web site hit counter The King of Dreams - Ebooks PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

The King of Dreams

Availability: Ready to download

The years since first he gained the Starburst Crown have been difficult ones for Coronal Lord Prestimion and the vast, unfathomable realm he rules. But finally peace has been restored to Majipoor. And now it is time for Prestimion to name the able Prince Dekkeret his succeeding Coronal and to descend to the Labyrinth as Pontifex. But a power from a dark past that both men The years since first he gained the Starburst Crown have been difficult ones for Coronal Lord Prestimion and the vast, unfathomable realm he rules. But finally peace has been restored to Majipoor. And now it is time for Prestimion to name the able Prince Dekkeret his succeeding Coronal and to descend to the Labyrinth as Pontifex. But a power from a dark past that both men believed was dead is stirring once again -- an evil more potent and devastating than either leader dares to remember. Once, decades past, a then knight-initiate Dekkeret had his dreams stolen from him. His quest for recovery led him to a remarkable helmet that could invade the psyches of sleeping foes, a device the newly anointed Coronal Prestimion later used to defeat his enemy Dantirya Sambail, tyrant of the continent Zimroel. In the fires of civil war, the terrible weapon was destroyed forever -- or so it was believed. The noxious weed of rebellion was torn out at its roots but its seeds have borne frightening fruit. Dantirya Sambail is dead, and the hungry jackals who ran at his heels now scheme to recover his lost lands and power. At their head is the tyrant's former henchman Mandralisca -- a villain of great wiles and icy heart, who somehow has unleashed a devastating plague of the mind upon Prestimion's subjects. Dark visions are invading the sleep of those loyal to the Lords and the Lady of Majipoor -- soul-shattering scenes of madness and monstrosity, driving those inflicted to commit horrible, destructive acts. And the dark wave is flowing ever-closer to the throne, seeping beneath the doors of the 30,000 rooms of the towering edifice atop Castle Mount ... and into sacrosanct depths of the Imperial Labyrinthitself.


Compare

The years since first he gained the Starburst Crown have been difficult ones for Coronal Lord Prestimion and the vast, unfathomable realm he rules. But finally peace has been restored to Majipoor. And now it is time for Prestimion to name the able Prince Dekkeret his succeeding Coronal and to descend to the Labyrinth as Pontifex. But a power from a dark past that both men The years since first he gained the Starburst Crown have been difficult ones for Coronal Lord Prestimion and the vast, unfathomable realm he rules. But finally peace has been restored to Majipoor. And now it is time for Prestimion to name the able Prince Dekkeret his succeeding Coronal and to descend to the Labyrinth as Pontifex. But a power from a dark past that both men believed was dead is stirring once again -- an evil more potent and devastating than either leader dares to remember. Once, decades past, a then knight-initiate Dekkeret had his dreams stolen from him. His quest for recovery led him to a remarkable helmet that could invade the psyches of sleeping foes, a device the newly anointed Coronal Prestimion later used to defeat his enemy Dantirya Sambail, tyrant of the continent Zimroel. In the fires of civil war, the terrible weapon was destroyed forever -- or so it was believed. The noxious weed of rebellion was torn out at its roots but its seeds have borne frightening fruit. Dantirya Sambail is dead, and the hungry jackals who ran at his heels now scheme to recover his lost lands and power. At their head is the tyrant's former henchman Mandralisca -- a villain of great wiles and icy heart, who somehow has unleashed a devastating plague of the mind upon Prestimion's subjects. Dark visions are invading the sleep of those loyal to the Lords and the Lady of Majipoor -- soul-shattering scenes of madness and monstrosity, driving those inflicted to commit horrible, destructive acts. And the dark wave is flowing ever-closer to the throne, seeping beneath the doors of the 30,000 rooms of the towering edifice atop Castle Mount ... and into sacrosanct depths of the Imperial Labyrinthitself.

