web site hit counter The Invisible Hands - Part 1: Gambit - Ebooks PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

The Invisible Hands - Part 1: Gambit

Availability: Ready to download

Anaxantis, prince of Ximerion. The threat of the barbarian invasion by the wild Mukthar tribes has been averted, and Anaxantis is starting to colonize the Renuvian Plains. There still remains a lot to be done — and that goes double for his private life. Meanwhile in the independent city state of Naodyma a young man, Lexyntas, sells himself into slavery to provide for his you Anaxantis, prince of Ximerion. The threat of the barbarian invasion by the wild Mukthar tribes has been averted, and Anaxantis is starting to colonize the Renuvian Plains. There still remains a lot to be done — and that goes double for his private life. Meanwhile in the independent city state of Naodyma a young man, Lexyntas, sells himself into slavery to provide for his younger siblings. Another one, Antybion, seeks the hospitality of rich relatives in Rhonoma. Arranulf still pines after Hemarchidas. Then disturbing news reaches Anaxantis. His father, the high king of Ximerion, is marching almost half of his troops toward the capital, Ormidon, to be decommissioned. Is he really disbanding them, notwithstanding the threat in the South? Or is it just a pretext to move them nearer to the territory of his rebellious lord governor and son, Anaxantis? The warlord suddenly finds himself in need of hard intelligence, and it's not that easy to come by…


Compare

Anaxantis, prince of Ximerion. The threat of the barbarian invasion by the wild Mukthar tribes has been averted, and Anaxantis is starting to colonize the Renuvian Plains. There still remains a lot to be done — and that goes double for his private life. Meanwhile in the independent city state of Naodyma a young man, Lexyntas, sells himself into slavery to provide for his you Anaxantis, prince of Ximerion. The threat of the barbarian invasion by the wild Mukthar tribes has been averted, and Anaxantis is starting to colonize the Renuvian Plains. There still remains a lot to be done — and that goes double for his private life. Meanwhile in the independent city state of Naodyma a young man, Lexyntas, sells himself into slavery to provide for his younger siblings. Another one, Antybion, seeks the hospitality of rich relatives in Rhonoma. Arranulf still pines after Hemarchidas. Then disturbing news reaches Anaxantis. His father, the high king of Ximerion, is marching almost half of his troops toward the capital, Ormidon, to be decommissioned. Is he really disbanding them, notwithstanding the threat in the South? Or is it just a pretext to move them nearer to the territory of his rebellious lord governor and son, Anaxantis? The warlord suddenly finds himself in need of hard intelligence, and it's not that easy to come by…

30 review for The Invisible Hands - Part 1: Gambit

  1. 4 out of 5

    Emma Sea

    Great book. Not m/m romance, but traditional political fantasy sprinkled with m/m relationships. The writing is this book is a vast improvement over Ashling's first two in the series. There is no longer any cringe factor, and instead I just got to submerge myself in the intricate plotting. Rullio was a huge fave of mine from his supporting role in book 2, and I would have read this just for his burgeoning relationship with Merw, which made me inordinately happy (although, going on past experience Great book. Not m/m romance, but traditional political fantasy sprinkled with m/m relationships. The writing is this book is a vast improvement over Ashling's first two in the series. There is no longer any cringe factor, and instead I just got to submerge myself in the intricate plotting. Rullio was a huge fave of mine from his supporting role in book 2, and I would have read this just for his burgeoning relationship with Merw, which made me inordinately happy (although, going on past experience I can't put it past Ashling to kill Merw off down the road.) I actually laughed out loud for Merw's first scenes, which is a very rare event. It was a sign of the Ashling ability to portray complex characters that, while in book one I was all "Yay, Anaxantis! Boo, Tenaxos!", after this book I like Anaxantis and Tenaxos equally, for completely different reasons. Not sure I can take the tension of the next two books: will they duke it out in this trilogy? Or is this all going to be set-up for a final conflict later? Or will the brothers band together? Sheesh, the stress. P.S. I definitely never want to live in a post-apocalyptic wasteland with Ashling as my local warlord: he has the most vivid imagination for torture techniques.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Absynthe

