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Andy and the Lion

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Andy was not afraid to meet a real lion...but he never suspected that a lion could be afraid of him, or that one might actually need his help.


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Andy was not afraid to meet a real lion...but he never suspected that a lion could be afraid of him, or that one might actually need his help.

30 review for Andy and the Lion

  1. 4 out of 5

    Calista

    An exciting story on the Mouse and the Lion from Aesop's Fables. The whole book is orange, black and white with extreme energy in the drawings. The drawings feel modern with all the action in them. This is a book from the 30s. For some reason James decided to split sentences on one page to the next as a cliff hanger. Yeah, I didn't like that. It was annoying. My nephew did think this was a fun story. I can see why this one won the honor. An exciting story on the Mouse and the Lion from Aesop's Fables. The whole book is orange, black and white with extreme energy in the drawings. The drawings feel modern with all the action in them. This is a book from the 30s. For some reason James decided to split sentences on one page to the next as a cliff hanger. Yeah, I didn't like that. It was annoying. My nephew did think this was a fun story. I can see why this one won the honor.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Luisa Knight

    Fun illustrations on every page and the story is quite engaging too. If you have any lion lovers (like my nephew) they'll thoroughly enjoy this delightful tale. Ages: 4 - 8 **Like my reviews? Then you should follow me! Because I have hundreds more just like this one. With each review, I provide a Cleanliness Report, mentioning any objectionable content I come across so that parents and/or conscientious readers (like me) can determine beforehand whether they want to read a book or not. Content surp Fun illustrations on every page and the story is quite engaging too. If you have any lion lovers (like my nephew) they'll thoroughly enjoy this delightful tale. Ages: 4 - 8 **Like my reviews? Then you should follow me! Because I have hundreds more just like this one. With each review, I provide a Cleanliness Report, mentioning any objectionable content I come across so that parents and/or conscientious readers (like me) can determine beforehand whether they want to read a book or not. Content surprises are super annoying, especially when you’re 100+ pages in, so here’s my attempt to help you avoid that! So Follow or Friend me here on GoodReads! You’ll see my updates as I’m reading and know which books I’m liking and what I’m not finishing and why. You’ll also be able to utilize my library for looking up titles to see whether the book you’re thinking about reading next has any objectionable content or not. From swear words, to romance, to bad attitudes (in children’s books), I cover it all!

  3. 5 out of 5

    Cheryl

    Like others of you, I have mixed feelings. I liked it as a boys' fantasy, written back in the day, and actually believe it has a bit of an *anti* hunting message. (I believe the same of another controversial Caldecott book, The Biggest Bear). I liked the structure, the way a reader is pushed to turn the pages by each interrupted sentence - sort of a cliffhanger idea. I like the three 'acts' that give it a classical story arc. After I got used to the all-capital 'shouting' font, I decided I liked Like others of you, I have mixed feelings. I liked it as a boys' fantasy, written back in the day, and actually believe it has a bit of an *anti* hunting message. (I believe the same of another controversial Caldecott book, The Biggest Bear). I liked the structure, the way a reader is pushed to turn the pages by each interrupted sentence - sort of a cliffhanger idea. I like the three 'acts' that give it a classical story arc. After I got used to the all-capital 'shouting' font, I decided I liked it... after all, those letters are all hand-drawn! I liked the very lively pictures, full of extreme motion. I did have trouble with full suspension of disbelief. I could not get used to Andy's chubby cheeks - to me it looked like he had mumps! I liked the different perspectives from the different grownups... well, I didn't like that Andy's parents were so very perturbed the boy was reading through dinner, but then, even in my family of avid readers we were expected to put the book down and have a family dinner together....

