web site hit counter The Tools of Screenwriting: A Writer's Guide to the Craft and Elements of a Screenplay - Ebooks PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

The Tools of Screenwriting: A Writer's Guide to the Craft and Elements of a Screenplay

Availability: Ready to download

In The Tools of Screenwriting, David Howard and Edward Mabley illuminate the essential elements of cinematic storytelling, and reveal the central principles that all good screenplays share. The authors address questions of dramatic structure, plot, dialogue, character development, setting, imagery, and other crucial topics as they apply to the special art of filmmaking. How In The Tools of Screenwriting, David Howard and Edward Mabley illuminate the essential elements of cinematic storytelling, and reveal the central principles that all good screenplays share. The authors address questions of dramatic structure, plot, dialogue, character development, setting, imagery, and other crucial topics as they apply to the special art of filmmaking. Howard and Mabley also demonstrate how, on a practical level, the tools of screenwriting work in sixteen notable films, including Citizen Cane, E.T., One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest, Rashomon, The Godfather, North by Northwest, Chinatown, and sex, lies, and videotape.


Compare

In The Tools of Screenwriting, David Howard and Edward Mabley illuminate the essential elements of cinematic storytelling, and reveal the central principles that all good screenplays share. The authors address questions of dramatic structure, plot, dialogue, character development, setting, imagery, and other crucial topics as they apply to the special art of filmmaking. How In The Tools of Screenwriting, David Howard and Edward Mabley illuminate the essential elements of cinematic storytelling, and reveal the central principles that all good screenplays share. The authors address questions of dramatic structure, plot, dialogue, character development, setting, imagery, and other crucial topics as they apply to the special art of filmmaking. Howard and Mabley also demonstrate how, on a practical level, the tools of screenwriting work in sixteen notable films, including Citizen Cane, E.T., One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest, Rashomon, The Godfather, North by Northwest, Chinatown, and sex, lies, and videotape.

30 review for The Tools of Screenwriting: A Writer's Guide to the Craft and Elements of a Screenplay

  1. 4 out of 5

    K.

    I found this to be a fantastic guide to screenwriting, not regarding formats and formulas. If you want format, hit up Judith Haag. If you want formula, stop and go home. There is no 'magic' formula. There is no how to. As for those citing confusion over the film write ups, reviews, and samples-- there is no answer to your question. It is your job to creatively construct your own script. If you want answers to how to do that, then your looking to plagiarize someone's work, or tread the easy route I found this to be a fantastic guide to screenwriting, not regarding formats and formulas. If you want format, hit up Judith Haag. If you want formula, stop and go home. There is no 'magic' formula. There is no how to. As for those citing confusion over the film write ups, reviews, and samples-- there is no answer to your question. It is your job to creatively construct your own script. If you want answers to how to do that, then your looking to plagiarize someone's work, or tread the easy route. You might get away with either or both but if you have no creativity or talent, that will quickly be evident to everyone. The fact that this section confuses the screen student is an indication they're not ready to write one yet. They need more apprentice time, in the very least. I found the section a good place to get my ideas flowing and to think about what has been done in the past in concrete examples that can be examined thoroughly. Priceless.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Emmanuel Oberg

    Howard, one of Frank Daniel’s [renowned screenwriting teacher at Columbia University] former students, wrote this excellent adaptation of Dramatic Construction, An Outline Of Basic Principles without ever meeting Mabley who passed away in 1984. A fascinating foreword by Gregory McKnight explains the genesis of Mabley’s book up to its publication in 1972; how it went out of print and lay dormant until Daniel discovered it and adopted it for his own use as a teacher, recommending it to his students Howard, one of Frank Daniel’s [renowned screenwriting teacher at Columbia University] former students, wrote this excellent adaptation of Dramatic Construction, An Outline Of Basic Principles without ever meeting Mabley who passed away in 1984. A fascinating foreword by Gregory McKnight explains the genesis of Mabley’s book up to its publication in 1972; how it went out of print and lay dormant until Daniel discovered it and adopted it for his own use as a teacher, recommending it to his students for many years as an excellent and concise introduction to dramatic theory; finally, how a former student of Howard introduced Mabley’s book to McKnight who, after acquiring the rights, asked Howard to rewrite the text in order to reflect the way its principles apply to screenwriting. It also features an insightful introduction by Frank Daniel, who never wrote a book about his own influential approach to screenwriting. If you can’t get hold of a second-hand copy of the original Mabley, The Tools of Screenwriting is the closest you’ll get to it. As Howard’s focus is on cinema – primarily American – rather than theatre, this makes it more directly relevant for many contemporary readers, especially those interested in the study of Hollywood movies. The Tools of Screenwriting is an essential book from the man who wrote (with Robert Gordon) the hilariously entertaining Galaxy Quest. I’m grateful to David Howard for both of these achievements. The first one delighted me as a moviegoer and the second was one of my references when I wrote the Developing a Plot-Led Story of Screenwriting Unchained: Reclaim Your Creative Freedom and Master Story Structure.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Willow Redd