30 review for The King of Dreams

  1. 5 out of 5

    Ben Lund

    Colour me unimpressed. All three of these books were less enjoyable than the "Lord Valentine" series. My biggest beefs? Predictability, monotony, followed by the actual story being wrapped up in the last 20 pages. I seriously thought that there were several characters that we weren't going to hear about because they wasn't enough time. Thank goodness for the jump cut and excessive exposition. Do you enjoy 400 pages of nothing happening, followed by 4 pages of resolution, because that is basicall Colour me unimpressed. All three of these books were less enjoyable than the "Lord Valentine" series. My biggest beefs? Predictability, monotony, followed by the actual story being wrapped up in the last 20 pages. I seriously thought that there were several characters that we weren't going to hear about because they wasn't enough time. Thank goodness for the jump cut and excessive exposition. Do you enjoy 400 pages of nothing happening, followed by 4 pages of resolution, because that is basically what is happening here. I am wondering if Silverberg got roped into another 3 book deal after the "Lord Valentine" series did well, and by the time he got to this one he just wanted to move onto something else and capped it off. I mean it is nice to get some of the backstory of Majipoor and you find out about how the "King of Dreams" was created, which you know exists if you read "Lord Valentine" first (which is the order in which it was published). But nothing that really deepened your appreciation of the world that he has created. Set you eyes to skim as he, at several points, lists off multiple lines of people and places with unpronounceable names to let you know that "hey, this world is really big, and look at all the work I did to make up a bunch of stuff that sounds foreign." Ohhh, lets get on my bilimbuk and ride down to the plains of stilfunport. Really? Also how is it that both Prestimion and Dekkert dislike magic so much, when it is literally saving their collective asses every time they turn around. I would have a healthy respect for the art if I've relied on it getting me out of trouble several times in a single year. Also what the hell is up with Prestimion, the past 2 books he is level-headed, methodical in getting things achieved, and this book he is pissed off in every other scene. Is he bi-polar? Is this some plot twist that Silverberg never got around to explaining. Finally though my biggest gripe, (view spoiler)[you have a entire governmental system that is based on leadership NOT being passed down within a family, part of your entire problem that you are dealing with is because of a group of people that think that power SHOULD BE passed down from generation to generation, so obviously the only solution is to create a power who can GO INTO ANYONE'S MIND AT ANY TIME AND TORTURE THEM. And that power should only stay within one family for the REST OF TIME. Because Dinitak is so good, that all his kids will be good as well, it only makes sense, I mean Dinitak's uncle and father were such good, upstanding---oh wait! (hide spoiler)] Yeah, I don't see that ever biting you in the butt. Basically, even though I really wanted to enjoy this book and these series as a whole, this book strikes me either as lazy writing or a poor editor, but there was not enough in it for me to recommend it to someone else as a great point for getting into a new author. I guess it's time for me to leave Majipoor behind as well.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Yev

    Yesterday I read all this book. The paperback came out in 2002, which is also when I bought it. I had already read all the previous books. It's a mystery how so much time can pass by before getting around to something that one buys. I had considerable trepidation before I started reading it. I had quite enjoyed the previous books that I had read all those years ago and I was concerned that I wouldn't enjoy this now and that it would ruin my memories. I don't like rewatching or rereading anything Yesterday I read all this book. The paperback came out in 2002, which is also when I bought it. I had already read all the previous books. It's a mystery how so much time can pass by before getting around to something that one buys. I had considerable trepidation before I started reading it. I had quite enjoyed the previous books that I had read all those years ago and I was concerned that I wouldn't enjoy this now and that it would ruin my memories. I don't like rewatching or rereading anything because past experience has shown me that I almost always enjoy it a lot less the second time and that causes me question why I liked it in the first place and whether it would be the same for everything else. Fortunately, I enjoyed this well enough, despite its various flaws. I don't remember there being so much unnecessarily detailed exposition along with unneeded side stories all throughout, but it's been closer to 20 years than not. A lot is unclear in general about my reading then. Majipoor is the planet's name and it was settled by humans and various other aliens about 14,000 years ago. For reasons that are never really addressed, aside from saying the crust is metal poor, it's still mostly medieval technology with random advanced technologies here and there and a functional spaceport that is rarely visited. I don't know whether this novel is a subversion of expectations or a result of unfortunate circumstances. I'll believe the former despite more evidence for the latter. Plot spoilers follow. (view spoiler)[For most of the novel, it seems like it's setting up for a massive war campaign with both sides strongly agitating for war, especially the more powerful side. However, none of that ever happens. The antagonist turns out to be a megalomaniac with delusions of grandeur who is unable to back up anything he does with actual action and has to continually reduce the scope of his ambitions as others withdraw their support from him as they realize he's simply a psychopathic narcissist without self-awareness who wants them to do everything for him. The antagonist also being driven insane by his plot device weapon. The novel ends with the antagonist proposing an in-person parley with the protagonist where the antagonist tries to kill the protagonist thinking that will solve all of the his problems, but they just kill him. The End. Despite that the book was originally published about 7 months before 9/11, it could be read as a response to that and the ensuing consequences of the following years. A story of a superpower wanting a disproportionate and misguided response to a terrorist attack, but cooler heads prevail. The protagonist's solution to prevent further rebellion is to have a global surveillance state. (hide spoiler)] Rating: 3.5/5