  4. 4 out of 5

    Paul

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. This book is about the world of imagination unfolded in reading books: Andy and the Lion is dedicated to the two cast lions that guard the New York Public Library, the opening page sees Andy following his dog to his local library, and the final page finds Andy returning to the library reading along the way. The story in between builds on Andy's interest in lions, passes through his dream about hunting a lion, and evolves into a chance encounter with an escaped circus lion. That's when we find ou This book is about the world of imagination unfolded in reading books: Andy and the Lion is dedicated to the two cast lions that guard the New York Public Library, the opening page sees Andy following his dog to his local library, and the final page finds Andy returning to the library reading along the way. The story in between builds on Andy's interest in lions, passes through his dream about hunting a lion, and evolves into a chance encounter with an escaped circus lion. That's when we find ourselves with Andy in the midst of "Androcles and the Lion" and Aesop's "Lion and Mouse." The story dashes from one episode to the next (removing a thorn, the visiting circus, the lion on the loose, Andy's saving the town from danger, and a celebratory parade). When Andy returns his book to the library followed by the lion, we both find ourselves in the story but also catching Daugherty's wink that maybe it's all the young boy's imagination...or is it? The story is skillfully layered with an imaginative telling. Daugherty's style of drawing, using the monochrome palette of brown and black on white, conveys a lot of energy, captures motion, elongation of perspective, facial expression and bodily posture, and includes little surprises, hints and amusements along the way - and like Robert McCloskey's illustrations has a certain dated or period feel. The text is spare but the book is spread over three parts and is probably too long for very young listeners. It's hard to tell when the story takes place in Andersonville (someone might be able to use the mother's dress and shoes to narrow the date down), but Andy's parents are nicely dressed while he heads off to school barefoot, which adds another texture of puzzlement. This book, just an honoree in the Caldecott's second year in 1939, set a high mark for the prestigious award.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Kathryn

    3.5 STARS As for "Andy and the Lion" (apologies, my link to the book is not working), I had mixed feelings. As has been a constant thread in our discussion of these early books, it is a piece of its time. I tried to see it as a child, especially a young boy, of the day would see it--putting himself in Andy's position on the thrilling visits to the circus and hunting lions. But, as present day animal-loving, vegan adult, I found those sections distressing rather than exhilarating. On the other han 3.5 STARS As for "Andy and the Lion" (apologies, my link to the book is not working), I had mixed feelings. As has been a constant thread in our discussion of these early books, it is a piece of its time. I tried to see it as a child, especially a young boy, of the day would see it--putting himself in Andy's position on the thrilling visits to the circus and hunting lions. But, as present day animal-loving, vegan adult, I found those sections distressing rather than exhilarating. On the other hand, I really loved how the story was a tribute to the magic of books! Beginning with the dedication, to the lion statues in front of the New York Public Library, on through with checking out the book about lions, the adventures with the lion (book) the ending where the boy is returning his lion book (and having with him the lion, and all he had learned and experienced through his book), it was such a great love story about all the fabulous places books can take you! I also appreciated the nods to the classic tales, like Androcles And The Lion and Aesop's Lion and the Mouse. The illustrations were charming. I loved the period details, even though parts were a bit confusing (the parents seemed well dressed though Andy went around much less formally dressed!), and I felt they fit the Caldecott criteria well. One little gripe, I found the "flow" of the text very annoying. It just seemed to jump from page to page in the middle of a sentence. Nothing wrong with the writing itself, I just found the placing from page to page awkward.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Jenny

    I am reading early Caldecott winners and honors with the picture book club on the Children's Book group. I read this with my daughters. My 5 year old loved this book. As soon as I finished reading, she begged me to read it again...right now. Andy reads a book about lions and begins to dream about lions and think about lions until one day he meets a lion. He is scared and runs around a rock...and so does the lion. The lion is just as scared of him as he is of the lion. Andy is able to help the li I am reading early Caldecott winners and honors with the picture book club on the Children's Book group. I read this with my daughters. My 5 year old loved this book. As soon as I finished reading, she begged me to read it again...right now. Andy reads a book about lions and begins to dream about lions and think about lions until one day he meets a lion. He is scared and runs around a rock...and so does the lion. The lion is just as scared of him as he is of the lion. Andy is able to help the lion and they become friends. It is fun and magical. Andy does dream about hunting lions early in the book which will be troublesome to some readers, I imagine, but because it was a dream and the whole book has a magical quality to it, I was not bothered by this.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Laura Harrison

