web site hit counter The Slow Fix: Solve Problems, Work Smarter and Live Better in a World Addicted to Speed - Ebooks PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

The Slow Fix: Solve Problems, Work Smarter and Live Better in a World Addicted to Speed

Availability: Ready to download

In the tradition of his internationally bestselling In Praise of Slow, and drawing on examples from the most progressive and successful leaders in business, politics, science and society, Carl Honoré brilliantly illuminates why the best way to face our problems might just be to take our time.   If the high-flying fighter pilots of the RAF can own up to their mistakes, why ca In the tradition of his internationally bestselling In Praise of Slow, and drawing on examples from the most progressive and successful leaders in business, politics, science and society, Carl Honoré brilliantly illuminates why the best way to face our problems might just be to take our time.   If the high-flying fighter pilots of the RAF can own up to their mistakes, why can't the rest of us? Toyota was fantastically good at exposing its failings and correcting them, until it stopped, setting the company up for one of the most spectacular falls from grace in the history of the auto industry. BP couldn't bring itself to apologize for its catastrophic oil spill until the entire Gulf Coast of the United States was bearing the brunt of its technological shortcomings.  Addicted as we might be to the quick fix--pills, crash diets or just diverting attention from things about to go wrong--the quick fix never really works. Trying to solve problems in a hurry, sticking on a plaster when surgery is needed, might deliver temporary relief, but only at the price of storing up worse trouble for later. For those looking for a fix that sticks, The Slow Fix will help us produce solutions in life and work that endure.


Compare

In the tradition of his internationally bestselling In Praise of Slow, and drawing on examples from the most progressive and successful leaders in business, politics, science and society, Carl Honoré brilliantly illuminates why the best way to face our problems might just be to take our time.   If the high-flying fighter pilots of the RAF can own up to their mistakes, why ca In the tradition of his internationally bestselling In Praise of Slow, and drawing on examples from the most progressive and successful leaders in business, politics, science and society, Carl Honoré brilliantly illuminates why the best way to face our problems might just be to take our time.   If the high-flying fighter pilots of the RAF can own up to their mistakes, why can't the rest of us? Toyota was fantastically good at exposing its failings and correcting them, until it stopped, setting the company up for one of the most spectacular falls from grace in the history of the auto industry. BP couldn't bring itself to apologize for its catastrophic oil spill until the entire Gulf Coast of the United States was bearing the brunt of its technological shortcomings.  Addicted as we might be to the quick fix--pills, crash diets or just diverting attention from things about to go wrong--the quick fix never really works. Trying to solve problems in a hurry, sticking on a plaster when surgery is needed, might deliver temporary relief, but only at the price of storing up worse trouble for later. For those looking for a fix that sticks, The Slow Fix will help us produce solutions in life and work that endure.

30 review for The Slow Fix: Solve Problems, Work Smarter and Live Better in a World Addicted to Speed

  1. 5 out of 5

    Jackie

    I took my time reading this, not just to make a pun, but also because there are many, many lessons and/or good points in this book I wanted to sit with for a bit before moving on. Which was beneficial, because the author continually refers back to earlier chapters as examples of how the many wise suggestions work together. All of these changes are meant to effect whole neighborhoods, communities, cities, states, countries and the world. Nowhere in this book does he say that any of this is easy. I took my time reading this, not just to make a pun, but also because there are many, many lessons and/or good points in this book I wanted to sit with for a bit before moving on. Which was beneficial, because the author continually refers back to earlier chapters as examples of how the many wise suggestions work together. All of these changes are meant to effect whole neighborhoods, communities, cities, states, countries and the world. Nowhere in this book does he say that any of this is easy. It all requires a great deal of passion, patience, fortitude and belief in what you are doing to make the kind of societal changes that are discussed in this book. A slow fix requires time, energy and commitment and well as a whole lot of planning and very careful thought. It isn't for the faint of heart, but for those who truly believe in changing things for the better, this book will help fire you up and get you pointed in the right direction. Every journey starts with a single step--perhaps this book can be just that.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Zaher Alhaj

    Illuminatingly lovely read. Carl tries to put the virtue of "long-term thinking" back on pedestal, amid the modern tempo of life that demands us to live mindlessly, jumping from task to task, from goal to goal, and trying frantically to beat the endless deadlines. The so-called "Getting Things Done" Culture is stealing our lives, disguised in attractive titles such as "productivity"..."success"..."goal-driven", and the like. The Author laments the culture of quick fixes and shortcuts, advocating Illuminatingly lovely read. Carl tries to put the virtue of "long-term thinking" back on pedestal, amid the modern tempo of life that demands us to live mindlessly, jumping from task to task, from goal to goal, and trying frantically to beat the endless deadlines. The so-called "Getting Things Done" Culture is stealing our lives, disguised in attractive titles such as "productivity"..."success"..."goal-driven", and the like. The Author laments the culture of quick fixes and shortcuts, advocating instead more balanced mindful mode for solving complicated intricate problems, which he called "the slow fix". He creatively defined, illustrated, and weaved the ingredients of this long-term, holistic, realistic, patient, life-long thinking, which we must employ to tackle today's wicked problems, whether we are grappling with national health issue or trying to mend our personal relationships.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Al Waie