    EPIC. The plot and characters are truly majestic and epic. I am stunned by the depth, complexity and intricacy of this book. If I could give 6 stars, I would do so without any hesitation!!! To truly appreciate this book, I reread the first 3 books of the series and then went right into this one. It put me in mind of Robert Jordan's Wheel of Time series. Except, ya know, Andrew Ashling actually wraps up plot points before the 8th or 9th book of the series! Andrew has a similar structure of one lar EPIC. The plot and characters are truly majestic and epic. I am stunned by the depth, complexity and intricacy of this book. If I could give 6 stars, I would do so without any hesitation!!! To truly appreciate this book, I reread the first 3 books of the series and then went right into this one. It put me in mind of Robert Jordan's Wheel of Time series. Except, ya know, Andrew Ashling actually wraps up plot points before the 8th or 9th book of the series! Andrew has a similar structure of one large plot and multiple subplots woven flawlessly together into a masterpiece of storytelling. The characters all have very distinctive voices and personalities that make them leap off the page as fully fleshed out people. The large, ongoing plot that flowed through the first 3 books got wrapped up in the 3rd book. So this book is almost like a second series because it starts off with a new over-arching plot. What jumped out at me about this book is that everything about it is bigger than the first series. Most authors who deliver a tremendous piece of work like the first 3 books usually somehow luck into that and the rest of the work they publish from then on is lackluster and disappointing compared to their greatest book. Not Andrew! This book has more of everything than the first three! More complex plots, more characters, more intrigue, more scheming, and more romance. Honestly, I think pigeonholing this book as an m/m book does a great disservice to anyone who appreciates and enjoys an epic fantasy tale. Magnificent! A must read! I can't wait for the next book!!!

  3. 4 out of 5

    Eve

    This was much better than I expected! I really enjoyed the first trilogy - Invisible Chains - however even though it ended beautifully, there were so many moving pieces to the story that I half expected Invisible Hands to start out as a plotting mess. It's not. This book is instead both brilliantly plotted and well paced, and was a pleasure to read throughout. The key characters all played out central components of the ongoing story, and Ehandar and Anaxants continue to be fascinating. I particu This was much better than I expected! I really enjoyed the first trilogy - Invisible Chains - however even though it ended beautifully, there were so many moving pieces to the story that I half expected Invisible Hands to start out as a plotting mess. It's not. This book is instead both brilliantly plotted and well paced, and was a pleasure to read throughout. The key characters all played out central components of the ongoing story, and Ehandar and Anaxants continue to be fascinating. I particularly injoyed a subplot wtih Rullio. A couple of interesting new characters were introduced and I expect they'll be further developed in book 2 of this trilogy. To get the most out of this book, I think it's best to start at the beginning of Invisible Chains and read the 4 books in order. Will be looking forward to the next one!

  4. 4 out of 5

    Samy Rose

    This excellent book, and other Ashling books, is for a “thinking” reader. I don’t have the correct words so this will have to do: it requires an “interactive” reader. There are multiple plots and multiple layers to each of those. Nothing is spoon-fed and happenings are not easily foreseen. Chapters are long and contain pieces of the different plots. Mood, pacing and voice changes are fascinating and it's hard to put the book down for any reason. There are maps of the lands, the routes taken, t This excellent book, and other Ashling books, is for a “thinking” reader. I don’t have the correct words so this will have to do: it requires an “interactive” reader. There are multiple plots and multiple layers to each of those. Nothing is spoon-fed and happenings are not easily foreseen. Chapters are long and contain pieces of the different plots. Mood, pacing and voice changes are fascinating and it's hard to put the book down for any reason. There are maps of the lands, the routes taken, the happenings of a battle. A battle you can actually follow! It’s an epic fantasy, a comedy in places, an intrigue, … or is it a political romp or a gay or erotic book? It has some of the features of each, but the whole truly is greater than the sum of the parts. It all fits together beautifully. But the term “epic fantasy”, used by Absynthe in a recent review, most accurately captures the complete book The vocabulary is huge. I can’t remember how many words I googled … * chagrined smile * ! Andrew just uses them like everyday words we’d all know.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Diane

