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Winner of the James Beard Foundation Cookbook of the Year Award "Smokehouse Ham, Spoon Bread, & Scuppernong Wine" is a scrumptious slice of Smoky Mountain and Blue Ridge hill country foodlore handed down from Scotland, England, Wales, Ireland, Germany, and the Cherokee Nation. In addition to generous helpings of folklore, the text highlights and embraces the art of Appalach Winner of the James Beard Foundation Cookbook of the Year Award "Smokehouse Ham, Spoon Bread, & Scuppernong Wine" is a scrumptious slice of Smoky Mountain and Blue Ridge hill country foodlore handed down from Scotland, England, Wales, Ireland, Germany, and the Cherokee Nation. In addition to generous helpings of folklore, the text highlights and embraces the art of Appalachian cuisine from pioneer days to the present, providing insights that will fascinate readers everywhere. Divided into four sections - The Folklore, The Art, The Foods, The Blessings - the book is packed with authoritative folklore and authentic Appalachian recipes, as well as old-timey photographs in the "Foxfire" fashion: fireplace and wood-stove cooking, hog killing, bear hunting, shuck-bean strining, apple-butter partying, dinner on the grounds, and much more. The Folklore includes chapters on the people, seasons, and social life as it pertains to food. The Art includes chapters on growing, gardening, farming by the signs, food preparation, and food preservation. The more than 200 recipes are accompanied with stories of how the foods have been passed from generation to generation. And the Blessings include numerous hill country invocations. All in all, the book contains 61 fascinating chapters and almost one hundred sidebars on special topics. Among the 23 chapters of recipes are such subjects as: Corn Bread: Mountain Staff of Life; From Catheads to Angel Biscuits; Moonshine: Mountain Water of Life; Hog-Killing Day: Mountain Celebration; Smokehouse Ham and Red-Eye Gravy. The result of years of research and interviews, "Smokehouse Ham, Spoon Bread, & Scuppernong Wine" will remind readers of the "Foxfire" series of an earlier generation.


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Winner of the James Beard Foundation Cookbook of the Year Award "Smokehouse Ham, Spoon Bread, & Scuppernong Wine" is a scrumptious slice of Smoky Mountain and Blue Ridge hill country foodlore handed down from Scotland, England, Wales, Ireland, Germany, and the Cherokee Nation. In addition to generous helpings of folklore, the text highlights and embraces the art of Appalach Winner of the James Beard Foundation Cookbook of the Year Award "Smokehouse Ham, Spoon Bread, & Scuppernong Wine" is a scrumptious slice of Smoky Mountain and Blue Ridge hill country foodlore handed down from Scotland, England, Wales, Ireland, Germany, and the Cherokee Nation. In addition to generous helpings of folklore, the text highlights and embraces the art of Appalachian cuisine from pioneer days to the present, providing insights that will fascinate readers everywhere. Divided into four sections - The Folklore, The Art, The Foods, The Blessings - the book is packed with authoritative folklore and authentic Appalachian recipes, as well as old-timey photographs in the "Foxfire" fashion: fireplace and wood-stove cooking, hog killing, bear hunting, shuck-bean strining, apple-butter partying, dinner on the grounds, and much more. The Folklore includes chapters on the people, seasons, and social life as it pertains to food. The Art includes chapters on growing, gardening, farming by the signs, food preparation, and food preservation. The more than 200 recipes are accompanied with stories of how the foods have been passed from generation to generation. And the Blessings include numerous hill country invocations. All in all, the book contains 61 fascinating chapters and almost one hundred sidebars on special topics. Among the 23 chapters of recipes are such subjects as: Corn Bread: Mountain Staff of Life; From Catheads to Angel Biscuits; Moonshine: Mountain Water of Life; Hog-Killing Day: Mountain Celebration; Smokehouse Ham and Red-Eye Gravy. The result of years of research and interviews, "Smokehouse Ham, Spoon Bread, & Scuppernong Wine" will remind readers of the "Foxfire" series of an earlier generation.

30 review for Smokehouse Ham, Spoon Bread & Scuppernong Wine: The Folklore and Art of Southern Appalachian Cooking