    I fell in love with Andy and the Lion the first time I gazed at the cover. The book was a living thing to me. The story, the illustrations-perfection. I have read this book hundreds of times. It is a classic every child should own.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Cathy

    There are so many things I love about this book. The way the "run-on" sentences pull the reader through the book. The way the words and pictures work together so closely. The joy of the relationship between the boy and the lion. And of course that it all begins and ends with a book from the library. I do love it so. There are so many things I love about this book. The way the "run-on" sentences pull the reader through the book. The way the words and pictures work together so closely. The joy of the relationship between the boy and the lion. And of course that it all begins and ends with a book from the library. I do love it so.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Crystal

    1939 Caldecott Honor I loved seeing all of the details in the picture like his dog peeking around the bookshelf in the library and the headline in the newspaper that his dad was reading. Funny how Andy's parents are dressed up in a very fancy way, but he is barefoot and in overhauls. 1939 Caldecott Honor I loved seeing all of the details in the picture like his dog peeking around the bookshelf in the library and the headline in the newspaper that his dad was reading. Funny how Andy's parents are dressed up in a very fancy way, but he is barefoot and in overhauls.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Abigail

    Originally published in 1938, and awarded a Caldecott Honor in 1939 - the medal-winner that year was Thomas Handforth's Mei Li - this charming picture-book follows the story of Andy, a lion-obsessed young boy who has an unexpected encounter with his favorite subject. Checking out a book about lions from the library one day, Andy is so engrossed that he reads through dinner, listening to his grandfather's stories of hunting lions in the evening. On his way to school the very next day, Andy ha Originally published in 1938, and awarded a Caldecott Honor in 1939 - the medal-winner that year was Thomas Handforth's Mei Li - this charming picture-book follows the story of Andy, a lion-obsessed young boy who has an unexpected encounter with his favorite subject. Checking out a book about lions from the library one day, Andy is so engrossed that he reads through dinner, listening to his grandfather's stories of hunting lions in the evening. On his way to school the very next day, Andy happens upon a lion in need of help, and goes to his assistance, forming a friendship that stands the test of time, when the lions returns much later, as part of a circus act... I was reminded here, both by the story and by its subtitle - "A Tale of Kindness Remembered or the Power of Gratitude" - of the Aesopic fable of Androcles and the Lion , with the boy doing the lion a kindness, and then being ecstatically greeted (and not harmed) by the lion in turn. This one is a little long for a picture-book - it is divided up into very brief chapters, or parts - but for slightly older picture-book audiences, I think it will be a winner. The story is engaging (and emphasizes the importance of the library!), and the artwork, done in black and white with brown accents, is exuberant and full of fun. Recommended to young readers who enjoy animal stories!

  11. 5 out of 5

    Katelynn Callahan

    This book is about a boy named Andy who loves to read. In the first part of the book, he went to the library to get a book and he read all day long. Before he went to bed his grandfather told him a story about hunting lions in Africa. All night Andy dreamed that he was hunting lions. When he woke up, all he could think about were lions. In the second part of the book, Andy heads off to school. On his way to school he runs into a real lion. The lion and Andy are both afraid of each other at first This book is about a boy named Andy who loves to read. In the first part of the book, he went to the library to get a book and he read all day long. Before he went to bed his grandfather told him a story about hunting lions in Africa. All night Andy dreamed that he was hunting lions. When he woke up, all he could think about were lions. In the second part of the book, Andy heads off to school. On his way to school he runs into a real lion. The lion and Andy are both afraid of each other at first. Andy realizes that the Lion has a big thorn in his paw so he decides to help. The lion is so pleased that he licks Andy's face. In the third part of the story, Andy takes a trip to the circus that is in town. In the show there was a famous lion act, but the lion jumped out of his cage and went after the crowd. The lion was right in Andys path and Andy thought he was going to be eaten. As the lion came closer he recognized him. It was the same lion Andy had helped earlier in the story. The crowd was not pleased with the lion and tried to capture him but Andy saved him. The book is only illustrated in two colors, orange and black. I think that they story is a bit confusing because of the way it is written. Sentences are broken up between pages so it makes the reading choppy. Also the pictures are very dull and not very detailed. It would be best suited for the 3rd grade reading level because of the strange way that the pages are broken up. some pages have only one word with others have a full paragraph. Overall i would not recommend this book because it seemed to be somewhat boring and I did not get a good reaction when I read it to a 4,6 and 9 year old.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Claudia