    A book that allows you to "live more than one life in more than one place." Just like what Anne Tyler used to say about her fascination towards reading book. Indeed, I traveled the world through this book looking for the ingredients to improve my problem-solving mojo. Great practical and real life examples of those who have applied the principal of the Slow Fix, and made the world a better place. A must read for most of us, who like to see our problem fixed, but are too damn impatient. We rather A book that allows you to "live more than one life in more than one place." Just like what Anne Tyler used to say about her fascination towards reading book. Indeed, I traveled the world through this book looking for the ingredients to improve my problem-solving mojo. Great practical and real life examples of those who have applied the principal of the Slow Fix, and made the world a better place. A must read for most of us, who like to see our problem fixed, but are too damn impatient. We rather opt for quick fix, which usually turn out to not actually solve the problem but only the symptoms.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Kylie Brooks

    This book had wonderful concepts and examples to illustrate the author's plea for us to, as a society, slow down and focus up in order to lead happier, more productive, and fulfilling lives. This book had wonderful concepts and examples to illustrate the author's plea for us to, as a society, slow down and focus up in order to lead happier, more productive, and fulfilling lives.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Andrea James

    The title and the ideas proposed are about slowing down but funnily enough this book is a really quick read. The author writes in a very light and flowing way and one feels pleasantly hurtled along a rapid stream of suggestions and examples. It's possible, and likely, that I liked this book because I agree with its ideas. I've been advocating deeper thinking in most of the training courses I've been delivering. Most of the managers/executives I train seem to be under incredible pressure to come u The title and the ideas proposed are about slowing down but funnily enough this book is a really quick read. The author writes in a very light and flowing way and one feels pleasantly hurtled along a rapid stream of suggestions and examples. It's possible, and likely, that I liked this book because I agree with its ideas. I've been advocating deeper thinking in most of the training courses I've been delivering. Most of the managers/executives I train seem to be under incredible pressure to come up with solutions almost immediately as well as keep up with their emails and respond to requests. This barrage of shallow interactions has created an acceptance of shallow thinking - "let's just do X because it's better than nothing" - which leave them trapped in a never ending cycle of solving almost the same problems over again. I am of course guilty of this too. The combination of being exhausted from meetings, problems and a burgeoning To-Do list, I frequently find my mind noisy with thoughts and unable to quietly ruminate on a problem without any distractions for a long period of time. I'm less able to focus and have sufficient patience and attention to work through the complexity of the situation/problem. This book makes the argument for us to slow down in a convincing way. It reminds us that when a quick fix eases the symptoms of a problem, we are then less driven to investigate deeper to learn the underlying causes, the complex interactions and to have the patience to try solutions that may have longer term effects. An example excerpt: "Complex problems can only be solved by persuading people to make sacrifices, or do something they would not naturally wish to do. Appealing to reason can only take us so far down that road. To engineer deeper change in the culture of a classroom, company or community, to ear the buy-in that is crucial for most Slow Fixes, you need to tap what Vincent Van Gogh called “the little emotions (that) are the great captains of our lives”." I recommend this book if you are rushing around patching your projects/business/life with quick fixes and you're tired and frustrated with the lack of real progress.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Howard

    I 'stumbled' on this book in the library and I cannot thank my luck enough for this! This is a brilliant book dealing with 'Slowness' and how we could achieve it in this fast paced world. The good things about this book: 1. It is really well written with the chapters being really 'racy' (And that is ironical considering that this book is all about slowness :-) ) 2. The stories are out of the world and the research Carl Honore has done is praiseworthy 3. The honesty with which the 'steps' or 'process I 'stumbled' on this book in the library and I cannot thank my luck enough for this! This is a brilliant book dealing with 'Slowness' and how we could achieve it in this fast paced world. The good things about this book: 1. It is really well written with the chapters being really 'racy' (And that is ironical considering that this book is all about slowness :-) ) 2. The stories are out of the world and the research Carl Honore has done is praiseworthy 3. The honesty with which the 'steps' or 'processes' are laid out. Whenever I felt the author was taking things a bit too far with some of his claims, he promptly gave the flip side to his claim. This aspect of pointing out the negatives is something that I have not seen with many of the authors when they want to spread 'their' message Conclusion: I am buying this book and adding it to my library collection for referring as & when required!

  7. 5 out of 5

    Donna Parker

    Slow down. Stop and smell the life that is being sucked out of us by technology, it was made to help us, not destroy us.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Alice

