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Teaching with Love and Logic: Taking Control of the Classroom

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"Love and Logic" is a method of working with students which was developed by educational expert Jim Fay, and child psychiatrist Foster W.Cline, M.D. The "Love and Logic" tecniques: Put teachers back in control of the classroomResult in students who are internalized in their discipline rather than dependent upon external controlsRaise the level of student responsibillityTea "Love and Logic" is a method of working with students which was developed by educational expert Jim Fay, and child psychiatrist Foster W.Cline, M.D. The "Love and Logic" tecniques: Put teachers back in control of the classroomResult in students who are internalized in their discipline rather than dependent upon external controlsRaise the level of student responsibillityTeach students to think for themselvesPrepare students to function effectively in a world filled wiht temptations, decisions, and consequencesReturn a teacher's joy of teaching!


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"Love and Logic" is a method of working with students which was developed by educational expert Jim Fay, and child psychiatrist Foster W.Cline, M.D. The "Love and Logic" tecniques: Put teachers back in control of the classroomResult in students who are internalized in their discipline rather than dependent upon external controlsRaise the level of student responsibillityTea "Love and Logic" is a method of working with students which was developed by educational expert Jim Fay, and child psychiatrist Foster W.Cline, M.D. The "Love and Logic" tecniques: Put teachers back in control of the classroomResult in students who are internalized in their discipline rather than dependent upon external controlsRaise the level of student responsibillityTeach students to think for themselvesPrepare students to function effectively in a world filled wiht temptations, decisions, and consequencesReturn a teacher's joy of teaching!

30 review for Teaching with Love and Logic: Taking Control of the Classroom

  1. 5 out of 5

    Dan

    I was handed this book by the head of a middle school and it is a solid piece of work. The subtitle is a bit misleading since much of the emphasis is on sharing control with your students. The basic idea is that people's self-worth and desire for control are at play in most situations where a student is 'misbehaving'. Therefore, valuing the student (regardless of the judgment of their behavior), showing empathy, giving students options in situations where we might usually dictate, and giving stu I was handed this book by the head of a middle school and it is a solid piece of work. The subtitle is a bit misleading since much of the emphasis is on sharing control with your students. The basic idea is that people's self-worth and desire for control are at play in most situations where a student is 'misbehaving'. Therefore, valuing the student (regardless of the judgment of their behavior), showing empathy, giving students options in situations where we might usually dictate, and giving students time to think are better options than punishing and creating antagonistic situations. Similar to the recommendations of Alfie Kohn, offering choices and preferring discipline (as an internal characteristic) and not punishment (as an external act) the book is a good read for any teachers. I am not crazy about the writing, it can be a tad saccharine and some of the conversations they quote sound like they were written and approved, not actual conversations. But it combines psychology, common sense, and anecdote to end up providing some very good recommendations.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Laura

    I found this book really helpful, and I'm looking forward to putting the ideas into practice next week when the students start school. The idea behind "teaching with love and logic" is that, instead of having a discipline system of rules and punishments, teachers address discipline issues on the basis of principles. This means that each instance is addressed uniquely. It also means that the kid is made to do most of the work in resolving the problem and thereby actually learns how to problem-sol I found this book really helpful, and I'm looking forward to putting the ideas into practice next week when the students start school. The idea behind "teaching with love and logic" is that, instead of having a discipline system of rules and punishments, teachers address discipline issues on the basis of principles. This means that each instance is addressed uniquely. It also means that the kid is made to do most of the work in resolving the problem and thereby actually learns how to problem-solve... as opposed to the teacher doing all of the work of thinking about the appropriate consequence to fit the crime. What was revolutionary to me was the idea that consequences don't have to be implemented at the moment of the misbehavior. Instead, the teacher can acknowledge the appropriate behavior and inform the student that she will think about how to handle this and will let the student know of her decision at that time. This avoids plunging into a power struggle in the heat of the emotional moment. The authors also stressed the importance of giving students choices. Saying, "Would you like to work quietly like you're supposed or would you like to go to the dean's office?" is not really a choice since it's obvious which choice is preferred. Instead, students need to be offered real, enforceable choices. For example, "Would you like to continue working with a partner quietly or would you like to work by yourself in a different area?" I really liked the idea of informing students what you, the teacher, will do instead of trying to dictate what the students will do. So, instead of "Sit down, be quiet", you can say, "We will begin the lesson when everyone is seated and quiet." If students refuse to sit in their assigned seats, instead of entering into the expected battle, you can simply say, "I will mark present students who are in their assigned seats." This informs the student of the implied consequence and allows the student to make a good decision instead of being ordered around. I think these new methods will take time to become second-nature, but, with the help of this book, I'm hoping to have a much calmer and smoother year.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Mark Schlatter