  1. 4 out of 5

    Candace Vianna

    For those out there who want something more than just a compendium of recipes, look no further. This is more than just a cookbook; it's a snapshot of a way of life that is rapidly disappearing. In addition to recipes and cooking techniques you'll find interesting facts about Appalachian culture and the people who live there. Before the influx of German, Scotch-Irish and English settlers, this region was first home to the Cherokee, and their influence can be seen throughout this book. Between the For those out there who want something more than just a compendium of recipes, look no further. This is more than just a cookbook; it's a snapshot of a way of life that is rapidly disappearing. In addition to recipes and cooking techniques you'll find interesting facts about Appalachian culture and the people who live there. Before the influx of German, Scotch-Irish and English settlers, this region was first home to the Cherokee, and their influence can be seen throughout this book. Between the covers you'll can find everything from hog killing to the history of moonshine. In addition to wines, beers, brandies and teas, there's recipes for making your own corn liquor and Kentucky moonshine using an 80 gallon still. In addition to recipes for bear, raccoon, venison, squirrel, opossum and other wild beasts (even snapping turtles,) there's sections on wild fruits and nuts, as well as local greens with advice on how to use them without getting poisoned, "Knowledgeable mountain folks have long known that while poke is an effective springtime pick-me-up, the nightshade plant has to be handled with care. Only the early first shoots should be used and even they must be parboiled before being fried and eaten." There's also information on canning, putting up preserves and a number of other practices that have been lost to modern convenience. This along with the Firefox series are my first go to resources for information and recipes on this unique slice of Americana.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Arrel

    I actually have the first (1998) edition, but it was not a selection. A James Beard Foundation Cookbook of the Year winner, this book is a treasure-trove of Smoky Mountain and Blue Ridge Mountain folklore and folkways. The book is aptly sub-titled "A celebration of foodlore handed down from Scotland, England, Ireland, Germany, and the Cherokee Nation." Divided into 4 sections - Folklore, Art, Foods, & Blessings, all of which are chocked full of mouth-watering recipes. Very nice B/W photos and qu I actually have the first (1998) edition, but it was not a selection. A James Beard Foundation Cookbook of the Year winner, this book is a treasure-trove of Smoky Mountain and Blue Ridge Mountain folklore and folkways. The book is aptly sub-titled "A celebration of foodlore handed down from Scotland, England, Ireland, Germany, and the Cherokee Nation." Divided into 4 sections - Folklore, Art, Foods, & Blessings, all of which are chocked full of mouth-watering recipes. Very nice B/W photos and quotes, poems, and writings of locals, some well-known but most not. A very good read and anyone interested in the history, culture, and heritage, not to mention foods, of the mountains of NC should own, enjoy and use this book.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Tiffany

    Review of: Smokehouse Ham, Spoon Bread, & Scuppernong Wine, the Folklore and Art of Southern Appalachian Cooking By Joseph E. Dabney Review written by Tiffany Kreierhoff I love flipping through cookbooks. I tend to find interesting recipes that I want to try out on my own. Or at least I find pictures of this I wish I had the skill and patience to make. This cookbook was different. I was unable to do that with this one. In no way does this mean that I didn’t find some interesting recipes, this book Review of: Smokehouse Ham, Spoon Bread, & Scuppernong Wine, the Folklore and Art of Southern Appalachian Cooking By Joseph E. Dabney Review written by Tiffany Kreierhoff I love flipping through cookbooks. I tend to find interesting recipes that I want to try out on my own. Or at least I find pictures of this I wish I had the skill and patience to make. This cookbook was different. I was unable to do that with this one. In no way does this mean that I didn’t find some interesting recipes, this book has many. But it also has so much more. I read it cover to cover, and while I picked it up at the library I do plan on purchasing a copy of my own. Joseph Dabney did a wonderful job researching this book. He peppers the work with plenty of quotes taken directly from mountain people that he interviewed. There is nothing that gives more authenticity to a work than stories of firsthand experience. The delightful part of these interviews are the fact that all of the people that gave them are older people. People that remember the hard times of the depression and gave firsthand accounts of what it took for their family to survive. What did families eat during the hard winter months in the Appalachian area? What kind of nuts can be collected in the hills? What’s the best way to prepare greens? And most importantly what the heck is a scuppernong? All of these questions and more can be answered in this book. This book is also full of regional wisdom. The reader will learn a little bit about what is means to planting vegetables by the signs, and when is the best time of year to be slaughtering hogs. This book is a must read for anyone that is interested in the practices of food preparation of a bygone era. In its pages you will find knowledge of a group of people that managed to take a rugged area and turn it into a home.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Charla Wilson

    This book is full of stories of the people of the Smoky Mountains. My favorite chapters are devoted to Fruits. Some of the mouth watering recipes are: Stewed Apples, Fried Apples, Apple Dumplings, Peach Cobbler,Peach Butter, Blackberry Cobbler, Scuppernong Jelly,and yes, Scuppernong wine, which I plan to try! Now, I will warn you that there are recipes for some things that I will not try, such as Turtle Stew, Squirrel Pie, and Possum and Sweet Potatoes. However, there are enough great ones like This book is full of stories of the people of the Smoky Mountains. My favorite chapters are devoted to Fruits. Some of the mouth watering recipes are: Stewed Apples, Fried Apples, Apple Dumplings, Peach Cobbler,Peach Butter, Blackberry Cobbler, Scuppernong Jelly,and yes, Scuppernong wine, which I plan to try! Now, I will warn you that there are recipes for some things that I will not try, such as Turtle Stew, Squirrel Pie, and Possum and Sweet Potatoes. However, there are enough great ones like Tomato Gravy, Mint Juleps, Angel Biscuits spoon bread, and apple butter to more than make up for the unusable ones. If you want to cook up some serious southern food that is sure to be authentic and delicious, you cannot go wrong with this book!