    We tend to think of transformative moments as sudden flashes of insight—but Carl Honoré’s The Slow Fix: Solve Problems, Work Smarter, and Live Better in a World Addicted to Speed, explains why that isn’t always the case. He points out that “[i]n every walk of life, from medicine and relationships to business and politics, we are hooked on the quick fix.” He goes on to say, “The hard, unpalatable truth is that the quick fix never truly fixes anything at all. And sometimes it just makes things wor We tend to think of transformative moments as sudden flashes of insight—but Carl Honoré’s The Slow Fix: Solve Problems, Work Smarter, and Live Better in a World Addicted to Speed, explains why that isn’t always the case. He points out that “[i]n every walk of life, from medicine and relationships to business and politics, we are hooked on the quick fix.” He goes on to say, “The hard, unpalatable truth is that the quick fix never truly fixes anything at all. And sometimes it just makes things worse.” Without resorting to a single bullet point in 262 pages, he shatters leadership and talk-show clichés, with encouragement like “sweat the small stuff.” Honoré’s writing is often eloquent, and his prose reflects his thesis as he takes time to explore and analyze each idea. Without resorting to a single bullet point in 262 pages, he shatters leadership and talk-show clichés, with encouragement like “sweat the small stuff.” Honoré’s examples and anecdotes—from the wisdom behind Van Halen’s famous “no brown M&M’s” clause to the “congenial” Norwegian prison system designed to curb recidivism—are worth contemplating. Unlike the authors of so many quick-fix, meme-studded self-help books, Honoré practices what he preaches, taking time to build his theories and exploring them through both narrow and wide lenses. Although he accepts that there are times—in surgery or on the battlefield, for example—when we can’t stop to ponder, Honoré explains that his focus in The Slow Fix is on the kind of problem “where the parameters are unclear and shifting, where human behavior comes into play, where there may not even be a right answer.” He maps out the process: confess, think hard, think holistic, think long, think small, prepare, collaborate, crowdsource, catalyze, devolve, feel, play, evolve. Each element builds on the one that precedes it, not as a checklist or an if/then logarithm, but as a recipe with room for improvisation. By approaching the material this way, he achieves the goal he states in his Introduction: “to draw some universal lessons about how to find the best solution when anything goes wrong.” A Slow Fix begins by acknowledging and examining our mistakes—something that tends to be discouraged in our culture, where the word “problem” is masked in euphemisms like “issue” and “challenge.” Honoré then spends four entire chapters on methods of thinking—pondering, mulling, incubating, sauntering, and considering the long view—arguing against snap judgment. Once we’ve genuinely thought things through, options are presented and rejected, contingencies are considered before they can arise. Honoré quotes engineer Peter Hodgman: “No matter how good you are, you’re always better with someone else. No one can do it all on their own,” and shows how this has been put into practice on collegial and global scales, from Freud’s Wednesday night salons to the giant think tank of the Internet, demonstrating how “[w]e are more creative when solving other people’s problems.” First, we need to strike a balance between the group and the individual, because “even the smartest team and wisest crowd can only take you so far.” Then we need to rely on, or have an underlying and connective vision of, “a hub for the network, a lightning rod for the crowd”—a Steve Jobs or an Ernest Shackleton, to bring direction and passion to a problem. This person must be able to transfer his or her power and give a sense of ownership to the people for whom it has the most meaning—those with the problem being solved—taking the process out of the office or laboratory and into the field. This empowerment balances logistics and facts with emotional connection. Many of the most successful Slow Fixers temper their brains with their hearts by tapping into humility and empathy. This in turn opens space for fun, and bringing games into the Slow Fix allows for inspiration and competition, helping us overcome inertia and bad habits. An element of humor lets us accept that there are “perpetual problems” that, because of their size or complexity, can never be completely solved, although they can be outgrown or shifted. Adaptation and uncertainty are key because we should “never rush a Slow Fix.” Honoré’s The Slow Fix is a roadmap for genuine transformation, for rewiring the way we overcome both individual and universal obstacles. “The good news is the world is full of Slow Fixes. You just have to take the time to find and learn from them.”

  9. 4 out of 5

    Tathagat Varma

    We live in a fast-paced world. Days (and nights) go by in back-to-back meetings. New features must be out before the weekend, new version is out by month-end and totally new products get launched max by the end of this quarter. Human speed, it seems, is only being challenged - and perhaps outcompeting - the clock speed of the latest core processors! It is like a new virtual digital jungle - there is a lion and there is a gazelle somewhere in this digital jungle, and whatever you are, you better We live in a fast-paced world. Days (and nights) go by in back-to-back meetings. New features must be out before the weekend, new version is out by month-end and totally new products get launched max by the end of this quarter. Human speed, it seems, is only being challenged - and perhaps outcompeting - the clock speed of the latest core processors! It is like a new virtual digital jungle - there is a lion and there is a gazelle somewhere in this digital jungle, and whatever you are, you better be running first thing in the morning! But is this fast pace quick-fix the best way? I once had a team member who was "#slow" by his own admission. When others would complete the tasks in days and weeks, he would take months. But the quality of work would be impeccable, and far superior to others. Premature judging based purely on how much one is sweating is likely to mislead big time! The best things are still made with oodles of long-care thinking and tireless patience. As we used to say in my favorite Dutch company - it still takes ten year to build a ten-year experience! https://lnkd.in/grg2AsE

