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While the rest of Chicago focuses on the enormous spectacle of the 1893 World's Columbian Exposition, Charlotte Farrow's attentions are entirely on one small boy--her boy--whom she has kept a secret from her wealthy employers for nearly a year. When the woman who has been caring for her son abruptly returns him to the opulent Banning home, Charlotte must decide whether to c While the rest of Chicago focuses on the enormous spectacle of the 1893 World's Columbian Exposition, Charlotte Farrow's attentions are entirely on one small boy--her boy--whom she has kept a secret from her wealthy employers for nearly a year. When the woman who has been caring for her son abruptly returns him to the opulent Banning home, Charlotte must decide whether to come clean and face dismissal or keep her secret while the Bannings decide the child's fate. Can she face the truth of her own past and open her heart to a future of her own? Or will life's struggles determine her path? This compelling story of courage, strength, and tender romance captures the tension between the glittering wealthy class and the hardworking servants who made their lives comfortable.


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While the rest of Chicago focuses on the enormous spectacle of the 1893 World's Columbian Exposition, Charlotte Farrow's attentions are entirely on one small boy--her boy--whom she has kept a secret from her wealthy employers for nearly a year. When the woman who has been caring for her son abruptly returns him to the opulent Banning home, Charlotte must decide whether to c While the rest of Chicago focuses on the enormous spectacle of the 1893 World's Columbian Exposition, Charlotte Farrow's attentions are entirely on one small boy--her boy--whom she has kept a secret from her wealthy employers for nearly a year. When the woman who has been caring for her son abruptly returns him to the opulent Banning home, Charlotte must decide whether to come clean and face dismissal or keep her secret while the Bannings decide the child's fate. Can she face the truth of her own past and open her heart to a future of her own? Or will life's struggles determine her path? This compelling story of courage, strength, and tender romance captures the tension between the glittering wealthy class and the hardworking servants who made their lives comfortable.

30 review for The Dilemma of Charlotte Farrow

  1. 5 out of 5

    Rachel Brand

    GENRE: HISTORICAL ROMANCE PUBLISHER: REVELL PUBLICATION DATE: JANUARY 01, 2013 RATING: 4 OUT OF 5 – VERY GOOD PROS: Perfect for “Downton Abbey” fans; interesting exploration of servant relationships; realistic presentation of political situations; emotionally engaging story; well-researched historical detail CONS: One conflict is resolved a bit too conveniently; ending felt a little rushed Housemaid Charlotte Farrow has managed to hide the existence of her child from the Banning household and their s GENRE: HISTORICAL ROMANCE PUBLISHER: REVELL PUBLICATION DATE: JANUARY 01, 2013 RATING: 4 OUT OF 5 – VERY GOOD PROS: Perfect for “Downton Abbey” fans; interesting exploration of servant relationships; realistic presentation of political situations; emotionally engaging story; well-researched historical detail CONS: One conflict is resolved a bit too conveniently; ending felt a little rushed Housemaid Charlotte Farrow has managed to hide the existence of her child from the Banning household and their staff, mainly due to the help of Lucy, the Banning’s daughter. But now Lucy has left home to travel with her husband and a family emergency has forced Charlotte’s childminder to return her son to her at no advance notice. With no idea how to hide Henry from the other staff in the Prairie Avenue house, Charlotte allows them to come to the conclusion that the child was abandoned in the garden because the mother knew of Lucy’s charitable work. Charlotte struggles to keep up this facade as the Banning family decides what to do with the child in Lucy’s absence. But soon her infant son’s presence in the house isn’t Charlotte’s only problem, and the reappearance of Henry’s father forces Charlotte to reassess her present situation and make some hard decisions about her son’s future. Will Archie, a fellow servant, and his political connections be a help or a hindrance to Charlotte’s situation? Can she allow herself the opportunity to fall in love while she faces so many pressing dilemmas? I’d like to start my review with an amusing story about my reading experience of The Dilemma of Charlotte Farrow. It appears that my Kindle edition of this book is glitched, as I left the book at the 50% mark last night, under the impression that the book still had a way to go even if the chapter I was reading at the time seemed to be wrapping up quite a few things. I was honestly intrigued about where the novel was going to go from there, as so much had already taken place. Today I picked my Kindle up again, read a couple of pages and found myself at the Acknowledgements and Author’s Note! Evidently, something went wrong in the conversion of this book and 47% of it is blank. I basically read an entire novel in one afternoon! I believe that’s a credit to Olivia Newport, as this book was obviously so engaging that I didn't realise quite how much of it I read in one sitting. I’ve been eagerly anticipating this book since I read the first book in the Avenue of Dreams series, The Pursuit of Lucy Banning, back in April 2012. The only change in my reading experience between these two books is that I discovered Downton Abbey a couple of months ago. My husband and I devoured the first two seasons in a couple of weeks while studying for our end of semester exams, and I can tell you, these books are a Downton Abbey addict’s dream. Although this series is set in Chicago towards the end of the nineteenth century, there’s a similar exploration of relationships between servants and masters, and the two separate worlds that they live in. Having studied a fair amount about the position of servants in Victorian Britain while at university and watched Downton Abbey, I find the topic fascinating, and particularly liked Olivia’s portrayal of the relationships between the below-stairs staff, especially the cook, butler and Sarah, the latter of whom I’m hoping will reappear in another book. Although the romance between Charlotte and Archie isn’t as central as those in other historical novels from this period, I appreciated the insights into Archie’s interest in the changing face of politics and the treatment of workers. It was interesting to hear about new opportunities opening up for working class people, jobs that would take them outside the service lifestyle and give them more independence, such as factory and clerical work. Although I’m not a scholar of this particular time period in United States history, it appears that Olivia has researched this topic quite thoroughly, as her depictions of political events and the staff’s treatment of Archie’s views seemed realistic. As for Charlotte and Henry, I really felt for her struggle to care for her son without bringing her true relationship with him to light. Regardless of whether her son was born inside or out of wedlock, it was impossible for a woman with a child to hold down a steady job in this period, particularly one in service. Charlotte truly does have a dilemma: if she reveals her relationship to Henry, she’ll lose her job and have no way to provide for him, but if she lets another servant care for him, she can continue to earn money and hopefully eventually be able to find another childminder for her son. Charlotte has to temporarily let go of her son in order to build a life for him. I actually got a little emotional reading about her struggle, and how she forced herself not to go to her son even when she desperately wanted to, for fear of giving herself away. When she eventually makes an incredibly difficult decision that she believes is in Henry’s best interests, I may have shed a tear or two. The storyline about Henry’s father, which propels Charlotte into acting to protect Henry more than ever, wasn’t quite what I’d expected. But when I thought about it, I really can’t remember what we discovered about Charlotte in the previous book. She was a bit of a mystery in the first novel in the series, and the revelations in The Dilemma of Charlotte Farrow make her all the more an intriguing character. I don’t want to give too much away, but there are several scenes towards the end of the novel that made it very hard to put the book down. I was only a little disappointed with the outcome of the situation, finding it a little bit too convenient. I don’t want to give too much away, but I will say that I do wish that some Christian historical novels would delve into the topic of divorce, rather than conveniently getting rid of a husband through another method. There are times, particularly when it comes to abusive relationships, where divorce is the only possible outcome, but I’ve rarely seem it explored in Christian fiction. I know that it’s not an ideal solution to a problem, but if more books explored the topic, perhaps it would be easier for modern women to openly discuss their marital problems. Furthermore, discussing divorce within different historical contexts would make for a rather interesting novel. I did appreciate that Olivia touched on it a little in this novel, and allowed her characters to discuss it as an option. My only other complaint about this book would be that the ending felt a little rushed. Initially, I thought this was because when I originally finished the book, I didn’t realise how close I was to the end of the book due to my glitched Kindle conversion. But I did go back and reread the last chapter and it seemed like an awful lot was wrapped up and concluded. I did wish we’d been allowed to see a bit more of Charlotte and Henry’s new life, but hopefully that’ll be touched on in the next book in the series. While I have a feeling that the third book will explore the life of Sarah, another servant in the Banning household, I would also like to see more of Emmaline, Lucy’s aunt. Although The Dilemma of Charlotte Farrow didn’t capture me quite as much as the previous book in the Avenue of Dreams series, it still had a thoroughly compelling storyline. Fans of the series will be pleased to encounter a similar mixture of romance, suspense and upstairs-downstairs relationships, all within a well-researched historical context. The 1893 Chicago Exposition makes a fascinating backdrop for this series and I can’t wait to see what Olivia Newport comes up with next. Review title provided by Revell.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Rissi

