we're told they have, and those same informed goals are the only reason for the plot. The art, which is absolutely Of all three volumes: The idea is that in a fully computer-dependent society, and by that I mean on ONE particular computer, a group of psi-powered mutants (the Mu) have been exiled from society and for some reason think that going back to Terra will solve all their problems. I liked this, but it's totally incomprehensible. All the characters are exactly the same except for the goals we're told they have, and those same informed goals are the only reason for the plot. The art, which is absolutely gorgeous on big sweeping starscapes and spaceships, is indecipherable in small panels. It takes forever for anything significant to happen, and when it does there seems to be no reason for it. Since none of the characters have any reasons for their beliefs, their actions just come across as juvenile and ill-informed. Every so often there's a time-out to try and explain some of the science involved, but that just makes it worse. But, despite all that, I did like it. The atmosphere is mesmerizing, and if you just sort of relax and zone out while you read it becomes dreamscape-y rather than just confusing. It's an interesting look at some older sci-fi, where some common ideas are used as new and thrown together in unorthodox ways. It's sci-fi, but Takemiya tends to use fantasy in the workings of it. I certainly didn't get bored with it, as hard as I was working to follow the story. There's this sudden flurry of action and energy and awesomeness at the end that makes the whole saga worth the trouble... And then an epilogue that plunged me back into misty confusion. So, if you don't really get what happened, neither do I. This is another one of those books that I'm not sure whether to recommend or not. If it sounds interesting then go ahead, knock yourself out, it's only three volumes.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Alexander Case

    This is kind of a slow-paced manga. This volume does a lot of world-building with regards to Terran society and Mu society, as well as our two leads views of their respective societies, Jomy Marcus Shin for the Mu, and Keith Anyan for the Terrans. (This part may sound spoiler-ish, but it really isn't). That said, thus far the story does a pretty good job of making the Terran society oppressive enough that you understand why the Mu rebelled, while also making the Terrans sympathetic - their society This is kind of a slow-paced manga. This volume does a lot of world-building with regards to Terran society and Mu society, as well as our two leads views of their respective societies, Jomy Marcus Shin for the Mu, and Keith Anyan for the Terrans. (This part may sound spoiler-ish, but it really isn't). That said, thus far the story does a pretty good job of making the Terran society oppressive enough that you understand why the Mu rebelled, while also making the Terrans sympathetic - their society is oppressive, but it's a society that chose to become oppressive for a specific reason - to make a society that could remain cohesive in spite of humanity's diaspora to the stars, and could also remain united and focused on the task of restoring and repairing the damaged ecosystem of Earth - and would be in agreement on how to prevent it from being despoiled once again, after the planet had been rebuilt. Their greatest sin isn't practicing eugenics, or having a non-traditional family unit (though their attempts to eliminate emotions from society is definitely something I'd consider a bad thing), as much as their greatest sin is treating the Mu, because they're ESPers, and are therefore different, as freaks to be (essentially) dissected and studied, rather than as being human beings like everyone else, and putting humans over their order. So, I'm definitely interested in reading future books, and seeing how this conflict goes down. This is definitely a situation where both sides are shades of grey, rather than the situation being black-and-white, and I look fore-ward to seeing this play out.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Sarah Goldberg

    Got this out of one of my local library branches, and it was honestly kind of a mixed bag for me. I was really in love with this on a visual level -- or at least, with the background settings, which feel like a gorgeously detailed mashup of every pre-Star Wars space epic. That SF setting -- harsh, inorganic largely free of the usual flower-covered shoujo visual tropes -- is part of what makes To Terra so remarkable to me. I honestly can't see any contemporary shoujo publication that I'm aware of Got this out of one of my local library branches, and it was honestly kind of a mixed bag for me. I was really in love with this on a visual level -- or at least, with the background settings, which feel like a gorgeously detailed mashup of every pre-Star Wars space epic. That SF setting -- harsh, inorganic largely free of the usual flower-covered shoujo visual tropes -- is part of what makes To Terra so remarkable to me. I honestly can't see any contemporary shoujo publication that I'm aware of taking on a manga that looked like this, or a storyline more concerned with the battle between individuals and a highly centralized state than with sexxi bishonen. More's the pity. Where To Terra fails me is in storyline and character design. It's not that Takemiya doesn't have fun ideas; they're just not executed very well. The story is rife with timeskips and poorly fleshed-out motivations, and half the time I was left wondering what was happening and why. The protagonist, Jomy, starts out as a sympathetic kid in a horrible situation; by the end of the volume I found him almost completely changed and only marginally more interesting than Paul Atreides from Dune (aka My Most Hated.) Since this was the only volume my library had, I'm not sure if I'll continue with this series; at 3 volumes, it seems like a short investment of time and/or money to have at least finished reading a classic manga, but I'm not sure I care about these characters enough to continue with them.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Amy Holliday