    The Invisible Chains series is one of those series that you get so wrapped up in the story and characters that you don't want it to end and you want to know what happens to everyone. Well, this is the first book of the continuing story, this time called The Invisible Hands. All the characters from the first three books are here, as well as several new ones - Anaxantis and Ehandar are trying to move forward after the experiences they've been through, and although the Mukthars may no longer be as m The Invisible Chains series is one of those series that you get so wrapped up in the story and characters that you don't want it to end and you want to know what happens to everyone. Well, this is the first book of the continuing story, this time called The Invisible Hands. All the characters from the first three books are here, as well as several new ones - Anaxantis and Ehandar are trying to move forward after the experiences they've been through, and although the Mukthars may no longer be as much of a threat, there are other regions to be concerned about, the ones mentioned most in this one are Lorsanthia, Rhonoma and the former free kingdom of Trachia. Lorsanthia came up in the first series as the ones the High King and the older brothers were to deal with, but this time you learn more about their culture, a few of the people, and some of the actions they are responsible for, like the "annexing" of Trachia and murdering members of the royal family there. There is a belief in slavery, and some of the royals and military captured alive in Trachia were turned into servants who, as in all the cases of slavery in any culture, have little or no rights and those that "own" them believe they can treat or humilate them any way they want! There is even a character who is in Ximerion as a diplomat's aid, who meets someone he quite likes that he plans to make a servant so they can be exclusive!!! Rhonoma sound like they who have similar customs to Lorsanthia, particularly with slavery, although possibly not as extreme, but that remains to be seen! They are considered a free state and have not been targeted by either Lorsanthia or Ximerion up to now, although I think their "neutrality" will be put to the test and give them an incredible bargaining chip as the series continues! Or make them the rope in a tug of war! With Rhonoma, new characters are introduced, the ones that stand out the most for me are Antybion, who is supposed to be a cousin of one of the "higher" families, and Lexyntas, who has sold himself into slavery to help support his family because there are too many children for his grandfather to care for. There are scenes that suggest the last of the royal family of Trachia is on the run and decides to do something extreme to go into hiding, so, could he be Antybion or Lexyntas? Both are brought to their current situations by grandfathers, and there is reportedly an older general with the prince and why do I think he's going to cross paths with one of the Ximerion princes, of which three are primary players now - south, north and middle??? There is also the character of Yorn, whose father gets an opportunity to "elevate" himself that includes travelling to the north, Yorn and the "cousin" Antybion accompany him out of Rhonoma, so the character of Yorn could be an interesting player in all of this too! As I've said before, Andrew's writing can make you suspend belief that this is fiction, and there are characters you have strong emotions for, such as those you love (for me, Arranulf, Obyann, Rahendo, Merw, Timishi, Anaxantis), characters that seem to have changed and you kind of like them now, or feel compassion for them (Ehandar, Rullio, even Ambrick), ones you're not sure about (Landar, Ryhunzo) as well as all these wonderful characters who really add to the scenes they are in and move the plot, such as Tomar and Lethoras. And then there is the rest of the Ximerion royal family - Mom has ambitions, Dad is playing chess with his sons, and the eldest brother? Such a manipulative drama queen! Everything Anaxantis achieved in the north with just being himself, the occasional force of his position, not necessarily brute force, his brother used lies and manipulations to achieve the same ends - loyalty from the general populace in the area he's in! I was asked to watch out for the character Merw, but to set that up. Rullio was sent on a mission for Anaxantis, but who also technically is working for the High King, so he walks a fine line. Ehandar wonders about his loyalty to the point of sending Gorth, his other friend, on the same mission. As it happens, Rullio finds out about Gorth being in the same area as him, but quickly determines what he is doing there and although he knows his own reputation, is still hurt by it. He meets Merw one night when Merw attempts to rob him (very unsuccessfully) and while initially I think Rullio's intent was to clean him up, feed him and send him on his way, soon the two of them are inseparable - I fell for Merw very quickly, who acts tough to cover the hurt of being "left" by his parents and having to fend for himself however he could, thinking everyone will leave him. And it's tough not to love a character who thinks the biggest extravagance is having a bath everyday! I hope that he and Rullio can find happiness because while I was not sure about Rullio in the last book, I did feel bad for him feeling betrayed by his friend when his plan was to try and balance the for no other reason than because of Ehandar and Ehandar had been there for him so many times. And I do think what he feels for Merw is real. It will be interesting how this plays out for the two characters, if they get a HEA or not! Anaxantis still worries about how to keep protecting the area he is in, and wonders if he can just stay there rather than ever go back to his childhood castle, he's found friends and happiness in the north and it is too important to him to want to give any of it up. And it's always entertaining hearing him and Tomar argue about money!!! At one point he is alone again as his various friends are on missions, but his focus is still on what the future holds and sees all of his friends as part of it. Ehandar has taken over some of the training, including some of the pages, a few of whom have been moved up to "squires" of his, and I'm not sure their loyalty to him is for him, or ambition they believe he should have, that will also be beneficial to them, but he is completely unaware of these workings. Even more possible plot directions! Not much with Arranulf and Hermachidas this time, they have been sent on their own adventure, as have Timishi and Lorcko, but I hope they will all make an appearance in the next book! Although there is a hilarious scene where both Arranulf and Hermachidas get a speech from Obyann before they left!!! We'll see if his wisdom was followed - and maybe if he finally got to start working on the family he wants! Yes, this is probably the most long winded review I've done, but a lot happens in this book! And at the end, you want to keep going, but the next book has not come out yet! I have really been enjoying this series! All sorts of emotions, I'm rooting for some characters, disliking others and hoping they don't "win" in any way! You do think you are reading history, not fictional fantasy and if you like fantasy, I guess all I can say is I hope you read them!