    Notions and daydreams are not something the hard-working Charlotte Farrow can afford. She is hiding a secret and trying to provide for her young son. Unable to share her burden, Charlotte has protected her secrets at all cost since it would mean immediate dismissal from her work in service at the Banning house. The only person who knows about Henry is Lucy Edwards, the Banning’s only daughter, and Charlotte’s advocate. All of her savings goes towards the care of Henry who was placed with a kindl Notions and daydreams are not something the hard-working Charlotte Farrow can afford. She is hiding a secret and trying to provide for her young son. Unable to share her burden, Charlotte has protected her secrets at all cost since it would mean immediate dismissal from her work in service at the Banning house. The only person who knows about Henry is Lucy Edwards, the Banning’s only daughter, and Charlotte’s advocate. All of her savings goes towards the care of Henry who was placed with a kindly woman but things are about to get complicated. Henry is dropped off at the Banning home leaving Charlotte in a horrible position. Coinciding with her son’s arrival is the Banning’s coach man, Archie talking of leaving service – and he wants to take Charlotte with him. Suddenly her once orderly life becomes a waiting game as she silently stands by while her employers determine what to do with a child they assume was abandoned. If Downton Abbey is your cup of tea, then Christian fiction readers will be delighted by Olivia Newport’s gem of a series. Set in the 1800’s, it tells the stories of the wealthy Banning family who are living on the verge of what Samuel Banning calls an economic trouble. Backdropped by the World Exposition and set in historical Chicago, the story has flair and characters that are easy to adore if not completely explored. Immediately, Charlotte is pitted as a sympathetic but proud heroine and we love her for it. Her struggles are easy to accept and we are as upset about the life she once was forced to lead as she is, which we learn when she regretfully recounts it. Though it may be uncommon to enjoy such a proper, rule-follower, I couldn’t help how endearing she becomes each passing page. Lesser than in its debut novel (or that is my guess), the relationship between Lucy and Charlotte is genuine, leading the reader to believe not only in the characters but also their actions. Archie is a decent leading man who refuses to let Charlotte give up, he isn’t all that “deep” of a character meaning that unfortunately, sometimes he felt like an unneeded character – it read more like he was the “token” romantic interest yet I wanted him to be so much more. The setting in which all of this takes place was elegant and refined making it any costume lover’s dream. Everything from the fair-minded employers to the stickler of a butler bespeaks of the ITV drama in ‘Downton’ and yet it has some spark of its own. A few things stuck out as being a bit of an irritant (like the too frequent use of character’s names) but nothing that dissuaded the enjoyment. There is drama, sorrow and happiness which cumulate into a sweet ending that seemed to be upon us in all too abrupt a manner. If it’s as good as Olivia Newport set it up to be, the third novel should be a joy. © Copyright 2011-2013 Dreaming Under the Same Moon / Scribbles, Scripts and Such

  3. 5 out of 5

    Dawn

    Charlotte Farrow has been serving as a maid in the wealthy Banning household for over a year now. During that time, she's managed to keep her infant son a secret from all but Lucy Banning who helped her find a place to board the baby. When the woman who has been caring for the baby is called away on an emergency and brings the baby back to Charlotte, she's at a loss as to what to do. The household assumes that the child has been left for Lucy, who is currently away on her honeymoon. As plans to Charlotte Farrow has been serving as a maid in the wealthy Banning household for over a year now. During that time, she's managed to keep her infant son a secret from all but Lucy Banning who helped her find a place to board the baby. When the woman who has been caring for the baby is called away on an emergency and brings the baby back to Charlotte, she's at a loss as to what to do. The household assumes that the child has been left for Lucy, who is currently away on her honeymoon. As plans to find the child a home build among Charlotte's employers, she must either admit that she's his mother or watch him be placed away from her. Will she claim her child at the risk of her position or will she see her son go to another? And what about the coachman who has been showering his attentions on her? I am awfully glad that I read the first book, The Pursuit of Lucy Banning, before I started this one. Because if I hadn't, I'd have been a bit lost. I must say that the author did an excellent job of capturing Charlotte's emotions when she faced the decision she had to make regarding her son. I found myself hoping that she would make the right choice. I also thought it fascinating that the domestic staff had very little rights and that they were reprimanded for daring to dream of a better life. I am looking forward to more books in this series. I received this book for free from the publisher, Revell Books, for the purpose of reviewing. My thoughts and opinions are my own. Recommended to fans of Amanda Cabot, Julie Klassen Tracie Peterson, Elizabeth Camden, Siri Mitchell Available January 2013 at your favorite bookseller from Revell Books, a division of Baker Publishing Group. Rating - 4 stars