  10. 4 out of 5

    Debs Taylor

    I loved this book, other than an unnecessary rationale via evolutionary biology which I think has zero effect on everything else discussed in the book. I will be asking my AP Sem kids to read this before they begin AP Research because I think his explanation of different approaches to problem solving is excellent. I also loved the wide and diverse range of examples he used to illustrate his steps to a Slow Fix. I think it will be a good way to kickstart some creative thinking on real life proble I loved this book, other than an unnecessary rationale via evolutionary biology which I think has zero effect on everything else discussed in the book. I will be asking my AP Sem kids to read this before they begin AP Research because I think his explanation of different approaches to problem solving is excellent. I also loved the wide and diverse range of examples he used to illustrate his steps to a Slow Fix. I think it will be a good way to kickstart some creative thinking on real life problems. The only thing I found a little strange (particularly as a teacher of Seminar and Research)were the lack of in text citations or footnotes. Probably the average reader wouldn’t care less about this but I had to go to the notes in the back to cross reference his examples, and not all of them were cited. Because I have already read Thinking, Fast and Slow I also recognized several examples quoted there but not really acknowledged. While this helped to not disturb the flow of the writing, it’s not the model of writing my students will be using.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Scott

    Great concepts with a little too much detail This book has fantastic concepts to improve the way we think and act, by taking it slow, balanced by when to move fast. However, the downside is a lot of detail on the examples and stories that is not necessary and actually takes you away from truly considering the concepts. I get it is somewhat ironic for me to say this given the book is about getting there slowly, however I feel crisper examples would allow more space and time in the book to explore t Great concepts with a little too much detail This book has fantastic concepts to improve the way we think and act, by taking it slow, balanced by when to move fast. However, the downside is a lot of detail on the examples and stories that is not necessary and actually takes you away from truly considering the concepts. I get it is somewhat ironic for me to say this given the book is about getting there slowly, however I feel crisper examples would allow more space and time in the book to explore the concepts. For the concepts, well worth the read, you probably can just decide to skim the details as you go.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Ajay Palekar

    A great message and well-written too. A different approach to problem-solving from what is normally preached, Carl makes an argument that is rooted in observation, history, business, and psychology. While a good book, The Slow Fix isn't so much great. I find you could read the first and last chapters and walk away with just as much knowledge as if you had read the entire thing cover-to-cover. A great message and well-written too. A different approach to problem-solving from what is normally preached, Carl makes an argument that is rooted in observation, history, business, and psychology. While a good book, The Slow Fix isn't so much great. I find you could read the first and last chapters and walk away with just as much knowledge as if you had read the entire thing cover-to-cover.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Rebecca Wagner

    More fabulous initiatives, ideas and reminders why living Slow is the key to the future. The author allows for solutions to be realistic and helpful to apply to the chaos of every day life. I continue to be impressed by Carl Honore, his content and writing style. Highly recommend.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Kirsten

    An interesting discussion of slow solutions from around the world.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Ahmed Turabi

    Great food of thought Because it added value to me. It is a kind of book I wish to have an audio version for it so I can listen to it.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Beckie Kellett

    Great reminder in our fast world that we need to take it slow.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Marc Faoite

    Carl Honoré is a Canadian writer, often referred to as ‘the guru of slow’. Following the success of his previous book - international bestseller In Praise of Slow - he travels the world expounding on the virtues of taking the time to smell the roses and savour the moment. The subtitle of his latest book - ‘solve problems, work smarter and live better in a fast world’ gives the reader an indication of the subject matter of The Slow Fix. Essentially this book is a practical guide to walking the tal Carl Honoré is a Canadian writer, often referred to as ‘the guru of slow’. Following the success of his previous book - international bestseller In Praise of Slow - he travels the world expounding on the virtues of taking the time to smell the roses and savour the moment. The subtitle of his latest book - ‘solve problems, work smarter and live better in a fast world’ gives the reader an indication of the subject matter of The Slow Fix. Essentially this book is a practical guide to walking the talk and applying the principles of taking the time to find the right solution. Even though the best solution might take longer to find Honoré argues that in the long-term it will save time, effort, money and resources – all valuable commodities both at home and at the workplace. This is an easy concept to grasp, but our genetic programming very often leads us to do exactly the opposite. Evolution has shaped us to be natural problem solvers and given us the ability to make snap decisions while under pressure. Faced with marauding wild animals or imminent attack it doesn’t do to take the time to mull and ponder over our options. Action needs to be taken and fast, so fast that in fact that our actions are often barely more than mere reactions to a given situation and involve very little rational thought. Particularly in stressful situations, whether at home or in the workplace, the limbic system takes over and our prefrontal cortex - the decision-making part of our brains - more or less shuts down. In a modern context this rarely leads to a positive outcome and often results in making bad decisions and wrong choices. In today’s busy world, where stress levels are often high, there is a temptation to think in the short term, to choose the most obvious and simple solutions to challenges faced on both professional and personal levels i.e. to apply the ‘quick-fix’. While treating symptoms may bring temporary relief, time and effort are required in order to act upon the root causes of those symptoms and eliminate the possibility of them reoccurring. Instead of just approaching things with band-aid solutions that cosmetically solve things on the surface level Honoré is interested in slowing down in order to find long-lasting and meaningful solutions to problems. When we act too quickly we increase our chances of making mistakes. Once they are made we would rather sweep them under the carpet, or shift the blame elsewhere. This causes all sorts of complications in relationships between human beings, but also in the workplace where there is often little or no incentive to owning up to the mistakes we may have inadvertently made. Honoré points out that acknowledging our own fallibility and creating an environment which allows people to admit their errors without fear of reprisal is one of the key elements to effectively avoiding trouble further down the line. The Slow Fix offers a holistic approach to problem solving. Rather than just one simple technique, Honoré’s solutions involve a combination of many different elements. Each chapter discusses a particular step, with concrete examples from real life showing how effective changes can be made. The Slow Fix is an easy read with material presented in a clear and precise journalistic manner. Though Honoré’s ideas are relevant on a micro level as well as a macro level, most of the examples and case studies in this book focus on large organisations and administrations. The diversity of the topics discussed makes this book an enthralling read. Among the many examples and cases-studies in this book are how to fix a broken school, how to install civic pride by building a public transport system that is used by all strata of society, or revealing the keys to establishing an effective organ transplantation programme. One of the case studies describes the vision of the Norwegian penal system and the choice made to focus on the ultimate goal of reducing the overall level of crime, rather than merely being a means of punishment. Honoré visits a prison where inmates live in relative comfort in a sociable environment that is not so different from the world outside. As a result prisoners have a much easier time reintegrating society upon release. While not all Norwegian prisons are managed on this model it has been consistently shown that in this example the reoffender level is admirably low compared to a ‘traditional’ prison systems where punishment is given more priority than rehabilitation. The Slow Fix also makes a very interesting read for the lay-person but particularly those in a business or administration management position would do well to read this book and will almost certainly learn valuable and useful lessons from other people’s mistakes and the creative and often counter-intuitive solutions they have found.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Shilpa