    Of all the books I've read so far on classroom management, I believe the Love and Logic approach fits best with my personal philosophy: give the students as much control as possible over their environment, backed up with natural and reasonable consequences and teacher consistency. The goal is to educate students in making good decisions while preserving their self concept while off-loading work from teachers onto students. The problem is that the book --- while it has a solid philosophy --- is di Of all the books I've read so far on classroom management, I believe the Love and Logic approach fits best with my personal philosophy: give the students as much control as possible over their environment, backed up with natural and reasonable consequences and teacher consistency. The goal is to educate students in making good decisions while preserving their self concept while off-loading work from teachers onto students. The problem is that the book --- while it has a solid philosophy --- is difficult to read. You have tips and experiments spread throughout the book, often with little connection to the surrounding text. There are lists and lists and examples and examples, but often not enough connective tissue to put it all together. There were a few times when the authors would refer to the Four Principles of Logic and Love, and I would go "what were those again?" You also have the problem of different chapters written by different authors with slightly different agendas. That begin said, the last chapter (with specifics on strategies of intervention) works very well.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Marla

    I'm intrigued by the idea and think it has definite possibilities, but the material in this book was not well compiled and edited. I found it redundant in some places and unclear in others. I'm intrigued by the idea and think it has definite possibilities, but the material in this book was not well compiled and edited. I found it redundant in some places and unclear in others.

  5. 4 out of 5

    DD

    I love the love and logic series. This makes me a better teacher and really it should be read once a year!

  6. 5 out of 5

    Heather

    I'm currently re-reading this book because it requires continued study and reflection. It's probably one of the best tools I've found for behavior management in a classroom, and possibly the only system that can work in an online teaching environment. The ideas seem so simple, but the application with a cool head under pressure takes much study and practice. I've found I've mastered several of the ideas put forth in the text and am mining it for the next ideas I can apply. As for the writing itse I'm currently re-reading this book because it requires continued study and reflection. It's probably one of the best tools I've found for behavior management in a classroom, and possibly the only system that can work in an online teaching environment. The ideas seem so simple, but the application with a cool head under pressure takes much study and practice. I've found I've mastered several of the ideas put forth in the text and am mining it for the next ideas I can apply. As for the writing itself, the main issue reader may have is the slightly clunky transition between authors. There is not a lot of co-writing in the book, but individual chapters written by two men. Honestly, there are times when one of them gets on my nerves in his prose, but I have pushed past it in order to get the total message. For my friends who have young kids, you might want to go look for the original Love and Logic guide for parents. I could TOTALLY stand working with parents who have already exposed their children to this way of thinking and deciding.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Kate

    I read a copy of the old edition and it was definitely dated. Basic premise is good - speak to kids respectfully and make them share responsibility for solving/preventing behavior problems in the classroom. It includes sample dialogues and suggested phrases and questions to use in particular situations. The book itself is pretty repetitive and way longer than it needs to be. The writing is a little smug and many of the dialogues do not sound realistic.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Indra

    I put my name in to be a substitute teacher in Strafford School working from K to 8 in any or all areas. Sadly, I told a friend who works before and aftercare in nearby Somersworth, that the words "I'm taking names!" escaped my lips and how I wished Love and Logic had a teacher's edition. I kid you not, she reached into her bag and handed me this book. How to use this book: take the advice in Chapter One - work on one thing at a time. Before you change a student's behavior, you need to change yo I put my name in to be a substitute teacher in Strafford School working from K to 8 in any or all areas. Sadly, I told a friend who works before and aftercare in nearby Somersworth, that the words "I'm taking names!" escaped my lips and how I wished Love and Logic had a teacher's edition. I kid you not, she reached into her bag and handed me this book. How to use this book: take the advice in Chapter One - work on one thing at a time. Before you change a student's behavior, you need to change yours. I read this book in small sections, took notes, and applied the ideas to the classroom. I did not move on to another chapter until I had it down. Quotes from the book work immediately in classrooms. Put them on note cards, then literally pull it out of your back pocket (examples below). I learned to rephrase requests to avoid confrontation, giving control to students where applicable, showing empathy, making connections, and how to handle extreme behavior both disruptive and those students who chronically underachieve. "I will listen to you when you use a soft voice." "Oh, that's too bad. It must feel frustrating to work hard and have points taken off for being late." "I am available to hear complaints at 4:00 pm." "You can talk as long as you are quiet." "I believe in you, let me know if I can help." This is the second book by these guys I've read. The only detractor is that they have become more professional and clinical in their approach. The first book - Parenting with Love and Logic - was more gritty and humorous. Either one, five stars.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Jeni Enjaian