  6. 4 out of 5

    Jora

    Another wonderful five star read! This came out just as I had finished the first trilogy, so I was able to continue on without breaks. The Amazon copy I bought indicates the second book in The Invisible Hands trilogy is expected in the last quarter of 2012, so I am looking forward to that. The love between Ehander and Anaxantis continues as a thread throughout this book, along with the introduction of new characters with their own stories and as a set up for the books to come. There is a bit more Another wonderful five star read! This came out just as I had finished the first trilogy, so I was able to continue on without breaks. The Amazon copy I bought indicates the second book in The Invisible Hands trilogy is expected in the last quarter of 2012, so I am looking forward to that. The love between Ehander and Anaxantis continues as a thread throughout this book, along with the introduction of new characters with their own stories and as a set up for the books to come. There is a bit more political plotting in this book, but it stayed personal enough to hold my interest.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Deanna

    As bloody as a George RR Martin novel, as twisted as a V.C. Andrews novel. Am I on to the 5th book? Yes. Did I love it? Hell Yes.

  8. 4 out of 5

    VVivacious

    This is the fourth book in the series and it begins with a whole horde of new secondary characters. This is what I hate about this series, the fact that it is introducing new characters even so far along in the story-line. So the beginning of the book is slow going as we learn all about these new people and the author doesn’t do a less then thorough job of any characterization. By the end of it you are as invested in all these new characters as the old ones and are quite aware of their intention This is the fourth book in the series and it begins with a whole horde of new secondary characters. This is what I hate about this series, the fact that it is introducing new characters even so far along in the story-line. So the beginning of the book is slow going as we learn all about these new people and the author doesn’t do a less then thorough job of any characterization. By the end of it you are as invested in all these new characters as the old ones and are quite aware of their intentions and opinions. I hate the slow beginnings but by the end this book has gone from mildly interesting to I-can’t-put-it-down-if-my-life-depended-on-it-awesome! And this book was awesome; it easily had the best ending ever. I loved Tenax’s cunning and way of thinking. I mean he is going to be a tough rival to defeat but you can tell he lacks the goodness of heart which Anaxantis possesses. Things are heating up and the House of Tanahkos is gearing up for war. Anaxantis and Ehandar have a lot to figure out, in their relationship. Because all those scenes of their lovemaking were hardly reassuring, in fact they were downright disturbing, while things might be solid in their hearts they hardly translate well in their actions. Their relationship needs quite a lot of development definitely more than it has gotten in this book but the storyteller foretells more things to come. So I know something big is approaching. ‘Tenaxos I’ really needs to take his middle sons a bit more seriously while Portonas IV might not survive a month, Ehandar is more than likely to outlive the year Tenaxos seems to think he will stay alive. No matter which way you see the fact that Ehandar is going to alive to see a lot of the history of Ximerion being shaped makes it unwise to take him so lightly. While I don’t doubt his love for Anaxantis one bit and I am pretty sure about Ehandar’s intentions, I also think that both the Tenaxos’ taking him lightly is a mistake considering they have no idea about the dynamic between Anaxantis and Ehandar and as such his loyalty to Anaxantis. Rullio of Brenx-Aldemon has my heart and I love his kitten Mrew. I hope his unhappiness doesn’t fortell bad things to come for him and I also hope Ehandar can set his doubts to rest. Wow so far this series is far more engrossing than I had ever hoped and looks like things are just starting. Onwards to the next book Castling (Huh! Castling is a manoeuver done to protect the king, wonder if that has any significance).