    This was going to be my 'book from my childhood' for my reading challenge, and then I found THE LITTLE LAME PRINCE. So I read this totally for myself. And it's better than I remember...I had forgotten how each page of text ends in the middle of a sentence that is continued on the next page. What a wonderful book to teach prediction!! The story and the illustrations are so motivating that kids' interest would be captured for sure. Of course I didn't know this was a retelling of the Aesop's fable, This was going to be my 'book from my childhood' for my reading challenge, and then I found THE LITTLE LAME PRINCE. So I read this totally for myself. And it's better than I remember...I had forgotten how each page of text ends in the middle of a sentence that is continued on the next page. What a wonderful book to teach prediction!! The story and the illustrations are so motivating that kids' interest would be captured for sure. Of course I didn't know this was a retelling of the Aesop's fable, "Androcles and the Lion," with the heavy-handed moral. Here, it's an adventure story, a silly story...a kid's story. Andy lives in a frontier town and walks to school barefoot. It's a miracle HE didn't get a thorn in HIS paw...but instead it's the lion, which inexplicably ends up in the little town. Good deed done, Andy toddles off to school. The payoff for his kindness occurs when the circus comes to town, and Andy saves the day. And on the very last page, he finally returns the library book that inspired the adventure. And speaking of libraries and lions, I love the dedication: "To Lady Astor and Lord Lenox, the library lions who have so long sat in front of the New Your Public Library and with such complacent good nature and forebearance looked down on Manhattan parade." Even better than I remembered. A true gem.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Jonathan Ryal

    This book would not be a top recommendation for somebody with a short attention span and a lack of comprehension. The story of Andy and the Lion has three parts. The first part introduces us to Andy, him grabbing a book on lions, and then after reading the entire day listening to his grandpa tells stories of hunting lions. Part 2 has Andy run into a lion. I take that it is real but they don’t ever give much about a lion appearing by school. I understand it is fantasy but they don’t give the impl This book would not be a top recommendation for somebody with a short attention span and a lack of comprehension. The story of Andy and the Lion has three parts. The first part introduces us to Andy, him grabbing a book on lions, and then after reading the entire day listening to his grandpa tells stories of hunting lions. Part 2 has Andy run into a lion. I take that it is real but they don’t ever give much about a lion appearing by school. I understand it is fantasy but they don’t give the implication of it being a dream or not real. Andy helps get a thorn out of the lion and they go their separate ways. Part 3 brings a circus to town where Andy runs into the lion he helped. There is a lot of talk of a lion in this story but the first to parts have little to no interaction with the lion and there is very little in the third part. The nice thing the author does to keep you curious as to what will happen next is they leave each page as a cliff hanger so that the sentence is finished on the next page. Overall, it was a bit dated and lacked what I would want to pull me in.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Matthew Henson

    This is another good book about having imagination. It is about a young boy named Andy whose grandfather reads him a story . Then the following day meets a lion and helps out a lion who has a thorn stuck. Later he meets the same lion again at the circus after almost being attacked. I believe that the Arthur is telling readers that once you become friends with anyone that time can past and when meeting them once again the friendship starts from where it was left off.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Michael Jones

    The reason for giving this five is that it really gets underneath a little boy's skin! This book just goes over and over again before bed and the illustrations are great! I know it's probably not politically correct or correct for the save the whales crowd, but great for young kids! The reason for giving this five is that it really gets underneath a little boy's skin! This book just goes over and over again before bed and the illustrations are great! I know it's probably not politically correct or correct for the save the whales crowd, but great for young kids!