    Imagine that the humans virtually destroy the planet with all of their waste and pollution. What can be done? Well, humans living on the planet Terra find themselves in this exact predicament and decide to create species that are better than humans. In this first volume of graphic novels, young Jomy Shin must face the reality of coming of age in a world where any imperfection is intolerable. Jomy is special and with the help of soldier Blue, and other MU (those humans that have created their own Imagine that the humans virtually destroy the planet with all of their waste and pollution. What can be done? Well, humans living on the planet Terra find themselves in this exact predicament and decide to create species that are better than humans. In this first volume of graphic novels, young Jomy Shin must face the reality of coming of age in a world where any imperfection is intolerable. Jomy is special and with the help of soldier Blue, and other MU (those humans that have created their own world to maintain the human species) they want to continue life as humans, and forgo the socialization into becoming perfect humans capable of living on the planet. I think that teenagers may really enjoy this, especially since Manga is so popular. The only downside is that this comic is really long. I had a hard time getting through this graphic novel, largely because I could not always follow what was going on. I am really impressed with teenagers ability to read this novels, because you really have to have an eye for all the detail that is presented in the illustration, if you overlook any of that you really miss a great bit of the story. I actually thought that the plot was pretty slow, and it took me a long time to get through it. I am curious to know what someone who really likes these novels thinks about this particular one

  15. 5 out of 5

    Jason

    An excerpt of my review for the full series: Its vintage and historical significance alone make To Terra… worth a look, but there’s much more to it than that. This book is a space opera in the grandest sense of the word, but by filtering this manliest of genres through Takemiya’s shojo sensibilities, the result is a fascinating hybrid. Takemiya’s heroes are so wispy that it looks like a strong wind might blow them away, but their slender limbs and softened features do little to deaden how fiercel An excerpt of my review for the full series: Its vintage and historical significance alone make To Terra… worth a look, but there’s much more to it than that. This book is a space opera in the grandest sense of the word, but by filtering this manliest of genres through Takemiya’s shojo sensibilities, the result is a fascinating hybrid. Takemiya’s heroes are so wispy that it looks like a strong wind might blow them away, but their slender limbs and softened features do little to deaden how fiercely she communicates their resolve as she serves up every tense scene with an extra dollop of melodrama. To Terra… certainly isn’t hurting for action-packed aerial dogfights, and when it comes time, Takemiya can draw technically flawless spaceships with the best of ‘em. She’s just as likely, though, to let the space scenery linger, with gorgeously rendered double-page spreads or long vertical panels that slash the page into pieces to help set the scene. In the art of To Terra…, atmosphere is key. For the full review, visit http://www.playbackstl.com/comic-book...

  16. 4 out of 5

    Chris Cabrera

    So far this manga is quite something. Shoujo artists doing sci-fi was at first something I wasn't sure would have a favorable outcome but Takemiya blends just enough elements from Science fiction and shoujo to make it work without feeling like it leans outright towards one of the genres. The art is gorgeous, some unorthodox panel and speech bubble placement(ala Tezuka) is always a good way to wake up the reader, and the story doesn't feel totally shallow: it actually gets pretty existential and So far this manga is quite something. Shoujo artists doing sci-fi was at first something I wasn't sure would have a favorable outcome but Takemiya blends just enough elements from Science fiction and shoujo to make it work without feeling like it leans outright towards one of the genres. The art is gorgeous, some unorthodox panel and speech bubble placement(ala Tezuka) is always a good way to wake up the reader, and the story doesn't feel totally shallow: it actually gets pretty existential and psychological. My only quip is sometimes the story jumps quite a bit between chapters leaving the reader to figure out what is going on for themselves. Perhaps Takemiya should have made this series longer than it was to flush out better the stories for the characters. Onwards to volume 2!

  17. 4 out of 5

    Vicki

    Classic 70s sci-fi manga. This is an epic spanning 3 volumes, featuring futuristic computers controlling the human race, genetically superior telepaths, space battles and an interesting take on the nature of humanity and our relationship with our planet. The artwork is very strong, with fantastic pacing to each page. The characters do look a little dated, and also more sparkly and girly than you might expect from a sci-fi manga. This is because To Terra was written and drawn by a top shojo (girls Classic 70s sci-fi manga. This is an epic spanning 3 volumes, featuring futuristic computers controlling the human race, genetically superior telepaths, space battles and an interesting take on the nature of humanity and our relationship with our planet. The artwork is very strong, with fantastic pacing to each page. The characters do look a little dated, and also more sparkly and girly than you might expect from a sci-fi manga. This is because To Terra was written and drawn by a top shojo (girls) manga creator. But never fear, she writes great sci-fi too :)

  18. 5 out of 5

    Ruth

    Although I'm typically not a fan of science fiction, Takemiya Keiko has done a wonderful job pulling together a concept of the future in a concise and yet compelling manner. Moreover, the characters are commanding, pulling in even the most hesitant of readers (such as myself). The art is a treat for old school manga fans, beautiful in its simplicity. I'm looking forward to reading the second volume as confrontation between the Terrans and Mu seems inevitable. Although I'm typically not a fan of science fiction, Takemiya Keiko has done a wonderful job pulling together a concept of the future in a concise and yet compelling manner. Moreover, the characters are commanding, pulling in even the most hesitant of readers (such as myself). The art is a treat for old school manga fans, beautiful in its simplicity. I'm looking forward to reading the second volume as confrontation between the Terrans and Mu seems inevitable.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Lisa

