web site hit counter Magdalena and Balthazar: An Intimate Portrait of Life in Sixteenth-Century Europe Revealed in the Letters of a Nuremberg Husband and Wife - Ebooks PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

Magdalena and Balthazar: An Intimate Portrait of Life in Sixteenth-Century Europe Revealed in the Letters of a Nuremberg Husband and Wife

Availability: Ready to download


Compare

30 review for Magdalena and Balthazar: An Intimate Portrait of Life in Sixteenth-Century Europe Revealed in the Letters of a Nuremberg Husband and Wife

  1. 5 out of 5

    Vaishali

    Some interesting facts, but if you love European medieval history... not enough! Since the letters are verbose and formal, Ozmet may have considered compiling just excerpts, super-padding them with history, maps, engravings, receipts, and tax records. Instead, we have a few full letters, background history, and Ozmet's continuous evaluations of the couple's personalities. Let's hope we see a future book from this respected Harvard historian, elucidating obsolete terms from this era. For example: Some interesting facts, but if you love European medieval history... not enough! Since the letters are verbose and formal, Ozmet may have considered compiling just excerpts, super-padding them with history, maps, engravings, receipts, and tax records. Instead, we have a few full letters, background history, and Ozmet's continuous evaluations of the couple's personalities. Let's hope we see a future book from this respected Harvard historian, elucidating obsolete terms from this era. For example: manna cabrina, a mixture of juices from several medicinal plants. I couldn't find this on the web anywhere, but am really curious about it. Neat facts about Nuremberg, circa 1590: -------------------------------- * Convicted thieves were hung if they were not citizens, and beheaded if they were. * Urine/refuse couldn't be thrown out of the house until after 10pm, punishable by fined imprisonment. * Arsonists were burned at the stake. * Legal minimum marriage age without parental consent: [email protected] and [email protected] * Legal minimum marriage age with consent: [email protected] , [email protected] (These were rare) * "Frauen Gate...in a canal by the fish stream, a mighty gushing fountain of pure brass of many waterfalls and spouts has been constructed... for the King of Denmark." * The Frankfurt Fair was a grand medieval trade market where Balthazar hawked goods. * Crackling - deep fried animal skin - was a common snack food that traveled well * Merchant routes were so dangerous that Balthazar and his colleagues term them Murder Road. Sometimes towns were closed off, as villagers were weary of carriers of plague. * Famines strike year-round, lining the merchant routes with "faces of pitiable wretched common folk." * A popular biyearly report about fairs was called the Jacobus Francus * Magdalena purchased flax, quinces, Venetian gold thread, ivory-handled knives, lebkuchen (German honeycakes), and Dutch cheese. * Unlucky middle class houses near ponds could have walls infested with snails. * In 1594, the Archbishop of Mainz passed by Nuremberg ... with 600 horsemen. * A fruit dealer and specialty weaver were executed for sodomy * Fires inside city walls were common. * Magdalena and Balthazar's child contracted 300 worms, allayed by drinking beer. * 1/3 of all children in Nuremberg died before 12. Magdalena/Balthazar's kid was one of them. * Medical treatments for adults included blood-letting, and hot mineral springs. "It was not unusual for families & friends to take blood-letting holidays: going in groups to the bath surgeon." * "The Nuremberg physician's instruction of 1572 recommended a regular cycle of spring and autumnal bleeding as optimal for good health." Magdalena blood-let every 2 weeks (!) * The cure for fatigue was laxatives, then drinking 2.3 liters of the bath waters for many days. * Italy experienced great famine. "One estimates that a year from now 1/3 ... of Italy may be dead. Even if a third doesn't die, many must starve to death." * Nuremberg's clergy banned dancing. * Popular interest in magic/witchcraft increased so much that the city of Wessenberg asked Nuremberg's clergy what to do. Franconia officially persecuted witches. Nuremberg scoffed at the trend in a private journal declaring witchery a delusion afflicting the simple-minded, ignorant, sad, poor, and ill. * Troops fighting the Turks at one point practiced outside city walls ... sometimes on migrating geese. * Nuremberg was charitable to the local poor, who received free food, medicine, and physician care. * "Poor artisans borrowed upto 100 gulden in interest-free loans to keep their businesses going... Probably 10% received regular care, while another 20% lived so marginal an existence that they too quickly became dependent on the city." .

