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The Retirement Maze: What You Should Know Before and After You Retire

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Millions of baby boomers are just beginning to retire, and in doing so many are likely to run into adjustment problems, such as loss of identity, deterioration of marriage and social life, and feelings of disconnectedness to the world. Studies have found that as many as 40% of retirees have difficulty adjusting, and even those who claim to enjoy retirement may experience s Millions of baby boomers are just beginning to retire, and in doing so many are likely to run into adjustment problems, such as loss of identity, deterioration of marriage and social life, and feelings of disconnectedness to the world. Studies have found that as many as 40% of retirees have difficulty adjusting, and even those who claim to enjoy retirement may experience some uneasiness as they adapt to a life lacking in structure and direction. This book investigates the struggles faced by retirees in building a new life outside of the workforce. It provides an honest assessment of retirement, based on the not-always-acknowledged fact that it is a difficult transition with pitfalls and obstacles to be overcome. But along with uncovering problems, the authors also propose solutions to enable both current and future retirees to be better prepared, allowing them to avoid being blind-sided by unexpected situations. By reading about the experiences of their peers, current and future retirees will come to understand that others share their difficulties adjusting, and that tactics are available to improve their comfort level in retirement as well as their overall well-being. Retirees and those planning for retirement will find in these pages what they need to make retirement successful and enjoyable.


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Millions of baby boomers are just beginning to retire, and in doing so many are likely to run into adjustment problems, such as loss of identity, deterioration of marriage and social life, and feelings of disconnectedness to the world. Studies have found that as many as 40% of retirees have difficulty adjusting, and even those who claim to enjoy retirement may experience s Millions of baby boomers are just beginning to retire, and in doing so many are likely to run into adjustment problems, such as loss of identity, deterioration of marriage and social life, and feelings of disconnectedness to the world. Studies have found that as many as 40% of retirees have difficulty adjusting, and even those who claim to enjoy retirement may experience some uneasiness as they adapt to a life lacking in structure and direction. This book investigates the struggles faced by retirees in building a new life outside of the workforce. It provides an honest assessment of retirement, based on the not-always-acknowledged fact that it is a difficult transition with pitfalls and obstacles to be overcome. But along with uncovering problems, the authors also propose solutions to enable both current and future retirees to be better prepared, allowing them to avoid being blind-sided by unexpected situations. By reading about the experiences of their peers, current and future retirees will come to understand that others share their difficulties adjusting, and that tactics are available to improve their comfort level in retirement as well as their overall well-being. Retirees and those planning for retirement will find in these pages what they need to make retirement successful and enjoyable.

30 review for The Retirement Maze: What You Should Know Before and After You Retire

  1. 5 out of 5

    Ellen

    This is not a personal finance book. This is a psychology self-help book. Criticisms are amply deserved. For some reason, the authors find it necessary to repeat and repeat and repeat and repeat and REPEAT every point, and then to illustrate it with a bogus "first person" narrative. These narratives are too uniform in voice, and i conclude they were fabricated. You could read the first paragraph or two of each chapter, and have absorbed the entire message. There are still some worthwhile lessons This is not a personal finance book. This is a psychology self-help book. Criticisms are amply deserved. For some reason, the authors find it necessary to repeat and repeat and repeat and repeat and REPEAT every point, and then to illustrate it with a bogus "first person" narrative. These narratives are too uniform in voice, and i conclude they were fabricated. You could read the first paragraph or two of each chapter, and have absorbed the entire message. There are still some worthwhile lessons to be learned, maybe. I think they will have helped me with the retirement process.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Jo

    If you haven't read any other retirement books this is chock full of good information. My problem is that I have read quite a few other books on getting and being ready for retirement, and this book says the same thing that others do but in a MUCH more negative cast. I prefer the more upbeat versions as they more mirror what I know from retired friends. Moreover, the survey he bases his dismal findings on is small, only 1200 people. If you haven't read any other retirement books this is chock full of good information. My problem is that I have read quite a few other books on getting and being ready for retirement, and this book says the same thing that others do but in a MUCH more negative cast. I prefer the more upbeat versions as they more mirror what I know from retired friends. Moreover, the survey he bases his dismal findings on is small, only 1200 people.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Christine

