web site hit counter Fashion & Surrealism - Ebooks PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

Fashion & Surrealism

Availability: Ready to download

The love affair between fashion and Surrealism began in the Paris of the 1920s when Surrealist artists plundered fashion's imagery for their art, raising fashion beyond the level of mere style to an important expression of culture. This text reveals the extravagent and ingenious creations resulting from this collaboration. It ranges from the shocking Surrealist dresses of The love affair between fashion and Surrealism began in the Paris of the 1920s when Surrealist artists plundered fashion's imagery for their art, raising fashion beyond the level of mere style to an important expression of culture. This text reveals the extravagent and ingenious creations resulting from this collaboration. It ranges from the shocking Surrealist dresses of Schiaparelli and Dali, and photographic experiments with Surrealist techniques by Horst P. Horst, Cecil Beaton and George Hoyningen-Huene to the work of younger fashion designers, including Olivier Guillemin and Vivienne Westwood, who have all brought Surrealist imagery into clothing and accessories.


Compare

The love affair between fashion and Surrealism began in the Paris of the 1920s when Surrealist artists plundered fashion's imagery for their art, raising fashion beyond the level of mere style to an important expression of culture. This text reveals the extravagent and ingenious creations resulting from this collaboration. It ranges from the shocking Surrealist dresses of The love affair between fashion and Surrealism began in the Paris of the 1920s when Surrealist artists plundered fashion's imagery for their art, raising fashion beyond the level of mere style to an important expression of culture. This text reveals the extravagent and ingenious creations resulting from this collaboration. It ranges from the shocking Surrealist dresses of Schiaparelli and Dali, and photographic experiments with Surrealist techniques by Horst P. Horst, Cecil Beaton and George Hoyningen-Huene to the work of younger fashion designers, including Olivier Guillemin and Vivienne Westwood, who have all brought Surrealist imagery into clothing and accessories.

46 review for Fashion & Surrealism

  1. 4 out of 5

    Kerfe

    A visual feast. Lavishly illustrated with both surrealist art (Magritte, Dali, Man Ray, de Chirico, Breton, Cocteau, Ernst) and artist-designer collaborations and inspirations, the borders between genres become very blurred. Schiaparelli, the first and foremost practitioner of surrealist visionary dress design, worked frequently with artists, including Dali and Jean Cocteau. Surrealist artists took on fashion advertisements, Vogue covers, fashion shoots, and window displays in stores like Saks an A visual feast. Lavishly illustrated with both surrealist art (Magritte, Dali, Man Ray, de Chirico, Breton, Cocteau, Ernst) and artist-designer collaborations and inspirations, the borders between genres become very blurred. Schiaparelli, the first and foremost practitioner of surrealist visionary dress design, worked frequently with artists, including Dali and Jean Cocteau. Surrealist artists took on fashion advertisements, Vogue covers, fashion shoots, and window displays in stores like Saks and Bonwit Teller. They designed jewelry, hats. and furniture. And their obsessions with body parts, the transition between the real and the artificial, and the theatrical abstraction and ambiguity of forms and symbols are still strong influences for designers, magazines, photographers, and writers. Fashion feeds on illusion after all.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Orji