  4. 5 out of 5

    Melanie

    Review on Amazon: http://www.amazon.com/review/R20FEFIC... Review on my blog (to be posted 1/22): http://christianbookshelfreviews.blog... Having read (and loved!) The Pursuit of Lucy Banning last year, I was really looking forward to The Dilemma of Charlotte Farrow and it did not disappoint! I loved learning more about Charlotte Farrow (who was introduced in book one) and was surprised by quite a few things in her story. The characters were great and even though I found one person very frustrating Review on Amazon: http://www.amazon.com/review/R20FEFIC... Review on my blog (to be posted 1/22): http://christianbookshelfreviews.blog... Having read (and loved!) The Pursuit of Lucy Banning last year, I was really looking forward to The Dilemma of Charlotte Farrow and it did not disappoint! I loved learning more about Charlotte Farrow (who was introduced in book one) and was surprised by quite a few things in her story. The characters were great and even though I found one person very frustrating, it was in a good way. ;) I particularly liked Archie, which surprised me because at first I wasn't sure I'd like him, but as the story continued I realized what a wonderful guy he was. I also found it interesting and unique that both of the main characters in The Dilemma of Charlotte Farrow were servants. Overall, I loved The Dilemma of Charlotte Farrow and recommend it if you like historical romances. I don't think it's necessary to read The Pursuit of Lucy Banning first in order to enjoy this one, but doing so will ensure you'll know more fully what had happened earlier in the Bannings' lives. Great read! *I received a complimentary copy of this book for my review. I was not required to give a positive review, only my honest opinion - which I've done. All thoughts and opinions expressed are my own.* “Available January 2013 at your favorite bookseller from Revell, a division of Baker Publishing Group.”

  5. 5 out of 5

    Margaret Chind

    The Dilemma of Charlotte Farrow is the second novel in the Avenue of Dreams series from new Christian Historical Fiction author Olivia Newport and while it is a pick up a year later, you could get by reading it alone. However I think you'd understand a lot more and enjoy watching the characters grow from reading both novels. Now to express my thoughts I have to go back to what I said for The Pursuit of Lucy Banning to really get an idea of how to express myself because my thoughts remain in the The Dilemma of Charlotte Farrow is the second novel in the Avenue of Dreams series from new Christian Historical Fiction author Olivia Newport and while it is a pick up a year later, you could get by reading it alone. However I think you'd understand a lot more and enjoy watching the characters grow from reading both novels. Now to express my thoughts I have to go back to what I said for The Pursuit of Lucy Banning to really get an idea of how to express myself because my thoughts remain in the positive same. Coming across a new author is always a little intimidating because the adventure of a read may really go either way. Reviews out there are almost all favorable and this Christian Historical Fiction reader agrees with all the positive! Olivia Newport transports readers into a fast paced, but enjoyable read in an area and time not often covered. This book will be enjoyed by Downton Abbey fans as well as many others. Step your feet in to enjoy the world of both the Chicago aristocracy as well as the maids and others downstairs. The title for The Pursuit of Lucy Banning, however, Lucy is not the only story you will find. Enter in and follow Lucy and Charlotte. Pick up and go deeper into Charlotte's story in The Dilemma of Charlotte Farrow. Olivia Newport is a new to this reader author and this first novel into the Avenue of Dreams is not the last be added to the shelf for the Creative Madness Mama. Continuing and understanding of the social classes was enjoyable and interesting. The romantic heart wants to scream leave them all and run away for love! Yet the practical is curious how anything could possibly work out in the end. Olivia did an impressive and engaging job keeping all the characters alive and coming off the page again and again. So much to wonder and guess what may be. After Lucy's story with snippets on Charlotte's story, I was eagerly looking forward to what her story would entail. Now let me tell you I had my month planned for which books I was to read when and one night I decided to just preview a bit into Charlotte's story before going to bed. Well... thank you very much Olivia, but I did not get to sleep that night until I think well beyond 3 AM and nearing the early morning as I could not put the book down until I was well and complete. I was tense and nervous and full of anticipation as I just HAD to know what would happen to Henry. I think that I read the beginnings of Charlotte and Henry's story when my OrangeBlossom was just a newborn herself and so now to continue their story where Henry is nearing his first birthday and my own baby just had hers a few months back makes the feelings of connection with Charlotte as a character and person off the page so much stronger. It is much in the way of I cannot imagine being in her situation! In the first book I was not certain I would like her, but oh she definitely won me over and I'm quite glad to say I enjoyed her story. Olivia has definitely won me over as a reader an fan. Bring it on! I want more! :) I think that readers will quite enjoy Olivia's books, especially those with a love of Upstairs/Downstairs type renditions as in Lucy's story we had the upstairs, and now with Charlotte's story it is all about the downstairs. *Thank to Revell Books for providing a copy for review.* scheduled: http://creativemadnessmama.com/blog/2...

  6. 4 out of 5

    Vera Godley

    Olivia Newport writes a very enjoyable book that plunks you right down in the midst of the specific historical period in which the story is set. In this case we go to Chicago in the 1890s during the period when the World's Columbian Exposition (world fair) is being held. In book one, The Pursuit of Lucy Banning, we meet the wealthy folks living in the row of large, beautiful homes where tour groups actually go by to show the common man and woman how the wealthy pursue happiness. In book one, Luc Olivia Newport writes a very enjoyable book that plunks you right down in the midst of the specific historical period in which the story is set. In this case we go to Chicago in the 1890s during the period when the World's Columbian Exposition (world fair) is being held. In book one, The Pursuit of Lucy Banning, we meet the wealthy folks living in the row of large, beautiful homes where tour groups actually go by to show the common man and woman how the wealthy pursue happiness. In book one, Lucy Banning enables her maid, Charlotte Farrow, to keep her new born infant a secret. It is important here for the reader to know the social mores of the time. The servants of the upper class were most often required to remain single, have no children, and leave their position of employment should they marry. Compassionate Lucy helped Charlotte. Now in book two, we find Lucy married and leaving for her honeymoon. Charlotte's child is entrusted (secretly) to a nursemaid who cares for the child full time at the behest of Lucy. Suddenly the scene changes and Charlotte is now in possession of her child, on employee (the Banning residence) property, and found out. The dilemma is to convince the others that this "foundling" has been thrust upon them all because of Lucy's caring for orphans and that they should all care for the child until Lucy returns and settles the issue. The story rambles on with the daily life of the Banning resident, the servants ins and outs with one another, the secrets they share and those that they withhold, and the care of the new foundling. It is interesting to see how the struggles and interactions of Charlotte with the other servants are so very much directed by the social issues of the times. We get a glimpse into how servants felt about their plight and how there was a movement to provide better working conditions for all afoot on the fringes It is interesting to see, too, how emotions and love can cause one to do that which does not seem normal but that which is perhaps best for the one we love. It is interesting to see how Charlotte's dilemma is resolved. You'll just have to grab a copy and see for yourself. (Tip: Though not absolutely necessary, it is beneficial to read book 1 in the series, The Pursuit of Lucy Banning, prior to reading The Dilemma of Charlotte Farrow. My review of The Pursuit of Lucy Banning can be read by clicking this link. http://chatwithvera.blogspot.com/2012... About the author: Olivia Newport is the author of The Pursuit of Lucy Banning. Her novels twist through time to discover where faith and passions meet. Her husband and two adult children provide welcome distraction from the people stomping through her head on their way into her books. She chases joy in stunning Colorado at the foot of the Rockies, where daylilies grow as tall as she is. DISCLOSURE: I was provided a complimentary copy of The Dilemma of Charlotte Farrow by Revell, a Baker House Publishing Group on behalf of the author for the purpose of rendering my honest opinion and review. Opinions expressed are entirely mine.