  16. 5 out of 5

    ABC

    Andy reads about lions and then meets a lion and helps him. I liked the ending--it shows Andy going back to the library for more books!

  17. 5 out of 5

    Angela

    Of the 1939 Caldecott award winners this is the one I would have chosen. It is a very fun and imaginative and we loved the pictures and story.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Laura

    Its just a story and VERY CUTE.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Jordann Singer

    2. Fable Andy and the Lion By James Daugherty Andy and the Lion is an easy-to-read book with a beautiful meaning and purpose. These factors are the reasons why it is considered a fable; it is a brief and simple story that clearly points to a lesson. The book also has a Caldecott Honor. Although the pictures are simplistic and non-realistic, they bring the story to life in the reader’s mind. It is easy to picture visualize what is going on in the story, especially since the words do not really desc 2. Fable Andy and the Lion By James Daugherty Andy and the Lion is an easy-to-read book with a beautiful meaning and purpose. These factors are the reasons why it is considered a fable; it is a brief and simple story that clearly points to a lesson. The book also has a Caldecott Honor. Although the pictures are simplistic and non-realistic, they bring the story to life in the reader’s mind. It is easy to picture visualize what is going on in the story, especially since the words do not really describe the setting or the character’s actions. Although the book does not end with a moral, it is easy for the reader to see the lesson of the story. The lesson of kindness is seen in the transition from Part 2 of the story to Part 3. Also, in one of the title pages of the book, it reads “A tale of Kindness Remembered or The Power of Gratitude” (Daugherty). This subtitle perfectly describes the themes of this book and could be seen as the moral of the story that the reader should take after reading it. The book can be seen as simple because there are only a couple of words per page and there are only thirty pages. Saying this, the book relates directly to the definition of a fable by being a brief story. Fables are effective in that they can be read to young children so that they are taught morals in a simplistic way that is easy to understand. This way, children are able to absorb all of what the book is trying to teach them. I would use this book in my classroom to teach children to read. For new readers, reading a page is an accomplishment and given that there are only a few words per page gives readers a sense of pride when they flip a page. The vocabulary is also fairly simple. There are a couple of larger words, but they should be easy to sound out. This book could only be used in younger classes, probably only up to second grade. I would most likely not use this book as a read aloud because it gives a lesson that a lot of other books give and it can get redundant. Saying this though, the moral is universal, and everyone could benefit from the implementing the lesson in to their daily lives.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Heather McC

    An unlikely friendship forms when a youngster goes to the library.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Maria Rowe

    • 1939 Caldecott Honor Book • Really cute! The first thing I saw in this book was the dedication that reads: “To Lady Astor and Lord Lenox, the library lions who have so long sat in front of the New York Public Library and with such complacent good nature and forbearance looked down on the Manhattan parade” I’m not really sure what’s supposed to be real or not in this story, but I think that’s the point: that books are magical and can transport you. I love the imagination in this book, the pro lib • 1939 Caldecott Honor Book • Really cute! The first thing I saw in this book was the dedication that reads: “To Lady Astor and Lord Lenox, the library lions who have so long sat in front of the New York Public Library and with such complacent good nature and forbearance looked down on the Manhattan parade” I’m not really sure what’s supposed to be real or not in this story, but I think that’s the point: that books are magical and can transport you. I love the imagination in this book, the pro library message, and I love that there’s kind of a lot of action taking place in such a short little book. This book introduced me to the term bed clothes which I think is really fascinating / funny. It means bed coverings such as sheets or blankets. Clothes for your bed! Materials used: unlisted Typeface used: unlisted

  22. 5 out of 5

    Seema Rao

    Nice story about a boy and lion, a la St. Jerome, accompanied by attractive multicolored lino print style illustrations. The text is short and is good to read aloud. Feels old-timey in a good way without being dated.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Shawn Thrasher

