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Jesus and the Demise of Death: Resurrection, Afterlife, and the Fate of the Christian

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What happens after death to Jesus and to those who follow him? Jesus and the Demise of Death offers a constructive theology that seeks to answer that very question, carefully considering both Jesus' descent into hell and eventual resurrection as integral parts of a robust vision of the Christian bodily resurrection. Taking on the claims of N.T. Wright and Richard B. Hays, What happens after death to Jesus and to those who follow him? Jesus and the Demise of Death offers a constructive theology that seeks to answer that very question, carefully considering both Jesus' descent into hell and eventual resurrection as integral parts of a robust vision of the Christian bodily resurrection. Taking on the claims of N.T. Wright and Richard B. Hays, Matthew Levering draws strongly upon the work of Thomas Aquinas to propose a radical reconstruction of Christian eschatological theology--one that takes seriously the profound ways in which Christianity and its beatific vision have been enriched by Platonic thought and emphasizes the role of the Church community in the passage from life to death. In so doing, Levering underscores the hope in eternal life for Jesus' followers and gives readers firm and fruitful soil upon which to base conversations about the Christian's future. --Reinhard Huetter, Professor of Christian Theology, Duke University Divinity School


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What happens after death to Jesus and to those who follow him? Jesus and the Demise of Death offers a constructive theology that seeks to answer that very question, carefully considering both Jesus' descent into hell and eventual resurrection as integral parts of a robust vision of the Christian bodily resurrection. Taking on the claims of N.T. Wright and Richard B. Hays, What happens after death to Jesus and to those who follow him? Jesus and the Demise of Death offers a constructive theology that seeks to answer that very question, carefully considering both Jesus' descent into hell and eventual resurrection as integral parts of a robust vision of the Christian bodily resurrection. Taking on the claims of N.T. Wright and Richard B. Hays, Matthew Levering draws strongly upon the work of Thomas Aquinas to propose a radical reconstruction of Christian eschatological theology--one that takes seriously the profound ways in which Christianity and its beatific vision have been enriched by Platonic thought and emphasizes the role of the Church community in the passage from life to death. In so doing, Levering underscores the hope in eternal life for Jesus' followers and gives readers firm and fruitful soil upon which to base conversations about the Christian's future. --Reinhard Huetter, Professor of Christian Theology, Duke University Divinity School

44 review for Jesus and the Demise of Death: Resurrection, Afterlife, and the Fate of the Christian

  1. 4 out of 5

    Joseph

    "[We are] always carrying in the body the death of Jesus, so that the life of Jesus may be manifested in our bodies." - 2 Corinthians 4:10 "I have been crucified with Christ; it is no longer I who live, but Christ who lives in me..." - Galatians 2:20a As I read this book, I almost heard the above verses playing in my head the whole time, although I don't recall if he ever stated them in the book. These verses speak of something glorious that occurs in the faithful: the events of Christ's life (esp "[We are] always carrying in the body the death of Jesus, so that the life of Jesus may be manifested in our bodies." - 2 Corinthians 4:10 "I have been crucified with Christ; it is no longer I who live, but Christ who lives in me..." - Galatians 2:20a As I read this book, I almost heard the above verses playing in my head the whole time, although I don't recall if he ever stated them in the book. These verses speak of something glorious that occurs in the faithful: the events of Christ's life (especially those surrounding His Pasch) are lived out in our lives. In each one of us, there is death followed by life. Because of this, Levering begins this beautiful work by discussing what happened to Our Lord after He died: His descent into hell, His glorious resurrection, and His Ascension and sitting at the right hand of the Father. He then proceeds to a discussion of "eschatology" or the theology of the last things (death, the soul, judgment, the beatific vision, and resurrection), which he models on the last things of the life of Christ. In this book, Levering unites the interpretation of Scripture with a discussion of the (often mutually opposed) views of modern theologians, all the time in comparison to the theology of St. Thomas Aquinas. In truly Thomist fashion (and Ratzingerian fashion as well), Levering takes what is good from the moderns and shows how - when separated from the chaff - it harmonizes beautifully with traditional theology. I would highly recommend this book for anyone interested in Christology and eschatology (especially Catholic Christology and eschatology).

  2. 5 out of 5

    James

    I don't particularly agree with Matthew Levering here. Coming from a Catholic perspective he buys much more into the platonic-Christian synthesis than I do. On the other hand I love the way he engages with Evangelical scholars like N.T. Wright, James Dunn, Richard Bauckham and Nancy Murphy and presents a thoughtful Thomist read on Jesus death and descent into Hell, his resurrection and glorification and his Ascension. Some thought provoking stuff here about the intermediary state, the nature of I don't particularly agree with Matthew Levering here. Coming from a Catholic perspective he buys much more into the platonic-Christian synthesis than I do. On the other hand I love the way he engages with Evangelical scholars like N.T. Wright, James Dunn, Richard Bauckham and Nancy Murphy and presents a thoughtful Thomist read on Jesus death and descent into Hell, his resurrection and glorification and his Ascension. Some thought provoking stuff here about the intermediary state, the nature of the soul and transcendence. Well worth a look.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Kyle

  4. 5 out of 5

    Christopher Esget

  5. 4 out of 5

    Alex Thompson

  6. 4 out of 5

    Kyle Nicholas

  7. 5 out of 5

    Joshua

  8. 5 out of 5

    Jonathan Light

  9. 4 out of 5

    Eric Balmer

  10. 5 out of 5

    Melissa J

  11. 4 out of 5

    Angelica

  12. 4 out of 5

    Caleb Roberts

  13. 4 out of 5

    Gregory Linton

  14. 4 out of 5

    Keith Kresge

  15. 5 out of 5

    Mahmoud Awad

  16. 5 out of 5

    Jonathan Tomes

  17. 5 out of 5

    Father Michael

  18. 5 out of 5

    Matthew

  19. 5 out of 5

    Daniel Kleven

  20. 5 out of 5

    Izzy

  21. 4 out of 5

    Thomas Estes

  22. 4 out of 5

    Clement

  23. 4 out of 5

    K.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Wilson

  25. 4 out of 5

    Andrew

  26. 4 out of 5

    Melanie Britt

  27. 5 out of 5

    J

  28. 5 out of 5

    J├Ârgen Vijgen

  29. 5 out of 5

    Vinnie Santini

  30. 5 out of 5

    Jeff Reimer

  31. 5 out of 5

    Peter

  32. 4 out of 5

    Tyler Stewart

  33. 4 out of 5

    Ryan Strebeck

  34. 5 out of 5

    John

  35. 4 out of 5

    Jeremy

  36. 5 out of 5

    Jason

  37. 4 out of 5

    Sensibly Catholic

  38. 5 out of 5

    Timothy

  39. 4 out of 5

    Leo

  40. 5 out of 5

    Luke Todd

  41. 5 out of 5

    Colin Lewis

  42. 5 out of 5

    Libraries Trocaire

  43. 4 out of 5

    Daniel Long

  44. 5 out of 5

    Daniel

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