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In the early 1980s, Springfield Remanufacturing  Corporation (SRC) in Springfield, Missouri, was a  near bankrupt division of International Harvester.  That's when a green young manager, Jack Stack,  took over and turned it around. He didn't know how to  "manage" a company, but he did know about the  principal, of athletic competition and democracy:  keeping score, having In the early 1980s, Springfield Remanufacturing  Corporation (SRC) in Springfield, Missouri, was a  near bankrupt division of International Harvester.  That's when a green young manager, Jack Stack,  took over and turned it around. He didn't know how to  "manage" a company, but he did know about the  principal, of athletic competition and democracy:  keeping score, having fun, playing fair, providing  choice, and having a voice. With these principals  he created his own style of management --  open-book management. The key is to let everyone in on  financial decisions. At SRC, everyone learns how to  read a P&L -- even those without a high school  education know how much the toilet paper they use  cuts into profits. SRC people have a piece of the  action and a vote in company matters. Imagine  having a vote on your bonus and on what businesses the  company should be in. SRC restored the dignity of  economic freedom to its people. Stack's  "open-book management" is the key -- a system  which, as he describes it here, is literally  a game, and one so simple anyone can use  it. As part of the Currency paperback line, the  book includes a "User's Guide" -- an  introduction and discussion guide created for the  paperback by the author -- to help readers make  practical use of the book's ideas. Jack Stack is the  president and CEO of the Springfield Remanufacturing  Corporation, in Springfield, Missouri. The recipient  of the 1993 Business Enterprise Trust Award, Jack  speaks throughout the country on The  Great Game Of Business and Open  Book Management.


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In the early 1980s, Springfield Remanufacturing  Corporation (SRC) in Springfield, Missouri, was a  near bankrupt division of International Harvester.  That's when a green young manager, Jack Stack,  took over and turned it around. He didn't know how to  "manage" a company, but he did know about the  principal, of athletic competition and democracy:  keeping score, having In the early 1980s, Springfield Remanufacturing  Corporation (SRC) in Springfield, Missouri, was a  near bankrupt division of International Harvester.  That's when a green young manager, Jack Stack,  took over and turned it around. He didn't know how to  "manage" a company, but he did know about the  principal, of athletic competition and democracy:  keeping score, having fun, playing fair, providing  choice, and having a voice. With these principals  he created his own style of management --  open-book management. The key is to let everyone in on  financial decisions. At SRC, everyone learns how to  read a P&L -- even those without a high school  education know how much the toilet paper they use  cuts into profits. SRC people have a piece of the  action and a vote in company matters. Imagine  having a vote on your bonus and on what businesses the  company should be in. SRC restored the dignity of  economic freedom to its people. Stack's  "open-book management" is the key -- a system  which, as he describes it here, is literally  a game, and one so simple anyone can use  it. As part of the Currency paperback line, the  book includes a "User's Guide" -- an  introduction and discussion guide created for the  paperback by the author -- to help readers make  practical use of the book's ideas. Jack Stack is the  president and CEO of the Springfield Remanufacturing  Corporation, in Springfield, Missouri. The recipient  of the 1993 Business Enterprise Trust Award, Jack  speaks throughout the country on The  Great Game Of Business and Open  Book Management.

30 review for The Great Game of Business: Unlocking the Power and Profitability of Open-Book Management

  1. 4 out of 5

    Adam

    I read this during a time when the company I was working for was considering making the switch to open book management. Our business was interested in getting the benefits of open book, employee owned operations, without offering employee ownership. Following reading this book I attended one of the Great Game seminars. The concept is great: make everyone with a stake in the business an owner. Put the accounting books in the open for all to see, so everyone has accountability and responsibility. T I read this during a time when the company I was working for was considering making the switch to open book management. Our business was interested in getting the benefits of open book, employee owned operations, without offering employee ownership. Following reading this book I attended one of the Great Game seminars. The concept is great: make everyone with a stake in the business an owner. Put the accounting books in the open for all to see, so everyone has accountability and responsibility. The reason I rate this book so low is not because the message is bad. I rate it poorly because for some reason I just can't make myself like Mr. Stack. A good deal of the book is Stack congratulating himself on his own success. Self-aggrandizing is a major turn-off for me, which is why I didn't really care for this book. Still, the message of open book management and employee ownership is sound, and definitely worth employing.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Jay Batson

