web site hit counter The Encyclopedia of Fantasy and Science Fiction Art Techniques - Ebooks PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

The Encyclopedia of Fantasy and Science Fiction Art Techniques

Availability: Ready to download

Most artists gravitate toward a comparatively small selection of tools and materials: some will be happiest using gouache on canvas, with perhaps a touch of airbrush; others will prefer line and wash on cartridge paper, or oils on textured board, or . . . It is through such specializations, either deliberate or intuitive, that artists develop their own particular styles.


Compare

Most artists gravitate toward a comparatively small selection of tools and materials: some will be happiest using gouache on canvas, with perhaps a touch of airbrush; others will prefer line and wash on cartridge paper, or oils on textured board, or . . . It is through such specializations, either deliberate or intuitive, that artists develop their own particular styles.

30 review for The Encyclopedia of Fantasy and Science Fiction Art Techniques

  1. 4 out of 5

    Zephyr

    Very helpful for aspiring fantasy illustrators as well as all aspiring illustrators and artists. I feel like I could’ve learned more from this only because the copy I got from the library had pages missing and sections cut out (I was horrified as expected, but I still read what I could). Had I read the whole book in its entirety, I most likely would have rated it higher- no fault of the author’s, only the monster who decided to kill the book. 4.0 Stars

  2. 5 out of 5

    James

    Cool and useful. This takes in a range from comic-book style art to techniques and styles suited to fine art. This not only shows how to achieve a given overall look and compose a scene by integrating the elements, it goes into the psychology of various stylistic touches and how they shift the perception of a character or creature.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Molly

    This is definitely an "okay" book. There's quite a few reasons for that. 1. Written in 1996, the idea of "modern comic books" is woefully out of touch. Enjoy the copious throwback shoulder pads and Liefield-style character design. 2. The opening fluff is written as though the reader doesn't even know what art is or what a paintbrush is for. Blocks of scribbles with felt-tip pens and layered gouache in hideously clashing colors will have to clue you in. 3. The section on "computer enhancement" is a This is definitely an "okay" book. There's quite a few reasons for that. 1. Written in 1996, the idea of "modern comic books" is woefully out of touch. Enjoy the copious throwback shoulder pads and Liefield-style character design. 2. The opening fluff is written as though the reader doesn't even know what art is or what a paintbrush is for. Blocks of scribbles with felt-tip pens and layered gouache in hideously clashing colors will have to clue you in. 3. The section on "computer enhancement" is an absolute laugh riot. At no point--even mid-90's--did any of these techniques look good. I can't really think of a use for any of them, even in the examples given, which feel rushed and pointless. 4. There's a huge variety of art shown. Some of it just really sucks. Like, so bad. 5. The author is snippy toward esteemed artist Boris Vallejo *every chance he gets.* It's weird and unfunny how he manages to slip in a snide comment every time. All other image descriptions are usually general artist and relevant design info, but not for Vallejo. What's your problem with him, John Grant? You never said a thing about the artist who drew a gun so freakin big you could ride on it or the weird antenna helmet and pointy swimsuit combo of a "young dragon trainer" looking like she could only physically mange her painfully boring pose because that outfit is not conducive to moving or sitting. Gah! Okay, so, that said, there are good things here. The whole book is arranged alphabetically by topic, so finding what you need is fairly easy. The sections on body language, characterization, and false perspective are *fantastic.* Most of the art is by lesser known artists, so it's a good way to discover styles and creators to learn more about. Even the more famous artists featured show their less-than-famous pieces. A refreshing change from the "just the hits" type of stuff you normally see. Sadly, the bad heavily outweighs the good. But the good is worth it to me, so this books sticks around. I recommend this one if you can get it on the cheap (as I did).

  4. 5 out of 5

    John

  5. 5 out of 5

    Joane Wisenhunt

  6. 4 out of 5

    Travis Gotschy

  7. 4 out of 5

    Matthew H Humphries

  8. 5 out of 5

    Leslie

  9. 4 out of 5

    David

  10. 5 out of 5

    Vicky

  11. 5 out of 5

    Brian O'daniel

  12. 4 out of 5

    Bill Morse

  13. 4 out of 5

    Paul

  14. 4 out of 5

    Cher

  15. 4 out of 5

    Jessica Fure

  16. 5 out of 5

    Rufus

  17. 5 out of 5

    C.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Jae

  19. 4 out of 5

    Shaun

  20. 5 out of 5

    Neil Smith

  21. 5 out of 5

    Jan Pospíšil

  22. 4 out of 5

    MAD

  23. 5 out of 5

    Mike Culver

  24. 4 out of 5

    Sharon George

  25. 4 out of 5

    Russell

  26. 5 out of 5

    Simon

  27. 5 out of 5

    Michelle Hilario

  28. 5 out of 5

    Amanda

  29. 4 out of 5

    Franci

  30. 4 out of 5

    Julie

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.