  3. 4 out of 5

    Chip Hunter

    This book, like most of the other Majipoor books, was disappointing at best. Although I do enjoy the detailed world that Silverberg has created, I just have a hard time really getting excited about a story line that even the characters in the book don't seem too concerned over! Way too much time is spent on insignificant little sideplots and wearisome detailed descriptions of everything from the food thats eaten to the color of the leaves of a tree. I want more action, more conflict, and more ex This book, like most of the other Majipoor books, was disappointing at best. Although I do enjoy the detailed world that Silverberg has created, I just have a hard time really getting excited about a story line that even the characters in the book don't seem too concerned over! Way too much time is spent on insignificant little sideplots and wearisome detailed descriptions of everything from the food thats eaten to the color of the leaves of a tree. I want more action, more conflict, and more excitment! I know part of that is just Silverberg's style, but most of these Majipoor books just havn't done it for me. This book in particular really should have been much better. The basic plot had great potential, with Mandralisca using the Barjazid helmet to mess with peoples minds and the possibility of a inter-continental war. Also, the way the book ended was weak. You take 400-something pages to gradually (very gradually) build up to a climax and then have it end in a completely predictable and insanely quick way. Nothing in this entire book was a surprise (except maybe that Septach Melyn appears to be gay??) and although some of it was quite interesting, it didn't really do much to add to the overall story or to keep the reader interested. I think Silverberg was just tired of writing about Majipoor and just decided to F-it and cap it off with this second rate work.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Bryan Thomas Schmidt

    A great ending to the Majipoor cycle. So good, it makes me sad to see it end. I read the previous two in the Prestimion series almost a year ago and kept putting this one off to read other things. I had found "Lord Prestimion" less satisfying than "Sorcerers of Majipoor" much as "Majipoor Chronicles" was not as good as "Lord Valentine's Castle." Unlike "Valentine Pontifex," however, "King Of Dreams" was as good as "Sorcerers" and a great read. Truly a delight. Silverberg is purely amazing. No on A great ending to the Majipoor cycle. So good, it makes me sad to see it end. I read the previous two in the Prestimion series almost a year ago and kept putting this one off to read other things. I had found "Lord Prestimion" less satisfying than "Sorcerers of Majipoor" much as "Majipoor Chronicles" was not as good as "Lord Valentine's Castle." Unlike "Valentine Pontifex," however, "King Of Dreams" was as good as "Sorcerers" and a great read. Truly a delight. Silverberg is purely amazing. No one writes and worldbuilds like this.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Lynn Calvin

    ereader ebook

  6. 4 out of 5

    Deedee

    IL: UG - BL: 7.6 - AR Pts: 30.0

  7. 4 out of 5

    Mary

  8. 4 out of 5

    Ossieu71

  9. 5 out of 5

    Ilias Sellountos

  10. 4 out of 5

    Sharon

  11. 5 out of 5

    Stuart

  12. 5 out of 5

    Brando Peter

  13. 5 out of 5

    Don

  14. 5 out of 5

    A Haunted Reader

  15. 4 out of 5

    Tracy

  16. 5 out of 5

    Chris

  17. 4 out of 5

    Brad Thompson

  18. 4 out of 5

    Alexander

  19. 5 out of 5

    Margaret

  20. 5 out of 5

    Ken

  21. 5 out of 5

    Chuck Ledger

  22. 4 out of 5

    Will

  23. 5 out of 5

    Gary

  24. 5 out of 5

    Gene Hult

  25. 5 out of 5

    Tracy Botsford

  26. 4 out of 5

    Krishna Sampath

  27. 5 out of 5

    Jeremy

  28. 4 out of 5

    sudeshna

  29. 5 out of 5

    Fabian

  30. 5 out of 5

    Kathleen

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.