  7. 4 out of 5

    TAMMY CUEVAS

    After Charlotte escaped a bad marriage and an even worse husband, she found employment with the Banning family in Chicago. Her employer and confidante, Lucy, helped her find a place to keep her infant son and kept her secret from the rest of the household. But while Lucy is in Paris on her honeymoon, her son is abruptly returned to her. Charlotte knows that if she can wait until Lucy returns, the problem will be solved. She struggles to keep the infant near her while trying to keep his identity After Charlotte escaped a bad marriage and an even worse husband, she found employment with the Banning family in Chicago. Her employer and confidante, Lucy, helped her find a place to keep her infant son and kept her secret from the rest of the household. But while Lucy is in Paris on her honeymoon, her son is abruptly returned to her. Charlotte knows that if she can wait until Lucy returns, the problem will be solved. She struggles to keep the infant near her while trying to keep his identity secret. But just when she thinks she may have everything under near-control, a man returns from her past. He has the power to ruin Charlotte's young life. On rare occasions, the sequel is better. This is one of those rare occasions. I read and reviewed The Pursuit of Lucy Banning last year, and liked it (4 stars). Somehow, this novel surpasses the first one. Ms. Newport continues to paint a vivid picture of 1893 Chicago and the 1893 World's Columbian Exposition; she knows her subject well. But her understanding and depiction of servants of that time sets this work apart. Women of Charlotte's social class did not have many rights or prospects at that time, and the discovery of an infant would have diminished even those. The author has created such a realistic portrayal of the household that the reader will feel as if they know the characters. Of course, being a fan of the BBC's Downton Abbey, I could not help but project their faces and voices onto some of Ms. Newport's characters. In my head, Mr. Penard sounded like Carson, Sarah looked and sounded like Daisy, and Archie bears a striking resemblance to Tom Branson, Lord Grantham's chauffeur and son-in-law. I share this not to change the subject, but to support my recommendation of this novel for Downton Abbey fans. Recommended for mature adolescents and up, along with the aforementioned Downton Abbey fans. 5 stars “Available January 2013 at your favorite bookseller from Revell, a division of Baker Publishing Group.” Disclosure of Material Connection: I received this book free from the publisher through the Baker Publishing Group book review bloggers program. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255 : “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”

  8. 4 out of 5

    QNPoohBear

    Set against the backdrop of the 1893 World's Colombian Exposition, this book is full of details about life in Gilded Age Chicago. The story takes place mostly "downstairs" from the perspective of the servants. It's very Downton Abbey with the starchy butler taking pride in serving a great family and the young maid who dreams of a better life. I liked seeing the Banning family from the servants' perspective.There's also descriptions of the World's Fair and the Ferris Wheel and what was happening Set against the backdrop of the 1893 World's Colombian Exposition, this book is full of details about life in Gilded Age Chicago. The story takes place mostly "downstairs" from the perspective of the servants. It's very Downton Abbey with the starchy butler taking pride in serving a great family and the young maid who dreams of a better life. I liked seeing the Banning family from the servants' perspective.There's also descriptions of the World's Fair and the Ferris Wheel and what was happening with the labor movement at the time. However, the historical detail leaves little room for plot. This book is really slow moving and nothing happens. When the would-be climax of the story comes it's let down with a whimper. I was left wondering if that was all or if something else was going to happen. I was really surprised by the twist in the story and wish the author had developed the story more. Everything that happens after that is rushed. I really felt for Charlotte in this novel. To Sarah she comes across as subservient and a dutiful maid but the reader watches her struggle to do the right thing for her child and feels her love for him. It's difficult to know what Charlotte should do and I felt her original solution was the right one. Downton Abbey handled this topic much more realistically and interestingly. Charlotte reveals her own story at the end which is far too late. We have an idea who she is running from but never really learn why. I wish that had been revealed in the beginning and developed over the course of the story. There's a quiet, slow burn romance developing in the story but it can't develop because of the circumstances. When it does happen, it happens too quickly. I didn't like Archie pushing Charlotte. He cared about her but didn't really understand what she was going through and wasn't very sympathetic. He kept pushing her to do what HE wanted without considering her needs. I thought Archie and Sarah would have made a better couple. I hated Sarah for most of the novel. She grows at the end but it's too sudden. I have her novel on hold at the library but find it difficult to believe I will like her as a protagonist. The maid who wants more out of life was again done much better in Downton Abbey (Gwen not Ethel) where the character was likeable and sympathetic. This novel could be much better with some reworking. I recommend it to Downton Abbey fans for the period details but don't recommend the plot for people who like well written novels.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Renee

    In her sophomore release in the Avenue of Dreams series Olivia Newport once again takes us to Chicago, on the cusp of the 20th century. This time instead of a tale set "upstairs" in the world of a wealthy socialite we meet Charlotte Farrow, "downstairs" maid whose life has more scandal than anyone upstairs could imagine. The only one who knows part of Charlotte's secret yet still supports her is halfway across the world on a honeymoon trip so Charlotte is left to fend for herself. If her secret In her sophomore release in the Avenue of Dreams series Olivia Newport once again takes us to Chicago, on the cusp of the 20th century. This time instead of a tale set "upstairs" in the world of a wealthy socialite we meet Charlotte Farrow, "downstairs" maid whose life has more scandal than anyone upstairs could imagine. The only one who knows part of Charlotte's secret yet still supports her is halfway across the world on a honeymoon trip so Charlotte is left to fend for herself. If her secret gets out she's afraid of what will happen to her and the one she loves most. As before in The Pursuit of Lucy Banning, I fell in love with Chicago. The World's Columbian Exposition is certainly an interesting setting for a story and in that respect The Dilemma of Charlotte Farrow doesn't disappoint, I even got a lurch in my chest when Charlotte finally rode the Ferris wheel! The imagery is definitely vivid but when it came to the romance it was a bit lacking. Don't get me wrong, the hero was such a sweetheart, but Charlotte and said hero didn't get a lot of page time together. I don't think every book has to end in a proposal or wedding especially if in the rest of the story there wasn't a big emphasis on the romance because then everything seems forced. Ms. Newport is supremely talented and I enjoyed reading about Chicago, the life of a servant, and orphans. Next time I'll keep my fingers crossed for more romantic interaction between characters because then the book will be perfect. Bring on book three! “Available January 2013 at your favorite bookseller from Revell, a division of Baker Publishing Group.” ~ My Rating: 3 out of 5 stars ~ *I received a complimentary copy of this book for review from the publisher. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission's 16 CFR, Part 255.*