    The plot is as old as storytelling - a Depression-era re-telling of Androcles and the Lion. It's the illustrations that really make this 1939 Caldecott Honor the cat's pajamas: Daugherty's wood cuts (?) are pure 1930s Americana; a striking example of American Regionalism in the style of American Gothic's Grant Wood, with some Ozian Denslow thrown in (my favorite is Andy's mother waving goodbye to him from the front porch as he goes off to school, which could almost be a storboard for the musical The plot is as old as storytelling - a Depression-era re-telling of Androcles and the Lion. It's the illustrations that really make this 1939 Caldecott Honor the cat's pajamas: Daugherty's wood cuts (?) are pure 1930s Americana; a striking example of American Regionalism in the style of American Gothic's Grant Wood, with some Ozian Denslow thrown in (my favorite is Andy's mother waving goodbye to him from the front porch as he goes off to school, which could almost be a storboard for the musical Oklahoma). The illustrations are also "lion" colored, which is extra neat. A striking book, if you love American art from this time period.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Rosemary Sullivan

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. I know a lot of Andy's. I come from a long line of them. This includes my father. Growing up, I felt he could do anything; befriending a lion wouldn't have seemed so far-fetched. So,while reading this book I felt a special kinship with the young boy in overalls named Andy who does just that, along with his trusty dog Prince. Besides my personal association to the story, Author James Daugherty's book has a literary legacy as a classic of children's literature. It was first published in 1938, when I know a lot of Andy's. I come from a long line of them. This includes my father. Growing up, I felt he could do anything; befriending a lion wouldn't have seemed so far-fetched. So,while reading this book I felt a special kinship with the young boy in overalls named Andy who does just that, along with his trusty dog Prince. Besides my personal association to the story, Author James Daugherty's book has a literary legacy as a classic of children's literature. It was first published in 1938, when Adolf Hitler was "Man of the Year" in "Time" Magazine. Fear and uncertainty must have been rampant, as it was during the times upon which the original folktale is based. It is a re-telling of "Androcles and the Lion," which dates back to ancient Rome and Athens. This was a time when men could literally be thrown to the lions, at the Roman Emperor's command. Times are still precarious, as I suppose they will always be. Perhaps that's why this book is still read, as its life-affirming message -under the main title are written the words, "A Tale of Kindness Remembered or The Power of Gratitude" - is read by each generation. In the story, barefoot Andy and Prince visit the Public Library of Andersonville. He checks out a book about lions and becomes so engrossed while reading it, he can't put it down. He pores over it during suppertime at the family table, much to the obvious displeasure of his father who glares at him with a furrowed brow. His feverish imagination is further sparked by his grandfather's tall tales of hunting them in Africa. Andy's own adventure with a lion begins when he and Prince spy one, or rather the tail of one, on his way to school. At first both lion and boy are frightened of each other, but then the lion, in distress, asks for Andy's help in removing a thorn from his paw. Andy obliges and that singular act of helping one in need has an impact on future events in the story, which involves a circus coming to town. While the timeless themes of courage and compassion are present in the book (as well as the value of public libraries. The dedication is to Lady Astor and Lord Lenox,the Library Lions that guard The New York Public Library), I found the virtue of respect for animals, even ones that can be intimidating, to be refreshing and ahead of its time. It predates the animal rights movement. Unlike the grandfather who dreams of the hunt, Andy ultimately seeks to protect the lion who is his friend, from the panicked masses. While that message is soul-stirring, the book and especially the illustrations are comforting and joyous. The yellow, black and white drawings reveal a loving family, as Andy's mother leans in to brush his hair. The boy, his dog and the lion have a zest for life that involves, smiling, dancing and running with exuberant determination. They are restless adventurers, unburdened by prejudice.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Josiah

