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Truth Tales: Contemporary Stories by Women Writers of India

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Here we meet Muniyakka, called “walkie-talkie” because she mutters to herself; Shakun, the dollmaker, an exploited artist who needs to feel that others depend on her; and Jashoda, professional mother to children of the rich, from Mahasveta Devi’s acknowledged masterpiece “The Wet Nurse.” First published in 1986, this rich collection presents the work of some of India's most Here we meet Muniyakka, called “walkie-talkie” because she mutters to herself; Shakun, the dollmaker, an exploited artist who needs to feel that others depend on her; and Jashoda, professional mother to children of the rich, from Mahasveta Devi’s acknowledged masterpiece “The Wet Nurse.” First published in 1986, this rich collection presents the work of some of India's most skillful contemporary writers, carefully selected from seven of the country's major regional languages. Although each writer is celebrated in her own language, many of the stories are presented here in English for the first time. The authors included are: Mahasveta Devi (Bengali), Ila Mehta (Gujarati), Suniti Aphaie (Marathi), Mrinal Pande (Hindi), Lakshmi Kannan (Tamil), Ismat Chughtai (Urdu), and Vishwapriya Iyengar (English).


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Here we meet Muniyakka, called “walkie-talkie” because she mutters to herself; Shakun, the dollmaker, an exploited artist who needs to feel that others depend on her; and Jashoda, professional mother to children of the rich, from Mahasveta Devi’s acknowledged masterpiece “The Wet Nurse.” First published in 1986, this rich collection presents the work of some of India's most Here we meet Muniyakka, called “walkie-talkie” because she mutters to herself; Shakun, the dollmaker, an exploited artist who needs to feel that others depend on her; and Jashoda, professional mother to children of the rich, from Mahasveta Devi’s acknowledged masterpiece “The Wet Nurse.” First published in 1986, this rich collection presents the work of some of India's most skillful contemporary writers, carefully selected from seven of the country's major regional languages. Although each writer is celebrated in her own language, many of the stories are presented here in English for the first time. The authors included are: Mahasveta Devi (Bengali), Ila Mehta (Gujarati), Suniti Aphaie (Marathi), Mrinal Pande (Hindi), Lakshmi Kannan (Tamil), Ismat Chughtai (Urdu), and Vishwapriya Iyengar (English).

42 review for Truth Tales: Contemporary Stories by Women Writers of India

  1. 4 out of 5

    Kelly Fugate

    Chosen for Women’s History Month. Did not disappoint. Short stories authored 1959-1986 by Indian women, translated into English.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Brimate

    i'm not a huge fan of short stories because they're usually not long enough for me to get into. these stories were a good collection of indian women writers of diverse backgrounds (although i suppose not too diverse since they're literate). but they're from different parts of India, translated from various languages. most stories are sad, as they reflect the conditions in which many indian women live. they're basically all feminist, reflected in different ways. it's a good collection, and i'm loo i'm not a huge fan of short stories because they're usually not long enough for me to get into. these stories were a good collection of indian women writers of diverse backgrounds (although i suppose not too diverse since they're literate). but they're from different parts of India, translated from various languages. most stories are sad, as they reflect the conditions in which many indian women live. they're basically all feminist, reflected in different ways. it's a good collection, and i'm looking forward to reading standard-length stories from the editor and a malayalee feminist writer mentioned in the foreward.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Zinnia Gupte

    Loved the rich and varied voices from women in different parts of India telling their tales that were full of pain, suffering, trials and most of all hope. These are stories that will leave the reader breathless with compassion.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Reed

    Rich stories, "Midnight Soldiers" and "Smoke" were my favorites, cool that there were 7 stories written in 7 different languages, diverse and interesting female perspectives/conditions Rich stories, "Midnight Soldiers" and "Smoke" were my favorites, cool that there were 7 stories written in 7 different languages, diverse and interesting female perspectives/conditions

  5. 5 out of 5

    Taylor

  6. 4 out of 5

    Praveen Sewpaul

  7. 4 out of 5

    Ashlee

  8. 5 out of 5

    S.

  9. 4 out of 5

    L A

  10. 5 out of 5

    Radhika

  11. 4 out of 5

    Feminist Press

  12. 5 out of 5

    Subramaniam Thirumeni

  13. 5 out of 5

    Desdemona Shaw

  14. 4 out of 5

    Shruti Shukla

  15. 4 out of 5

    Akshata

  16. 4 out of 5

    Huma Anwar

  17. 4 out of 5

    Rakesh

  18. 5 out of 5

    Sabine

  19. 5 out of 5

    Maya Gavi

  20. 5 out of 5

    Kayley

  21. 5 out of 5

    Nicholas Beck

  22. 4 out of 5

    Allegra

  23. 5 out of 5

    Shawn

  24. 4 out of 5

    Kookie

  25. 5 out of 5

    Anjali

  26. 4 out of 5

    Claire S

  27. 5 out of 5

    Melon109

  28. 4 out of 5

    Elizabeth

  29. 5 out of 5

    Bangaloregirl

  30. 4 out of 5

    Karoline

  31. 5 out of 5

    SanjeeB

  32. 5 out of 5

    Colleen

  33. 5 out of 5

    Ariel Morrison

  34. 4 out of 5

    Bethanie

  35. 4 out of 5

    Sindhu

  36. 5 out of 5

    Jbondandrews

  37. 4 out of 5

    Yasmin

  38. 4 out of 5

    Noslen

  39. 4 out of 5

    Kash

  40. 5 out of 5

    Asha

  41. 4 out of 5

    Annabel

  42. 5 out of 5

    Kathy Wolf

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