    I have read through this book several times now. It is a good, concise guide to the elements of screenplay writing. Apparently the book was adapted from an older text on the craft and elements of stage play writing and was updated by a professor upon his learning that the original was no longer available as a resource for his writing classes. One thing I really like about this book is the great examples it incorporates from the screenplays of well known movies. The writers go through and analyze I have read through this book several times now. It is a good, concise guide to the elements of screenplay writing. Apparently the book was adapted from an older text on the craft and elements of stage play writing and was updated by a professor upon his learning that the original was no longer available as a resource for his writing classes. One thing I really like about this book is the great examples it incorporates from the screenplays of well known movies. The writers go through and analyze movies such as Citizen Kane, One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest, Thelma & Louise, Diner, and others. Along with these, the final analysis is from the 1948 Hamlet directed by Laurence Olivier, thus crossing over into the area of the stage as well. It's a nice closing to the book. While I've been through the book several times, and surely will go through it several more, this time I decided to try something a little different. After reading through the first half of the book, I decided to watch each movie analyzed before reading the analysis. This took a little time, and I did not watch the movies in any particular order (though I did end on Hamlet and plan to follow up by reading the play), but it really helped drive home the points made in the analyses because the movies were very fresh in my mind. This is one I would highly recommend to anyone interested in screenwriting.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Josh

    This is a great book. Contains a lot of valuable writing concepts, some that I haven't found in other books, some that I have but which are explained better in this book. For example: the basic principle of drama (somebody sympathetic wants something badly and is having trouble getting it), objective vs subjective drama, dramatic irony, main tension, advertising and elements of the future. Etc. It's not a perfect book. For example, the section on dialog was IMO weak and didn't begin to explain w This is a great book. Contains a lot of valuable writing concepts, some that I haven't found in other books, some that I have but which are explained better in this book. For example: the basic principle of drama (somebody sympathetic wants something badly and is having trouble getting it), objective vs subjective drama, dramatic irony, main tension, advertising and elements of the future. Etc. It's not a perfect book. For example, the section on dialog was IMO weak and didn't begin to explain why we all remember "I'll be back" and all those other great film lines. But it's still packed with useful information. The first half of the book explains the tools. The second half uses those tools to analyze 10-20 classic films. I was a bit surprised by one reviewer who complained that the reviews are only useful if you've seen the films. I'd respond by saying those films include Citizen Kane, Casablanca, The Godfather, ET, Annie Hall, Rashoman, Witness and Some Like it Hot, clearly some of the most famous and successful films in history. In other words, I give the book high marks for explaining it's concepts with famous films. Definitely buy it.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Seb

    I'm always skeptical of screenwriting books, but Dad always gives me them, and I feel obligated to read them. This is one of the better ones I've read. The case studies were particularly helpful. Since reading it, I've been thinking a lot about the concept of dramatic irony, as in when one character knows something that another doesn't. Or, alternatively, when the audience knows something the main character doesn't. This is a basic concept, but the book illustrated how effective it is, and it he I'm always skeptical of screenwriting books, but Dad always gives me them, and I feel obligated to read them. This is one of the better ones I've read. The case studies were particularly helpful. Since reading it, I've been thinking a lot about the concept of dramatic irony, as in when one character knows something that another doesn't. Or, alternatively, when the audience knows something the main character doesn't. This is a basic concept, but the book illustrated how effective it is, and it helped a friend and I rework the end of our screenplay. This is the screenwriting book I would recommend most, over Story and Save the Cat, though that is not saying much.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Jared

    This is a very helpful book. The author first explains elements that are important in a good movie. Then he gives several examples of movies that use these elements well. Unfortunately, I have not watched all of the movies the author recommends. So I skipped the chapters where he would talk about a movie I had not seen. I did not want any spoilers. That is one downfall of the book. Half of it is a spoiler if you have not seen any of the movies he gives examples of. But on the bright side they al This is a very helpful book. The author first explains elements that are important in a good movie. Then he gives several examples of movies that use these elements well. Unfortunately, I have not watched all of the movies the author recommends. So I skipped the chapters where he would talk about a movie I had not seen. I did not want any spoilers. That is one downfall of the book. Half of it is a spoiler if you have not seen any of the movies he gives examples of. But on the bright side they all look like movies worth seeing (for example North by Northwest). So I will hurry up and watch them so I can read the rest of the book!