  10. 5 out of 5

    Trinity Rose

    The Dilemma of Charlotte Farrow is the first book I’ve read written by Olivia Newport. It is a really sweet story. I love the characters the description of the city and mostly of the house where she is a maid. Charlotte had a baby before she came to work for the Bannings, but she has kept it a secret from everyone. Now her baby is brought to her, because the caregiver can’t take care of him anymore. How does Charlotte keep him safe without telling the Bannings this is her child? What will she d The Dilemma of Charlotte Farrow is the first book I’ve read written by Olivia Newport. It is a really sweet story. I love the characters the description of the city and mostly of the house where she is a maid. Charlotte had a baby before she came to work for the Bannings, but she has kept it a secret from everyone. Now her baby is brought to her, because the caregiver can’t take care of him anymore. How does Charlotte keep him safe without telling the Bannings this is her child? What will she do to provide for her child, but not to destroy his life? The plots, twist and turns of this book are fantastic. It is suspenseful, but also full of love for her child. The Dilemma of Charlotte Farrow is also an Historical Romance. You have to read this book to find out if Charlotte keeps her child, if she tells anyone who he is or if she meets someone and falls in love? What would you do to save your child from starvation, from being found by someone who only intends him harm? This story shows how all things can work out if you are patient and willing to wait for the right outcome, but when we think we know everything and hurry up and get it done, we often make mistakes. Very good book that I will recommend. I received my free copy from Donna Hausler from Revell, a division of Baker Publishing Group for my review. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission's 16 CFR, Part 255

  11. 4 out of 5

    Michelle

    I read the first book in the series, but in my opinion it wasn't needed to understand this one. The author outlined the maid's background just enough in this book to give you a feel for what happened in the past. The author did a great job with the location and the surrounding details to make the setting feel like that era in Chicago's history. The situation Charlotte found herself in truly did give her a dilemma that was complicated, to say the least. It's hard to show a parent trying to do the I read the first book in the series, but in my opinion it wasn't needed to understand this one. The author outlined the maid's background just enough in this book to give you a feel for what happened in the past. The author did a great job with the location and the surrounding details to make the setting feel like that era in Chicago's history. The situation Charlotte found herself in truly did give her a dilemma that was complicated, to say the least. It's hard to show a parent trying to do the right thing for their child, especially when it's the mother making that decision. Many women are quite passionate about the subject of placing a child for adoption or allowing someone else to raise their child, so I can see this being hard for some women to swallow. Having done adoptions and varying foster placements with many clients over the years, I can tell you it's no small thing to set aside your own needs to do what is best for your child. I think the author depicted that well. I also liked the ending and how Charlotte realized she felt truly loved for the first time in her life. I was wondering how in the world the author would sort that mess out, but in the end, she did a great job working out the details so the reader would feel satisfied with the outcome. This is not an easy subject to address, but considering the many emotional challenges that go with this issue, I think the author did well. It wouldn't be an easy task to make the situation work for this story, but the author pulled it off.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Rosie

    This is a book you won't want to put down! I blew through this in a day. It was so easy to read and slip back into the setting from The Pursuit of Lucy Banning. I have been waiting for The Dilemma of Charlotte Farrow for a long time and I am pleased to report my expectations were reached! A very good friend of mine compared it to Downton Abbey, and I have to agree. It really held that separation of social classes that we're so familiar with in Downton. I think my favorite character was Charlotte. This is a book you won't want to put down! I blew through this in a day. It was so easy to read and slip back into the setting from The Pursuit of Lucy Banning. I have been waiting for The Dilemma of Charlotte Farrow for a long time and I am pleased to report my expectations were reached! A very good friend of mine compared it to Downton Abbey, and I have to agree. It really held that separation of social classes that we're so familiar with in Downton. I think my favorite character was Charlotte. (No surprise there!) I really liked Charlotte in the first book and was simply ecstatic to find out the next book in the series would be about her. Charlotte is such a sweet person, and she's a great mother to her son Henry, who stays with a woman while Charlotte works for the Bannings. Another thing I liked is that we really get to know Archie, my second favorite character, in this novel. He is head over heels in love with Charlotte though she puts him off at every turn. I loved his persistence. There were quite a few times I thought, "Okay, this is it. He'll be done with her now." But I was wrong. There were one or two things I didn't like, very minor things. For one, it felt like a character had a too sudden change of heart. But aside from that, I thoroughly enjoyed reading this. Available January 2013 at your favorite bookseller from Revell, a division of Baker Publishing Group I received this book from Revell in return for an honest review of my opinions, thanks!

  13. 5 out of 5

    Catherine

    Full disclosure, I am a huge Downton Abbey fan. Therefore, when I first heard about Olivia Newport's books, I was immediately drawn in. I loved The Pursuit of Lucy Banning, and I couldn't wait to see how Ms. Newport's next book, The Dilemma of Charlotte Farrow, would follow along with the story line created in Book 1 of her series. And it is a dilemma indeed. Enter Charlotte, the mild-mannered servant with a secret so life-changing you simply have no idea how things could ever possibly work in he Full disclosure, I am a huge Downton Abbey fan. Therefore, when I first heard about Olivia Newport's books, I was immediately drawn in. I loved The Pursuit of Lucy Banning, and I couldn't wait to see how Ms. Newport's next book, The Dilemma of Charlotte Farrow, would follow along with the story line created in Book 1 of her series. And it is a dilemma indeed. Enter Charlotte, the mild-mannered servant with a secret so life-changing you simply have no idea how things could ever possibly work in her favor. With her only adversary out of the picture, one must wonder how on earth this poor girl will survive the next chapter, let alone the whole book. I must admit, the whole time I was reading, I pictured Mr. Penard, the Banning family butler, as very Carson-like (from Downton), but I'd guess that's exactly how he should have been. Every bit of this book pulls you into the time period of The World's Fair. The characters are so well drawn, the setting so real and vibrant, that you're easily able to picture the scenes set out before you. Emotion carries you along while each page is thick with rich dialogue and questions that simply must be answered. By the end of the story you have made friends, rejoiced when enemies are thwarted and reveled in some jolly good story-telling. The kind of literary talent possessed by Ms. Newport is a rarity these days, and I hope she will share it with us through many more books in the near future.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Maureen Timerman