    This book made me weep. It is a repetitive, data driven ( the authors' surveys, research, and the research of others) volume which tells you over and over, in several different ways, that most retirees shouldn't expect to be happy. And by the way, you won't be happy if you stay in your job either. Oh, if you have resources and chose to retire, you weren't pushed out, you might have a shot at it, but chances are your new state of affairs won't be as interesting or as meaningful as your job was, b This book made me weep. It is a repetitive, data driven ( the authors' surveys, research, and the research of others) volume which tells you over and over, in several different ways, that most retirees shouldn't expect to be happy. And by the way, you won't be happy if you stay in your job either. Oh, if you have resources and chose to retire, you weren't pushed out, you might have a shot at it, but chances are your new state of affairs won't be as interesting or as meaningful as your job was, better get used to it. It is not a how to book, but an investigation of the psychology of the individual making this big life transition. You may find a pearl or two of good advice in here; I liked this one: "Don't prioritize chores". But really. READING is listed as one of three activities that retirees are doing way too much of. There goes my future, right out the window. By the way, if you are divorced, widowed, or simply single, your special needs are not addressed at all in this book. Find a different resource, and, by all means, enjoy reading it in your new free time.

  4. 4 out of 5

    George E

    The reviews posted are interesting as they show what different people are searching for in retirement info. I had read enough of them to note they usually fell into two categories, or a combination thereof. First, you want someone to tell you how much you will need to retire, or two, you don't know what to do with yourself after retirement. Most of the retirement books cover just those things, so there's no shortage of advice. There's even a "dummies" book. If that what you want, you've waited wa The reviews posted are interesting as they show what different people are searching for in retirement info. I had read enough of them to note they usually fell into two categories, or a combination thereof. First, you want someone to tell you how much you will need to retire, or two, you don't know what to do with yourself after retirement. Most of the retirement books cover just those things, so there's no shortage of advice. There's even a "dummies" book. If that what you want, you've waited way too late to think on the subject, and if you don't know what to do with your time, you are in big trouble. This book was written by social scientists, and dealt with the emotional reactions you are likely to experience after retirement in the first year or so , and its pretty much on the money. It tells you where you will run into confusion and not to worry about it. From what I was looking for, it was the best book out there.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Lori

    This is not a how-to book. They have surveyed people before and after retirement in search of data on what leads to a successful retirement and what trips people up. As a result it is dry at times, but I found it worthwhile in part because it lacks the hype of most self-help books. I can think for myself about what applies to me. One takeaway -- before retirement everyone has a flawed idea of what it will be like. Those who plan for it likely will have to revise their plan. Even so, those who pl This is not a how-to book. They have surveyed people before and after retirement in search of data on what leads to a successful retirement and what trips people up. As a result it is dry at times, but I found it worthwhile in part because it lacks the hype of most self-help books. I can think for myself about what applies to me. One takeaway -- before retirement everyone has a flawed idea of what it will be like. Those who plan for it likely will have to revise their plan. Even so, those who plan are more likely to enjoy retirement than those who don't.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Jen

    I was hoping this would be more specific to what preparations you should do - especially financially. Unfortunately, it was more a self help book about feeling useful after retirement which doesn't really apply to me. They tried to add some research in but their sample size was small and it didn't seem to add a lot of value. Ended up about 3 chapters in and not finishing. I was hoping this would be more specific to what preparations you should do - especially financially. Unfortunately, it was more a self help book about feeling useful after retirement which doesn't really apply to me. They tried to add some research in but their sample size was small and it didn't seem to add a lot of value. Ended up about 3 chapters in and not finishing.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Maureen

    has some good information but very repetitive, and it would have been helpful to have more bullet point types of summaries on the information. I did get quite a bit of food for thought from it though.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Timothy Stobbs

    A great book for what to expect from your retirement but it mainly focuses on the mental transition and avoids talking about money for the most part.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Brian Angle