    Generally worth the read if you're a CEO or senior executive of a company. Basic points are: * Develop a strong financial model of how your business operates, identifying / creating the financial metrics that are important for your business * Find the elements under your control that need most attention, and work on that * Make your financials, and those elements visible to your entire company. Teach everyone top-to-bottom what the knobs are in your business, and how each person's individual work af Generally worth the read if you're a CEO or senior executive of a company. Basic points are: * Develop a strong financial model of how your business operates, identifying / creating the financial metrics that are important for your business * Find the elements under your control that need most attention, and work on that * Make your financials, and those elements visible to your entire company. Teach everyone top-to-bottom what the knobs are in your business, and how each person's individual work affects the knobs or the results * Get your staff to own those numbers / variables * Do this via collaborating with the team to create challenges & games to tackle the metrics that need attention. Achieving the goals thus mean you won that game. All will be fun. * Share both good, and bad news. CEO credibility comes from honesty, not sugar-coating. I'm roughly in agreement with most of the things in this book from a style perspective. I was fairly open with financial position with staff when I was a CEO, though didn't go the full boat of transparency & enrollment the way the author (Stack) suggests. On reflection, I would probably lean more towards his full transparency than I have in the past if I were in that position again. However, a fair bit of Stack's view works well for a mature industry, where you're taking share from other competitors because of a combination of low cost, high deliverability / quality, and sales effectiveness. Many businesses operate in a different environment, though, and some of his advice doesn't translate to those environments. I've spent most of my time in early-stage, high-growth companies. There are multiple phases in that type of environment: * Find product-market fit. Success comes less from concentrating on managing the financials, and more from making sure you can sell lots of your product to your intended customer. During this time, unpredictable spending is important to do in some areas, and avoid in others; revenue is highly unpredictable, but finding the knobs that you can turn to make growth go fast is THE most important thing. * Early growth. Once you know you can spend $0.50 this week to acquire a customer that brings in $0.10 of revenue per month - totaling nearly $5.00 over the next 4 years - you spend like crazy to acquire as many of those customers as possible, as fast as you can. This creates a HUGE cash trough that hits you right in the face, because you need to pay the cost to acquire the revenue up-front, and it takes at least 6 months to collect that cost back. If you can grow your customer base 100% / year, but it might cost you $30M in cash that you don't have to do it in that year, and looks like you're losing money, you don't hesitate - you go get the cash & spend it because the long-term value of that spending is so high. * Maturation. There will come a point when you've acquired such a huge number of customers that you can't sustain that 100% growth rate any longer. At this point, you start dialing towards profitability, and start to institute the controls that Stack refers to in this book. Another example of differences in industry: He talks about an Employee Stock Ownership Program as a motivation for employees. In general, the tech industry has heavily used stock as a compensation tool. However, the method varies, and so the motivations vary. In ESOPs, the compensation to employees is more visible because the stock is more liquid (either via public markets, or internal company-operated markets). This means the stock compensation has a more "current" compensation value. In tech, the stock is entirely illiquid unless / until the company has a liquidity event (IPO, acquisition); in this case, the stock is more of a bet on a windfall than a measure of current compensation. Thus, the dynamics on use of it as an employee motivator are different. So, the book isn't a formula for all companies; but, it's quite useful in many. And if nothing else, CEOs in mature markets who do NOT have a handle on their financials & the knobs they have available in their business would do well to use this as a method to run their company better.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Jessica Berry

    Every time I picked up this book, I came up with new ideas about how to improve my business. I kept a running Google doc of notes, ideas & quotes that got up to 11 pages by the time I finished. And I've brought up the principles to my business partners many many times of the past few months. Now to work on implementing the tactics... Every time I picked up this book, I came up with new ideas about how to improve my business. I kept a running Google doc of notes, ideas & quotes that got up to 11 pages by the time I finished. And I've brought up the principles to my business partners many many times of the past few months. Now to work on implementing the tactics...