    This book started with The Pursuit of Lucy Banning, when Charlotte Farrow arrived in Chicago with her infant son. With the help of Lucy, who found a woman to care for "Henry", she was able to go into Service at the Mansion. This book opens with the woman who was caring for Henry, literally dropping him off, as she had to leave home. Now Charlotte has a big dilemma, she is not allowed to be married or have a child and keep her job. Lucy would have helped her, but she is in Paris on her honeymoon. T This book started with The Pursuit of Lucy Banning, when Charlotte Farrow arrived in Chicago with her infant son. With the help of Lucy, who found a woman to care for "Henry", she was able to go into Service at the Mansion. This book opens with the woman who was caring for Henry, literally dropping him off, as she had to leave home. Now Charlotte has a big dilemma, she is not allowed to be married or have a child and keep her job. Lucy would have helped her, but she is in Paris on her honeymoon. To top all things the evil man who is her husband has discovered her, and she is worried about the safety of her baby. Staying with the family at the mansion is a relative of the family, there for a visit to find a husband, who takes a real shine to the baby. Will Charlotte tell who the baby is or do as Moses mother did years ago to save him? There is also a sweet love story here, but will Charlotte be able to open her heart, or will her husband find her? Travel along with Charlotte as we visit 1890's Chicago, and the closing days of World's Columbia Exposition. Delightful, and a real page turning fast read. I received this book through the Publisher Revell and their Blogger Program, and was not required to give a positive review.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Holly (2 Kids and Tired)

    I really liked Charlotte when I met her in The Pursuit of Lucy Banning and I was excited to see that she had her own story. Charlotte wants nothing more than to be a good mother to her son, but life in service doesn't lend itself to motherhood. When the woman who has been caring for Henry leaves him at the Banning home, Charlotte can't admit that he's hers and must let the household believe he's an abandoned baby. A woman staying with the Banning family wants Henry for her own and when Charlotte I really liked Charlotte when I met her in The Pursuit of Lucy Banning and I was excited to see that she had her own story. Charlotte wants nothing more than to be a good mother to her son, but life in service doesn't lend itself to motherhood. When the woman who has been caring for Henry leaves him at the Banning home, Charlotte can't admit that he's hers and must let the household believe he's an abandoned baby. A woman staying with the Banning family wants Henry for her own and when Charlotte's past interferes with her present, she believes that giving up Henry is the best thing. Charlotte is strong, brave and spunky. Her story isn't quite plausible, but I enjoyed it nonetheless. I like Charlotte and I loved Archie. I hated Sarah and I really hope that hers isn't the next story in the series because she has no redeeming qualities and I can't imagine ever liking her. The historical setting is again terrific: the 1893 Chicago World's Fair, Chicago's affluent Prairie Avenue and the disparity between the privileged and the working class. Second in the Avenue of Dreams series, the book stands alone well but, as always, is richer if you've read the first one, The Pursuit of Lucy Banning.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Melissa

    This book was just not for me. I continued reading it simply to get it off my TBR pile and to have something to read on today's bus trip. Charlotte was the most cowardly heroine I have come across in a while and boring to read about to boot. Archie was too pushy and pretty stalkerish. Sarah was obnoxious and her quick 180 degree flip in personality at the end of the book to set up her as the heroine in the next book was not executed well. The Bannings were your typical rich white family. The writ This book was just not for me. I continued reading it simply to get it off my TBR pile and to have something to read on today's bus trip. Charlotte was the most cowardly heroine I have come across in a while and boring to read about to boot. Archie was too pushy and pretty stalkerish. Sarah was obnoxious and her quick 180 degree flip in personality at the end of the book to set up her as the heroine in the next book was not executed well. The Bannings were your typical rich white family. The writing is competent and I really liked how Chicago in 1893 really came through via placement of historically accurate details and events (such as the World's Fair and the beginnings of a the 20th century labor movement). The religious tone is pretty light and done with a deft touch to make you feel like the characters' faiths are really authentic. If you like Christian fiction (women's and/or historical) and Downton Abbey, this is your book.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Aerykah

    Buddy Read with Caitlyn Santi -- April/May 2013

  18. 5 out of 5

    Kathleen E.

