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Elsie's Children

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In this sixth volume in The Original Elsie Dinsmore Series, Elsie and Edward winter at Viamede where the newest member of their family, Lily, is born. The family is thrown into turmoil, however, when a carriage accident threatens the life of Grandpa Dinsmore and one of their children dies from a mysterious ailment.


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In this sixth volume in The Original Elsie Dinsmore Series, Elsie and Edward winter at Viamede where the newest member of their family, Lily, is born. The family is thrown into turmoil, however, when a carriage accident threatens the life of Grandpa Dinsmore and one of their children dies from a mysterious ailment.

30 review for Elsie's Children

  1. 4 out of 5

    Tara Lynn

    Although disappointed with this series as whole, I made a promise to myself a while back to finish a series once I start. Even though Elsie's Children, sequel to Elsie's motherhood, was the original "last" book in a 6 volume series, I feel no need to read the author's additional volumes concerning the same characters. I largely felt the series to be too full of it's own piety. I can understand the nature of wanting an uplifiting religious children's series for little girls, but this series was f Although disappointed with this series as whole, I made a promise to myself a while back to finish a series once I start. Even though Elsie's Children, sequel to Elsie's motherhood, was the original "last" book in a 6 volume series, I feel no need to read the author's additional volumes concerning the same characters. I largely felt the series to be too full of it's own piety. I can understand the nature of wanting an uplifiting religious children's series for little girls, but this series was far too pious for it's own sake. In a different time and place, I can imagine that the undertones of filial obedience, piety, chastity, and good humor in the face of adversity were considered the cornerstones of good education for little girls of the middle to late 18th century. However, as time and social structures change, so do some principles of daily living. In today's society, some cases of the complete obedience to parental wishes have been shown to stunt a child's development. In addition, I find that the series tends to trivialize the rather severe nature in which Elsie's own father punishes her within the first two volumes, (in which she almost martyrs herself for God in the face of her father's wishes for her to participate in secular behaviour.) Any sociologist or behavioral student in today's society could tell the reader that the behavior exhibited by Elsie's father in the first two books was nothing short of mental and physical abuse, which was perpetuated in the name of God. (In an effort to undermine his daughter's piety, father Dinsmore tells her that GOD has compelled her to obey her parents at all costs.) I often felt that the series was written in preachy fashion, almost too demanding and biblical for young minds to process today. In many cases, feminist and equal principles among both sexes are completely ignored, and the constant deference of the "humble negro" to their white "masters" was more than a little teeth grating. However, I can issue the belief that this may in fact be a product of the author's own birth and residence in Southern states for much of her life, and her own attitude towards the war. Despite the author's attempts to research her novels historical and political backgrounds with references to popular propoganda and political journals of the time, I felt that she was often biased and her views more than a little ill-informed. As I've stated in previous reviews, as a child of the South, she would have known that the rich livelihood exhibited by Elsie and her family would have been an insult to their extremely poor and destitute neighbors, who would have severely felt the bite of Elsie's well-intentioned charity. Also glossed over as unimportant is the fact that Union officers and their troops often stole and cheated many Southern people, including women and children left destitute on ruined farms. Although eventually the winners of the war, neither side was by any means the heroic contenders Finley portrays them to be. All in all, an interesting read for anyone wishing a brief glimpse into the psychology and sociology of children's literature in the late 18th and early 19th centuries, but I wouldn't recommend it as casual reading for children. To parents looking for similar stories, I point them to Heidi, The Little House series, and anything by Frances Hodgeson Burnett.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Kellyn Roth

    I prefer the original Elsie classics over the Life of Faith stories (they're just more authentic). They do have their faults, yes, but overall they're really good. Elsie's Children was about, surprise, Elsie's children! They're all pretty sweet ... and perfect ... although their parents don't really see this perfection ... and neither does anyone else ... except the 'bad guys' ... xD Honestly, I'm fond of this ridiculousness, you know?

  3. 5 out of 5

    Brenna

    I love these Elsie Dinsmore books, how you can see the children grow up. I don't really get though how the mother can be pregnent and the children not know it until the baby is born. I love it how even though other children might tempt them, they still what they know is right!

  4. 5 out of 5

    Holly

    ELSIE'S CHILDREN is #6 in the Elsie Dinsmore series. By now Elsie has eight children,having pumped out babies as religiously as Queen Victoria. However, unlike that great and porcine monarch, Elsie remains slim, beautiful and eternally young. Most of the action centers round her daughters who are growing up very nicely. Namesake Elsie is gorgeous, predictably, and has many suitors. Violet is a sweet young girl with a terrible secret. And Lily, sickly from birth, seems likely to die young and pro ELSIE'S CHILDREN is #6 in the Elsie Dinsmore series. By now Elsie has eight children,having pumped out babies as religiously as Queen Victoria. However, unlike that great and porcine monarch, Elsie remains slim, beautiful and eternally young. Most of the action centers round her daughters who are growing up very nicely. Namesake Elsie is gorgeous, predictably, and has many suitors. Violet is a sweet young girl with a terrible secret. And Lily, sickly from birth, seems likely to die young and provide us with a stereotypical deathbed scene... From the first, the Elsie Dinsmore series has had fairytale elements. Elsie is, of course, the "Cinderella" who overcomes early adversity to become a grown-up princess. Her jealous, mean-spirited aunts---Enna and Louise---have always functioned as the "wicked stepsisters." In ELSIE'S CHILDREN we see the "stepsisters" get their comeuppance at last, and all in accordance with God's law. (!) Enna has a tragically crippled daughter and after a carriage accident, is herself reduced to brain damage and insanity. Louise is afflicted with poverty and widowhood and also with a child who converts to Catholicism. Follows a long, ugly rant against the Church of Rome, which author Martha Finley hates. (Finley, it should be noted, has no tolerance for any faith except her own.) Just as racism is alive and well in the early Elsie books, so religious bigotry is showcased here. I see ELSIE'S CHILDREN as a Victorian period piece, politically incorrect by today's standards. Its theology is far from sound. Yet it succeeds as social Americana, showing the wide divide between Protestants and Catholics that really did exist in the nineteenth century. It's not my favorite Elsie book, yet it has some redeeming qualities.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Mecque