    While I found this book interesting and gleaned some useful information from it, I did not find it as useful as I thought I might. (I may have find it more useful if I reread it during the summer when I have more time to study books and techniques. Right now I will admit that I am attempting to read as many books as I can before the end of the year so that I can meet my reading goal.) I also must acknowledge that the version I read was published a few years before the pictured version. Thus, some While I found this book interesting and gleaned some useful information from it, I did not find it as useful as I thought I might. (I may have find it more useful if I reread it during the summer when I have more time to study books and techniques. Right now I will admit that I am attempting to read as many books as I can before the end of the year so that I can meet my reading goal.) I also must acknowledge that the version I read was published a few years before the pictured version. Thus, some of the information was dated; the book has no doubt been updated since initial publication. I actually thought the book fairly good until one of the authors related a series of stories in which he mentions striking two different children. He uses these as negative examples and things that he learned from. However, these two stories left a bitter taste in my mouth that I could not set aside as I finished the book. In my time teaching (granted, only two and a half years at this point), I have never once even come close to hitting a student, unless I accidentally move my arm unaware that a student had walked behind me. To me, these stories undermined the author's credibility and generated a lot of doubts about the method. In the end, I think that the "love and logic" method has several good techniques to choose from even amongst some impracticability.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Jessica

    Like any "self-help" sort of book, the basic things are repeated over and over. And over. But sometimes it's not until the 10th time that you read it that it clicks. I'm honestly not sure how to apply some of the principles suggested here--like whispering in a kid's ear and then walking away, or saying something like, "Can you do that in Mr. Johnson's room? I'm not sure how to handle it right now." I've tried to remember to use the statements about me, as *I* am the only person I can control (th Like any "self-help" sort of book, the basic things are repeated over and over. And over. But sometimes it's not until the 10th time that you read it that it clicks. I'm honestly not sure how to apply some of the principles suggested here--like whispering in a kid's ear and then walking away, or saying something like, "Can you do that in Mr. Johnson's room? I'm not sure how to handle it right now." I've tried to remember to use the statements about me, as *I* am the only person I can control (that one took awhile to click. That I can only control me, not the students. Duh!). So I'll say things like, "I can dismiss you when you're lined up/quiet/whatever." I've also tried a lot more of the choices. "Yes, you can turn that in on Friday, but you know what will happen if you do, right?" Also applying a lot of the Socratic questioning. A lot of times, they sort of rat themselves out, ya know?! And some of it I already knew and was already applying without really realizing I was doing so. It's an easy read and I'm sure it's one I'll go back to, scanning the highlighted text. Although some of it I'm just not sure about, I think a lot of it will come in handy. (I'm sure I'll let some of you know!)

  11. 5 out of 5

    Hannah K

    The best book I've ever read on teaching. I wish I'd read it at the beginning of the year and not the end! I started seeing results in student behavior as soon as I implemented some of these techniques. It's definitely geared more toward middle/high school students rather than younger kids, but a lot of the principles are applicable to all kinds of teachers, in my opinion. The best book I've ever read on teaching. I wish I'd read it at the beginning of the year and not the end! I started seeing results in student behavior as soon as I implemented some of these techniques. It's definitely geared more toward middle/high school students rather than younger kids, but a lot of the principles are applicable to all kinds of teachers, in my opinion.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Melissa

    I have used these techniques while student teaching and they actually work. I think it's a humane, stress-free way of dealing with teenagers in particular, in a way that makes sense, with compassion, reason and the proper placement of responsibility for behavior choices. I have used these techniques while student teaching and they actually work. I think it's a humane, stress-free way of dealing with teenagers in particular, in a way that makes sense, with compassion, reason and the proper placement of responsibility for behavior choices.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Chris Bates