    Tuesday, January 22, 2013 The Dilemma of Charlotte Farrow, Book 2 of the Avenue of Dreams series, by Olivia Newport, ©2013 Excerpt ~*~ The Dilemma of Charlotte Farrow, 15-17 Sheets flapped in the wind above an empty basket, and Sarah was nowhere in sight. With a sigh, Charlotte reached for the first clothespin and began to pull the sheets off the line. “Charlotte!” Charlotte stilled her hands. Had she actually heard the hoarse whisper? That voice should not be on Banning property. Gasping in recog Tuesday, January 22, 2013 The Dilemma of Charlotte Farrow, Book 2 of the Avenue of Dreams series, by Olivia Newport, ©2013 Excerpt ~*~ The Dilemma of Charlotte Farrow, 15-17 Sheets flapped in the wind above an empty basket, and Sarah was nowhere in sight. With a sigh, Charlotte reached for the first clothespin and began to pull the sheets off the line. “Charlotte!” Charlotte stilled her hands. Had she actually heard the hoarse whisper? That voice should not be on Banning property. Gasping in recognition, she spun around, a sheet draped over her shoulder. Out of the shadows against the courtyard wall stepped a middle-age woman holding a baby. “Mrs. Given! What are you doing here?” “I’ve been waiting for almost thirty minutes, hoping you would come out. He was sleeping, but now he’s awake and I don’t think I can keep him quiet. I was about to give up and knock at the back door.” Shock swelled through Charlotte as the little boy’s hands reached for her eagerly. Swiftly she wrestled out of the sheet across her shoulders, dumping it in the basket, and took the baby in her own arms. She cooed in a low voice to keep him quiet. Looking up again, she whispered, “Mrs. Given, what’s going on?” “I have to leave town.” The older woman stuffed the baby’s quilt and a small bundle in Charlotte’s arms. “I have to go right now.” “But what about Henry? I can’t keep him here. You know that.” Mrs. Given covered her eyes with one hand as her shoulders heaved once. “I have a family emergency. I truly have no choice. I can’t take him, and I have to go. You’ll have to work something out. I’m sorry I couldn’t bring more of his things, but it was too much to manage on the streetcar.” Charlotte held the child tightly, wrapping him in the quilt he loved—her grandmother’s quilt. He snuggled happily against her chest, tucking his head under her chin in his favorite way. “You know I cannot have him here!” Charlotte’s eyes moved from left to right, scanning the courtyard. “Mr. Penard will dismiss me if he discovers I have a child.” Without Lucy, Charlotte had no advocate. “What about your neighbor? Doesn’t she sometimes help you watch him?” “For an hour or two,” Mrs. Given answered, “but I can’t ask her to take on the care of a child when I don’t know when I’ll be back—or even if I’ll be able to return.” “Please, Mrs. Given—” The woman was resolute. “I’ve had two telegrams saying that I must come now. My sister wired the fare this morning. I’m sure St. Andrew’s will take the boy, but I don’t have time to see to that for you.” “You know I don’t want him at St. Andrew’s. That’s why he’s with you.” “I’m sorry. I have to be on the next train to Omaha.” Brushing a strand of gray hair out of her face, Mary Given softened. “He’s a lovely child, Charlotte, and you’re a devoted mother. You’ll always do what’s best for him.” Within a few seconds, Charlotte was left standing in the courtyard with a laundry basket at her feet and an eleven-month-old boy squirming in her arms. Suddenly feeling weak, she set her son in the basket and watched absently as he pulled a corner of the sheet over his head and giggled. Her knees trembled. Uncertain they would support her slight weight, Charlotte crouched next to the basket and laid her hand on the child’s feathery brown hair. A shadow crossed her vision. Sarah. “Where did that baby come from?” the girl demanded to know. *** The Dilemma of Charlotte Farrow By Olivia Newport 978-0-8007-2039-1 Paperback 320 pages Pub Date: January 2013 The whole world is coming to Chicago. Charlotte’s whole world is coming down around her. This compelling story of courage, strength, and tender romance captures the tension between the glittering wealthy class and the hardworking servants who made their lives comfortable. Enter the world of Chicago’s wealthy class in 1893, from the vantage point of a servant. Charlotte Farrow is the maid for the prominent Banning family, and must make a difficult decision when a secret comes to light. My Review: And so begins Charlotte's new adventure. For almost a year now, Charlotte saw her son every Thursday and every other Sunday afternoon on her time off. Now what would become of them? Having a known child would put her out of her position with the Bannings. Fortunately, they are not home from their holiday at their lake house. It is August and the Bannings have taken most of their staff with them for their month away from the sweltering heat of the city. What is she going to do? She is to direct Sarah, the new girl, in kitchen duties before Mrs. Fletcher, the Cook, returns. Sarah has been leaving things half done; out of neglect or lack of understanding in the hurried few days she has been here? And Mr. Penard, the household butler, is the overseer of the staff. How will little Henry be explained to him? Sarah runs ahead to tell Penard that they have found a baby outside in the laundry basket. Upon the soon return of the Bannings, what is to become of this child? Will Charlotte confess he is her son, or will the family decide where to place him? The story is set with the background of the Chicago World Fair. Family members come to visit this 1983 spectacular World's Columbian Exposition so the house is bustling from within and without. Everyone on schedule; those serving and those being served. Tourists come to gawk at the opulent Prairie Avenue homes from the public sidewalk. Can you imagine being in your home and having people pointing and staring, hoping to see you exit? Still today, neighborhoods are toured without a thought that there are people inside. The Banning house jutted out at angles that surrounded three sides, and a passage accommodating delivery carts. Clearly the brick used on this view of the house was less expensive than the stone walls facing Prairie Avenue, but Charlotte savored the enclosure. Something about it felt safe. The family spent little time outside. The winters were too cold, and in the summer they escaped to the lake house. Certain the Bannings would not step into the rear courtyard, Penard allowed the staff to set out pots of flowers and enjoy the lush patch of grass. Charlotte often lingered outside in the evening to inhale the night air before retiring to her stifling third-floor room. --The Dilemma of Charlotte Farrow, 14-15 I read the entire book into the early morning, as Charlotte sorts this out. Having to watch her son being jostled from one person to another, as the Banning nursery floor is reopened. Having him called by another name, she dare not whisper his name aloud or give him extended eye contact. The depths love does to keep him safe. Charlotte goes to the fair to confront Henry's father, finding him at the feared Ferris wheel. I am with Charlotte. That makes me queasy too. Especially this original one, so different from the swaying seats of today. Look at the width of this glass-enclosed wheel. the Ferris wheel Charlotte had heard enough accounts in the last few months to know that the view from the top of the wheel was breathtaking. Passengers more courageous than she was enjoyed vistas of Lake Michigan along with surrounding states of Wisconsin, Indiana, and Michigan. Even on a cloudy day, much of the excitement was simply in the ride itself. Yet it terrified her. The thought of stepping into one of the cars, with plate glass windows all around, made Charlotte queasy--even without imagining the sensation of lifting off the ground and swaying in the air. --Ibid, 232 By facing her past, Charlotte is able to be freed in her future. I have not read the first book in the series. I was able to follow this story as a stand-alone. I would like to read the first book. The Pursuit of Lucy Banning by Olivia Newport Book 1 of the Avenue of Dreams series Revell Books, May 2012 Lucy Banning may live on the exclusive Prairie Avenue among Chicago’s rich and famous, but her heart lies elsewhere. Expected to marry an up-and-coming banker, the son of family friends, Lucy fears she will be forced to abandon what matters to her most—her work at the orphanage and the classes she is secretly taking at the newly opened University of Chicago. When she meets Will Edwards, an unconventional young architect working on plans for the 1893 World’s Fair, Lucy imagines a life lived on her own terms. A new young maid brings her own secret to the Banning household, and Lucy must choose between deeply held values. Can Lucy find love and live out of her compassionate heart? "I love writing historical fiction because the stories themselves rise out of well-documented events and personalities. An urban setting like Chicago provides myriad historical trails to explore and opportunities to imagine how events in the newspapers of the time would have impacted the lives of ordinary people. I never get tired of it." --author Olivia Newport Before reading The Dilemma of Charlotte Farrow, I read information about this time period in Chicago and discovered I have been inside one of these buildings, several times. Chicago's World's Fair: The Remains of the Day "Although the Palace of Fine Arts had a plaster facade like the other buildings in the White City, it was the lone building with a brick underbelly. Consequently, it is the only White City building standing today. Housing first the Columbian Museum and then Chicago’s Field Museum, the Palace eventually became the home of Chicago’s Museum of Science and Industry. Recast in limestone during the 1930′s, the museum continues to be one of Chicago’s premier attractions." --http://newsburglar.com/2008/10/09/chi... ~*~ ~*~ ~*~ Revell, a division of Baker Publishing Group, offers practical books that bring the Christian faith to everyday life. They publish resources from a variety of well-known brands and authors, including their partnership with MOPS (Mothers of Preschoolers) and Hungry Planet. Thank you to Revell Blog Tour Network Historical Fiction for inviting me to be part of this tour in exchange for a review in my own words. No other compensation was received. The Dilemma of Charlotte Farrow by author Olivia Newport is now available (January 2013) at your favorite bookseller from Revell, a division of Baker Publishing Group. Avenue of Dreams series, Book 3, The Invention of Sarah Cummings, releases in September, 2013!