  3. 4 out of 5

    Biba

  4. 4 out of 5

    Franxie

    Published in 1996, Martin brought to life an educational collection of surrealist art pieces created throughout the 20th century and named it Fashion and Surrealism. Created mainly for investigative purposes, Martin gathered 300 illustrations from many artists whose work was primarily influenced by the surrealist movement introduced after the First World War. Symbols of Surrealism are explained in great detail during the first chapters – meaning the author intended the reader to pay attention to Published in 1996, Martin brought to life an educational collection of surrealist art pieces created throughout the 20th century and named it Fashion and Surrealism. Created mainly for investigative purposes, Martin gathered 300 illustrations from many artists whose work was primarily influenced by the surrealist movement introduced after the First World War. Symbols of Surrealism are explained in great detail during the first chapters – meaning the author intended the reader to pay attention to what Surrealism is accurately based on and how it crossed-over with Fashion – followed and reassured by projects which appeal to the creative side of someone who may be merely search for a stimulation source. And even if the first pages may slightly frustrate due to the massive description, Fashion and Surrealism content and imagery are captivating enough to get through until the last pages. “Surrealism”, flourished around the year of 1917 by the poetic words of Guillaume Apollinaire, and by its own definition, consists on a “Psychic automatism in its pure state by which one proposes – verbally, by means of the written word, or in any other manner – to express the actual functioning of thought.” (Breton, 1924, p.15) Its intuit was to promote “an art of theoretical initiatives and verbal foundation” (Martin, 1996, p.11) while being guided and inspired by the revolutionary Dada movement, the polemical political views of Marx and the vast theories of Freud regarding the subconscious mind. However meant solemnly for written theories, by mid 1920’s Surrealism had become such an effervescing and polemical movement that emerging artists, such as Salvador Dali, Man Ray and Joan Miró were not able to resist creating dramatic scenarios linked to the human subconscious. By the 1930’s, Fashion was the newest “victim” to this artistic wave, as “fashion arts came to serve as a statement of the Surrealist vision and of the Surrealist faith in the connections between the every-day and the exceptional.” (Martin, 1996, p.11) As for those who wish to fully understand the concept of the magic world of Surrealism and its connection with Fashion, Martin’s book perfectly explains, in an escalating motion, how the artistic movement solidified itself through the usage of daily objects which were a representative for the objectification of the female figure, such as an iron (Man Ray’s Gift published in 1921 and which examples women labour during nineteenth century) or a sewing machine diabolical and sinisterly drawn in Salvador Dali’s Plate 14 from Les Chants de Maldoror, 1934, until painters, photographers and designers embraced the art form and Surrealism grew out of its theoretical spotlight to welcome paintings, photographs, clothing, and in between others, while constantly questioning the femme personage. Fashion and Surrealism may not lack on descriptive imagery to sustain its text, but the later may get too overwhelming and metaphoric in certain times, as it seems Martin got a little bit eager on writing about delusional sewing machines, bodies and geometrical shapes, as it can be found, for example, through these passages (and many more): “Concepts may be naked at birth, but they are soon swaddled in realities” (p.9); “The Surrealist striving for an analogue to the human body found fulfilment in the mannequin and dress form as well as in classical statuary.” (p.49). Even though it is meant to be an educational book, those topics did not need a lot of attention as it is not difficult to understand what role they played in the Surrealist Art and how they were attributed to the designing of clothing and photography. Richard Martin did succeed in providing to Fashion and Art students/intellectuals a consistent source of both text and illustrations. For beginners or mere curious, Martin’s writing may get arduous to keep up with, due to his descriptive style. Nonetheless, this book is not only historical as it is passionate, honouring a timeless and controversial art movement called Surrealism.

  5. 5 out of 5

    sarah

  6. 5 out of 5

    Robert Smith

  7. 5 out of 5

    nign

  8. 5 out of 5

    Dave

  9. 5 out of 5

    Sunny Chapman

  10. 4 out of 5

    Adrianna Degenaro

  11. 4 out of 5

    Badinia

  12. 4 out of 5

    Tien Manh

  13. 4 out of 5

    Nienke Van hijum

  14. 4 out of 5

    Nagham

  15. 4 out of 5

    Deborah

  16. 4 out of 5

    Mary Karpel-Jergic

  17. 4 out of 5

    Fred

  18. 5 out of 5

    Christiana Kontopoulou

  19. 5 out of 5

    Hyo

  20. 4 out of 5

    Cyndy Kitt Vogelsang

  21. 4 out of 5

    Amelia Ollis-olds

  22. 4 out of 5

    Shelley Fairbanks

  23. 5 out of 5

    John

  24. 4 out of 5

    Hazalkarasah

  25. 5 out of 5

    Aaron

  26. 5 out of 5

    Lily

  27. 4 out of 5

    Amy

  28. 5 out of 5

    Mặc Mặc

  29. 4 out of 5

    Karlie

  30. 4 out of 5

    Wolfgang

  31. 5 out of 5

    Kiki von Cougar

  32. 4 out of 5

    Mary

  33. 5 out of 5

    Rebecca Perry

  34. 4 out of 5

    Dhanush

  35. 4 out of 5

    Kanika

  36. 4 out of 5

    Kewpie

  37. 5 out of 5

    Ayushi

  38. 5 out of 5

    Alison

  39. 5 out of 5

    Jason

  40. 5 out of 5

    Jecka Marie

  41. 4 out of 5

    Patricm

  42. 5 out of 5

    Trefelen

  43. 5 out of 5

    Karin Dubbelve

  44. 5 out of 5

    Megan

  45. 5 out of 5

    Chloe Whorrie

  46. 4 out of 5

    Jurek Joanna

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.