  4. 4 out of 5

    Jasmine

    I know this book is dated a little bit, so it felt like I heard a lot of the concepts that Mr. Stack presented before. I agree with a lot of what he has to say. Although I don't know if I myself will ever be quite as committed to some of the "game" aspects that he seems so zealous about (such as making numbers a competition and providing parties/awards for winners at every single possible opportunity), I did agree with his opinions on open-book management and how giving employees education in bu I know this book is dated a little bit, so it felt like I heard a lot of the concepts that Mr. Stack presented before. I agree with a lot of what he has to say. Although I don't know if I myself will ever be quite as committed to some of the "game" aspects that he seems so zealous about (such as making numbers a competition and providing parties/awards for winners at every single possible opportunity), I did agree with his opinions on open-book management and how giving employees education in business makes them work harder to achieve end goals. The best part of this book I have to say would be the last chapter about capitalism, health care and "social overhead". Now that is something that I agree with and feel passionate about to a T! I truly share his fears and hopes in that regard. I think that in a sense America has lost it's "hunger for ownership" and hence there has been a decline in the fight to regain capitalism and create jobs. But of course it will just come to stab us from behind if we let it continue this way with the working class having to take care of the unemployed and destitute in what Mr. Stack calls "social overhead" if we can't get our acts together. I thought it was very fitting that I should read this right after the presidential debate. I guess you can tell who I will be voting for!!

  5. 5 out of 5

    Hugo Messer

    Great book. I havent read these ideas in many other business books. Jack advocates opening up the books to all employees, teaching everyone how to win and make money in a company and make everything a game.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Jon Nordmark

    This is an excellent book about how ownership structure, and a patient teacher, can create wholesale positive change for an organization.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Abe Nemer