  2. 4 out of 5

    Linda

    Absolutely loved this book. This is a book of letters between a husband and wife and gives you a good picture of their lives and the times they lived in. Balthasar often traveled away to go to a "spa" for bloodletting. Many of his letters told how he believed in the medicinal value of bloodletting to keeping one healthly. I was so fascinated with the bloodletting that I decided that I too would give bloodletting a try. However, my "spa" is the Red Cross. My friends laugh, but this book is the re Absolutely loved this book. This is a book of letters between a husband and wife and gives you a good picture of their lives and the times they lived in. Balthasar often traveled away to go to a "spa" for bloodletting. Many of his letters told how he believed in the medicinal value of bloodletting to keeping one healthly. I was so fascinated with the bloodletting that I decided that I too would give bloodletting a try. However, my "spa" is the Red Cross. My friends laugh, but this book is the real reason I started to donate and each time I think of Balthasar.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Rouchswalwe

    This must have been a labor of love. The letters were interesting for me to read, and I feel like I've travelled in the Tardis, peeking in on a long-ago time. Love truly is eternal. This must have been a labor of love. The letters were interesting for me to read, and I feel like I've travelled in the Tardis, peeking in on a long-ago time. Love truly is eternal.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Cliff Davis

    The late Steven Ozment contributed much to the world of scholarship, and this little, highly readable book is perhaps his greatest gift. That is, because it is more than a work of scholarship, it is his laying out before our eyes a collection of letters by real people, a couple living in Germany in the 16th century -- a time, in his words, of a world "between absolutes, still believing in the power of God while discovering the power of man." Their human emotions, their joys and sorrows, are those The late Steven Ozment contributed much to the world of scholarship, and this little, highly readable book is perhaps his greatest gift. That is, because it is more than a work of scholarship, it is his laying out before our eyes a collection of letters by real people, a couple living in Germany in the 16th century -- a time, in his words, of a world "between absolutes, still believing in the power of God while discovering the power of man." Their human emotions, their joys and sorrows, are those of a family, and this, Ozment says, makes a lie of the modern hypothesis that the family of yore was a coldly patriarchal construct, a institution that was more business than cozy home as we know it.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Klissia

    Simple and fascinating lifes!

  6. 5 out of 5

    Bobbie

    a short but fascinating account, based on letters of a wife in Nurnberg and her husband, a merchant who traveled in Germany and Italy in the late 1500's. Ozment says " If there is a mistake worse than believing that the present and the past are the same, it is thinking they are completely different...the past is not a different world." a short but fascinating account, based on letters of a wife in Nurnberg and her husband, a merchant who traveled in Germany and Italy in the late 1500's. Ozment says " If there is a mistake worse than believing that the present and the past are the same, it is thinking they are completely different...the past is not a different world."

  7. 4 out of 5

    Jessica Godfrey

    An excellent book on the daily lives of a merchant and his wife in 16th-century Nuremburg. This is a must read for anyone interested in social history. I only wish all 169 letters were in this book.

  8. 5 out of 5

    S.

    think i'm giving a sympathetic 4/5 not for any amazing, mind-blowing capacity of this work, but just because it's so rare; a nuremburg husband and wife of middle/merchant class exchange letters, and so we gain understanding of the 16th century. not something most people really know about. think i'm giving a sympathetic 4/5 not for any amazing, mind-blowing capacity of this work, but just because it's so rare; a nuremburg husband and wife of middle/merchant class exchange letters, and so we gain understanding of the 16th century. not something most people really know about.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Kristin McKnight

  10. 5 out of 5

    Carmen

  11. 4 out of 5

    Morgan McGuire

  12. 4 out of 5

    Jose Esquibel

  13. 5 out of 5

    Julie

  14. 4 out of 5

    Inge

  15. 4 out of 5

    Rachael

  16. 4 out of 5

    Leah Blackwell

  17. 4 out of 5

    Beth

  18. 4 out of 5

    Brigitta Riegers

  19. 5 out of 5

    MJHahn

  20. 5 out of 5

    Cathy

  21. 5 out of 5

    Kevin S

  22. 4 out of 5

    Chase

  23. 5 out of 5

    Lettie

  24. 4 out of 5

    Vasiliki

  25. 5 out of 5

    Marie Toussaint

  26. 5 out of 5

    Donna Riley

  27. 4 out of 5

    Jordan

  28. 4 out of 5

    Amber

  29. 4 out of 5

    Zach

  30. 4 out of 5

    Michelle

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.