  19. 5 out of 5

    Erin

    A sweet, clean story! I was glad Charlotte got a happy ending. I really liked her in the previous book. It was nice to read a little more into her background and see her grow as a person. Her and Archie were so cute! She needed a guy like him. Such a sweet romance, though it wasn't the main storyline. There was a lot more going on with her and Henry (her son). The romance was more of a supporting story. As much as I liked Charlotte and this story, it fell a little flat. There always seemed to be a A sweet, clean story! I was glad Charlotte got a happy ending. I really liked her in the previous book. It was nice to read a little more into her background and see her grow as a person. Her and Archie were so cute! She needed a guy like him. Such a sweet romance, though it wasn't the main storyline. There was a lot more going on with her and Henry (her son). The romance was more of a supporting story. As much as I liked Charlotte and this story, it fell a little flat. There always seemed to be a big lead up and suspense to the "drama"/climax and then it's over and very anticlimactic. Nothing really happens. It solves itself way too easily. It was disappointing. There was hardly a lead up to the ending though. It just happened. All of the sudden I'm in the last chapter and everything is finishing up too nicely and quickly. It's all happy and how it should be, but it needed way more storyline. It skips a lot to get to the end. It needed a little more drama or...I don't know. More. Too fast and clean at the end. Then there was Sarah. Ugh, I hated Sarah! So unfortunately I'm not going to finish out this series. I can't handle a whole book of Sarah. She never redeemed herself for me.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Michele

    I did enjoy this Christian novel and second in a series that takes place in Chicago during the 1893 Worlds Fair. This one follows Charlotte, a young maid in a wealthy house who has a secret and that is that she has a son. Up to now, he has been out of sight as he is being taken care of by another woman. When that person can no longer keep him, Charlotte does not know what to do. If it is found out that she has a child, she will be fired and she will not be able to take care of him. The book also I did enjoy this Christian novel and second in a series that takes place in Chicago during the 1893 Worlds Fair. This one follows Charlotte, a young maid in a wealthy house who has a secret and that is that she has a son. Up to now, he has been out of sight as he is being taken care of by another woman. When that person can no longer keep him, Charlotte does not know what to do. If it is found out that she has a child, she will be fired and she will not be able to take care of him. The book also highlights the lives of servants during this time and the fight for better job conditions. It was enjoyable but not my favorite as I never really got to like Charlotte or many of the characters. No sex or profanity.

  21. 4 out of 5

    K

    When I realized that Lucy Banning was part of a series, I thought this book would offer redemption for the lack felt in the first. Sadly, the same problems reappeared, and some got worse. Sarah was a flat out brat and her spot towards the end where she orders Charlotte to tell the Bannings was ridiculous. Archie across the street from the mayor was also totally contrived and absolutely pointless. When I saw that the third book stars the brat and not Emmaline (which would have made more sense to When I realized that Lucy Banning was part of a series, I thought this book would offer redemption for the lack felt in the first. Sadly, the same problems reappeared, and some got worse. Sarah was a flat out brat and her spot towards the end where she orders Charlotte to tell the Bannings was ridiculous. Archie across the street from the mayor was also totally contrived and absolutely pointless. When I saw that the third book stars the brat and not Emmaline (which would have made more sense to me), I cheerfully kicked it to the curb.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Cheryl

    This was a quick and easy read. Newport does a good job at creating the sights and sounds of Chicago during the World's Fair. Charlotte is still a likable character but I missed Lucy in this book. Sarah is a spoiled brat and I didn't find Archie all that likable. I kept hoping that Sarah would turn around because the next book in the series is about her, but there were only glimpses of her true character. Maybe she just needs to be loved, guess I'll find out in the next book of the series. This was a quick and easy read. Newport does a good job at creating the sights and sounds of Chicago during the World's Fair. Charlotte is still a likable character but I missed Lucy in this book. Sarah is a spoiled brat and I didn't find Archie all that likable. I kept hoping that Sarah would turn around because the next book in the series is about her, but there were only glimpses of her true character. Maybe she just needs to be loved, guess I'll find out in the next book of the series.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Pianosue

    Charlotte is in service to the Bannings working in the kitchen. Then Mrs. Givens shows up with an emergency and must leave Charlotte's infant son with Charlotte. The Bannings do not know she has a son. What is she going to do? If they find out they may fire her. Another maid assumes someone has abandoned the child at the home. What will Charlotte do? Will she finally tell them the truth? or will she let someone else take her son? Charlotte is in service to the Bannings working in the kitchen. Then Mrs. Givens shows up with an emergency and must leave Charlotte's infant son with Charlotte. The Bannings do not know she has a son. What is she going to do? If they find out they may fire her. Another maid assumes someone has abandoned the child at the home. What will Charlotte do? Will she finally tell them the truth? or will she let someone else take her son?

  24. 5 out of 5

    Shanon

    I was really surprised by this book. At first I wasn't a fan of it compared to its prequel but the more I read the more into it I got and by the end I was truly invested in the characters and the outcome. To be honest the ending was exactly what I wanted to happen but it didn't happen in the way I expected it to. I was really surprised by this book. At first I wasn't a fan of it compared to its prequel but the more I read the more into it I got and by the end I was truly invested in the characters and the outcome. To be honest the ending was exactly what I wanted to happen but it didn't happen in the way I expected it to.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Tammy

    Charlotte, Archie Chicago I enjoyed the story and wondered how Charlotte was going to solve her dilemma. I didn’t like Sarah, but I do want to read the next book even though she will be the main character.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Massanutten Regional Library

    Grace, Central patron, July 2019, 4 stars: Doing what she thinks is best for her son will destroy her heart. Can she go through with her plan? A must read to see where courage takes one young mother.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Deborah

    Dilemma I enjoyed the book, Charlotte was frightened of telling her secret, but with the help of others she finally got her happy ending.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Carolyn Tye

    Historically accurate. Identifiable characters. Hard to believe what women used to have to endure

  29. 5 out of 5

    Ashley

    Another 5 stars for Olivia Newport! I loved it!

  30. 5 out of 5

    Krissy

    Okay - I might read again

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