  7. 5 out of 5

    Danielle

    The only thing I didn't like about this book were the screenplay analyses. First of all, they don't make sense if you haven't seen the films, and second, they identify the elements discussed in the rest of the book but don't effectively show why those elements are there or how they make the screenplay a good one. Basically a waste of 180 pages. The discussion of the elements themselves -- the tools of screenwriting -- was informative and interesting. The only thing I didn't like about this book were the screenplay analyses. First of all, they don't make sense if you haven't seen the films, and second, they identify the elements discussed in the rest of the book but don't effectively show why those elements are there or how they make the screenplay a good one. Basically a waste of 180 pages. The discussion of the elements themselves -- the tools of screenwriting -- was informative and interesting.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Suncan Stone

    I have read a few writing manuals lately and this was the best for me (out of the ones I have read recently). I like the way the book is set out, with the first part dealing with basics and giving an outline of the main (screen)writing tools (I am sure you can use many of them in any sort of writing) and in the second half it gives an analysis of 15 or 16 films so you can see on examples how certain things were tackled. Definitely worth a read if interested in writing.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Michael

    After reading Story and a slew of other books. I felt I was reading the same thing I already knew, but presented in a lesser form. It does have some good info, but I think there are too many books out there that I would recommend other than this.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Wes

    More of a reference book, with some good film analysis really. If you come to this expecting to give it a read and know how to write a screenplay, then I feel you are on the wrong track. Otherwise, pretty clear cut on the general elements that make up an effective screenplay.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Ian

    Yep. Just as influential as it was the first time I read it. So influential that there's no point in writing a review...most of my theoretical writing is a response to this book. Yep. Just as influential as it was the first time I read it. So influential that there's no point in writing a review...most of my theoretical writing is a response to this book.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Rodrigo Mendoza

    Great read for beginning screenwriters. Unpretentious and easy to read, this is a must: it's not about formulas or preconceived equations but about important concepts. Excellent. Great read for beginning screenwriters. Unpretentious and easy to read, this is a must: it's not about formulas or preconceived equations but about important concepts. Excellent.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Jonathan Inman

    Provides great elements for crafting any kind of story, though its focus is screenwriting. That said, it doesn't really get into the technical aspects of screenwriting and how to use them to your best advantage. That is not workshopped in this book, though it would have been an incredibly insightful addition. Its focus is on story craft--mostly the analysis of the craft than the application of it. Still, this is a great book to start with to become familiar with common elements and to spot them. Provides great elements for crafting any kind of story, though its focus is screenwriting. That said, it doesn't really get into the technical aspects of screenwriting and how to use them to your best advantage. That is not workshopped in this book, though it would have been an incredibly insightful addition. Its focus is on story craft--mostly the analysis of the craft than the application of it. Still, this is a great book to start with to become familiar with common elements and to spot them. Some other book, then, might do better with the application of them. The writing is simple and clear, despite some clunky sentence structure. I very much appreciated the film analyses and their application of the elements the book defines. I found it most advantageous to read the screenplay, then read his analysis and watch the film. Some parts of the analyses were a little too simplistic, but that was made up for with more insightful examples. Because of the near repetitious nature of the analyses, it really drives home the need for considering and using the writing elements and in using good writing craft.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Илья

    Учебник заканчивается на 108 странице, далее анализ фильмов. Поэтому не то что бы советую брать книгу на бумаге. В цифре идеально и всегда под рукой, чтобы что-то подсмотреть, перечитать. Анализов достаточно прочесть парочку, чтобы понять метод и на что обращать внимание. А годных разборов предостаточно на Ютубе, сразу на актуальные/любимые фильмы и сериалы.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Arina Sydorkina

    Подробная инструкция про то, как написать сценарий. Вот тупо бери и делай. Да, получится кагбе клише. В первый, второй и третий раз. Но на десятом сценарии есть шанс выдать кое-что достойное. Эта книжка про азы. И хороший сценарий она писать не научит. Но она научит, как сделать первые шаги. Это букварь. Без него не продвинешься вообще никуда.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Tolendi Kaken

    Легко читается, анализы крутые (разбор Гражданина Кейна и Свидетеля просто огонь). Хоть и пришло понимание структуры сценария, такие вещи как единство и анонс будущего требуют дальнейшего изучения. Продолжу "Спасите котика", который был обруган в предисловии. Легко читается, анализы крутые (разбор Гражданина Кейна и Свидетеля просто огонь). Хоть и пришло понимание структуры сценария, такие вещи как единство и анонс будущего требуют дальнейшего изучения. Продолжу "Спасите котика", который был обруган в предисловии.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Enso

    Первые 108 страниц хороши, за них две звезды. Но разбор фильмов, Аааааа, скучнейший. Если составлять мнение о фильмах только по этим разборам, я бы не смотрел ни один.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Abdulaziz Almograby

    A must if you are trying to be a screenwriter!

  19. 5 out of 5

    Pearse Anderson

    Pretty fine, and pretty old, I say as a Gen Z dumbass! I read select chapters for school and will re-read them as I continue my dumbass screenplay. Lordy!

  20. 4 out of 5

    Mike Mercer

    Mike-Nice book I like it

  21. 5 out of 5

    Ash Connell-Gonzalez

  22. 5 out of 5

    Sarah Hart

  23. 5 out of 5

    Mark Wilkins

  24. 5 out of 5

    Marva Whitaker

  25. 5 out of 5

    Joshua

  26. 5 out of 5

    Денис Чужой

  27. 5 out of 5

    LesserGuardian

  28. 4 out of 5

    Jose Lopez

  29. 5 out of 5

    Billy Bob

  30. 5 out of 5

    Verleen Tucker

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.