    In every walk of life, from medicine to relationships to business and politics, we are all hooked on the quick fix. Today, the quick fix has become the standard across the board in our fast-forward, on-demand, just-add-water culture. Random House Canada has released the paperback version of Carl Honoré’s book The Slow Fix. The author, a Canadian journalist living in London, is already known for his bestseller In Praise Of Slow and a relaxed parenting primer, Under Pressure, which would be a welco In every walk of life, from medicine to relationships to business and politics, we are all hooked on the quick fix. Today, the quick fix has become the standard across the board in our fast-forward, on-demand, just-add-water culture. Random House Canada has released the paperback version of Carl Honoré’s book The Slow Fix. The author, a Canadian journalist living in London, is already known for his bestseller In Praise Of Slow and a relaxed parenting primer, Under Pressure, which would be a welcome antidote to the modern phenomena of helicopter parenting prevalent today. In The Slow Fix Honoré emphasizes the need to learn the art of the slow fix and draws on examples from today’s progressive, successful leaders in business, politics, science and society, to argue his point and make his case. Carl Honoré feels that if we are to start solving problems thoroughly, we must first understand our fatal attraction to speedy solutions. He talks about how the human brain has two mechanisms for solving problems: System 1 (Quick Fix) and System 2 (Slow and Deliberate). Carl Honoré is first to admit that the Quick Fix mechanism isn’t just for life and death situations, but also serves as a shortcut for us to help navigate daily life and save us from trouble. But not all problems are created equal and in order to get to the root of a problem we have to learn to use the second mechanism of conscious thinking which involves more planning, critical analysis and rational thinking. In reality when we apply System 1 mechanism to problems – i.e. making a snap decision – we are essentially also utilizing System 2 principles. These entail sizing up the scenario, plucking out the relevant data, joining the dots and pinpointing the best course of action. Psychologists refer to this as “thin-slicing” because we extract all the necessary information from a tiny sliver of experience. But as Carl Honoré suggests: quick fixes whisper the same seductive promise of maximum return for minimum effort. Trouble is, the equation doesn’t add up. When companies learn this, they will become much more successful. Toyota learned the hard lesson of ignoring the slow fix when over 10 million faulty vehicles were recalled (which is covered in the book). But in 2010, Akio Toyoda the company’s chastened president, explained to the U.S. congress how the company fell from grace: “We’ve pursued growth over the speed at which we were able to develop our people and our organization.” Anyone who’s experienced a creative eureka moment knows that these moments seldom come when we are stuck in fast-forward mode, juggling emails, straining to make our voices heard in a high-stress meeting, rushing to deliver a piece of work to an impatient boss. On the contrary: they happen when we are walking the dog, or soaking up some Vitamin D on a hammock. When we are calm and unhurried, that’s when the brain switches into a richer, more refined mode of thought. So what are the essentials for solving complex problems? At one end of the spectrum, it requires widening the lens to think holistically and take in the long view, while at the other end it requires zooming in on the tiniest details. You have to slow down to spot, understand and master the details. One of the first things you can do to achieve the latter is to make lists. When tackling a problem, write down the idea, however small you think it is. Then put those that will clearly advance your long-term goal on a To Do list. The rest can go into a Maybe list. If you take time reading this book (slowly, of course), you will glean a lot more from it. The scenarios are abundant and with slow comprehension and critically thinking you will be able to appreciate the lessons. So many lessons go unlearned in a workplace, simply because they subscribe to the culture of “fix this fast” and in the end use up all their resources and energy to cover up mistakes. Imagine a workplace that puts all its efforts on making every error a catalyst to working smarter? Albert Einstein was once asked what he would do if he was given one hour to save the world. His answer was, “I would spend fifty-five minutes defining the problem and only five minutes finding the solution.” Related reading: 5 books that shaped Carl Honoré’s thinking on Slow Faster by James Gleick Fast Food Nation by Eric Schlosser In Praise of Idleness by Bertrand Russell The Discovery of Slowness by Sten Nadolny Slowness by Milan Kundera Sukasa Reads recommendations on how we think Thinking Fast and Slow by Daniel Kahneman Gut Feelings by Gerd Gigerenzer (sukasareads.com)