    An amazing tool for business

  8. 4 out of 5

    Omar Halabieh

    Through this book Jack outlines his open-book management framework - which he calls "The Game" - while at SRC. As he states: "What lies at the heart of the Game is a very simple proposition: The best, most efficient, most profitable way to operate a business is to give everybody in the company a voice in saying how the company is run and a stake in the financial outcome, good or bad." The ensuing chapters discuss the various aspects of this framework, covering a breadth of topics such as vision, Through this book Jack outlines his open-book management framework - which he calls "The Game" - while at SRC. As he states: "What lies at the heart of the Game is a very simple proposition: The best, most efficient, most profitable way to operate a business is to give everybody in the company a voice in saying how the company is run and a stake in the financial outcome, good or bad." The ensuing chapters discuss the various aspects of this framework, covering a breadth of topics such as vision, goals, compensation etc. Below is an outline of these topics: "1- Why teach people how to make money: On profit in general, On your company's profits, On making money and generating cash, On jobs and job security, On wealth and wealth creation. 2- Myths of management: On the danger of telling the truth, On the danger of being a "nice guy", On the role of the manager, On motivation. 3- The feeling of a winner: On the credibility of management, On the attitude of employees, On pride and ownership, On starting games, On celebrating wins. 4- The big picture: On defining the big picture, On Sharing the big picture, On moving people around the company, On sending mixed messages, On Connecting with communities outside the company. 5- Open-book management: On taking the emotions out of the business, On being the least-cost producer, On the fear of competitors, On the fear of employees, On sharing compensation figures. 6- Setting Standards: On critical numbers, On the purpose of standard costs, On setting up a standard cost system, On absorbing overhead. 7- Skip the praise - give us the raise: On designing the bonus program, On the effectiveness of the bonus program, On the size of the potential bonuses, On the issue of equal payouts, On educating with bonuses. 8- Coming up with the game plan: On budgets and game plans, On the sales forecast, On getting people to buy in, On changing the plan as the year goes along. 9- The great huddle: On staff meetings, On putting names on the numbers, On the timing of meetings, On the role of the Leader, On writing the numbers down. 10- A company of owners: On equity in general, On long-term thinking, On playing the game in employee-owned companies, On playing the game without the equity tool, On participation versus democracy in business. 11- The highest level of thinking: On the cost of health care and other benefits, On creating new opportunities for people, On cash-flow generators and overhead absorbers, On the hunger for ownership. 12- The ultimate higher law: a message to middle managers: On getting your boss to play the game, On playing the game without the boss, On having fun." A great educative book on management, that promotes openness, transparency and effectiveness! Below are excerpts from the book that I found particularly insightful: 1- "The only way to be secure is to make money and generate cash. Everything else is a means to that end. Those simple rules apply to every business. And yet, at most companies, people are never told that the survival of the company depends on doing those two things...most important, no one tells people how to make money and generate cash. 2- "People only get beyond work when their motivation is coming from the inside...Management is all about instilling that desire to win. It's about instilling self-esteem and pride, that special glow you get when you know you're a winner. Nobody has to tell you. You just feel it. You know it." 3- "Along the way, we learned some lessons about the kind of games and goals that work best: 1) Business is a team sport - choose games that build a team. 2) Be positive, build confidence. 3) Celebrate every win. 4) It's got to be a game. 5) Give everyone the same set of goals. 6) Don't use goals to tell people everything you want them to do." 4- "I found out that people who had worked in two or more jobs had a whole different attitude about business. Cooperation was great. They were much better at seeing the other guy's perspective. They understood how different functions fit together, how the depended on each other." 5- "The best argument for open-book management is this: the more educated your work force is about the company, the more capable it is of doing the little things required to get better." 6- "When you use financial statements as management tools, you have to adapt to your purposes...How you do that depends entirely on your business, but here are some general rules to follow: 1) Start with the income statement. 2) Highlight the categories where you spend most money. 3) Break down categories into controllable elements. 4) Use the income statement to educate people about the balance sheet." 7- "The real power of the bonus program lies in its ability to educate people about business. Once they understand the math, they see how everything fits together, and how business can be a tool for getting them what they want. And it all does fit together. The system really works. You can't criticize it because it is simply a reflection of reality. You can criticize individuals. You can take people to task for the way they do business. You can go after the ones who are greedy, who only want to help themselves, who exploit other people for personal gain. But the fault lies in those individuals, not in the nature of capitalism." 8- "That's because a company of owners will outperform a company of employees any day of the week..When you think like an owner, you do all the little things necessary to win...But people will only thing like owners if they have a larger purpose, if they are not just working for a paycheck...People have to see the Big Picture. They have to know what they are doing, why it's important, where they are going, and how business is helping them get there. Only then will they have the desire to go out and use the tools you provide and play the Great Game of Business to win." 9- "..."Everyone who comes fishin' here gits the same number of bites. The only difference between thems that catch the fish and thems that don't is preparation and concentration. You gotta make sure your hook is sharp and your line don't have no nicks. Then you gotta watch that line. You pay attention to them little things, and you'll catch all the fish you kin handle." I think of that story whenever I run into people who don't know what to do with their lives because there just aren't enough opportunities around. I also think of it when I hear about companies laying people off because their services aren't needed, because there isn't enough work for them, because the opportunities have all dried up. What a waste. There are opportunities everywhere - opportunities to grow, opportunities to start new businesses, opportunities to create jobs and absorb overhead. Everybody gets the same number of bites. You catch the fish when you're prepared and ready to respond."