    Seventy-one years before Jerry Pinkney's The Lion and the Mouse won the 2010 Randolph Caldecott Medal, the esteemed James Daugherty received (retroactively, at least) a Caldecott Honor for his own version of the classic fable. In Andy and the Lion, though, it isn't a timid mouse that swallows its fear to help a lion in a compromising spot, but a young boy infatuated with the massive jungle cats, who reads anything he can get his hands on about the majestic Panthera leo. Andy's sudden confrontat Seventy-one years before Jerry Pinkney's The Lion and the Mouse won the 2010 Randolph Caldecott Medal, the esteemed James Daugherty received (retroactively, at least) a Caldecott Honor for his own version of the classic fable. In Andy and the Lion, though, it isn't a timid mouse that swallows its fear to help a lion in a compromising spot, but a young boy infatuated with the massive jungle cats, who reads anything he can get his hands on about the majestic Panthera leo. Andy's sudden confrontation with a loud, aggressive lion only a short walk from his own house is more silly and exaggerated than Jerry Pinkney's version of the tale, with more jarring transitions and less introspective content, but there's something for us to learn here if we tune in closely. James Daugherty won the Newbery Medal (Daniel Boone, 1940) for a reason. Lions are all Andy has on his mind since picking up a book from the local library and eagerly devouring its information. He doesn't expect to run into a real lion, however, on his way to school with his dog, Prince. Fortunately for Andy, the lion has matters besides food on his mind today. A painful little thorn is jammed into the animal's delicate paw, causing agonizing pain. Without a thought for his own safety, Andy comes to the rescue and has the thorn extracted in a flash. Lion and boy part ways amicably, but this isn't the last they're ever going to see of each other. On the festive occasion of a circus coming through town, Andy and droves of other excited, smiling spectators in attendance at the parade are thrown into a panic as the circus's largest lion leaps free of its confinement and begins prowling freely among the audience. Caught in the wild creature's path, it looks like the end for Andy. Or has a past kindness performed without hesitation saved him from an awful fate? Andy and the Lion doesn't proceed in perfectly linear fashion, not every plot surprise is given explanation, and the rhythm of the text is slightly incongruous, frequently trailing off mid-sentence on one page before finishing on the next. I like James Daugherty's drawing style, and while I'm not sure I see why the American Library Association selected this particular book of his as a Caldecott runner-up, there are one or two notably nice illustrations in it. I don't consider Andy and the Lion James Daugherty's best work, but the theme of selflessness and kindness is quietly present throughout, and has value. I would at least consider giving Andy and the Lion one and a half stars. If you like old-fashioned picture books, as I do, you'll probably have some fun with this one.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Margaret Chind

    This is week 28 of the Memoria Press Junior Kindergarten Curriculum: Complete Lesson Plans for One Year and the literature choice for this week is Andy and the Lion. Coming into this I do know who James Daugherty is because of a new 2013 book Lincoln's Gettysburg Address. It was neat knowing how amazing those illustrations are to be able to come back to this Caldecott winner book with it's whimsical two-tone illustrations. This is my favorite part of the Memoria Press Junior Kindergarten curricu This is week 28 of the Memoria Press Junior Kindergarten Curriculum: Complete Lesson Plans for One Year and the literature choice for this week is Andy and the Lion. Coming into this I do know who James Daugherty is because of a new 2013 book Lincoln's Gettysburg Address. It was neat knowing how amazing those illustrations are to be able to come back to this Caldecott winner book with it's whimsical two-tone illustrations. This is my favorite part of the Memoria Press Junior Kindergarten curriculum in the book selections and questions with vocabulary to discuss during and after reading a class treasure. Both girls are actually fighting over this one to “read” alone and it even was involved in nap time. We read it again today as well as yesterday and I’m sure it will be read again tomorrow. I purchased this one to go along with our curriculum for Memoria Press Junior Kindergarten.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Samantha