    Works for teachers and parents. Choices give people power. Giving acceptable choices relenquishes power within boundaries.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Josh Shepardson

    Teaching With Love and Logic gives great insight into a better method of interacting with and teaching children (or adults). The pillars of this philosophy are: 1) The enhancement of self-concept 2) Shared control 3) Consequences with empathy 4) Shared thinking After reading this book and learning more about how to implement these ideas, I feel better equipped to improve relationships and show love. The examples given in the book show how love and logic can be mutually beneficial for the teacher, stu Teaching With Love and Logic gives great insight into a better method of interacting with and teaching children (or adults). The pillars of this philosophy are: 1) The enhancement of self-concept 2) Shared control 3) Consequences with empathy 4) Shared thinking After reading this book and learning more about how to implement these ideas, I feel better equipped to improve relationships and show love. The examples given in the book show how love and logic can be mutually beneficial for the teacher, student, and others involved. It allows children to internalize consequences and keeps them from feeling a victim in the situation. Shared thinking and control results in the student doing part of the work and coming up with a solution to their problem. By showing empathy, we can show that we believe the child or person is good while the behavior is not. I am not a professional teacher. I read this book in the hope that it would help in the interactions I have with youth at church, in my volunteer work with 4-H / Scouting, and with my own children as I try to teach them how to be valuable members of society. It will not be an overnight change, but I can already see the difference it has made when I practice these concepts and focus on the pillars set forth by Love and Logic. I look forward to reading other works on Love and Logic as I attempt to navigate this crazy world we live in. Thanks for reading. Yours in Love and Logic, Josh Shepardson

  15. 5 out of 5

    Audrey Lynn

    Absolute must read for educators! Also absolute must read for people who interact with kids on the daily. This is my new"classroom management bible!" Absolute must read for educators! Also absolute must read for people who interact with kids on the daily. This is my new"classroom management bible!"

  16. 4 out of 5

    Rebekah

    I teach college, and I read this because I am truly struggling to take control of my classroom. There were things I liked about this book, but it was ultimately not the book for me. It would be helpful for raising children or working with younger students, but it is not going to help me address the fact that 18-year-old boys in my classroom want to take advantage of me as a young female instructor, it doesn't talk about how to take control of my classroom and seem like I am in charge despite my I teach college, and I read this because I am truly struggling to take control of my classroom. There were things I liked about this book, but it was ultimately not the book for me. It would be helpful for raising children or working with younger students, but it is not going to help me address the fact that 18-year-old boys in my classroom want to take advantage of me as a young female instructor, it doesn't talk about how to take control of my classroom and seem like I am in charge despite my youth, and it doesn't help me become a better teacher. (I am trying to visualize saying "You can put your phone away or leave class--your choice" and all I can do is imagine how horribly that is going to go over.) It is also outdated at this point; I was very confused about the concept of "self-concept." Do they mean self-confidence?

  17. 5 out of 5

    Rachelle

    I do not have a job in the education field nor did I study education in college. This book was my mom's who was did work in the education field and she let me borrow it to try to get some ideas on how to deal with a toddler with an attitude. At the time I did not know there was a Love and Logic book on parenting. Now that I have read this one I will search out the parenting one. Although this book gives ideas to help with classroom management I felt that lots of the ideas were applicable with my I do not have a job in the education field nor did I study education in college. This book was my mom's who was did work in the education field and she let me borrow it to try to get some ideas on how to deal with a toddler with an attitude. At the time I did not know there was a Love and Logic book on parenting. Now that I have read this one I will search out the parenting one. Although this book gives ideas to help with classroom management I felt that lots of the ideas were applicable with my parenting management. The main idea that stuck out to me was to offer choices. I have been trying this more along with other methods mentioned in the book and they have worked rather well for creating more of a calm interaction between my toddler and I and less of a power struggle.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Kevin E