  9. 5 out of 5

    Angela Lam

    This revised edition is rather similar to the original book 20 years ago, except (i) for a more comprehensive intro that shows the results till 2012/13 and (ii) it ends with an additional guide that gels the points together into a story and 3-part model. Basically, the book is about Open-Book Management, i.e. opening your books, educating people on financials and running the company in a way that allows everyone to make financial decisions and contribute to the bottomline. The whole approach is This revised edition is rather similar to the original book 20 years ago, except (i) for a more comprehensive intro that shows the results till 2012/13 and (ii) it ends with an additional guide that gels the points together into a story and 3-part model. Basically, the book is about Open-Book Management, i.e. opening your books, educating people on financials and running the company in a way that allows everyone to make financial decisions and contribute to the bottomline. The whole approach is built on this philosophy: To get the highest level of performance, you must first appeal to people’s highest level of thinking. Playing the Game involves: • Teaching People about the Language of Business (Money) • Adopting the Right Management Philosophies • Getting People into Game-Playing Mode • Showing People the Big Picture • Setting Standards to Drive Action • Spicing things up with Bonuses • Developing your Game Plan • Establishing your Rhythm and Cycles • Creating a Company of Owners (ownership-mindset + stock/shares) Having managed teams in MNCs (employee-mindset) vs now running my own business and working a lot with freelancers and agencies (self-employed / business mindset), I do see a big difference in thinking/approach. I'd definitely love to have a company full of capable, business-minded people who can run the business with me. And Stack is right....if people can deliver the value, the bosses will have no issue sharing the rewards with them. Book summary at : https://readingraphics.com/book-summa...

  10. 4 out of 5

    Adam Tuttle

    The book is awesome. The author should have paid a professional to narrate the audiobook, rather than doing it himself. There are a lot of pauses where you can tell a line ended in the book from which he was reading............ before the sentence ended, and it can be distracting. His pronunciation is also less than perfect. But as I said, the book is awesome. I read it because my company is headed down this road, and I'm very excited to start that journey. It seems like a very engaged, energetic The book is awesome. The author should have paid a professional to narrate the audiobook, rather than doing it himself. There are a lot of pauses where you can tell a line ended in the book from which he was reading............ before the sentence ended, and it can be distracting. His pronunciation is also less than perfect. But as I said, the book is awesome. I read it because my company is headed down this road, and I'm very excited to start that journey. It seems like a very engaged, energetic, and exciting way to run a business. I do have a few gripes. In particular, he went out of his way to make it a point that people need to know the difference between "making money and generating cash" but never actually explains it. There are also a few other areas that he leaves a trail of breadcrumbs for you to find your own path (i.e. how to share equity with employees without going public) that I found annoying mostly because he didn't offer the slightest glimpse at what his company did. Just a "you need to do this, we did it, it's really important, and here is where you can find out more information on how to do it yourself." So all in all, 4 out of 5 stars.

  11. 4 out of 5

    J. Elise

    This was a long read for me, as I'm not as financially literate as I should be. I got a bit bogged down in the middle chapters about setting targets and crafting a bonus plan. Of course, ignorance like mine is a key failing in modern businesses, as this book makes clear. Business success or failure is predicated on financial performance (for most of us - let's ignore the distorted operating models of VC-backed big tech for now) and we need to remedy that appalling and widespread financial ignora This was a long read for me, as I'm not as financially literate as I should be. I got a bit bogged down in the middle chapters about setting targets and crafting a bonus plan. Of course, ignorance like mine is a key failing in modern businesses, as this book makes clear. Business success or failure is predicated on financial performance (for most of us - let's ignore the distorted operating models of VC-backed big tech for now) and we need to remedy that appalling and widespread financial ignorance if we want sustainable businesses that support resilient communities. For businesses with enough maturity to know what they're selling to whom, the operating system laid out in the GGOB is a winner. Education, engagement, and performance aren't aspirations here - they're practices built into how work gets done every day. I've recommended this to many leaders already and will continue to do so going forward.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Terry Koressel