  19. 5 out of 5

    Leigh Anne

    Common sense explained slowly, for the people in the back. It makes perfect sense that slowing down to think about things makes for better problem-solving, and yet, we collectively just don't do it. Easy answers and quick solutions are prized in our world, even as we gravitate toward slow food (yep, same guy) and other "back to slow" movements. Honore applies the principles of slow living to problem-solving in business and industry, coming to the conclusion that if you can yank yourself out of th Common sense explained slowly, for the people in the back. It makes perfect sense that slowing down to think about things makes for better problem-solving, and yet, we collectively just don't do it. Easy answers and quick solutions are prized in our world, even as we gravitate toward slow food (yep, same guy) and other "back to slow" movements. Honore applies the principles of slow living to problem-solving in business and industry, coming to the conclusion that if you can yank yourself out of the quick-fix, out-of-the-box solution addiction, you can actually do quite a bit of good in your organization. The trick is that he tells you HOW to go about it, too. Speed still plays a role in business, Honoré argues, but it's the kind of speed you develop from practiing something for many years. Speed requires expertise, but not every situation requires expertise, as his many examples of crowdsourced solutions demonstrate. One big part of a slow fix is the willingness to involve the people you're trying to solve problems for in the process of solving them. If, for example, you want to improve service to the disability community, they should be included in the planning process so you know exactly what kind of services would be most helpful, without making assumptions. In other words, treating people with respect and dignity, which is really sad that we even have to say it's something you need to do. For a proper slow fix, you need a corporate culture that owns up to its mistakes and uses them for improvement and learning rather than punishment. You also need to spend a lot of time on the problem, and not just jump with the first solution that comes up. You have to think about every factor in an ecosystem, and you have to think about ten years down the road, not just today (succession planning and knowledge transfer come to mind here). You need to be super-nit-picky about tiny details, be prepared for every possible scenario, no matter how unlikely, and be open to both crowdsourcing and collaboration. At the same time, you need to make sure you find the right people, the key catalysts who can bring everything together with passion and dedication. You need to think small-scale solutions rather than large ones (artisanal, if you will), and you seriously need to be able to deal with the emotional climate of every problem-solving situation (something most business cultures ignore or forget). Adopting attitudes of curiosity and play are important, and you must bear in mind that problem-solving never really stops. It has to be a constant evolution of processes and thought-models, or you'll get stuck in "the way we've always done it." If I were in a position to solve large-scale problems in an organization, I would want this as my playbook. It's counter-intuitive to capitalism because speed and profit aren't its core values. However, slow can FIX capitalism by taking the time to correct its imbalances. This book is a serious no-brainer for non-profits, too, who will be more likely to adopt its principles, as they are closer to that sector's current values. Recommended for anybody in a position to make a difference who wants to shake up their company by slowing it the hell down.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Paul

    In this speed-obsessed, quick-fix world, it has become almost normal to expend the minimum amount of effort, in business and in life. But that approach is never quick, and usually makes things worse. If you make a mistake, admit it. Don't try to blame someone else. If you are the boss, don't treat that mistake as a disaster that requires that someone be fired. Instead, treat it as an opportunity to take a very close look at your entire process. It may seem preferable to worry only about immediate In this speed-obsessed, quick-fix world, it has become almost normal to expend the minimum amount of effort, in business and in life. But that approach is never quick, and usually makes things worse. If you make a mistake, admit it. Don't try to blame someone else. If you are the boss, don't treat that mistake as a disaster that requires that someone be fired. Instead, treat it as an opportunity to take a very close look at your entire process. It may seem preferable to worry only about immediate problems. Is that really better, and cheaper, than going through every bit of your business, top to bottom, to make sure everything is working properly? An underlying, fundamental problem rarely has just one cause. Try linking the various pieces of that fundamental problem. Don't focus just on today; look at tomorrow, too. Will fixing Problem X now lead to other big problems next month, or next year? Naturally, the devil is in the details. Be willing to see things in a new light. Preparation ahead of time, being ready for anything, will help keep problems from rearing their ugly heads. Don't be afraid to collaborate, especially with someone who has a different field of expertise. A different set of eyes may be just what is needed to solve your problem. There are times when crowdsourcing is the best place to go for an answer to your problem. Don't underestimate the power of games to solve problems. Meant more for groups than individuals, this is an excellent book. It is very thought-provoking, and is recommended for everyone.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Andrew