  5. 4 out of 5

    Melinda

    I picked up a copy of this food history/cookbook in N GA while on vacation and quickly devoured its tasty mix of history and food lore. This amazing book tells the story of the Celts who immigrated over the Great Philadelphia Wagon Road in the 1700s. There are many old recipes, some sound strange, others tasty, but this is far more than a cookbook. Chapers deal with folklore, family traditions, and the social life of these stubborn, hardscrabble mountain people. The author, himself a product of I picked up a copy of this food history/cookbook in N GA while on vacation and quickly devoured its tasty mix of history and food lore. This amazing book tells the story of the Celts who immigrated over the Great Philadelphia Wagon Road in the 1700s. There are many old recipes, some sound strange, others tasty, but this is far more than a cookbook. Chapers deal with folklore, family traditions, and the social life of these stubborn, hardscrabble mountain people. The author, himself a product of rural NC life, has interviewed many mountain people, and the book bursts with their collected memories. In the vein of the Foxfire series, this is a great book about mountain folks and food.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Ami

    One of the best cookbooks I've ever read. Not only are the recipes delicious and nostalgic, but the book itself is a wonderful read with great, old pictures. Being that my family's heritage is from the same origins and area, although we are far removed from the places and people, I felt a special connection to this book. One of the best cookbooks I've ever read. Not only are the recipes delicious and nostalgic, but the book itself is a wonderful read with great, old pictures. Being that my family's heritage is from the same origins and area, although we are far removed from the places and people, I felt a special connection to this book.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Donna

    This is one of the best cookbooks I've ever read. I loved every minute of it. I may never cook any of the recipes, but I will read this book over and over again. It gives you some history and some insight into life in Southern Appalachia as well as recipes for some...ahem..."unique" culinary delights. You don't have to cook to enjoy reading this book. This is one of the best cookbooks I've ever read. I loved every minute of it. I may never cook any of the recipes, but I will read this book over and over again. It gives you some history and some insight into life in Southern Appalachia as well as recipes for some...ahem..."unique" culinary delights. You don't have to cook to enjoy reading this book.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Suzanne

    Interesting, if a bit too anecdotal and familiar/folksy. The whole "we all knew dinner was gonna be good when granny started sharpening her chicken-killin' knife" talk got tiresome. The chapters on home brewing/fruit wine/moonshine were very good. Recipes included! I am glad I read it. Interesting, if a bit too anecdotal and familiar/folksy. The whole "we all knew dinner was gonna be good when granny started sharpening her chicken-killin' knife" talk got tiresome. The chapters on home brewing/fruit wine/moonshine were very good. Recipes included! I am glad I read it.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Kimini85

    More novel or textbook than a cookbook, I can't believe how much I learned from reading this! The personal stories included with the recipes are endearing, and the history and folklore are fascinating. Loved it! More novel or textbook than a cookbook, I can't believe how much I learned from reading this! The personal stories included with the recipes are endearing, and the history and folklore are fascinating. Loved it!

  10. 4 out of 5

    Lanette

    I originally thought this was more of a cookbook, but it turned out to be a great look at the history of some of Appalachia's most 'famous' food... while I may never actually cook from the book, I feel like I know more about the dishes I have heard so much about while living here in VA. I originally thought this was more of a cookbook, but it turned out to be a great look at the history of some of Appalachia's most 'famous' food... while I may never actually cook from the book, I feel like I know more about the dishes I have heard so much about while living here in VA.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Della Collins

    I loved the history and stories of Appalachia. Of course, as always new cooking ideas are welcomed!

  12. 5 out of 5

    Mary

    Love the cultural and historical foodie tidbits, and some good down home yummy recipes.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Oleta

    I think I will go order my own copy of this wonderful book.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Avis Black

    Had too much about the culture, when what I wanted was a focus on the food.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Susannah

    One of the staples in my kitchen, much-stained, much-thumbed, much-loved.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Alice

    LOVE THIS BOOK. It was one of the first books I read when I moved into the area, and it taught me a lot about local customs and foodways.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Marty Elrod

    I LOVE THIS BOOK!!!

  18. 4 out of 5

    Beth

    This book ROCKS!

  19. 4 out of 5

    Fred

    I recommend this for any foodies out there. Good history good reading good eats.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Susan Graham

  21. 5 out of 5

    Josh Moore

  22. 4 out of 5

    Laura Emmert

  23. 5 out of 5

    Lois

  24. 5 out of 5

    Gary Heaton

  25. 5 out of 5

    Molly Lynde

  26. 4 out of 5

    Jackie

  27. 4 out of 5

    Amy

  28. 4 out of 5

    Rebekah Epling

  29. 5 out of 5

    Mary Funk

  30. 4 out of 5

    Staci

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