    This is my second reading of The Great Game of Business....my first reading was in the mid-90's. I enjoyed and learned from my second reading as much as I did the first. Jack Stack is absolutely correct about his most important message: Business mastery is not complicated; it does not require an MBA or even a college degree. But it does require an obsession with winning; an obsession with success; and an obsession with maximizing the contributions of everyone in the organization. The "game"....J This is my second reading of The Great Game of Business....my first reading was in the mid-90's. I enjoyed and learned from my second reading as much as I did the first. Jack Stack is absolutely correct about his most important message: Business mastery is not complicated; it does not require an MBA or even a college degree. But it does require an obsession with winning; an obsession with success; and an obsession with maximizing the contributions of everyone in the organization. The "game"....Jack Stack's approach to business management/leadership is one way of achieving this. The game's underlying principles are the key and they are mentioned above. This is a practical, intelligent, down-to-earth, "blue collar" primer to creating a successful, thriving business. If you are a manager or business leader, The Great Game of Business is a terrific learning tool....and an enjoyable read to make your time investment even better. Two thumbs up is my recommendation!

  13. 5 out of 5

    u571

    Great book about management This is a great book about management, much better than most of the management books I read. There are a few reasons I liked this book 1. This book was written from the author’s real experiences in SRC by bringing a small and almost bankrupted business into a healthy and growing company. 2. Jack Stack really poured heart into it rather than copy & paste. He has many great examples, cases, tools for readers to learn. 3. I like the philosophy of the book - open book manage Great book about management This is a great book about management, much better than most of the management books I read. There are a few reasons I liked this book 1. This book was written from the author’s real experiences in SRC by bringing a small and almost bankrupted business into a healthy and growing company. 2. Jack Stack really poured heart into it rather than copy & paste. He has many great examples, cases, tools for readers to learn. 3. I like the philosophy of the book - open book management, which has been successfully used by many companies like Netflix. Some other great business leaders like Jack Welch, Howard Schulz - they all focused on the essence of open book management (candor and transparency) 4. Last but not least, the book offered implementation guide. The GGOB is not a rocket science but rather something that every manager can learn and use. I would recommend the book to other readers and the book is definitely worthy of your time!

  14. 5 out of 5

    Ann Gibson

    My husband was asked to read this book for work( from corporate) who uses this as a guide for running the company. Wayne Automatic Fire Sprinklers. Not my usual read but as a “favor” to my busy, non - reader hubby I read to him during his commutes. First chapters use humor to engage readers into otherwise dry subject matter. Lots of case studies as well as “workbook” to implement suggestions. Good ideas to motivate and incentives for lowering costs and increasing production and profit in all dep My husband was asked to read this book for work( from corporate) who uses this as a guide for running the company. Wayne Automatic Fire Sprinklers. Not my usual read but as a “favor” to my busy, non - reader hubby I read to him during his commutes. First chapters use humor to engage readers into otherwise dry subject matter. Lots of case studies as well as “workbook” to implement suggestions. Good ideas to motivate and incentives for lowering costs and increasing production and profit in all departments.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Lacey Martinez

    These people have ruined my work place environment because they decided to do GGOB seriously. The healthy work place that I have enjoyed for 10 years went to strictly money. Money, money, money. Toxic environment, competive... not to mention the famous Paul Smith who scared me into not coming into work for 3 days. Just dont dabble in the GGOB. It will cost you a lot of money and employees not being happy. All employees are not allowed to voice their opinion because if you dont agree with GGOB yo These people have ruined my work place environment because they decided to do GGOB seriously. The healthy work place that I have enjoyed for 10 years went to strictly money. Money, money, money. Toxic environment, competive... not to mention the famous Paul Smith who scared me into not coming into work for 3 days. Just dont dabble in the GGOB. It will cost you a lot of money and employees not being happy. All employees are not allowed to voice their opinion because if you dont agree with GGOB you will be terminated.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Kaiya Pelletier

    Had to read this book for work. The company I work pretty much built their entire business around the concepts and ideas from this book. I did like a lot of their ideas when it came to the bonuses, sharing financials and overall open book management. I felt like the author dragged out the section with financials with lots of numbers and math that made no sense to me lol. What saved it was that the author Jack Stack started in Missouri. And I love Missouri.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Marcin Jędrzejczak