    Some good research on retirees and best practices, worth a skim

  10. 4 out of 5

    David

    Last year I decided to prepare for retirement by reading some books on the subject. Unlike many books that focus on finances this book actually talks about other things one should consider. Since the authors are researchers they base their comments on surveys they conducted from 1500 people who are already retired. They address their research to many helpful topics: change in role identity when the work ends, the different stages of retirement, refocusing on a new routine and developing a new sc Last year I decided to prepare for retirement by reading some books on the subject. Unlike many books that focus on finances this book actually talks about other things one should consider. Since the authors are researchers they base their comments on surveys they conducted from 1500 people who are already retired. They address their research to many helpful topics: change in role identity when the work ends, the different stages of retirement, refocusing on a new routine and developing a new schedule, identity issues, and how retirement impacts your marriage. One way I have found it helpful was the recommendation to talk with your spouse about it. This seems like a no brainier, but since I prefer introversion I tend to do lots of thinking and not very much talking. Talking with my spouse has opened my eyes to differences and has also clarified some areas of agreement. We do not live in isolation. Now that I'm done I hope she will read it too. The book focuses on common preconceptions and misperceptions that can cause people problems. Their comments are backed up with data that help add insight to their perspective. They believe planning and goal-setting are keys to making the transition to a happy and meaningful retirement. However, it was interesting they did research on well-adjusted retirees, and on people who self-identified as not happily retired. Some might find the statistics tiring, but I found it very interesting. Other books focus on money and very little time on health and issues related to lifestyle. I think readers will find the research helpful as they plan for retirement. If you are thinking about early retirement you might find it interesting to note one of the authors retired at age 51 and the book addresses some of the issues of early retirement. The data that backs up their observations is illuminating. In addition, this book also looks at the issue of working again, why do people do it? What are the reasons? What are the problems? While reading this book I started developing a schedule and a plan. I'm usually pretty spontaneous so this was new for me, and I found it more difficult than what I thought. This exercise convinced me of its importance. If one thinks of retirement as entering the final third of life it is important not to think of it as "retiring" but more like "re-engaging." The book talks about the changes this transition will cause to family and friend relationships. This might actually be the most helpful part of the book. It is hard to imagine myself retired, but this book has a chapter that actually makes it possible to imagine what it will be like. As a pastor I face some unusual challenges, and the book does not address those directly, but in a general way it has some useful guidance on how to avoid the common human problem of negativity and procrastination. I don't want to be that person who has no reason to get out of bed in the morning. The next thirty-plus years may be filled with blessings upon blessing, and this book helped me learn how to re-engage with my future. If you are considering retirement let me know and you can borrow my copy, but be forewarned I've underlined all the important parts.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Tom Statton

    I liked the book. Yes, it uses a lot of research studies, but that is better than just offering an opinion. Most retirement books deal primarily with financial issues. The Retirement Maze deals with many other types of issues as well as emotional aspects. For instance the more activities you have that will continue after retirement, the easier the transition will be. Women transition a little better at the beginning but later are similar to men. Men have trouble if their whole identity is tied u I liked the book. Yes, it uses a lot of research studies, but that is better than just offering an opinion. Most retirement books deal primarily with financial issues. The Retirement Maze deals with many other types of issues as well as emotional aspects. For instance the more activities you have that will continue after retirement, the easier the transition will be. Women transition a little better at the beginning but later are similar to men. Men have trouble if their whole identity is tied up with their work role. Having and keeping friends is very important. These provide excellent insights into the whole transition to full retirement.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Betsy Eaton

    I bought the book for the library, but it hasn't gotten to the shelves there yet. It's sobering, as I approach my October retirement. I wish I had the time to take the advise I'm reading, but have littered the book with post-its and share them with Mike. I bought the book for the library, but it hasn't gotten to the shelves there yet. It's sobering, as I approach my October retirement. I wish I had the time to take the advise I'm reading, but have littered the book with post-its and share them with Mike.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Kevin

    I didn't get much out of this book, it was mainly a lot of statistic's compiled from an online survey, while it did open my eyes to a few problem areas it didn't offer much in the way of practical advise. I didn't get much out of this book, it was mainly a lot of statistic's compiled from an online survey, while it did open my eyes to a few problem areas it didn't offer much in the way of practical advise.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Sharon

  15. 4 out of 5

    Dennis

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Recommended by Molly Olson

  16. 5 out of 5

    Chuck

  17. 5 out of 5

    Jay

  18. 4 out of 5

    Kelly

  19. 5 out of 5

    David

  20. 5 out of 5

    Doug

  21. 5 out of 5

    Karen

  22. 5 out of 5

    Galicius

  23. 5 out of 5

    Barbara

  24. 4 out of 5

    Chere Marie

  25. 4 out of 5

    Chuck

  26. 4 out of 5

    Jim

  27. 4 out of 5

    Bill

  28. 4 out of 5

    Bonnie

  29. 5 out of 5

    Jean Potuchek

  30. 5 out of 5

    Tim Lynch

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