    This was quite a good read but only received three stars because it all felt familiar. It's been a great year for books about brains, society, and thinking. The problem is that all these titles begin to use the same stories and examples (The Power of Habit, The Power of Why , and How Children Succeed I'm pretty sure had some of the same stories). It's not because the authors are copying each other, but rather that there are only so many interesting anecdotes that have made it into publica This was quite a good read but only received three stars because it all felt familiar. It's been a great year for books about brains, society, and thinking. The problem is that all these titles begin to use the same stories and examples (The Power of Habit, The Power of Why , and How Children Succeed I'm pretty sure had some of the same stories). It's not because the authors are copying each other, but rather that there are only so many interesting anecdotes that have made it into publications accessible to authors writing outside of hardcore academic studies into neurology. Or perhaps they just sound the same. That being said, Carl Honoré's latest book is a welcome reminder of the need to slow down and dig deeper into problems that we often rush to solve. Carefully addressing issues normally results in better and longer-lasting outcomes, and guards against having to come up against the same problem in the future. There are many examples in this book of people and institutions who took this approach, and although they sometimes sound quite idealistic (see Norwegian prisons), they may also change your mind on important issues (again, prisons). I'm on Twitter: @Dr_A_Taubman

  22. 5 out of 5

    Max

    An eminently readable book on a topic that I find fascinating. Honoré is a great writer; easy to understand and conversational in tone. Building upon his work from his first book, In Praise of Slowness: Challenging the Cult of Speed, The Slow Fix looks at the concept of problem solving in terms of the slow philosophy. From prisons in Norway, to cities in Columbia this is a world-wide tour of people, organizations, corporations and governments that have attempted to solve problems using slow philos An eminently readable book on a topic that I find fascinating. Honoré is a great writer; easy to understand and conversational in tone. Building upon his work from his first book, In Praise of Slowness: Challenging the Cult of Speed, The Slow Fix looks at the concept of problem solving in terms of the slow philosophy. From prisons in Norway, to cities in Columbia this is a world-wide tour of people, organizations, corporations and governments that have attempted to solve problems using slow philosophies. From a business or managerial standpoint I found the book, ideas and case-studies to be interesting, on-point and really fascinating. There isn't much in this book that offers ways to apply this kind of thinking to more personal interactions. Honoré mentions using 'slow' to help fix relationships, but doesn't go into it at all. Either way I highly recommend this for people who are interested in new management techniques, books on management and business, and for people who are interested in the Slow Movement, or fans of Honoré's other books.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Paul

    Following on from his excellent In Praise of Slow, this is Honoré's look at practical ways to achieve by thinking about a problem first. His theory is that by rushing into solving a problem then you are not considering the full implications of your decisions and actions, and that by taking time and effort to get it right you only need to do it once. He does accept that quick fixes are sometime necessary; to get a car running again to get home, but proper consideration on a problem will lead to l Following on from his excellent In Praise of Slow, this is Honoré's look at practical ways to achieve by thinking about a problem first. His theory is that by rushing into solving a problem then you are not considering the full implications of your decisions and actions, and that by taking time and effort to get it right you only need to do it once. He does accept that quick fixes are sometime necessary; to get a car running again to get home, but proper consideration on a problem will lead to long term benefits. The book is stuffed full of examples and case studies and he picks examples from other titles that I have read, such as The Wisdom of Crowds, Blink and Good to Great. Al lot of what he says is very true; the churn of stocks and share has no benefit to society or companies, as the long term investments made by Warren Buffet prove. The examples of the way that the RAF looks at pilot error and other mistake make all the flying by them safer, and looks at the check list now used by surgeons the world over to minimise errors. Overall it is not a bad read, but not as ground breaking as his first book.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Wanda

    I won this novel via Goodreads Firstreads giveaway. Thanks to Carl Honore for the opportunity! The novel introduces us to a vast number of social issues and business world issues from around the globe that have been impacted by "The Slow Fix". It reminds us that sometimes the quickest solution is not always sustaining nor will it reap the best results. The author has obviously done a vast amount of research into finding a great array of different "Slow Fix" successes in conjunction with the unfo I won this novel via Goodreads Firstreads giveaway. Thanks to Carl Honore for the opportunity! The novel introduces us to a vast number of social issues and business world issues from around the globe that have been impacted by "The Slow Fix". It reminds us that sometimes the quickest solution is not always sustaining nor will it reap the best results. The author has obviously done a vast amount of research into finding a great array of different "Slow Fix" successes in conjunction with the unfortunate quick fix failures along the way. I enjoyed reading about different cultures and life circumstances from around the globe, not just in North America. It was a reminder that sometimes in life we need to take a step back, gather all of our available resources and take time to work through our issues instead of trying to nip them in the bud in record setting time. We can apply the Slow Fix to issues big and small. Would recommend to anyone wanting to reconsider their problem solving tactics.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Scott Lee

