web site hit counter Postmodern Sacred: Popular Culture Spirituality in the Science Fiction, Fantasy and Urban Fantasy Genres - Ebooks PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

Postmodern Sacred: Popular Culture Spirituality in the Science Fiction, Fantasy and Urban Fantasy Genres

Availability: Ready to download

From The Matrix and Harry Potter to Stargate SG:1 and The X-Files, recent science fiction and fantasy offerings both reflect and produce a sense of the religious. This work examines this pop-culture spirituality, or "postmodern sacred," showing how consumers use the symbols contained in explicitly "unreal" texts to gain a secondhand experience of transcendence and belief. From The Matrix and Harry Potter to Stargate SG:1 and The X-Files, recent science fiction and fantasy offerings both reflect and produce a sense of the religious. This work examines this pop-culture spirituality, or "postmodern sacred," showing how consumers use the symbols contained in explicitly "unreal" texts to gain a secondhand experience of transcendence and belief. Topics include how media technologies like CGI have blurred the lines between real and unreal, the polytheisms of Buffy and Xena, the New Age Gnosticism of The DaVinci Code, the Islamic "Other" and science fiction's response to 9/11, and the Christian Right and popular culture. Today's pervasive, saturated media culture, this work shows, has utterly collapsed the sacred/profane binary, so that popular culture is not only powerfully shaped by the discourses of religion, but also shapes how the religious appears and is experienced in the contemporary world.


Compare

From The Matrix and Harry Potter to Stargate SG:1 and The X-Files, recent science fiction and fantasy offerings both reflect and produce a sense of the religious. This work examines this pop-culture spirituality, or "postmodern sacred," showing how consumers use the symbols contained in explicitly "unreal" texts to gain a secondhand experience of transcendence and belief. From The Matrix and Harry Potter to Stargate SG:1 and The X-Files, recent science fiction and fantasy offerings both reflect and produce a sense of the religious. This work examines this pop-culture spirituality, or "postmodern sacred," showing how consumers use the symbols contained in explicitly "unreal" texts to gain a secondhand experience of transcendence and belief. Topics include how media technologies like CGI have blurred the lines between real and unreal, the polytheisms of Buffy and Xena, the New Age Gnosticism of The DaVinci Code, the Islamic "Other" and science fiction's response to 9/11, and the Christian Right and popular culture. Today's pervasive, saturated media culture, this work shows, has utterly collapsed the sacred/profane binary, so that popular culture is not only powerfully shaped by the discourses of religion, but also shapes how the religious appears and is experienced in the contemporary world.

36 review for Postmodern Sacred: Popular Culture Spirituality in the Science Fiction, Fantasy and Urban Fantasy Genres

  1. 4 out of 5

    Kyla Ward

    An erudite and pithy book forming a junction-box between an almost insane variety of philosophies, ideologies and, of course, other texts. Thought- and use-provoking in its basic premise, that the wholesale raiding of the 'real' religious by the overtly fictional creates an arena wherein people can play with belief. An erudite and pithy book forming a junction-box between an almost insane variety of philosophies, ideologies and, of course, other texts. Thought- and use-provoking in its basic premise, that the wholesale raiding of the 'real' religious by the overtly fictional creates an arena wherein people can play with belief.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Jaime Wright

    I could tell this was an expanded thesis--I think it just needed to be refined more so that the argument carries through all the chapters clearly. The chapter on LOTR seemed like it had just been dropped in. Her main concept 'the postmodern sacred' is intriguing. I could tell this was an expanded thesis--I think it just needed to be refined more so that the argument carries through all the chapters clearly. The chapter on LOTR seemed like it had just been dropped in. Her main concept 'the postmodern sacred' is intriguing.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Bookshire Cat

    DNF, not really interesting for me now.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Kj

  5. 5 out of 5

    Odin

  6. 4 out of 5

    Scott

  7. 4 out of 5

    Elizabeth Sutherland

  8. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer L. Julian

  9. 5 out of 5

    Mindy

  10. 4 out of 5

    Gerrit

  11. 4 out of 5

    Xiri

  12. 4 out of 5

    Rita Marie

  13. 5 out of 5

    Hayley

  14. 5 out of 5

    Ernest

  15. 5 out of 5

    Patrik Olterman

  16. 4 out of 5

    Aviva Gabriel

  17. 5 out of 5

    Kori Klinzing

  18. 5 out of 5

    Meep

  19. 4 out of 5

    Collette

  20. 4 out of 5

    Wench

  21. 5 out of 5

    Caryn

  22. 5 out of 5

    Tope

  23. 5 out of 5

    Ren-Yi

  24. 4 out of 5

    Joshua

  25. 5 out of 5

    M.A. Brotherton

  26. 5 out of 5

    Steve Walker

  27. 5 out of 5

    Hana

  28. 5 out of 5

    Maja

  29. 4 out of 5

    Nikolina

  30. 4 out of 5

    Mary Poppins

  31. 4 out of 5

    Judah

  32. 5 out of 5

    Katherine Lee

  33. 4 out of 5

    Michelle

  34. 5 out of 5

    Brianna Limas

  35. 4 out of 5

    Boreas

  36. 4 out of 5

    Diana

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.