    This book outlines the author's program of taking a love and logic approach to classroom management. To sum it up, the author asserted that a teacher called to let him know that the school was unhappy with results after he'd done a lengthy, protracted series of training with him. The school ended up having ZERO discipline issues, but students weren't WORKING. He explained to them that student motivation is different from discipline -- that was another aspect that he'd be happy to work with them This book outlines the author's program of taking a love and logic approach to classroom management. To sum it up, the author asserted that a teacher called to let him know that the school was unhappy with results after he'd done a lengthy, protracted series of training with him. The school ended up having ZERO discipline issues, but students weren't WORKING. He explained to them that student motivation is different from discipline -- that was another aspect that he'd be happy to work with them on. In short, the teachers-thusly enlightened- were then able to provide the proper supports to get students working. Of note, he suggests using "enforceable statements" like,"I give credit for papers that are on my desk by 3:15PM," and,"I call on students who raise their hands." This is, of course, a very different approach than the more heavy-handed ones (and many which teachers wouldn't ordinarily consider as such...are, in fact.) Another tenet is to give students time to reflect on a transgression, rather than respond in the heat of the moment and allow them to wrestle control and usurp classroom time. This makes perfect sense because students are likely to be defensive and not thinking about consequences at that time. He goes on to suggest discussing the matter after the student has had time to reflect--and encourage them to come up with their own consequences. It's really a revolutinary approach, and saves administrators from being overwhelmed with errant students. The author describes the in-depth processes that comprise the love and logic approach. He also includes some missteps he took in his own career as an educator and administrator. These are effective at painting the contrasts between old, arrogant approaches (which worked with the Internet-disconnected, regional, non-global students of many decades past,) and the hyper-aware, defensive students (and parents) who are quick to point out their rights (and rightfully so) in our current reality. He also talks about how this helps special-needs, socioeconomically-disadvantaged, and other marginalized students. I highly recommend this work. It really made me reflect on my practices, and commit to making changes to bring about more positive learning environments that would bring about more buy-in by students and parents--as well as save countless hours that would otherwise be spent writing and following-up on referrals, making phone calls, documenting events, and constantly being on the offensive. It also made me realize that teachers have to REALLY walk the walk. We are in education on purpose, and today's students need the love and support of a VILLAGE--unCONDITIONAL, nonjudgemental love! They read into everything we say and do (or don't)-which we model for them (which we also do as parents) -and will usually turn this to their advantage if the opportunity arises (since they could possibly be more interested in aligning with their peers, saving face, hiding undiagnosed learning disorders, and the like. But, this could be turned around. Studying and implementing these techniques is a great step in the right direction. I put this book up there with First Days of School and Tools for Teachers as REQUIRED READING for educators. It's that good.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Glenn Davies

    The strategies in this book could be named as common sense, however, we are all aware that common sense is not always as readily available as we would like. When these approached as used as a respectful school-wide behaviour management system, deep respect develops within a community and many of the daily challenges schools face in terms of bullying, low self-esteem, and poor academic performance fade away. The book also challenges us as educators to reconsider the language we use to describe st The strategies in this book could be named as common sense, however, we are all aware that common sense is not always as readily available as we would like. When these approached as used as a respectful school-wide behaviour management system, deep respect develops within a community and many of the daily challenges schools face in terms of bullying, low self-esteem, and poor academic performance fade away. The book also challenges us as educators to reconsider the language we use to describe students, ourselves, our learning and our culture. Our language exposes our assumptions, and by recognising our assumptions, we can change them and change our core values about what drives behaviour choices.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Karen Stockton-call

    Giving the children choices in the classroom is of the utmost importance, and this book has many ideas on how to do that. It also empowers teachers to turn problems back to the students to help them find their own answers and to help guide their thought processes. This book doesn't teach "control"--it teaches cooperation, with ourselves as guides rather than a "sage on the stage", and that is our goal (modeling and using higher order critical thinking questions, which really forces the brain to Giving the children choices in the classroom is of the utmost importance, and this book has many ideas on how to do that. It also empowers teachers to turn problems back to the students to help them find their own answers and to help guide their thought processes. This book doesn't teach "control"--it teaches cooperation, with ourselves as guides rather than a "sage on the stage", and that is our goal (modeling and using higher order critical thinking questions, which really forces the brain to think about the question and formulate answers without even trying) so that education can take place. Real education comes from knowing the right questions to ask. Highly recommended.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Christy