    The first volume of this series has left me with brain pain. I want to like it, but the story isn't very straightforward. The artwork is eye candy though. Worth a read just for the drawings. I have a basic idea of what is going on and hopefully the next couple of volumes will clarify. I also can't figure out if Jomy is good, bad or a jerk. All of the above? I guess the main problem for me is just trying to figure who the good guys are versus the bad guys. The first volume of this series has left me with brain pain. I want to like it, but the story isn't very straightforward. The artwork is eye candy though. Worth a read just for the drawings. I have a basic idea of what is going on and hopefully the next couple of volumes will clarify. I also can't figure out if Jomy is good, bad or a jerk. All of the above? I guess the main problem for me is just trying to figure who the good guys are versus the bad guys.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Fadhila

    Dnf When I read this book I was in high hopes of this to be at less a 2 or 3 but it didn't get any stars. I mean the plot was very interesting and the art was great. However, the flow of everything was just messed up and turned it worst. The characters were childish and unrealistic. And there was so many characters use as plot devices that it became so awkward. Anyways, to wrap up all my feelings about this book. It was boring and not exciting as I thought it would. Dnf When I read this book I was in high hopes of this to be at less a 2 or 3 but it didn't get any stars. I mean the plot was very interesting and the art was great. However, the flow of everything was just messed up and turned it worst. The characters were childish and unrealistic. And there was so many characters use as plot devices that it became so awkward. Anyways, to wrap up all my feelings about this book. It was boring and not exciting as I thought it would.

  21. 4 out of 5

    K T

    I took a look because the cover caught my eye (Chip Kidd is good at that). The classic scifi concepts are fun. The art style is also fascinating. Figures are so abstracted as to appear unhuman. They're all GIANT SHINING SOULFUL EYES. Not much action, but cute. I took a look because the cover caught my eye (Chip Kidd is good at that). The classic scifi concepts are fun. The art style is also fascinating. Figures are so abstracted as to appear unhuman. They're all GIANT SHINING SOULFUL EYES. Not much action, but cute.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Maria Kramer

    Despite some lovely art, I found this manga hard to get into, maybe for the same reason I have trouble with Tezuka's work -- the old style of manga is a bit jarring to someone used to Western comic book sensibilities. I really was left without much sense of the characters as people, or the setting as a real setting -- interesting as the premise was. Despite some lovely art, I found this manga hard to get into, maybe for the same reason I have trouble with Tezuka's work -- the old style of manga is a bit jarring to someone used to Western comic book sensibilities. I really was left without much sense of the characters as people, or the setting as a real setting -- interesting as the premise was.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Ian Tripp

    A triumph of manga, this is a well illustrated and written story of the Mu, a race of psychics who attempt to return to terra after being rejected by normal humans and their 'mother', a man-made super computer A triumph of manga, this is a well illustrated and written story of the Mu, a race of psychics who attempt to return to terra after being rejected by normal humans and their 'mother', a man-made super computer

  24. 4 out of 5

    Shannon

    Somehow Bookslut got me excited about this, and since I'd been grooving on Naruto and DeathNote so much, I picked this up. But man, it's pretty crappy. Somehow Bookslut got me excited about this, and since I'd been grooving on Naruto and DeathNote so much, I picked this up. But man, it's pretty crappy.

  25. 5 out of 5

    R.

    Didn't read as shoujo at all. A little bi-shonen, but that's all. A really good read! Didn't read as shoujo at all. A little bi-shonen, but that's all. A really good read!

  26. 5 out of 5

    Lord

    Incredible artwork and the story that's a regular space opera rather than shojo makes this a timeless manga series. It's very old but still perfectly readable. A very nice surprise. Incredible artwork and the story that's a regular space opera rather than shojo makes this a timeless manga series. It's very old but still perfectly readable. A very nice surprise.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Rhiannon

    Enjoyed it - I find that I am a great fan of the "Well, we destroyed the Earth...is it time for totalitarianism and brainwashing?" genre (see my love of the Uglies series). Enjoyed it - I find that I am a great fan of the "Well, we destroyed the Earth...is it time for totalitarianism and brainwashing?" genre (see my love of the Uglies series).

  28. 5 out of 5

    Peacegal

    1.5 stars. A muddled story with mostly annoying values.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Michael

    well now i have read a classic manga. i do not have to read any more.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Lorna

    Difficult to follow, didn't care for the artwork, didn't make any sense. If this had been my first manga, I wouldn't have read any others. Difficult to follow, didn't care for the artwork, didn't make any sense. If this had been my first manga, I wouldn't have read any others.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.