  9. 5 out of 5

    R.

    As Andrew Ashling moved toward completion of the first book in his second trilogy…or the fourth book in the second movement of his double trilogy set…I was looking forward to more of a lot of things. I got it all, plus kind of an interesting new surprise. I love the depth of character development he brings to the warriors, pages, dukes, mothers, aunts, brothers, etc. that have been carried along through the four books. Andrew makes me laugh at the antics the besotted pages get into with both thei As Andrew Ashling moved toward completion of the first book in his second trilogy…or the fourth book in the second movement of his double trilogy set…I was looking forward to more of a lot of things. I got it all, plus kind of an interesting new surprise. I love the depth of character development he brings to the warriors, pages, dukes, mothers, aunts, brothers, etc. that have been carried along through the four books. Andrew makes me laugh at the antics the besotted pages get into with both their boyfriends and their girlfriends. I still cringe at the new and nasty torture techniques and depth of descriptions he lays before us for those who have done (or thought…) terrible things which he deems punishable. And I am rubbing my hands together in glee as I get to know an additional brother / prince that will certainly play a significant role in the future books. In the third book Andrew proved that he was a chess player in the story telling sense of the word. He handled a number of dissimilar plot lines and blithely moved them forward to completion without using the wave of a magic wand. In this fourth book he pulls out all the stops and proves that in triplicate. There is no doubt in my mind that this is the written history of a story that happened far away and not a yarn spun by a pencil chewer sitting at a computer terminal. My eyes and fears (yes, I meant fears) opened with the new realizations that Anaxantis made as he moved through the story. This heightens my enthusiasm for the fifth and sixth installments of what, seems like, could be a life long endeavor for Andrew. Book four has made me look at Andrew Ashling with new admiration for his story telling ability, and retained love for the wit, humor and sexuality in his writing. Thank you once again for bringing entertainment to my life, Andrew!

  10. 4 out of 5

    Ran ♠

    “Nothing, I hope. I want history to forget me.” I like the cover of this book. It looks glamorous and intriguing. As of the moment, I'm not particularly sure what I feel about this book. At 80% onward, I started skimming and skimmed more when it involved Tenaxos (view spoiler)[specially when I reach the part about the battle and Tenaxos' elaborate plan to make people believe what a great Prince he was (hide spoiler)] . Tenaxos. Oh God, he's a disgusting piece of cowardly scum copycat. W “Nothing, I hope. I want history to forget me.” I like the cover of this book. It looks glamorous and intriguing. As of the moment, I'm not particularly sure what I feel about this book. At 80% onward, I started skimming and skimmed more when it involved Tenaxos (view spoiler)[specially when I reach the part about the battle and Tenaxos' elaborate plan to make people believe what a great Prince he was (hide spoiler)] . Tenaxos. Oh God, he's a disgusting piece of cowardly scum copycat. Whatever he says, I'm going to remember the battle against Losanthia as The Battle of Donkey Hills. I dislike the bastard big-time. Anyway, at some point, I was either rolling my eyes over Rullio's sexcapades [he sure has a distinct taste in his men, remember Cariam? He and Merw has distinct similarities.] or getting irritated over Ehandar's delusional squires. Poor Ehandar has no idea the people he thought as friends only sees him as a commodity. Nothing really got me overexcited in this book. Ehandar and Anaxantis were still in love. Obyann was still as amusing as ever. Ambrick was finally let go of his sufferings. New characters spouted like mushrooms everywhere... It got me wondering whether I'd enjoy the next book or not. The bird's eye view concept of this series, to be honest, gave me headaches but it's convenient to know some angles in the story. However, the element of surprise and thrill were less in this case since you're able to know what the characters were thinking, villains or not.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Patdbooks