    Not quite as good as In Praise of Slowness, but Honore sets the bar higher by presenting solutions to specific challenges the world faces in the context of the slow fix. I read this in conjunction with the book Deep Economy and they made for a fascinating pairing. Honore argues passionately for developing slow fixes to the world's problems, and to approaching things with a slow fix mentality in our own lives. That is, taking the long view before jumping to the easiest or most politically, financ Not quite as good as In Praise of Slowness, but Honore sets the bar higher by presenting solutions to specific challenges the world faces in the context of the slow fix. I read this in conjunction with the book Deep Economy and they made for a fascinating pairing. Honore argues passionately for developing slow fixes to the world's problems, and to approaching things with a slow fix mentality in our own lives. That is, taking the long view before jumping to the easiest or most politically, financially, wahtever-ily possible answer. It would be nice to see some politicians buy, read, and internalize the approach described here. Doesn't mean Honore is right about everything (he's not!), but his approach would provide real solutions and move us past the quagmire and childish tantrum throwing that pass for politics in the USA at present.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Taylor Ellwood

    In this book the author explores the value of the slow fix, which involves learning how to solve problems from a process perspective instead of just trying to use a quick fix. The author explores a variety of elements that are integral to the slow fix process and uses case studies to demonstrate how those elements work together to bring about useful solutions to problems. I got a lot of value from this book by applying its principles to my business and my clients. I'd recommend it to anyone who In this book the author explores the value of the slow fix, which involves learning how to solve problems from a process perspective instead of just trying to use a quick fix. The author explores a variety of elements that are integral to the slow fix process and uses case studies to demonstrate how those elements work together to bring about useful solutions to problems. I got a lot of value from this book by applying its principles to my business and my clients. I'd recommend it to anyone who wants to improve how problems are solved in general and in their organization, because what you will learn is how to examine your problem solving processes and introduce the right elements of the slow fix to help you improve on what you are already doing.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Mary-Jane

    This is not one of Honore's best books. He writes well and provides engaging and memorable examples of innovative and effective strategies and solutions to problems around the world. However, his premise that a solution must be solved via the slow fix (as opposed to the "quick fix") is not convincing. In fact, the author acknowledges as much throughout the book and also in its conclusion. Regardless, the chapter themes provide practical approaches to consider when encountering problems of all ty This is not one of Honore's best books. He writes well and provides engaging and memorable examples of innovative and effective strategies and solutions to problems around the world. However, his premise that a solution must be solved via the slow fix (as opposed to the "quick fix") is not convincing. In fact, the author acknowledges as much throughout the book and also in its conclusion. Regardless, the chapter themes provide practical approaches to consider when encountering problems of all types. In any event, the examples and illustrations, such as the rehabilitative prison system in Norway and the successful transformation of a problematic American urban school, serve to inspire the reader.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Cara

    I will admit that this book is a bit useless. I mean useless in the sense that there's nothing in it that isn't either common sense or has been repeated many times before. But I still really liked it. Maybe because the whole point of the book is that many people (me included) go from one thing to another without really taking the time to understand anything. We are constantly looking for a "quick fix", even though we may know deep down that no quick fix really exists. Well, quick fixes don't exi I will admit that this book is a bit useless. I mean useless in the sense that there's nothing in it that isn't either common sense or has been repeated many times before. But I still really liked it. Maybe because the whole point of the book is that many people (me included) go from one thing to another without really taking the time to understand anything. We are constantly looking for a "quick fix", even though we may know deep down that no quick fix really exists. Well, quick fixes don't exist. This book is a testament to its own thesis. You won't find anything life-changing here because what it's really about is how you can't change your life (or your business, or your community, etc.) with any one idea (or one book).

  29. 5 out of 5

    Sean

    Consider this book a decent, quick read on the virtues of slowing down, considering all aspects of a decision, and not cramming through a decision to arrive at an expedited haphazard fix. One of the best parts of the book deals with the importance of making mistakes, admitting them, learning from them, and moving on. Different professions -- medicine and financial services to name two -- punish mistakes unnecessarily. However, mistakes have paved the arch of humanity's progress and do not deserv Consider this book a decent, quick read on the virtues of slowing down, considering all aspects of a decision, and not cramming through a decision to arrive at an expedited haphazard fix. One of the best parts of the book deals with the importance of making mistakes, admitting them, learning from them, and moving on. Different professions -- medicine and financial services to name two -- punish mistakes unnecessarily. However, mistakes have paved the arch of humanity's progress and do not deserve rebuke. Share ideas, confess, respect System 2 thinking, slow down, think, and decide. I hear you, Carl. Will anyone else listen?

  30. 5 out of 5

    Ryan Stuver

    I found this book to be mostly similar to other professional development/self-help books I've read. There was a ton of anecdotal evidence and even more common sense assumptions. I did find a few things to take away and apply to my everyday work life. My rule with these books is that almost always they are 80% fluff and 20% substance. With that said, it was worth the time to read. In today's world, everything has to happen immediately. We have all of our emails in our pocket and a reply 3 hours la I found this book to be mostly similar to other professional development/self-help books I've read. There was a ton of anecdotal evidence and even more common sense assumptions. I did find a few things to take away and apply to my everyday work life. My rule with these books is that almost always they are 80% fluff and 20% substance. With that said, it was worth the time to read. In today's world, everything has to happen immediately. We have all of our emails in our pocket and a reply 3 hours later is too late. This book puts things in perspective and shows why it's so important to slow down. I've since passed this book on to my boss.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.