    Andy gets a book about lions from the library. It casts a spell over him and he reads it and reads it all the way up until bedtime. That night he dreams lions. Throughout hsi day, lions are never far from Andy's mind. On his way to school, Andy crosses paths with a lion! Both are terrified of one another and rush this way and that way around abig rock only to keep seeing each other's face when they peek around to check for one another. Finally, the lion bravely offers his wounded paw with a thor Andy gets a book about lions from the library. It casts a spell over him and he reads it and reads it all the way up until bedtime. That night he dreams lions. Throughout hsi day, lions are never far from Andy's mind. On his way to school, Andy crosses paths with a lion! Both are terrified of one another and rush this way and that way around abig rock only to keep seeing each other's face when they peek around to check for one another. Finally, the lion bravely offers his wounded paw with a thorn stuck in it to Andy who ready with a pair of pliers in his back pocket yanks it out. The two unlikely friends cross paths once more when the circus comes to town and the lion escapes the ring during the act and reunites with Andy in the audience. Sentences carry across pages leaving readers hanging for a conclusion to action. Illustrations are ink drawings shaded with sepia tones. Fun read aloud! Must read/see!

  28. 4 out of 5

    Londa

    This version of Aesop's lion-hearted fable was interesting. The tale of a little boy who helped a lion in need was a little confusing at times. I was unsure as to whether the boy was supposed to have dreamed the entire thing or if it was supposed to have really happened. That may have been the point. The cinnamon and black illustrations were full of movement and made me think of stop action photography. I was not fond of the way the lion or Andy's dog were drawn. They looked emaciated, way to man This version of Aesop's lion-hearted fable was interesting. The tale of a little boy who helped a lion in need was a little confusing at times. I was unsure as to whether the boy was supposed to have dreamed the entire thing or if it was supposed to have really happened. That may have been the point. The cinnamon and black illustrations were full of movement and made me think of stop action photography. I was not fond of the way the lion or Andy's dog were drawn. They looked emaciated, way to many ribs. My son thought that made them look more realistic though. I have seen some reviewers remark about how each page ended mid sentence. I can understand the irritation with that, but it would be a great book to use in an elementary prediction exercise. Once again my son and I have converged on a rating of 4. I would have give it a 3 but he gave it a full out 5. He LOVED the illustrations and thought the story was exciting.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Becky B

    Andy is just a little obsessed with lions. He lives on Grandpa's tales of lion hunting in Africa and a book of lions he checked out of the library. One day, on the way to school, what should Andy run into, but a real, live lion! The lion has a thorn in his paw and Andy helps him out. Later, at the circus, a lion escapes and is about to attack Andy, but then they recognize each other. Andy saves the lion again and is awarded for bravery by the town. A retelling of Androcles and the Lion set in 193 Andy is just a little obsessed with lions. He lives on Grandpa's tales of lion hunting in Africa and a book of lions he checked out of the library. One day, on the way to school, what should Andy run into, but a real, live lion! The lion has a thorn in his paw and Andy helps him out. Later, at the circus, a lion escapes and is about to attack Andy, but then they recognize each other. Andy saves the lion again and is awarded for bravery by the town. A retelling of Androcles and the Lion set in 1930s America. This is a book that has aged pretty well. The story is still relatable for modern little kids, and it's a fun retelling of the ancient tale. Andy's a humorous little boy with his head consumed by lions so much, you aren't quite sure if the lion is real at first. And Daugherty tells the tale with just the right comedic touches. The illustrations are sometimes a little overwhelming when there's a lot of the rust color swirling around, but overall still fun.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Jess ORourke

    I read this book when I was a child (it was old then) and it brought such a wave of nostalgia, I don't think I can give it an unbiased review. A wonderful book about a young boy who loves lions, meets and helps a lion, and they help each other during separate occasions. A retelling of Aesop's Lion and Mouse. Yes, yes, there is hunting and circuses in the book -- it was written in the 1930s and times were different then (please note I did not say they were right). I find many of the not political I read this book when I was a child (it was old then) and it brought such a wave of nostalgia, I don't think I can give it an unbiased review. A wonderful book about a young boy who loves lions, meets and helps a lion, and they help each other during separate occasions. A retelling of Aesop's Lion and Mouse. Yes, yes, there is hunting and circuses in the book -- it was written in the 1930s and times were different then (please note I did not say they were right). I find many of the not politically correct books from the early 1900s give a great starting point for discussions with my 6 year old. The illustrations are dated, of course, because the book is dated. But they are still well done and deserving of the Caldecott Medal Honor designation.

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