    What a great story. A great set of books. Enjoyed how the author is building on existing characters as well as introducing new ones. Giving us insight into the struggles that characters have gone through as well as going through. The continued relationship between annex and Ehandar is good. I do believe they do love each other and I think the author shows how often in relationships it is hard to be truthful about ones true feelings because of ones own insecurities. The constant interjections of What a great story. A great set of books. Enjoyed how the author is building on existing characters as well as introducing new ones. Giving us insight into the struggles that characters have gone through as well as going through. The continued relationship between annex and Ehandar is good. I do believe they do love each other and I think the author shows how often in relationships it is hard to be truthful about ones true feelings because of ones own insecurities. The constant interjections of both annex and Ehandar as well as other characters shows how hard it is for us to be truthful with others let alone ourselves when it comes to our true feelings. We are all like fine china. We are getting to see even soft sides of the hard nuts such as the high king and glorious queen. Also like how we are introduced to new characters wondering what key role, if any, they will play in future books. I did make the big big mistake of writing this review 3/4 of the way through the next book and oh boy am I enjoying it. Well done Mr Ashling - a pleasure to read and journey with you, though I do not take back what I wrote in my review at the end of book 3.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Maria in the 16th century

    I started reading this book as soon as I was finished with the first trilogy. I have to say I am a huge fan of the world Mr.Ashling has built. The subplots, characters and twists overlap and may be a bit confusing to me at times but I've learnt to relax because I know that sooner or later it all falls into place. Although Anaxantis is still a central figure in this book, other characters come into focus and we get to learn more about the kingdom of Lorsanthia; Trachia, Rhonoma and other cities t I started reading this book as soon as I was finished with the first trilogy. I have to say I am a huge fan of the world Mr.Ashling has built. The subplots, characters and twists overlap and may be a bit confusing to me at times but I've learnt to relax because I know that sooner or later it all falls into place. Although Anaxantis is still a central figure in this book, other characters come into focus and we get to learn more about the kingdom of Lorsanthia; Trachia, Rhonoma and other cities that have a part to play in the huge power struggle that the books are -ultimately- about. I clearly see that Mr.Ashling's plot-building skills have been developing for the better ever since book 1. The editing in this book is much improved, I must say. You should read the first trilogy, The Invisible Chains, before reading this book. Just read them all, and share in the many characters' hopes, ambitions and loves. Pick your favourites and see what becomes of them. The trip is worthwhile and full of adventures...

  13. 5 out of 5

    Diane

    I liked this book very much. I think it's entertaining and engaging and for the most part was interesting from the first page until the last page. My only criticism is that there are just so many characters to remember that I wish the author had taken the time to make a list of characters and who they are. It is obvious that the author took pains to come up with some really unusual names for the many characters who interact with each other, but nonetheless, it is still difficult to remember so m I liked this book very much. I think it's entertaining and engaging and for the most part was interesting from the first page until the last page. My only criticism is that there are just so many characters to remember that I wish the author had taken the time to make a list of characters and who they are. It is obvious that the author took pains to come up with some really unusual names for the many characters who interact with each other, but nonetheless, it is still difficult to remember so many names and the backstory for some of them. I also think that at times the dialog is a bit silly and anachronistic, but this is a world that the author has invented, so I guess that's what he decided to do. At times, it's also difficult to tell who is speaking and I find myself sometimes having to reread that particular conversation to figure out who is speaking what. But, all in all, I loved the book and will be reading the rest of the series because I want to find out what happens to Anaxantis, Ehandar and their friends.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Edwinnaarden

    I liked it but the book ended at a point where you would've expected a bit more, I guess that's the reason for the next sequel. I think I liked the first books a bit more but maybe they were less predictable then. I liked it but the book ended at a point where you would've expected a bit more, I guess that's the reason for the next sequel. I think I liked the first books a bit more but maybe they were less predictable then.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Laura

    So good! This series really engages your emotions and your brain - a rare combination for me! I need to read the next book of this series ASAP - I must know what is to come of Anaxantis and Ehandar.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Crystal

    Totally in love with this series!! Love the comedic moments and the battle strategies. Can't wait to see how the story ends. Totally in love with this series!! Love the comedic moments and the battle strategies. Can't wait to see how the story ends.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Karen

    Reread 1/2016

  18. 5 out of 5

    Ayanna

    Someday, I will actually read these books. I promise. Maybe.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Susan Baker

  20. 4 out of 5

    Kenneth J. Babauta

  21. 4 out of 5

    Alexual

  22. 5 out of 5

    Robert

  23. 5 out of 5

    Hendrix

  24. 4 out of 5

    Hilary Ponticelli

  25. 4 out of 5

    Dawn Jacobs

  26. 5 out of 5

    Dave

  27. 5 out of 5

    Someone

  28. 5 out of 5

    Doll

  29. 5 out of 5

    Nana

  30. 5 out of 5

    LoriO.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.