    A really great book showing the difference between command - control management and open-book management by playing the game; following the rules, engaging all employees in the financial statements and launching effective Bonus Program & ESOP. If people don’t participate they don’t buy-in if they don’t buy in they do not commit if they don’t commit they don’t deliver - I was reading as Product Manager.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Regan Robertson

    Without knowing it, many of the philosophies taught in this book were tactics I employ as a leader in the organizations I serve. They go into real, tangible applications with tools you can download and take into your business, same day. I have my senior management team going through this book now together. This teams well with the Small Giants Community, also started by Bo.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Lylyna Heng

    There is no one right way of running the business nor the great management of all time. Business needs to adapt and change base on the climate and circumstances. The book lays out the great example in that perspective. It shows the big picture of how to run the business, especially collaboration in the company.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Ben Donahower

    I'm in the game I'm sold, well except the equity part, but this is definitely something I can run with. I love having a system and this one is aligned with ad hoc things I've been doing including sharing financials. But I was missing a lot of pieces and this book showed me those pieces and what the puzzle looks like. I'm in the game I'm sold, well except the equity part, but this is definitely something I can run with. I love having a system and this one is aligned with ad hoc things I've been doing including sharing financials. But I was missing a lot of pieces and this book showed me those pieces and what the puzzle looks like.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Colin Thomas

    A nice central concept. Better maybe for an exec at a company with like 20+ employees. Also has the classic moments of all business books written by unacademic ceo types where it tries to be prescriptive about the human condition and the ills of society and how this new management structure this guy came up with can be the solution to it all.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Scott Howard

    What are you hiding? Open book management is critical to driving engagement at all levels in the organization and ultimately, better results. Jack Stack's approach is something any business can execute. What are you hiding? Open book management is critical to driving engagement at all levels in the organization and ultimately, better results. Jack Stack's approach is something any business can execute.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Jack

    The fount for today's typical startup advice -- build momentum celebrating small wins; get buy-in on forecasted numbers and targets from those who do it; measure and move your one KPI. The advice on being open with the numbers and business health was important to me to read. The fount for today's typical startup advice -- build momentum celebrating small wins; get buy-in on forecasted numbers and targets from those who do it; measure and move your one KPI. The advice on being open with the numbers and business health was important to me to read.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Arianne Montilla

    I started to read the book in spanish, terrible translation; also tried the audio book and it´s like listening to Mexican people talking so I didn´t like it and the book didn´t catch me at all. I had been told very good things about the book but I couldn´t continue reading. I didn´t like it.

  25. 5 out of 5

    James Martin

    If you and your organization want to get real about managing the metrics that really drive your business, and you want everyone in on the secret, read this book and adopt the principles. Stop pretending you know how your business works.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Anan Lowell

    Really Good business book. From experience of the author take over a collapse company, to a big company with 20 subsidiaries, with open book management and big benefit to all the employees and owners. old book, but I think more relevant today in transparency Era.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Katie

    Great principles and accompanying stories. Easy to read but not easy to remember- the flow/organization is lacking. Many of the topics in this book I’d never considered or learned about before. I love that my company plays the game, and I will continue to study this book.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Gabe Wood

    A fun read. I like business and this was a good case for profit sharing, and for equity involvement even if only from the perspective of greed (not saying that he is greedy, but it's just better for everyone, even those simply trying to profit maximize in a lot of situations) A fun read. I like business and this was a good case for profit sharing, and for equity involvement even if only from the perspective of greed (not saying that he is greedy, but it's just better for everyone, even those simply trying to profit maximize in a lot of situations)

  29. 4 out of 5

    Vonetta

    Maybe running a business is easier than I thought. According to this book, all you need is transparency and to be a decent human being plus a dash of competence, and it’s all in the bag. Shrugs. The chapters on ESOPs and “social overheard” were pretty solid and thought-provoking, tho.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Thomas Dunavant

    The principles shared in this book are good, mostly common sense but it’s good to be reminded. The downside is the author’s insistence that this is the only way to run a company. He was successful with this method but business is not a one size fits all.

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