    "Teaching with Love and Logic" gives simple strategies to manage behaviors in the classroom. The ideas discussed in this book are asking questions, giving choices, and showing students respect so that they take responsibility of their behavior and learn natural consequences. The advice that was different from what is normally taught to teachers is that a behavior doesn't have to be dealt with at that moment. It's actually better for the student and teacher to think about what the consequence sho "Teaching with Love and Logic" gives simple strategies to manage behaviors in the classroom. The ideas discussed in this book are asking questions, giving choices, and showing students respect so that they take responsibility of their behavior and learn natural consequences. The advice that was different from what is normally taught to teachers is that a behavior doesn't have to be dealt with at that moment. It's actually better for the student and teacher to think about what the consequence should be and come to an agreement at a later time. I rated this book a 4 out of 5 stars because it was a lengthy book with the same information repeated over and over. * I was required to read this book as a professional development book study with the staff at the school I'm employed.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Angie Hull

    The rating would be more appropriate at a 3.5 stars. This text gave some unique ideas of how to continue to build relationships within the classroom to create a culture of learning. It provided ways to handle scenarios empathically and in a way that allowed the students to have some control. It also guided students into problem-solving techniques when they have created an issue. The ideas were somewhat redundant and some were common sense. The writing style was unique and focused on real-life si The rating would be more appropriate at a 3.5 stars. This text gave some unique ideas of how to continue to build relationships within the classroom to create a culture of learning. It provided ways to handle scenarios empathically and in a way that allowed the students to have some control. It also guided students into problem-solving techniques when they have created an issue. The ideas were somewhat redundant and some were common sense. The writing style was unique and focused on real-life situations.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Sharla Bazen

    Genre: Informational as well as Educational Unique feature: This book is amazing because it gives you all the words you need to say in order to be a completely successful teacher. Even the title of the book is heart warming and still sends shivers through my veins because of how powerful this book really is. Grade suggested: college level or parents (there is another book called "Parenting with Love and Logic" - which I believe every family should own this book!!!!! <3 Genre: Informational as well as Educational Unique feature: This book is amazing because it gives you all the words you need to say in order to be a completely successful teacher. Even the title of the book is heart warming and still sends shivers through my veins because of how powerful this book really is. Grade suggested: college level or parents (there is another book called "Parenting with Love and Logic" - which I believe every family should own this book!!!!! <3

  24. 5 out of 5

    Gillie

    I love the Love & Logic philosophy, and this application of it to school settings did not disappoint. I like the emphasis on principles that enhance the self-esteem of students and make them responsible for solving their own problems. Although the focus is on principles, there are lots and lots of examples of specific, practical ways to use them in the classroom -- scripts and experiments to try.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Laura

    The key messages in this book are great, but it is in dire need of a good editor. It is poorly organized and cluttered with random pieces of information that don't connect well with main chapter topics. Also, the writing is mostly trite and over-simplified in a way that feels condescending. I recommend just skimming it to pull out a few useful pieces of information rather than reading it cover-to-cover. The key messages in this book are great, but it is in dire need of a good editor. It is poorly organized and cluttered with random pieces of information that don't connect well with main chapter topics. Also, the writing is mostly trite and over-simplified in a way that feels condescending. I recommend just skimming it to pull out a few useful pieces of information rather than reading it cover-to-cover.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Sarah

    So, so, so dull. The writing was stilted and felt so inauthentic. While I think the message — teach like you’re a human teaching other humans — is important, I also feel like, if empathy isn’t already something you’re pretty good at, teaching is likely not for you. (I’m so sick of formulaic teaching manuals like this one.)

  27. 5 out of 5

    Nicole

    I like this book. It has a lot of great ideas to give more choice, use empathy, be creative, not having to come up with consequences right now, etc. I would recommend this book to another teacher. I actually like this teacher version better than the parent version I read years ago. I hope to use these ideas in my classroom this upcoming school year.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Shelley Johnston

    It was a good easy read and made me stop and think about some of the things I do and say in my classroom. I am hoping to implement a few of their ideas. The one thing that worries me, is that to fully implement this as a teacher yo have to be mentally in the game every second of every day. It seemed a little daunting, but I am willing to try it.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Chris Loeffler

    This is so easy to read and understand. I would recommend this for all teachers, at all stages of their teaching career, either for young teachers to help teach classroom management or refresh experienced teachers on the skills we need to use every day. The title Love and Logic, fits exactly what the book accomplishes.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Rachel Mayes Allen

    Classroom discipline is the least fun part of being a teacher--especially for someone who, like me, hates conflict. This book is an excellent resource for mitigating classroom conflicts with individual students. Instead of making generalizations, the authors walk teachers through specific behaviors and statements they can use to respond to students effectively. I found it highly helpful.

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