    These books are a trial to read as a Catholic,though I don't know why I expect differently. I wish the author had attempted to at least learn a bit about the faith before railing against in so overblown a manner. That said, the book was still generally pleasant and heartfelt

  6. 4 out of 5

    Katja

    5 stars & 5/10 hearts. What can I say, except that I love this book as much as the other 5? The children are all so sweet & Godly... such a blessing. Elsie is just as lovely as ever & so is her husband. (And her father is just a great grandfather). I loved the message about the girls choosing husbands, & again, the message of fully trusting God in every situation. Oh, and I also loved the death scene—so beautiful & made me tear up. A Favourite Quote: “Els 5 stars & 5/10 hearts. What can I say, except that I love this book as much as the other 5? The children are all so sweet & Godly... such a blessing. Elsie is just as lovely as ever & so is her husband. (And her father is just a great grandfather). I loved the message about the girls choosing husbands, & again, the message of fully trusting God in every situation. Oh, and I also loved the death scene—so beautiful & made me tear up. <33 I’m so eager for the next Elsie book! A Favourite Quote: “Elsie had overheard the whispers and her cheek paled, a look of keen distress coming into her face as she glanced from one to another of her loved ones, dearer far than her own life. But she showed no other sign of agitation; her heart sent up one swift cry to him to whom ‘all power is given in heaven and in earth,’ and faith and love triumphed over fear. His love to her was infinite nor was there any limit to his power. She would trust him that all would be well whether in life or death.” A Favourite Beautiful Quote: “It was a lovely October day, the air balmy, the woods gorgeous in their richly colored autumn robes; gold, scarlet and crimson, russet and green mingled in gay profusion; the slanting beams of the descending sun fell athwart the lakelet, like a broad band of shimmering gold, and here and there lent an added glory to the trees.” A Favourite Humorous Quote: “‘Oh!’ cried Vi, who was gently feeling the top of the tiny head, and she looked aghast at her father, ‘O, papa, its head's rotten!’ “‘No, daughter, don't be alarmed,’ he said smiling slightly, ‘there's nothing wrong there; all young babies' heads are soft like that on the top.’ “‘Oh, are they?’ she said with a sigh of relief, ‘I was afraid it would spoil soon and we couldn't keep her.’”

  7. 5 out of 5

    Rileysfire

    Beautiful What an entertaining and charming tale. It contains everything one could wish for in a diversion. The characters were well developed. If only it did not end.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Samantha Obermeyer

    As expected, the story was a struggle to get into at first due to not knowing any of the characters, as Elsie’s Children by Martha Finley is actually the last in a book series. The sheer number of children made that even more difficult, but Finley is consistent with mentioning relationships so I was able to keep track of siblings and children. Much like The Awakening, it took me a little while to get used to the sentence structure of this old book, but after a while the words became second nature As expected, the story was a struggle to get into at first due to not knowing any of the characters, as Elsie’s Children by Martha Finley is actually the last in a book series. The sheer number of children made that even more difficult, but Finley is consistent with mentioning relationships so I was able to keep track of siblings and children. Much like The Awakening, it took me a little while to get used to the sentence structure of this old book, but after a while the words became second nature. I found the language use and inflections to indicate accents quite well done. It was easy to feed my imagination and both visualize and hear the individual characters. Read more... https://samasasim.wordpress.com/2020/...

  9. 5 out of 5

    Madeline Rose

    These books are really good.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Elaine Cooper

    This is a very fun book series to read. I really appreciate the love they show to each other and their love for Jesus Christ.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Rachel

    This series is a bit Calvinistic in its theology, and it's also a bit uber-Christian; i.e., the Christians are really, really good and the non-Christians are really, really bad.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Willow

    This is the best Elsie book I have read so far.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Elisabeth Gimenez

    This one is really good. I don't know if its my favorite, though. I like how their children always tell their parents when they do something wrong and don't hide it. They are such a good example.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Stacy Graves

  15. 4 out of 5

    Katie

  16. 4 out of 5

    Lydia Osborne

  17. 4 out of 5

    Christa Ewing

  18. 4 out of 5

    Lydia

  19. 4 out of 5

    Cate

  20. 4 out of 5

    Salinn

  21. 5 out of 5

    Stephanie Wright

  22. 5 out of 5

    Kaitlyn

  23. 4 out of 5

    Tracy

  24. 4 out of 5

    Carol R. Waters

  25. 4 out of 5

    Sara

  26. 5 out of 5

    Amanda

  27. 5 out of 5

    Sixela

  28. 5 out of 5

    Ellyn Davis

  29. 4 out of 5

    Jim E. Jordan

  30. 5 out of 5

    Vanessa

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